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Fletch Won As a fledgling reporter, Fletch is doing more flailing than anything else. That and floating around from department to department trying to figure where he fits in. His managing editor’s got him pegged for the society pages, but the kind of society Fletch gets involved with is anything but polite. Fletch Won His first big interview, a millionaire lawyer with a croo Fletch Won As a fledgling reporter, Fletch is doing more flailing than anything else. That and floating around from department to department trying to figure where he fits in. His managing editor’s got him pegged for the society pages, but the kind of society Fletch gets involved with is anything but polite. Fletch Won His first big interview, a millionaire lawyer with a crooked streak and an itch to give away some of his ill-gotten gains, ends up dead in the News-Tribune’s parking lot before Fletch can ask question number one. So Fletch ends up going after the murderer instead, and ends up learning a thing or two about crime and punishment. Fletch Won At the same time, he’s supposed to be covering (or maybe uncovering) a health spa that caters to all its clients needs, and gets hired as a very personal trainer. Never mind that he’s supposed to be getting married at the end of the week; Fletch has a few other engagements to take care of first.


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Fletch Won As a fledgling reporter, Fletch is doing more flailing than anything else. That and floating around from department to department trying to figure where he fits in. His managing editor’s got him pegged for the society pages, but the kind of society Fletch gets involved with is anything but polite. Fletch Won His first big interview, a millionaire lawyer with a croo Fletch Won As a fledgling reporter, Fletch is doing more flailing than anything else. That and floating around from department to department trying to figure where he fits in. His managing editor’s got him pegged for the society pages, but the kind of society Fletch gets involved with is anything but polite. Fletch Won His first big interview, a millionaire lawyer with a crooked streak and an itch to give away some of his ill-gotten gains, ends up dead in the News-Tribune’s parking lot before Fletch can ask question number one. So Fletch ends up going after the murderer instead, and ends up learning a thing or two about crime and punishment. Fletch Won At the same time, he’s supposed to be covering (or maybe uncovering) a health spa that caters to all its clients needs, and gets hired as a very personal trainer. Never mind that he’s supposed to be getting married at the end of the week; Fletch has a few other engagements to take care of first.

30 review for Fletch Won

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    Hang on a second. I gotta start listening to Harold Faltermeyer's soundtrack while I write this review. Fletch Won is the eighth book in the series, but it’s a prequel to the original Fletch. Young Irwin M. Fletcher is a Vietnam veteran trying to become a sports reporter, but he’s been stuck writing obituaries and headlines for his newspaper. His irreverent attitude angers his editor and gets him assigned to a fluff story about a wealthy criminal lawyer donating $5 million to an art museum, but Hang on a second. I gotta start listening to Harold Faltermeyer's soundtrack while I write this review. Fletch Won is the eighth book in the series, but it’s a prequel to the original Fletch. Young Irwin M. Fletcher is a Vietnam veteran trying to become a sports reporter, but he’s been stuck writing obituaries and headlines for his newspaper. His irreverent attitude angers his editor and gets him assigned to a fluff story about a wealthy criminal lawyer donating $5 million to an art museum, but the attorney is killed in the newspaper’s parking garage before Fletch even meets him. Despite Fletch insisting that he should get to cover it, the murder is given to the paper’s bullying crime reporter, and Fletch is given the task of infiltrating a whore house masquerading as a gym instead. However, Fletch keeps digging into the attorney’s life which annoys his fiancé who thinks he’ll get fired right before their wedding. I noted in my review of Fletch that there’s a curious thing about the print and movie versions of the character. While Chevy Chase’s portrayal captured the smug smart-ass nature of Fletch, the film one was also more of a goofball with funny disguises and pratfalls. There’s sometimes an edgier meanness to Fletch in the books. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, and there’s certainly no shortage of smart ass protagonists in crime fiction, but Fletch’s tone frequently makes him seem like kind of a asshole and puts him far down the list of my favorite fictional sleuths.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Back to the publication order re-read of the Fletch novels. It took a while to restart after the dreadful Carioca, Fletch, but this is back on form. Sparkling dialogue, fast pace and witty repartee. A welcome return to form.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joe Valdez

    My introduction to Gregory McDonald began with Fletch Won, the eighth mystery featuring wise guy newspaper reporter I.M. Fletcher. Published in 1985, the novel is actually a prequel chronicling Fletch as he chases down his first big story. Having grown up watching the movie Fletch (which was based on the 1974 novel of the same name), I couldn't get the voice or attitude of Chevy Chase out of my head while reading this book, which does recall certain plot elements from the film while at the same My introduction to Gregory McDonald began with Fletch Won, the eighth mystery featuring wise guy newspaper reporter I.M. Fletcher. Published in 1985, the novel is actually a prequel chronicling Fletch as he chases down his first big story. Having grown up watching the movie Fletch (which was based on the 1974 novel of the same name), I couldn't get the voice or attitude of Chevy Chase out of my head while reading this book, which does recall certain plot elements from the film while at the same time, feels light in the loafers. Fletch is introduced his third month on staff at the News Tribune. His editor, the acerbic Frank Jaffe, started Fletch off writing headlines, but after submissions like WESTERN CAN CO. SITS ON ITS ASSETS, shifted him to obituaries. Fletch's habit of digging for the truth resulted in more unprintable work. Begging to cover sports, Fletch is instead assigned to the society beat and given a piece on Donald Habeck, a defense attorney who's due to announce a donation of $5 million to a local museum. Before Fletch can meet the philanthropist, Donald Habeck is shot and killed in the News Tribune parking lot. The paper's crime reporter Biff Wilson has jurisdiction over the story, but Fletch begins digging, provoked by his colleague's want of investigative skills and lazy determination that this was a gangland execution. Fletch beats both Wilson and plainclothes cop Lt. Gomez to Habeck's home, where Fletch is coaxed into the swimming pool by a strange old bird who claims to be Mrs. Habeck. Later, the gardener informs Fletch that he's never seen the woman before. Because this is a mystery novel, Fletch is assigned what at the time appears to be a totally unrelated case, that of the Ben Franklyn Friend Service, an escort company that managed to wiggle its way into free advertising in the News Tribune under Frank Jaffe's watch. Fletch is mortified at being asked to go undercover at an escort service because he's to be married on Saturday. His fiancee Barbara works at a flower shop and while giving the sarcastic journalist his space, is busy making big plans for their future. The chief reason to read Gregory McDonald is his dialogue, which races by often without character names serving as speed bumps. "Messages for you," said the resource desk's Mary over the car phone. "Someone named Barbara called. Sounds like a personal message." "Yes?" "We're not supposed to take too many personal messages, you know." "Ah, come on, Mary. Be a sport." Fletch's hunger, the morning's heat, the bright sunlight, made his eyes and head ache. "Message is, 'Did you eat all the pizza yourself? All is forgiven. Please phone.'" The reference to pizza made his tum-tum beat a tom-tom. "Well?" Mary asked. "Well what?" "Did you eat all the pizza yourself?" "Mary, that's a personal question. No personal questions, please." "You did. I think you ate the pizza yourself. There's nothing worse than expecting someone to bring you a pizza and that someone eats it all himself." Being a fan of the Chevy Chase film, I wasn't surprised that Fletch comes on like a major league smart ass. When confronting cops or solving the mystery, the character's prep school wit hit home. At other times, it becomes repetitive. I often wondered why Fletch bothered going into journalism, with its monotonous typewriter component, when he'd seem much more comfortable, and maybe meet more women, bagging groceries at Trader Joe's. I was surprised by how chaste the character was. This is a very lighthearted, PG-13 romp with no sex or violence. Fletch's ears turn positively red at the prospect of having to go near an escort service and he's strictly hands off when it comes to being alone with his fiancee. I got the impression that McDonald might blush if a young woman smiled at him at a church picnic. It wasn't a bad choice but a bewildering one that caught me off guard. One of the things that disappointed me about Fletch Won is how every character sounds alike, slipping into the same banter as Fletch in order to navigate a conversation with him. In McDonald's world, everybody's got a comeback. It's a little too cute. Fletch's fiancee Barbara has got to be one of the most useless characters I've ever come across and in fact, none of the female characters in the book stood out much (McDonald's church picnic inclinations finally hamstring his fiction, I think). The novel has no sense of place, no atmosphere. The newspapers are fictitious, landmarks non-existent and I'm positive that the words "Los Angeles" were never mentioned. It gives the book a very bland feel. I guess whether or not McDonald is to your liking comes down to whether you're in the mood for a detective mystery that slams you through a wall and features all sorts of lurid detail, or is a lark, almost a joke book. At 264 pages, I shot through this paperback in three days, so it is a light, effortless read. It's not a bad novel, but one I can barely recommend. Based on what I found here, I doubt I'll be returning to Fletch again.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James Love

    Fletch Won is the first (chronologically), in the series, whilst being the eighth book to be published (Don't you just love prequels? (insert sarcastic wink here)). The first chapter introduces us to the wise-cracking, rookie reporter being assigned to interview a lawyer who is donating $5M to an art museum. This same lawyer is found "shot dead" (the only thing "shot live" used to be sit-com's) in the newspaper's parking lot. The fun begins when Fletch is held at gunpoint in a liquor store for a Fletch Won is the first (chronologically), in the series, whilst being the eighth book to be published (Don't you just love prequels? (insert sarcastic wink here)). The first chapter introduces us to the wise-cracking, rookie reporter being assigned to interview a lawyer who is donating $5M to an art museum. This same lawyer is found "shot dead" (the only thing "shot live" used to be sit-com's) in the newspaper's parking lot. The fun begins when Fletch is held at gunpoint in a liquor store for asking directions and then is conned out of his bourbon-soaked clothes by a woman claiming to be the dead man's wife. The literal riot at the end makes Fletch Won well worth reading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Another amusing little Fletch farce!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mical

    Well, let me think; where to start? Ye gods. This story, a sequel, or more accurately, a prequel, chronicles the start of investigative journalist Irwin M. Fletcher's career. Marked by quick wit and a dizzying blur of action, thought, and some seemingly unrelated events that somehow puzzle themselves out yet keep the reader guessing I have to say; I'm glad I picked it up, and I'm glad I can finally put it down. The author really sells you on the details and backgrounds, adding things purely for Well, let me think; where to start? Ye gods. This story, a sequel, or more accurately, a prequel, chronicles the start of investigative journalist Irwin M. Fletcher's career. Marked by quick wit and a dizzying blur of action, thought, and some seemingly unrelated events that somehow puzzle themselves out yet keep the reader guessing I have to say; I'm glad I picked it up, and I'm glad I can finally put it down. The author really sells you on the details and backgrounds, adding things purely for flavor that enhanced the story in ways I'd not have thought of until you sit back to play the whole story through in your mind. Definitely more cerebral than many modern day stories. I enjoyed it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hobart

    ★ ★ ★ 1/2 (rounded up) This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- This is chronologically the first Fletch novel, he's a rookie reporter, who's been bounced around from headline writer, to obituaries, to wedding announcements, and is finally sent to the Society pages—with a warning. Fit in, and don't make any trouble or he'll be unemployed. His first assignment is to meet with an attorney, Donald Habeck, in the publisher's office to discuss a major donation he'll be making to a loca ★ ★ ★ 1/2 (rounded up) This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- This is chronologically the first Fletch novel, he's a rookie reporter, who's been bounced around from headline writer, to obituaries, to wedding announcements, and is finally sent to the Society pages—with a warning. Fit in, and don't make any trouble or he'll be unemployed. His first assignment is to meet with an attorney, Donald Habeck, in the publisher's office to discuss a major donation he'll be making to a local museum and do a puff piece about it. Fletch objects, wanting to do real news—the kind of stuff he'll later be known for. His editor (Frank Jaffe, a name known to those who've read Fletch and Fletch and the Widow Bradley) refuses, insisting that this is his assignment—and maybe later he'll get a chance to do something else. There's a catch—Habeck is murdered in the newspaper's parking lot on his way to this meeting. Fletch jumps on the opportunity to report on this, but the senior crime reporter shoos him off (and Jaffe). Fletch tries to exercise squatter's rights, but no one is having any of it. Naturally, this means that Fletch will ignore this and will investigate the murder on his own—and typically is a few steps ahead of both the police and the senior crime writer. In the meantime, he has to do his actual job (at least until he has something he can print). There's another story they want Fletch to work on, there's a local "escort service" parading itself as a fitness establishment—Jaffe insists that Fletch do an expose about them. To stay employed, Fletch agrees—but threatens the most detailed and explicit expense report ever. This isn't a story that appeals to Fletch—I don't think he cares too much if this service is just close to prostitution, or if it's the actual thing—and he has better things to do with his time. Also, he's about to get married, the last thing his fiancé is going to want is him hanging around a brothel all day. The opening chapter is a hoot. As are several of the encounters Fletch has with the members of Donald Habeck's family (particularly his wife)—and Alston Chambers never fails to be amusing. The escort service story is fun, and ends up being the kind of thing that Fletch can write about—but its main purpose is to give Mcdonald an opportunity to opine on our cultural obsession with beauty, health, and so on, while causing problems for Fletch's personal life. There's not a lot of meat to this story, but there's a lot of fun. On the other hand, the murder investigation is great and vintage Fletch. It's the best part of the book (as a mystery novel, I guess it should be, right?) All in all, a decent Fletch novel—full of interesting characters, a nice twist, Fletch bucking all sorts of authority (police, veteran reporters, Frank Jaffee), and more than a few amusing situations. It works as an origin story, how did he become the sort of reporter we know, etc. As I mentioned earlier, we even see young Alston Chambers -- just starting as an associate in a powerful law firm. But—and this is a big but— this places Fletch at the newspaper we know he ends his newspaper career with as a rookie, as a man about to be married (for the first time). We know there's not a lot of time between the end of his first marriage and Fletch, but there's some. Enough for a second marriage and the Window Bradley events, but not much more. What there isn't time for is the past referred to in Confess, Fletch, Fletch's Fortune and even hinted at in The Man Who -- and the first two of those depend on Fletch's history to work. Unless we're to believe that his wives let him leave the state, work in a variety of other papers, developing a Fletchian reputation, move back to the same paper he started his career in (with the same senior editor), and then hit him up for alimony and still be carrying a torch for him. It stretches credulity a bit too much for me to stomach. The next book, Fletch, Too, doesn't help things. Does that ruin Fletch Won for me? Not totally, but that alone keeps it out of my personal top-tier Fletch novels and rank it slightly above The Widow Bradley (only for the chuckles it gives me). Clearly, McDonald isn't as picky about this sort of thing as many of his readers are, but man, that rankles. Still, it's fun, it features entertaining characters— some odd poetry—and enough Fletchisms to keep you happy. It's a good time, and if you ignore what it suggests about the rest of the series, you should have a good time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Fletch Won is a return to the comedic cornball goofiness of the early Fletch books. This one chronologically has a young Fletch as a reporter about to get married. Along the way to the alter, he skinny dips in dead men's pools, applies for a job as a male prostitute, embarks on a unique weight training program, hands his clothes to an old lady who skeedaddles with them, visits a monastery, tackles a display of bourbon - but not top shelf bourbon, runs a foot race, and is arrested for ordering pi Fletch Won is a return to the comedic cornball goofiness of the early Fletch books. This one chronologically has a young Fletch as a reporter about to get married. Along the way to the alter, he skinny dips in dead men's pools, applies for a job as a male prostitute, embarks on a unique weight training program, hands his clothes to an old lady who skeedaddles with them, visits a monastery, tackles a display of bourbon - but not top shelf bourbon, runs a foot race, and is arrested for ordering pizza. This book really delves into the life of a young struggling reporter, explores why people donate millions of dollars, and looks at dysfunctional families. It works in all its cornball buffoonery.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shane Phillips

    Fletch is loosing its steam as we move through the series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brenna Sydel

    The pre-sequel, as it were. Not too bad. Certainly less offensive then previous 'Fletch' stories. He is still, however, every bit as swarmy and clever and snarky and all knowing as usual. The pre-sequel, as it were. Not too bad. Certainly less offensive then previous 'Fletch' stories. He is still, however, every bit as swarmy and clever and snarky and all knowing as usual.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tristan

    I loved this story, i laughed through many parts of this book just visualizing the ridiculous crap Fletch endures. The dialogue was well written and the sarcasm between the characters was enough for me to continue reading just to see what witty comments they'd throw at each other. I couldn't get the image of Chevy Chase out of my head though.. he played that character so well in the movie that no matter how they describe Fletch you still see Chevy. I loved this book and i plan on collecting the I loved this story, i laughed through many parts of this book just visualizing the ridiculous crap Fletch endures. The dialogue was well written and the sarcasm between the characters was enough for me to continue reading just to see what witty comments they'd throw at each other. I couldn't get the image of Chevy Chase out of my head though.. he played that character so well in the movie that no matter how they describe Fletch you still see Chevy. I loved this book and i plan on collecting the whole series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I watched my Fletch VHS obsessively when I was younger and vaguely recall reading the book. It's been decades, though. Decided to read this book when I heard it was a prequel. I was hoping it was an origin story of sorts. Not so much. It was Fletch's first "case" for the newspaper, though. And it was thoroughly entertaining - for a guy who grew up obsessively watching the film. All Fletch dialog was heard in my brain as Chevy Chase speaking. The synth soundtrack was on a constant loop in my head I watched my Fletch VHS obsessively when I was younger and vaguely recall reading the book. It's been decades, though. Decided to read this book when I heard it was a prequel. I was hoping it was an origin story of sorts. Not so much. It was Fletch's first "case" for the newspaper, though. And it was thoroughly entertaining - for a guy who grew up obsessively watching the film. All Fletch dialog was heard in my brain as Chevy Chase speaking. The synth soundtrack was on a constant loop in my head. It was a blast. I will probably go back and read through the series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hans

    4.5 Stars - McDonald continues the series of Fletch novels by turning to the story of Fletch's first big break. As in the other books in the series, the pleasure is in watching Irwin Maurice Fletcher make the journey…the actual solution to the mystery doesn't really matter. My only complaint is that when McDonald gives Fletch's coworker the name Biff, he clearly telegraphs that the guy is going to be a heel. I can't think of a book or movie from the 1980s that had a sympathetic character named B 4.5 Stars - McDonald continues the series of Fletch novels by turning to the story of Fletch's first big break. As in the other books in the series, the pleasure is in watching Irwin Maurice Fletcher make the journey…the actual solution to the mystery doesn't really matter. My only complaint is that when McDonald gives Fletch's coworker the name Biff, he clearly telegraphs that the guy is going to be a heel. I can't think of a book or movie from the 1980s that had a sympathetic character named Biff.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I love this series. I decided to re-read them in chronological order vs publication order. I am sure many folks are familiar with the Fletch movies starring Chevy Chase, but I would challenge you to also pick up the books as well. As with most things the book is always better. In the Fletch series it is not that they are so much better, but there is just so much subtle humor that is lost on the big screen. I am looking forward to reading them all again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Niceguyeddie

    The Origin of Fletch. I love it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    This was pretty alright - funny, noirish, 90% dialog. I have a suspicious that I will like the first Fletch book more. This book has made me want to read the first Fletch book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Benn Allen

    While this is the eighth (I believe) book of Gregory McDonald's Fletch series, chronologically it's the first book, telling the tale of I.M. Fletcher's (Fletch) early days of his newspaper career and the first case Fletch solved The story moves at a quick, smooth pace and the mystery itself is serviceable. McDonald's style was to lean heavily on dialogue to tell his stories and move the plot along. Generally, this technique works quite well, especially since the dialogues tend to be quite clever While this is the eighth (I believe) book of Gregory McDonald's Fletch series, chronologically it's the first book, telling the tale of I.M. Fletcher's (Fletch) early days of his newspaper career and the first case Fletch solved The story moves at a quick, smooth pace and the mystery itself is serviceable. McDonald's style was to lean heavily on dialogue to tell his stories and move the plot along. Generally, this technique works quite well, especially since the dialogues tend to be quite clever and witty. However, since the first Fletch novel was published in 1974, I think it's safe to assume "Fletch Won" is set in the late '60s, early '70s. However, since we get mentions of video taped and cars having phones in them, it felt like "Fletch Won" is set in the '80s. But the story is captivating enough one can ignore those anachronisms. The silly way the novel ends is less forgivable. Overall, "Fletch Won, '. Is an excellent book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Herbert

    As a belated prequel, Fletch Won just about passes muster. The original was supposed to be the most important story of its slightly seasoned hero's life. He was a bum then, so it's odd reading him as a slightly less cynical bum here, working on a story with equally big stakes years prior. But it's hard to argue with more Fletch, especially when McDonald seems so reinvigorated with the guy. After international departures and elevations in tax bracket, it's refreshing to see the barefoot reporter As a belated prequel, Fletch Won just about passes muster. The original was supposed to be the most important story of its slightly seasoned hero's life. He was a bum then, so it's odd reading him as a slightly less cynical bum here, working on a story with equally big stakes years prior. But it's hard to argue with more Fletch, especially when McDonald seems so reinvigorated with the guy. After international departures and elevations in tax bracket, it's refreshing to see the barefoot reporter toiling away in a newsroom again. His personality is a little softer than in the original - Fletch worries that investigating a brothel may upset his soon-to-be bride - but it's not an unwelcome change, even if the timing doesn't make much sense. The mystery is solid, if a little less airtight than the series gold standard, but this one's more about the ride than the destination, and McDonald only got better at that.

  19. 5 out of 5

    J

    From beginning to end a real treat, like the first book. It's really kinda interesting to me, since I like to read novels by the same author in publication order (and with the Fletch series, there's that, and there's chronological order as this novel takes place before the first published novel and the whole series' publishing order is nothing like the storyline chronology), how McDonald can go from a somewhat dull book in Carioca Fletch and turn around and write something that's as good as his From beginning to end a real treat, like the first book. It's really kinda interesting to me, since I like to read novels by the same author in publication order (and with the Fletch series, there's that, and there's chronological order as this novel takes place before the first published novel and the whole series' publishing order is nothing like the storyline chronology), how McDonald can go from a somewhat dull book in Carioca Fletch and turn around and write something that's as good as his first book. There was a falling off that was happening with the series and then this one was a sharp uptick in quality of writing, crispness of dialogue, and just sheer pleasure in reading.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Buckley

    I listened to the audio book for Fletch Won and the narrator really made it into a fun journey. Some chapters felt a little on the pointless side as they didn't move the story forward and I still find McDonald's style to be dialogue-heavy. But the character of Fletch is such an endearing one and this tale of his origin story and how he became the journalist we find him to be in 'Fletch' is a fun ride along two parallel mysteries. The character's ability to fall from one problem to another while I listened to the audio book for Fletch Won and the narrator really made it into a fun journey. Some chapters felt a little on the pointless side as they didn't move the story forward and I still find McDonald's style to be dialogue-heavy. But the character of Fletch is such an endearing one and this tale of his origin story and how he became the journalist we find him to be in 'Fletch' is a fun ride along two parallel mysteries. The character's ability to fall from one problem to another while maintaining a dry sense of wit and survival is just too much fun.

  21. 4 out of 5

    J. Griff

    This series had me entertained, but I’ve been reading them in published order & for the life of me I couldn’t figure out why Fletch’s situation was so erratic. Until I noticed there was a chronological order to the series. So now here I am most of the way thru the 11 book series now realising why certain book references didn’t make sense to me (slaps forehead). These are entertaining books, but make sure to read them in the right order for maximum enjoyment.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darrin Snider

    I'm actually impressed how McDonald can go from the old, tired version of Fletch in the mediocre, barely-a-mystery Carioca Fletch, back to this younger/prequel iteration of Fletch here and recapture the wit and pace of the first Fletch novels. Not that I haven't enjoyed every installment of this series, but he definitely found his energy again with this one. I'm actually impressed how McDonald can go from the old, tired version of Fletch in the mediocre, barely-a-mystery Carioca Fletch, back to this younger/prequel iteration of Fletch here and recapture the wit and pace of the first Fletch novels. Not that I haven't enjoyed every installment of this series, but he definitely found his energy again with this one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mailmanr5

    This book is over 30 years old. At the present I find it lacking humor and a plot. I don't know how I finished it. Maybe 30 years ago it was considered fresh but that is no longer so. Won't be reading any others in this series. This book is over 30 years old. At the present I find it lacking humor and a plot. I don't know how I finished it. Maybe 30 years ago it was considered fresh but that is no longer so. Won't be reading any others in this series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Enjoyable prequel with all the familiar Fletch traits: odd story, odder characters, quick wit, wordplay. Story sees Fletch work out at least two mysteries despite the attentions of the police, his editor and a colleague.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

    Fletch is the best. Someone needs to restart these books as a movie series. Will Arnett would be great in the role. The book itself has all the usual witty dialogue, fun, and mystery that you'd expect. It's awesome. Really enjoyed it. Fletch is the best. Someone needs to restart these books as a movie series. Will Arnett would be great in the role. The book itself has all the usual witty dialogue, fun, and mystery that you'd expect. It's awesome. Really enjoyed it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Austin Gaines

    It's Fletch making jokes and I guess it's his first adventure at the press since these are written out of order. It's the second one i've read. I plan to keep reading them. It's the kind of humor that I dig. Great dialogue. It's Fletch making jokes and I guess it's his first adventure at the press since these are written out of order. It's the second one i've read. I plan to keep reading them. It's the kind of humor that I dig. Great dialogue.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hannah F

    not bad but the earlier books are much funnier . Not such a fan of Jack hes kind of a more watered diwn Fletch . Still better than many of the so called modern "humorous fiction " out there Those are hideous and not funny at all. not bad but the earlier books are much funnier . Not such a fan of Jack hes kind of a more watered diwn Fletch . Still better than many of the so called modern "humorous fiction " out there Those are hideous and not funny at all.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Much better.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wil Smith

    Sad we never got to see Kevin Smith’s adaptation/reboot of this...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Toni Rieder

    More like 2.5 stars. First time reading this one, eh not the greatest but parts of it didn’t suck.

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