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Mary Higgins Clark Presents Malice Domestic

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An anthology of 17 tradidtional mysteries collected by master mystery writer Mary Higging Clark. Contents: (all stories copyright 1992) * As It Was in the Beginning by Mary Higgins Clark * Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd? by Amanda Cross * Dog Television by Robert Barnard * Goodbye, Sue Ellen by Gillian Roberts * Even Steven by Taylor McCafferty * Water by Sally Gunning * You Nev An anthology of 17 tradidtional mysteries collected by master mystery writer Mary Higging Clark. Contents: (all stories copyright 1992) * As It Was in the Beginning by Mary Higgins Clark * Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd? by Amanda Cross * Dog Television by Robert Barnard * Goodbye, Sue Ellen by Gillian Roberts * Even Steven by Taylor McCafferty * Water by Sally Gunning * You Never Know by Sarah Shankman * The Return of Ma Barker by Gary Alexander * A Romance in the Rockies by K. K. Beck * Checkout by Susan Dunlap * The Nieman Marcus Body by Lucretia Grindle * Anna and the Snake People by Ed Gorman * ...That Married Dear Old Dad by Margaret Maron * Parris Green by Carole Nelson Douglas * Kim's Game by M.D. Lake * Arsenic and Old Ideas by Jan Grape * Cold and Deep by Frances Fyfield


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An anthology of 17 tradidtional mysteries collected by master mystery writer Mary Higging Clark. Contents: (all stories copyright 1992) * As It Was in the Beginning by Mary Higgins Clark * Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd? by Amanda Cross * Dog Television by Robert Barnard * Goodbye, Sue Ellen by Gillian Roberts * Even Steven by Taylor McCafferty * Water by Sally Gunning * You Nev An anthology of 17 tradidtional mysteries collected by master mystery writer Mary Higging Clark. Contents: (all stories copyright 1992) * As It Was in the Beginning by Mary Higgins Clark * Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd? by Amanda Cross * Dog Television by Robert Barnard * Goodbye, Sue Ellen by Gillian Roberts * Even Steven by Taylor McCafferty * Water by Sally Gunning * You Never Know by Sarah Shankman * The Return of Ma Barker by Gary Alexander * A Romance in the Rockies by K. K. Beck * Checkout by Susan Dunlap * The Nieman Marcus Body by Lucretia Grindle * Anna and the Snake People by Ed Gorman * ...That Married Dear Old Dad by Margaret Maron * Parris Green by Carole Nelson Douglas * Kim's Game by M.D. Lake * Arsenic and Old Ideas by Jan Grape * Cold and Deep by Frances Fyfield

30 review for Mary Higgins Clark Presents Malice Domestic

  1. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    I find it difficult to give an accurate rating to an anthology when the stories (to me, at least) range from very weak to absolutely first-rate. I thought the very first story, "Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd?", was by far the weakest and least interesting. However, my favourites, "Dog Television", "Goodbye, Sue Ellen", "Even Steven", "Parris Green", and "Cold and Deep" more than made up for that and were all excellent. In fact, as so often happens when I read a mystery anthology, I found an author I h I find it difficult to give an accurate rating to an anthology when the stories (to me, at least) range from very weak to absolutely first-rate. I thought the very first story, "Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd?", was by far the weakest and least interesting. However, my favourites, "Dog Television", "Goodbye, Sue Ellen", "Even Steven", "Parris Green", and "Cold and Deep" more than made up for that and were all excellent. In fact, as so often happens when I read a mystery anthology, I found an author I had previously never read, despite her popularity, loved her story, and now I have yet another mystery series I absolutely must read! (The Irene Adler books by Carole Nelson Douglas).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd? by Amanda Cross tells the story of a moderator for a discussion panel between two writers who is murdered during the debate. The female writer, a sweet, grandmotherly woman, is confidant that she was the intended victim. But when the most likely killer is the chauvinistic male writer sharing her stage at the time of the killing, it seems like her suspicions are nothing more than a shot in the dark. The story was fun and had a clever solution, and the characters were enj Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd? by Amanda Cross tells the story of a moderator for a discussion panel between two writers who is murdered during the debate. The female writer, a sweet, grandmotherly woman, is confidant that she was the intended victim. But when the most likely killer is the chauvinistic male writer sharing her stage at the time of the killing, it seems like her suspicions are nothing more than a shot in the dark. The story was fun and had a clever solution, and the characters were enjoyable to follow. This was the first Malice Domestic story I read, and it was a great jumping point. Dog Television by Robert Barnard tries to be one of those stories told from an animal's point of view while the actual events are happening to their humans. I've read several that use this perspective, but only one that's ever managed to pull it off. Dog Television is the story of Jaggers, who sees the newly transparent installed cat flap as a perfect way to keep an eye on the property no matter which side of the door he's on. We get his doggy perspective of his master's guest, their conversation before he's booted out of the way, and his view of his master burying the guests body. There's no resolution, it's just a murder from the eyes of the murder's dog, though there is a cheerfully ominous line at the end while Jagger's is watching the body being buried and how 'what had been buried cried out to be dug up again', tail wagging and all. It's cute, and the writing from the dog's POV is well done, but it's a pass. Goodbye, Sue Ellen by Gillian Roberts is my favorite in the collection, and in the series so far. Ellsworth Hummer has had enough of being tucked aside with a pat to the head. He'd married Sue Ellen to get his hands on her family business, and she and her relatives will not be keeping his well-deserved power away from him any longer. He'll get it, even if he has to kill her to do it. What follows is a fantastic story of a sexist husband's increasingly frustrated attempts to murder his wife, and the best twist ending I've seen in a long time. In Even Steven by Taylor McCafferty four friend travel to Vegas for a fun trip in their later years, but when one woman returns to her room to find her husband dead the stakes seem to be just a little bit higher than they've ever played before. A fun first-person story with a great solution and twist ending. Water by Sally Gunning features a rich man who builds a big house on the sea shore and starts hearing and seeing things. The descriptive writing was good but didn't really go anywhere. I think it's supposed to be a ghost story, like how Jacob Marley was trying to warn Scrooge that his sins were catching up with him, only this ghost drowned him. Did the guy build his house on an ancient burial ground or something? It's never really understood who the ghost woman was. The victim was an asshole, that was shoved down our throats at the beginning of each new segment, but was the woman a manifestation of something? Was he responsible for her death in some way? Pass. You Never Know by Sarah Shankman tells two stories. The tale of a woman chatting with her friend and complaining about her ex-husband, and a bus driver having a rather stressful day. It's cute but there's no mystery and its nothing more than a light read. The Return of Ma Barker by Gary Alexander is about an elderly bank robber and the policemen trying to track her down. A fun story with a clever solution. Just what you're looking for in a mystery short story. In A Romance in the Rockies by K. K. Beck a rich young woman and her mama are being hounded by the young woman's beau, who's followed them to a chateau in the Canadian Rockies to pleas for her hand in marriage, and to plead his innocence in the theft of her pearls. A great story, but I may be biased. When you don't live in the US it's always thrilling to have a story set in your own country. Especially a good story. In Checkout by Susan Dunlap a dead woman has arrived in limbo and must win a supermarket contest in order to get into heaven. It's a cool story: limbo is a supermarket checkout line and to win the contest she has to find an item that describes how she died before she gets to the cash register. It's worth a read, but there's not much to say about it even if it might make you smile. The Neiman Marcus Body by Lucretia Grindle portrays a stable as the scene of a murder, with a body strangled by a custom-made horse lead. The story is pretty good with characters that are pretty well-developed for a short story. It always amazes me that someone can take a story a handful of pages long and balance an involving plot and fleshed out characters. In Anna and the Snake People by Ed Gorman, Anna is a police officer investigating the death of a preacher's wife. It's a weird, made up religion, one that starts out looking Christian but only takes certain things out of the bible to listen to, and now someone's gone and been bitten by the rattlesnakes they use in the baptism ceremonies. But the symptoms don't sound like rattler poisoning and the preacher is a nasty thing that's taken a keen dislike to Anna's interference. You figure out the perpetrator right before the ending, mostly because the suspect's been so obvious until now that for the story to end well it's either got to have a clever motive or a twist perpetrator, and the motive was already discovered and there was only one other perpetrator who made sense. But it's a pretty good story nonetheless. ...That Married Dear Old Dad by Margaret Maron tells the tale of the perfect wife who married the perfect husband and is finally pregnant with the perfect baby. Or that's how everyone outside the marriage sees it. Hell, that's even how Jessica sees it, and it had better be since she's thrown herself so thoroughly into the role. Her husband's work habits aren't a concern, she simply needs to work around them. His health wasn't the best, but it was the doctor's concern, no need to badger her hubbie about it. And he always said he didn't want children, but she was sure he'd be every bit as happy about it as she was. This. This is such a fantastic story. I love it to pieces; the image of this 1950s perfect housewife who cleans and cooks every bit as efficiently as she murders. Fantastic. Parris Green is a story by Carole Nelson Douglas about a painter who's trapped himself in his studio, to the worry of his friends and relations. But when the sanctuary is invaded, it's discovered that the artist has lost touch with reality and his model is stone cold dead. The story is pretty good. It's a historic mystery set in London in 1886, and isn't as much of a light read as the rest. There's a lot of references to go through that'll make you feel part of the time period. A good story, with a distinctly different feel than the rest. A young camper features in Kim's Game by M.D. Lake. Kim is plagued by her intellect and her ability to observe the things and people around her. She knows why her parents sent her away. She knows they'll be divorced by the time she gets back. All the signs were there and reading them is her specialty. So when a vicious murder occurs and Kim is the first witness to the crime scene, she is also the only one who knew that the item removed before the police arrived can crack this case. If she can survive that long herself. Brilliant story; I absolutely loved it. Wish there was a series with this character, I'd love to read more. My second favorite in the book. Arsenic and Old Ideas by Jan Grape is a writer story. A writing group meets and finds out that the husband of a member has died. I've read a lot of books and short stories using writer characters, including the first story in this book, and I'm always surprised when I find one that gets it right. It's hard to write a writer character because I've noticed a trend of molding the character into their chosen genres. Mystery writers always want to be the ones to hunt down the killers, romance writers are all about true love or getting revenge on old loves, etc. Sometimes it's done well, like the above Who Shot Mrs. Byron Boyd?, and sometimes, like Arsenic and Old Ideas, it's done great. The characters are all mystery writers but their styles are all so different that it's clear there's no general mold they're going to be squeezed into. The story doesn't focus too much on the writing aspects, and there's a cop involved so it's not all 'let's solve this before the cops do'. Great piece of writing. Cold and Deep by Frances Fyfield is just... holy shit, this was heart wrenching. There's so much subtext in this story. So little is said explicitly that even after you're done reading you're not sure if you understood things right. Basically it's the story of a family come home for Christmas to their old father's home, where he now lives alone with his dog and his son's wife Fiona (as his temp caretaker). Right off the bat the characters are a marvel. There's just something slightly off about all of them and they come apart over the duration of the story. The actual murder is at the very end, and it's not so much a mystery as it is the culmination. Very dramatic. The verdict? Saying I had a favorite in this book is a lie. The stories I loved best are all so different they're impossible to compare. Cold and Deep is dark and murky and you can't tell quite which way is up. Kim's Game is clever and so full of lovely vindication. ...That Married Dear Old Dad is fun and cheerful. And Goodbye, Sue Ellen is a comedy gem, and so super satisfying. This was the first book of the series I'd read and I'm glad it spurred me on to read the rest, but this one will always be my favorite and the first I'll recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Moira Fogarty

    A mixed bag of well-penned short stories, ripe for enjoying during a commute or in the kitchen, these were in no way cozy classic mysteries, but genre-bending tales that focused on out-of-the-box settings and ideas that might not have found a home elsewhere, despite the good quality of their craftsmanship. There are strange settings for murder (a gorilla enclosure at the zoo) which explore the ambiance and politics of place; strange weapons for murder (a kite string) that triggers an older coupl A mixed bag of well-penned short stories, ripe for enjoying during a commute or in the kitchen, these were in no way cozy classic mysteries, but genre-bending tales that focused on out-of-the-box settings and ideas that might not have found a home elsewhere, despite the good quality of their craftsmanship. There are strange settings for murder (a gorilla enclosure at the zoo) which explore the ambiance and politics of place; strange weapons for murder (a kite string) that triggers an older couple to go on a Miss Pollifax-style hunt for the killer, highlighting the difference and sameness between the younger and older generations; strange accomplices for murder (the victim's wife), showing the frustrations of the mother of a teenager with some cutting dialogue and marking where loyalties truly lie between men and women; strange motives for murder (a badly bequeathed boat) in a complicated and macabre Addams-family style setting, as witnessed by a newly engaged outsider. There's also a hard-boiled lady detective who solves the mystery of an outbreak of black cat thefts in her New York neighborhood. For me, the jewel in this oddball crown was the final story - the Sherlockian homage starring Irene Adler and Oscar Wilde pursuing the mystery of an artist frantically painting his dead model. The story is told from the perspective of Adele's uptight maid, and has a dashing combination of entertaining dialogue, darkly atmospheric stairwells and garrets, and a diabolical crime. No heavy meaty fare in the collection, but a cornucopia of delicious bite-sized treats, perfect October reading in prep for Halloween.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tomi Alger

    All of the murders happen in homes or among family and friends. Though I did not recognize the authors, I enjoyed their stories. There were some terrific twists that I did not expect. Artists, bank robbers, a religious group that handles snakes, people unhappy with their spouses all have parts in these stories. It was a fun read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Love, love love this collection of mystery short stories. Two of my favorite authors are the editors ( Mary Higgins Clark, Elizabeth Peters). I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys fun mysteries similar to Agatha Christie.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Ann Wills

    A delightful anthology of (mostly murder) mysteries. Some were quite humorous. Only one was dragged out (which is why the 4 not 5 stars). All remarkably well narrated. And editing was superb, making all the writing a joy to read. I only wish there had been more stories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    I have to say, I had my doubts about this anthology at the beginning. The first two stories weren't really interesting to me, but the others were really good! I was happy to find out that Joan Hess was one of the writers, and I think I'll try Carole Nelson Douglas’ Irene Adler stories soon.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Audiobook. The only reason I continued with this book was because of the Library summer reading challenge. They were really dumb stories, murder mysteries.Note: I didn't like the audio book format, in that I never knew the title of the story I was listening to.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I loved these short murder mystery stories - such a range of characters and styles. I especially loved the one about visiting the in laws!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    Ok, but not great!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This is a great audiobook. My favorites were Goodbye Sue Ellen and Kim’s game.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Camille E

    Ce recueil de nouvelles est intéressant. cependant les histoires sont assez inégales. certaines sont très bonnes, d'autres beaucoup moins..

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    "New York Times bestselling author Mary Higghins Clark presents this delightfully chilling collection of original mystery stories, written in the classic Christie vein. A fitting tribute to the world's most beloved crimewriter, Dame Agatha Christie, MALICE DOMESTIC 2 showcases a houseful of top contemporary writers at their very best." ~~back cover You Never Know by Sarah Shankman is the star of this collection. You won't see it coming, and neither did anyone else ...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Shoop

    Grade: D+ This collection was a disappointment, especially after having listened to the excellent 6th edition of the Malice Domestic series. There were a couple of average stories--the best one being "Cold and Deep" by Frances Fyfield. NOTE: I listened to the audio collection which is apparently abridged to 10 stories, and does not include Clark's story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I usually like these types of collections because I get a chance to read a sample from a variety of writers. This one was just ok. The standouts for me were: "Checkout" by Susan Dunlap "Dog Television" by Robert Barnard "You Never Know" by Sarah Shankman

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leng

    Be aware that only one story is by Mary Higgins Clark. The whole book is very much a letdown. I feel like the stories were written for a city's newspaper short story contest. Characters are shallow, and the story-telling is amateurish.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette

    Listened to this group of short stories in the vein of Marple on our drive home from Thanksgiving in Illinois. Sorry to say I can't remember much beyond the first story, so I guess I must rule this collection pleasant but not memorable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I liked the first Malice Domestic better. Since I listened to this on audiobook, a few of the readers were monotone and so I had trouble keeping up. There were three really good short stories in this edition and I gained a couple of new mystery writers to check out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Good read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Short mysteries from a variety of writers. I like reading so many different styles in one book. Some of the stories were very clever and well written.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Shoop

    Grade: C+ This collection was MUCH better than Malice Domestic 2. Nothing earth-shattering, but an enjoyable listen.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Excellent short stories for commute reading.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marian

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marian Mertes

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bevannes

  27. 4 out of 5

    Flora

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adriana Alejandra

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Dickinson

  30. 5 out of 5

    LS

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