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What Goes Up

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How do you forgive yourself—and the people you love—when a shocking discovery leads to a huge mistake? Acclaimed author Christine Heppermann’s novel-in-verse tackles betrayals and redemption among family and friends with her signature unflinching—but always sharply witty—style. For fans of Elana K. Arnold, Laura Ruby, and A. S. King. When Jorie wakes up in the loft bed of a How do you forgive yourself—and the people you love—when a shocking discovery leads to a huge mistake? Acclaimed author Christine Heppermann’s novel-in-verse tackles betrayals and redemption among family and friends with her signature unflinching—but always sharply witty—style. For fans of Elana K. Arnold, Laura Ruby, and A. S. King. When Jorie wakes up in the loft bed of a college boy she doesn’t recognize, she’s instantly filled with regret. What happened the night before? What led her to this place? Was it her father’s infidelity? Her mother’s seemingly weak acceptance? Her recent breakup with Ian, the boy who loved her art and supported her through the hardest time of her life? As Jorie tries to reconstruct the events that led her to this point, free verse poems lead the reader through the current morning, as well as flashbacks to her relationships with her parents, her friends, her boyfriend, and the previous night. With Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty and Ask Me How I Got Here, Christine Heppermann established herself as a vital voice in thought-provoking and powerful feminist writing for teens. Her poetry is surprising, wry, emotional, and searing. What Goes Up is by turns a scorchingly funny and a deeply emotional story that asks whether it’s possible to support and love someone despite the risk of being hurt. Readers of Laura Ruby, E. K. Johnston, Elana K. Arnold, and Laurie Halse Anderson will find a complicated heroine they won’t soon forget.


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How do you forgive yourself—and the people you love—when a shocking discovery leads to a huge mistake? Acclaimed author Christine Heppermann’s novel-in-verse tackles betrayals and redemption among family and friends with her signature unflinching—but always sharply witty—style. For fans of Elana K. Arnold, Laura Ruby, and A. S. King. When Jorie wakes up in the loft bed of a How do you forgive yourself—and the people you love—when a shocking discovery leads to a huge mistake? Acclaimed author Christine Heppermann’s novel-in-verse tackles betrayals and redemption among family and friends with her signature unflinching—but always sharply witty—style. For fans of Elana K. Arnold, Laura Ruby, and A. S. King. When Jorie wakes up in the loft bed of a college boy she doesn’t recognize, she’s instantly filled with regret. What happened the night before? What led her to this place? Was it her father’s infidelity? Her mother’s seemingly weak acceptance? Her recent breakup with Ian, the boy who loved her art and supported her through the hardest time of her life? As Jorie tries to reconstruct the events that led her to this point, free verse poems lead the reader through the current morning, as well as flashbacks to her relationships with her parents, her friends, her boyfriend, and the previous night. With Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty and Ask Me How I Got Here, Christine Heppermann established herself as a vital voice in thought-provoking and powerful feminist writing for teens. Her poetry is surprising, wry, emotional, and searing. What Goes Up is by turns a scorchingly funny and a deeply emotional story that asks whether it’s possible to support and love someone despite the risk of being hurt. Readers of Laura Ruby, E. K. Johnston, Elana K. Arnold, and Laurie Halse Anderson will find a complicated heroine they won’t soon forget.

30 review for What Goes Up

  1. 4 out of 5

    Creya

    This was so dumb. I absolutely adore free verse but I have no idea what I just read. The book opens with Jorie waking up in a stranger’s bed after a drunken night out. Throughout the book, she is constantly listing the names of different mushrooms and fungi?? Wtf??? She whines about her father’s affair, then the book ends with her mother picking her up from the stranger’s house. There were no transitions between past and present and like I said, the book is full of mushrooms. I will be avoiding H This was so dumb. I absolutely adore free verse but I have no idea what I just read. The book opens with Jorie waking up in a stranger’s bed after a drunken night out. Throughout the book, she is constantly listing the names of different mushrooms and fungi?? Wtf??? She whines about her father’s affair, then the book ends with her mother picking her up from the stranger’s house. There were no transitions between past and present and like I said, the book is full of mushrooms. I will be avoiding Heppermann like the plague.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I wanted a little bit more -- just a touch more -- to really get to know Jorie a little better and her emotional interior, since she offers up so much so quickly. A story about a girl who wakes up after making a poor decision and everything that led her to it, including her father's infidelity, her obsession with Art, the breakup with her boyfriend, and more. I loved the mushroom motif throughout.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Ummmm, this made no sense? I must not be smart enough to understand free verse books. Because I had no clue what was happening.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Haylee Huddleston

    A quick read with lots of wit and mushroom facts that draw parallels between different types of fungus and Jorie's life, from her father's affair to her own relationships.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Hill

    I have no idea what was going on. Too disjointed. Too much mushroom/ fungi.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Gutierrez

    This is my first novel in verse. I wasn't sure if I would want to read something in that format, but I was hooked right away and had to keep going. I was amazed at how deep the story could go with so little writing. Hepperman did an amazing job keeping the story line moving while providing details that added to the character and made you connect and feel for her situation. I really enjoyed the book. I won this book as a goodreads giveaway. Thank you for the copy!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alysa

    I was fortunate enough to get a hold of an ARC of this beautiful book. Heppermann's a magician with words and this novel in verse a gem. What on the surface looks like a small story, a moment in time, is really the gateway to a daring and beautiful journey of discovery and truth. The fraught relationship btw a mother and daughter is so beautifully mined here, leaving the reader and the MC with the gift of deeper understanding.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth Rodgers

    'What Goes Up' by Christine Heppermann is a quick read, as it is a novel-in-verse, a format that can be very enticing not only because of the fast pace it takes, but due to its more intense nature as there are fewer words to convey all of the emotions and stories being told. Even though the engaging format of novels-in-verse is compelling, it seemed like this book could have been longer to help fill the gaps that were left in terms of what is happening in Jorie's family life and how it has affec 'What Goes Up' by Christine Heppermann is a quick read, as it is a novel-in-verse, a format that can be very enticing not only because of the fast pace it takes, but due to its more intense nature as there are fewer words to convey all of the emotions and stories being told. Even though the engaging format of novels-in-verse is compelling, it seemed like this book could have been longer to help fill the gaps that were left in terms of what is happening in Jorie's family life and how it has affected who she is and how she sees herself. When Jorie finds herself waking up in the bed of a stranger, her upset at the situation she has found herself in is obvious. Being broken up with someone that she still has to see and do things with doesn't make her life any easier as she contemplates the fallout of what she has found herself dealing with in the moment. It was interesting that there was a lot of scientific talk in the book, but for people who don't understand all of the jargon, the metaphors that are often used don't always resonate the way they surely would if they were more relatable to a larger number of readers. Despite there not being quite enough to make the book feel as “whole” as one might like, there is a lot of room for discussion that can be generated from the textual references, metaphors, and emotional storyline. Jorie is a typical girl dealing with typical issues that are making her feel like life isn't easy or understandable. Everyone has been through something like this, even if they haven't acted in quite the way Jorie does in the story. Yet, that is one of the interesting aspects of this book, and books in general. They allow readers to explore the depths of someone else's life to help make sense of who they as readers are and how the books help define their own character through the eyes of the book characters themselves. Beth Rodgers, Author of 'Welcome to Chanu-Con!,' a Children's Picture Book, and Freshman Fourteen' and 'Sweet Fifteen,' Young Adult Novels *Review originally posted at YABooksCentral.com*

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Tuite

    Reading 2020 Book 133: What Goes Up by Christine Heppermann #30booksin30days (book 4) and #youbetYA2020 (book 3). Working my way through the month of challenges. A YA novel in verse, is the story of Jorie who's life is a mess. She is trouble by her father's affair, and her mother's seeming acceptance of the whole thing. She is acting out of character going to parties, and breaking up with her boyfriend. Through the whole book the discussion of her world in relationship to mushrooms. This book was no Reading 2020 Book 133: What Goes Up by Christine Heppermann #30booksin30days (book 4) and #youbetYA2020 (book 3). Working my way through the month of challenges. A YA novel in verse, is the story of Jorie who's life is a mess. She is trouble by her father's affair, and her mother's seeming acceptance of the whole thing. She is acting out of character going to parties, and breaking up with her boyfriend. Through the whole book the discussion of her world in relationship to mushrooms. This book was not for me, the mushroom metaphors throughout the book were distracting. When the book finished I was not sure what I read or what I was supposed to get from the book. Reviewed for ages 14 and older, this book was published in August this year. My rating 2 ⭐️.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    RTC

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zoë Danielle

    What Goes Up by Christine Heppermann is my third book by the author, who writes poetry and in verse, formats I am often persuaded by. This novel follows Jorie, a teen girl who wakes up in the bed of a college but she doesn't know or remember, and spends most of the book reflecting back on her life and what led her to these moments. I'm pretty conflicted over this novel--on one hand, I enjoyed a lot of the writing, and especially all of the mycological references and connections, since that's not What Goes Up by Christine Heppermann is my third book by the author, who writes poetry and in verse, formats I am often persuaded by. This novel follows Jorie, a teen girl who wakes up in the bed of a college but she doesn't know or remember, and spends most of the book reflecting back on her life and what led her to these moments. I'm pretty conflicted over this novel--on one hand, I enjoyed a lot of the writing, and especially all of the mycological references and connections, since that's not something I've seen before in a book (especially a YA one). On the other hand, I feel like while Jorie's back story was really strong, the present tense just felt like a plot device in order to tell it. What actually happened to Jorie and the repercussions are basically brushed off in a way I found pretty off-putting. I thought Jorie was a strong character, and I could emphasize with her, but the novel felt surface-level in terms of dealing with what is going on. I don't want to spoil it by saying anything further, but it ultimately led to me giving this a much lower rating than I thought I was going to. What Goes Up is really short, under 200 pages, and few words, given the format, and I wish that Heppermann had spent a few more of them addressing these issues, but her writing has enough potential that I'd probably still give it a fourth try in the future.  Disclosure: I received a digital copy of this book for review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    It felt like a drive by. I needed so much more from the book. It moved swiftly because of the verse format where Heppermann creatively made verse brief and impactful but then because of it, I felt like I could never quite get a hold on all that was happening to Jorie, specifically emotionally. She's dealing with the aftermath of being with someone else after a breakup and after her father's infidelity. She's reaching out to friends. There's a timeline put together and it doesn't quite come toget It felt like a drive by. I needed so much more from the book. It moved swiftly because of the verse format where Heppermann creatively made verse brief and impactful but then because of it, I felt like I could never quite get a hold on all that was happening to Jorie, specifically emotionally. She's dealing with the aftermath of being with someone else after a breakup and after her father's infidelity. She's reaching out to friends. There's a timeline put together and it doesn't quite come together not because it's a mystery but because there needed to be just a few more pages! I wanted and was invested in finding out more about her ex, her parents' relationship, how her friends would support her, Conor too, but alas, it was fleeting. I need more! Yet the pace and topic makes it a perfect developing reader book in that sense where it lends itself to discussion about "what would you do" in particular.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erin Brauer

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  16. 5 out of 5

    Meghan Myers

  17. 4 out of 5

    TheAmazingCat

  18. 4 out of 5

    JennRenee

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mrs.Shawncasey

  20. 5 out of 5

    Candi

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erin Cogburn

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shelly Ibok

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kris Cram

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lira

  28. 5 out of 5

    WildBookBosomed

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marie-eve

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kali Cole

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