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Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed

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New York Times bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson (Speak, Shout) and artist Leila del Duca reimagine Wonder Woman's origins in this timely story about the refugee experience, teenage activism, and finding the love and strength to create change. Princess Diana believes that her 16th birthday will be one of new beginnings--namely acceptance into the warrior tribe of Ama New York Times bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson (Speak, Shout) and artist Leila del Duca reimagine Wonder Woman's origins in this timely story about the refugee experience, teenage activism, and finding the love and strength to create change. Princess Diana believes that her 16th birthday will be one of new beginnings--namely acceptance into the warrior tribe of Amazons. The celebrations are cut short, however, when rafts of refugees break through the Themysciran barrier. Diana tries to help them, but she is swept away by the sea--and from her home--thus becoming a refugee herself. Now Diana must survive in the world outside of Themyscira for the first time; the world that is filled with danger and injustice. She must redefine what it means to belong, to be an Amazon, and to make a difference. Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is a story about growing into your strength, battling for justice, and the power of friendship.


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New York Times bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson (Speak, Shout) and artist Leila del Duca reimagine Wonder Woman's origins in this timely story about the refugee experience, teenage activism, and finding the love and strength to create change. Princess Diana believes that her 16th birthday will be one of new beginnings--namely acceptance into the warrior tribe of Ama New York Times bestselling author Laurie Halse Anderson (Speak, Shout) and artist Leila del Duca reimagine Wonder Woman's origins in this timely story about the refugee experience, teenage activism, and finding the love and strength to create change. Princess Diana believes that her 16th birthday will be one of new beginnings--namely acceptance into the warrior tribe of Amazons. The celebrations are cut short, however, when rafts of refugees break through the Themysciran barrier. Diana tries to help them, but she is swept away by the sea--and from her home--thus becoming a refugee herself. Now Diana must survive in the world outside of Themyscira for the first time; the world that is filled with danger and injustice. She must redefine what it means to belong, to be an Amazon, and to make a difference. Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is a story about growing into your strength, battling for justice, and the power of friendship.

30 review for Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Wonder Woman has always been one of my favorite superheroes and I love this interpretation of Diana Prince. Diana is the princess of the Amazon and it's her sixteenth birthday. Like all teenagers, she's painfully awkward and uncertain of her place in her world, but eager to grow up. When she plunges into the sea to save refugees, she ends up accidentally breaking through the veil surrounding Themyscira and ending up in our world instead. Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Wonder Woman has always been one of my favorite superheroes and I love this interpretation of Diana Prince. Diana is the princess of the Amazon and it's her sixteenth birthday. Like all teenagers, she's painfully awkward and uncertain of her place in her world, but eager to grow up. When she plunges into the sea to save refugees, she ends up accidentally breaking through the veil surrounding Themyscira and ending up in our world instead. Her skill with languages helps identify her to a diplomat and a volunteer, who pull her out of the camps and take her to New York, where she ends up staying with a Polish family. There, she immediately begins helping out undocumented immigrants and low income families, while the book-- very neutrally and not at all sanctimoniously-- tackles issues like gentrification, human trafficking, and corruption. I really loved this book a lot. It's aimed at young adults but nothing about it is childish. The art style is polished and the writing is mature. I wouldn't have expected less from Laurie Halse Anderson, though. Tough topics are basically her bread and butter as an audience. Diana is a hard character to write and Leigh Bardugo didn't quite pull it off with her interpretation. This is close to perfect, though. Diana is the perfect blend of kick-butt heroine and naive traveler. She doesn't tolerate sexism and is willing to put everything on the line to defend families and children, but she doesn't know what a merry-go-round is and is flummoxed by homelessness and bad coffee. I also loved the positive themes in this book: bonding together as a community, the greatness of libraries and how they serve as resource hubs for those who are struggling, and the importance of friendship and family ties. I think TEMPEST TOSSED will be an excellent read for anyone who loves Wonder Woman. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review! 4 to 4.5 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Anderson

    Writing this story was a dream come true! Shout out to the other women on #TeamDiana: artist Leila delDuca, colorist Kelly Fitzgerald, and letterer Saida Temofonte! Together we crafted a reimagined Wonder Woman - Diana at age 16, struggling to find her strength, appalled by the lack of justice in Man's World, and ready to make a difference.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    It's nice to finally see one of these DC Ink books that are actually good. This is a story about a young person growing into their own strength as they recognize the injustices of the world and try to come with terms on how they can help right those injustices. Diana is going through an awkward stage as she turns 16 on an island where she's the only child. The other Amazons don't really know how to deal with her. Then one day she's thrust into man's world when she dives into the ocean to save a It's nice to finally see one of these DC Ink books that are actually good. This is a story about a young person growing into their own strength as they recognize the injustices of the world and try to come with terms on how they can help right those injustices. Diana is going through an awkward stage as she turns 16 on an island where she's the only child. The other Amazons don't really know how to deal with her. Then one day she's thrust into man's world when she dives into the ocean to save a capsized boatload of refugees. When she can't find her way back to Themyscira, she goes with the rest of the refugees living in a camp with them. Eventually, her skills are noticed by some U.N. workers who help her immigrate to New York to attend school. There, she encounters many social issues afflicting people around the world. She experiences homelessness, food insecurity, racism, and human trafficking all for the first time. Laura del Luca brings emotion and warmness to her art that I quite enjoyed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher (DC Comics) in exchange for an honest review. This was a great YA interpretation of Wonder Woman! The book was very appropriate for the young adult age range. This focuses on a teenage Diana and she is portrayed exactly like that. Diana is frustrated with her changing body and is unsure of her place in the world. A lot of teenagers will be able to relate to her and her struggles of growing up. The book also touches upon the refugee experi I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher (DC Comics) in exchange for an honest review. This was a great YA interpretation of Wonder Woman! The book was very appropriate for the young adult age range. This focuses on a teenage Diana and she is portrayed exactly like that. Diana is frustrated with her changing body and is unsure of her place in the world. A lot of teenagers will be able to relate to her and her struggles of growing up. The book also touches upon the refugee experience which is such an important topic. Additionally, is features child trafficking which is another tough topic. All of this was well executed. At one point Diana wears a hoodie that says, “Seeking Asylum Is A Human Right,” and her friend wears one that says, “Immigration Built This Nation.” This was a subtle, but powerful touch. My one critique is that the book went by so fast. Since this is an origin story, there was a lot of stuff that happened and it all happened at lightning speed. I wished it would have went a little more slowly. Overall, I really enjoyed this new take on the Wonder Woman origin story and its message! If you love YA and Wonder Woman, read this!

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    As with Jill Thompson's Wonder Woman origin story, YA great author Laurie Halse Anderson has Wonder Woman as a changeling who at 16 becomes fully welcomed into Amazon society. But then is swept to sea, and ends up in Queens, (NYC, but she likes the implication of queens vs. kings, this being a feminist work) finally becoming a child immigration social activist. Doing good. Social justice work. Anderson, a funny and insightful and feminist writer, seems sometimes pretty constrained by the tone an As with Jill Thompson's Wonder Woman origin story, YA great author Laurie Halse Anderson has Wonder Woman as a changeling who at 16 becomes fully welcomed into Amazon society. But then is swept to sea, and ends up in Queens, (NYC, but she likes the implication of queens vs. kings, this being a feminist work) finally becoming a child immigration social activist. Doing good. Social justice work. Anderson, a funny and insightful and feminist writer, seems sometimes pretty constrained by the tone and strictures of Greek mythology initially, and then, while her WW is appropriately feisty and "tempest tossed " (a little anger management there, Diana!) I didn't find the story really fresh or edgy; not enough witty Andersonian dialogue. But the art from Leila Deluca is fresh and lively and colorful. I bet a lot of Anderson fans of her many books will like this. And this book includes more diversity than in many other Anderson books. I have read a few other WW volumes, from Brian Azzarello's run to Ron Reage's alt-comix occult origin Diana. And if you want to see the complex history of how WW actually got invented, see Jill Lepore's Secret History of Wonder Woman. But this is a respectable contribution to the WW list, something that may get YA readers to consider comics.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Noura Khalid (theperksofbeingnoura)

    I've read many of these graphic novels but this one spoke volumes! So much diversity and fighting for what's right and the importance of justice.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cadence

    "Diana was trying to help people in the water and couldn't swim. After they were saved she couldn't get back home to her island. She moved to New York and helped feed hungry children and saved kidnapped kids. She also helped a kid who couldn't breathe. At the hospital she talked different languages to help the doctors because she's an Amazon. I want to visit the Statue of Liberty some day in New York City." -Cadee, age 7 almost 8

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    Written by Laurie Halse Anderson Illustrated by Leila Del Duca Out of all the wonderful DC graphic novels i have had the pleasure of reading, none have done what this did. Tempest Tossed tackled multiple social problems and raised awareness of child trafficking. While most of the novels we read help one overcome their own insecurities and troubles, this one takes Diana away from her home and literally in the place of these children. She was able to witness these problems and come to know that they Written by Laurie Halse Anderson Illustrated by Leila Del Duca Out of all the wonderful DC graphic novels i have had the pleasure of reading, none have done what this did. Tempest Tossed tackled multiple social problems and raised awareness of child trafficking. While most of the novels we read help one overcome their own insecurities and troubles, this one takes Diana away from her home and literally in the place of these children. She was able to witness these problems and come to know that they aren't right. This book is directed for younger readers while the topics are not childish at all. Yet, it goes about bringing awareness to them in an impactful way for these readers. Not only do I think that Anderson nailed the Wonder Woman character, I think she outstandingly created her as an even greater role model for the younger community of readers. I say that because Diana (classic) is this naïve yet determined character. Anderson nailed that for a younger audience and stepped it up by allowing Diana to grow. Tempest Tossed tackled a bunch of different issues like LGBTQ, bullying, acne, cultural differences, loss of family, homelessness, poverty, child trafficking, and even foster care. I mean so many issues are displayed within these pages, but done in a realistic way you could easily overlook one. Diana's earnest sincerity is what this whole novel is based on and I loved every second of it. She is from a world of Amazons that she didn't fit into. She struggled to be like them and when she selflessly helps outsiders, she finds herself trapped in a different world and unable to get back home. The whole time she learns that the world is disgusting and troubled and all she wants to do is make is better. Yet while she is new and feels very alienated, she goes above and beyond to help the community and save the children. This novel is very timely in our society. The reasoning to just be a good person and help out your own community is well enough to allow any young reader to love this book. By allowing them to understand that these issues are real, is a great way to get them to be more productive members of society and fight these issues. So, why not allow an influential character help these young readers grasp these issues? Diana is a perfect example throughout this novel and this twist of her origin story is perfect for readers today. I have never read anything so significant while being able to manage a storyline, character arc, all with a load of social issues attached. Anderson's writing combined with Del Duca's artistry is the perfect mix to modernizing literature to extinguish the stigma around graphic novel reading. Thank you to DC Comics for sending me a copy and the images to use for this review. All my thoughts are my own. Until next Time, Brittany from DauntlesslyReading

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah Waters

    What a fantastic graphic novel! One of my favorite Wonder Woman retellings, this one focuses on social justice issues: racism, human trafficking, poverty, and more. With Diana's unique perspective, Laurie Halse Anderson confronts the atrocities that have become commonplace--and she proves that while Diana has powers, you don't need powers to make a difference.

  10. 5 out of 5

    ♠ TABI ♠

    I'm a simple woman of simple tastes, and this was a simple book that spoke its messages loud and clearly through Diana's voice.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ilana

    2.5 rounded down. I was not grabbed. Not enthused. Not impressed. I'm a big fan of Laurie Halse Anderson, so I put that entirely on me. I've been a kind of SJW a good part of my life, raised by a woman who literally was on the front lines of social changes as a communist, socialist, separatist, radical feminist and a bunch of "ists". There's been too much virtue signalling in the last years and it's been taken up by far left radical ideologies I don't wish to align myself with any longer. They'v 2.5 rounded down. I was not grabbed. Not enthused. Not impressed. I'm a big fan of Laurie Halse Anderson, so I put that entirely on me. I've been a kind of SJW a good part of my life, raised by a woman who literally was on the front lines of social changes as a communist, socialist, separatist, radical feminist and a bunch of "ists". There's been too much virtue signalling in the last years and it's been taken up by far left radical ideologies I don't wish to align myself with any longer. They've changed what it means to have good intentions into something violent and angry and ultimately, as oppressive as the Right are accused of being. I'm a grown-ass woman with a mile-wide range of life experiences, and I don't feel pressured to say I like something when it doesn't satisfy. I call that having personal tastes and opinions and my very own mind frame. I like the word paradigm, too. We each have our unique paradigm. I think this book will probably inspire a lot of young girls, and maybe boys too, and certainly parents, with its message of tapping into one's personal strength and fighting the good fight. Tying Wonder Woman to the ancient Amazons who are supposedly inhabitants of an island invisible to anyone from outside and her origin story of having been been made from clay was interesting, harking back to a tale from the Greek myths to explain how humans were made. I hadn't delved into Wonder Woman's creation story before, having only watched TV episodes when I could as a kid, so had the mistaken impression this was a theme invented by the author and this somewhat confused me, which probably didn't help me fully appreciate this graphic novel. There is a theme of contrasting civilizations and how dehumanizing our modern society is. Lots of good things going on here. The art is good, and the pacing is good. I have tastes that are unpredictable because it's always a question of how all the different elements come together, and it was a meh for me, but don't take my word for it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lu

    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. An huge thanks to DC Comics for this free copy. TW: children exploitation, harassment, kidnapping, mention of rape and sexual abuse, human trafficking. Princess Diana of Themyscira always felt different and alienated from the Amazons in her island home and she hopes her sixteen birthday will change everything and she will finally feel part of the warrior tribe. But when rafts with refugees break the barrier around her Themyscir I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. An huge thanks to DC Comics for this free copy. TW: children exploitation, harassment, kidnapping, mention of rape and sexual abuse, human trafficking. Princess Diana of Themyscira always felt different and alienated from the Amazons in her island home and she hopes her sixteen birthday will change everything and she will finally feel part of the warrior tribe. But when rafts with refugees break the barrier around her Themyscira, Diana defies her tribe to save and bring them to safety. But she's carried away by the sea, finding herself in the modern world. Stranded in a unfamiliar and dangerous world, away for the first time from her family, traditions and Goddesses, Diana is forced to adapt and learn her place, finding new friends, a found family and discovering the dangers of the modern world. Dangers she's more than ready to fight against. I fell in love with the artwork of Leila del Duca and the beautiful and current plot of Laurie Halse Anderson that reivent Wonder Woman's origin, putting Diana Prince first in a refugee camp and then in the frontline against abuse, sexual violence, children exploitation and refugees' experiences and rights. The characterization is brilliant. Diana is the only person who was born on Themyscira, the only one with a birthday and that and other changes (we could call them puberty) separate her from the Amazons. She feels like an outsider and she's eager to belong and to prove the Amazons she's like them. The reader can feel her desire, her wanting to be really part of the Amazons tribe in her own island, to find her place and when she's, literally, swept away from everything that was familiar to her, Diana is a character able to find her own way, place and strength, to adapt and overcome the difficulties. She's surrounded by strong characters, like Steven and Trevor and Henke and Raissa and her friendship with them helps Diana feel with a purpose and a place, above all when she's involved in the activism. Even if she will never stop looking a way for getting back home, Diana is ready to fight against injustices. Diana's journey is intertwined with important social and political issues. Swept away by the sea and living in a refugees camp, Diana is able to see the disastrous conditions people are forced to live in, the injustices against them, the awful sanitary conditions. When her ability of talk, understand and translate multiple language (thanks to her upbringing in Themyscira) catches the attention of Trevor and Steve (a cute gay couple, both involved in the refugees situation, working at the United Nations), they decide to help her get a Visa and a place to stay in New York with their friend, a Polish immigrant names Henke and her granddaughter Raissa. Involved in their activism, helping families and children, in New York Diana has to face the reality of homelessness, street harassments and the refugees' situations and the danger of human greed and evil. Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed is a wonderful and intense graphic novel about finding one's strength and place in the world, a found family, love and friendship.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Danielle (always_read_the_end_first)

    Whoa this is a feminist graphic novel perfect for Young Adults and I'm obsessed! This displays sexual harassment, bullying, homeless communities, being of a different country coming to America, loss of family, cultural differences, liberal arts, acne, menstral cycles, child trafficking, socializing, being arrested, public library! being in a park! Ugh I miss socializing right now. When Diana has an epiphany that the world is a disgusting horrible place just by reading a newspaper in a park. It w Whoa this is a feminist graphic novel perfect for Young Adults and I'm obsessed! This displays sexual harassment, bullying, homeless communities, being of a different country coming to America, loss of family, cultural differences, liberal arts, acne, menstral cycles, child trafficking, socializing, being arrested, public library! being in a park! Ugh I miss socializing right now. When Diana has an epiphany that the world is a disgusting horrible place just by reading a newspaper in a park. It will break your heart like it did mine. "Defecting evil is harder than I thought." Diana is reading WAR AND PEACE. Damn this is epic! I need a hoodie that says "Immigration built this nation." This is perfect for young adults and this is coming out June! I love Laurie Halse Anderson's writing style and storytelling. Leila Del Duce is an amazing artist and now I have to check out her other works!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tabrizia

    Thank you NetGalley and DC Comics for an advanced copy in exchanged for an honest review. It was okay. Although the artwork was good, I felt that the story was a little rushed and was jumpy all over the place. I did like the empowerment message about accepting your flaws and not letting it get the best of you, a similar statement that could be said about the view of the rest of society. The story targeted a lot of important issues: homelessness, refugees, immigration, gentrification, issues that Thank you NetGalley and DC Comics for an advanced copy in exchanged for an honest review. It was okay. Although the artwork was good, I felt that the story was a little rushed and was jumpy all over the place. I did like the empowerment message about accepting your flaws and not letting it get the best of you, a similar statement that could be said about the view of the rest of society. The story targeted a lot of important issues: homelessness, refugees, immigration, gentrification, issues that will appeal and be understood by the younger audience. And it was great how Anderson tied it in with a different telling of Wonder Woman's origin story. I just wished it was better executed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    & She Reads

    I received a copy of this via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review Oh crap I freaking loved this and honestly I needed some wonder woman in my life right now Diana is always my favorite her bravery and kindness always inspire me and right now the world could use some Diana Prince Everyone needs to read this the moment it comes out!! The art in this comment was absolutely beautiful and I absolutely loved the story it shows off some things that are actually wrong with our world at this time I received a copy of this via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review Oh crap I freaking loved this and honestly I needed some wonder woman in my life right now Diana is always my favorite her bravery and kindness always inspire me and right now the world could use some Diana Prince Everyone needs to read this the moment it comes out!! The art in this comment was absolutely beautiful and I absolutely loved the story it shows off some things that are actually wrong with our world at this time and Wonder Woman totally kicks ass!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Yursa Tahir

    3.5 stars. Its was very thrilling, artwork was nice but thats about it

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather - hturningpages

    Rating: 5/5 donated sandwiches Format: ebook. I’d like to thank Netgalley for a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. To sum up: This is a retelling of the Wonder Woman origin story by Laurie Halse Anderson, the writer of SPEAK (now also a graphic novel!). Although the beginning of this story felt very familiar, Anderson brings a sensitivity and call to action that feels new and full of hope. I will admit, I haven’t read the original DC Justice comics, but I have absorbed a lot Rating: 5/5 donated sandwiches Format: ebook. I’d like to thank Netgalley for a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. To sum up: This is a retelling of the Wonder Woman origin story by Laurie Halse Anderson, the writer of SPEAK (now also a graphic novel!). Although the beginning of this story felt very familiar, Anderson brings a sensitivity and call to action that feels new and full of hope. I will admit, I haven’t read the original DC Justice comics, but I have absorbed a lot from pop culture and I loved the 2017 Wonder Woman film adaption. This story starts off with Diana as a girl just about to turn 16 amongst a community of Amazonian women on the hidden island of Themyscira. She is an outsider to this community however because she is the only one not born into womanhood as an Amazonian warrior, and actually thinks of herself as a changeling, or someone of “human-like” identity. In this community, it is her “human” half that sets her apart however because Amazonians are fierce, powerful, and extraordinary warriors; whereas Diana at first glance appears to be an ordinary human teenager with pimples, armpit hair, and a period. On her birthday, Diana attempts to save some humans at the magical border of her island and suddenly finds herself on the outside, in the real world for the first time. The rest of this first installment follows Diana as she navigates the struggles of being a refugee as she tries to find her identity, purpose, friendship, and her way back home. What I loved: I’ve always been drawn to the character of Wonder Woman because of her earnest sincerity to help others. Because she has been sheltered her whole life up to this point in a beautiful utopia, she has this naive but beautiful idea of how the world should be. It is so cool to see her dropped into a world where a lot of us have become desensitized to homelessness and poverty and see her stop and not only take notice but put in a real effort to help people in need. She looks at the world and sees how it could be made better. Diana in this version of WW is just the same. Her courage in the face of adversity is inspiring and her curiosity about the world is infectious to all around her. She is introduced to the world outside during war and turmoil in the middle east and is brought into Greece as a refugee. She then finds her way to Queens, New York, where she stays with a Polish family and meets a parkour enthusiast and community activist teen her own age. Seeing life as a refugee and immigrant through Diana’s eyes is heartbreaking. Every step of the way, she is asking why is this world so broken? Why are there so many without? But in this world, she also finds friendship, community, and a loving host family that shows her how to give back and support her community. I loved that this version of Wonder Woman takes on the important themes of diversity and immigrant life in our culture, the current weaknesses of our social services programs, and the adversity faced by those that are homeless, impoverished, or just in need. I also loved the theme of friendship in this story and their interest in social activism. I am definitely interested in reading more. Who I'd recommend it to: Fans of DC Comics and Wonder Woman stories, social activism, and fans of Laurie Halse Anderson.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Artemis

    'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' is a rich, relevant, endearing and even a little funny contemporary retelling of Wondy's origin. This DC young adult graphic novel, written by Laurie Halse Anderson, is less about superheroics (Diana is never actually called Wonder Woman here, nor does she sport a secret hero identity, though she hides her Amazonian background from everyone in mortal Man's World) and flashy comic book action, and more about tackling all kinds of social and political issues. Its pri 'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' is a rich, relevant, endearing and even a little funny contemporary retelling of Wondy's origin. This DC young adult graphic novel, written by Laurie Halse Anderson, is less about superheroics (Diana is never actually called Wonder Woman here, nor does she sport a secret hero identity, though she hides her Amazonian background from everyone in mortal Man's World) and flashy comic book action, and more about tackling all kinds of social and political issues. Its primary focus is on what's ordinary and normalized today - an eyeopener on what's happening in real life that's controlled by men. It's about the ways in which the patriarchy hurts us all and makes no sense; it ignores basic humans rights and the legal justice system, and it is run through incompetence, ignorance, violence, and brutal cruelty, in keeping with the centuries-long status quo. It's about exposing a corrupt, broken system. It holds a mirror to bigotry; examples include racism, xenophobia, classism, sexism, and misogyny. It reveals, in no small estimate, the suffering of children in this system. And make no mistake. Poverty and homelessness are major points of discussion. And Princess Diana - changeling (another word for a mood-swinging teenager), accidental refugee, and newcomer to the horrors of Man's World - is truly going to tell it as it is... Of course it won't be easy. Despite the fact that seeing and knowing what is right and wrong is simple and not complicated at all, change is never easy. Change on a large scale in a corrupt world system that favours men is next to impossible, and it can take forever to achieve even a chink in the glass ceiling. But at least in Man's Messed Up World, Diana will have female friends to aid her in her day-to-day living as a "normal" human activist girl. An activist with a voice, and language, listening, and understanding skills. And super strength. On top of everything else, Diana is a lost girl wanting to find her way home to the island of Themyscira, after she had disobeyed her mother, Queen Hippolyta, and left the magically-protected-but-weakened island to swim and save drowning refugees. She got swept away in the currents, along with the refugees. She was tempest tossed, hence the meaning of the title. In the meantime, she'll help in any way she can to make a difference - to make a small hope - in the outside world. A world that is nowhere near the paradise that is her beloved Themyscira. The lost and confused but smart teenage Amazon can only do so much, but she'll never give up. 'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' is brimming with social justice and commentary, so naturally the diversity in its cast of characters is exquisite. Nearly every person that Diana, a white girl, interacts with is a POC. All sorts of people are represented. And Steve Trevor has been split into two separate characters, Steve and Trevor - who are married to each other. Now THAT is creative licencing, and a creative liberty. Diana has no love interest in this version of her origin. Brilliant. No romance to undermine the strong feminist agenda. Mainstream superhero comic book readers, however, may be put off by the lack of action in this book. It is strictly about Diana as a civilian - a refugee, an exchange student, an activist, a prisoner of the patriarchal system - who isn't Wonder Woman as we know her yet. While she does possess super strength, speed and endurance (which, since she's still growing and learning, she hasn't perfected yet), and her Lasso of Truth, her bracelets, and her tiara, she rarely uses them, and not to their full effect. There is not much creativity put into the Wonder Woman identity, when it comes to saving the day, as it were. Some elements are a little underdeveloped, such as Diana's homesickness; she doesn't really attribute anything specific about home. Like, does she miss her mother? Her fellow Amazon friends, teachers, and healers? Her new horse she got on her Born Day (birthday)? It's just the vague notion of her peaceful, feminist home that she misses. The ending, which involves a child trafficking ring, is also lacking in full potential and feels rushed. Its climatic battle is rather short, and some important details - building towards this climax - are skimmed over or forgotten about. Certain teen trafficking victims' fates aren't resolved, for instance. In the beginning of the graphic novel, it is mentioned by Diana in narration that there's some great evil that the Greek goddesses (including my gal Artemis!) prophesied, and they created the Amazons so they could one day fight against it once it's revealed in the outside world. But this so-called darkness isn't mentioned again after Diana leaves Themyscira. Is there a sequel planned? Also, there's no Etta Candy. Boo. But all in all, 'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' is vital in its own right, and educational. It showcases how anyone can be a hero. No monikers or costumes are required. Heroes are ordinary people, who fight to make the world a better, fairer place for everyone to live in. Altruism is its own reward. I've got to give Anderson extra credit for sticking to the born-from-clay origin story, as well. In 'Tempest Tossed', Diana was also created from Hippolyta's tears. Even in the darkly prophetic abyss that is 2020, where any work published is made irrelevant and can instantly be considered "badly timed" and "dated", I still recommend this superhero YA comic that isn't really about superheroes. It's about people. Real people, in a story featuring a fantasy protagonist. Final Score: 3.5/5

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    A very different take on Wonder Woman, one which purists will not care for. I felt that the middle of this book was taking this somewhere special, but the end conflict was a bit formulaic and simplistic. The best parts were based around Diana’s naive goodness and her questioning the injustices prevalent in the world. I just wish the conclusion followed the nonviolent premise of the world - the fact that a female hero could accomplish her goals in ways that our male superheroes seem forced to wou A very different take on Wonder Woman, one which purists will not care for. I felt that the middle of this book was taking this somewhere special, but the end conflict was a bit formulaic and simplistic. The best parts were based around Diana’s naive goodness and her questioning the injustices prevalent in the world. I just wish the conclusion followed the nonviolent premise of the world - the fact that a female hero could accomplish her goals in ways that our male superheroes seem forced to would have been a much more interesting and complex work. Still, it was entertaining and well-written enough time be worth a read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Diana is a young girl growing up on Themyscira surrounded by immortal Amazons. She never really fits in among her elders, but she hopes that will change when she reaches her 16th birthday. She believes that with the blessings of the Five Mothers, the five goddesses who created Themyscira and the Amazons, she will gain control over her body and become a true Amazon like all of the amazing women she grew up with. Instead, the barrier between Themyscira and the rest of the world starts to weaken, a Diana is a young girl growing up on Themyscira surrounded by immortal Amazons. She never really fits in among her elders, but she hopes that will change when she reaches her 16th birthday. She believes that with the blessings of the Five Mothers, the five goddesses who created Themyscira and the Amazons, she will gain control over her body and become a true Amazon like all of the amazing women she grew up with. Instead, the barrier between Themyscira and the rest of the world starts to weaken, and in a moment of heroism and selflessness Diana finds herself lost. Stuck outside the only home she ever knew, Diana is ferried around the world through refugee camps and eventually finds herself in New York. While part of her is amazed by all the amazing people and cultures she gets to experience in America, she also finds herself face to face with its evils too. Diana and her friends are constantly challenged through the OGN, not only because they are women but because they are immigrants. Things get worse as children start to disappear across the city and Diana grows increasingly frustrated with the slow response of the police who are supposed to be helping. Diana isn't Wonder Woman yet. She's not a superhero. She's not a mature adult who knows what she's doing. She's a young girl who knows the difference between right and wrong, and is willing to use her strength to fight for those who cannot.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I love Laurie Halse Anderson and I love Wonder Woman, so this mashup is right up my alley. Anderson does a nice job setting teenage Diana in our world and allowing us to see the injustices encountered by everyday people and also refugees and immigrants through new eyes by using Diana's outside-looking-in perspective. There's less rough and tumble action than you may expect, but it's a timely book and celebratory of the human spirit. 4 stars. Thanks to NetGalley for a copy in exchange for an hone I love Laurie Halse Anderson and I love Wonder Woman, so this mashup is right up my alley. Anderson does a nice job setting teenage Diana in our world and allowing us to see the injustices encountered by everyday people and also refugees and immigrants through new eyes by using Diana's outside-looking-in perspective. There's less rough and tumble action than you may expect, but it's a timely book and celebratory of the human spirit. 4 stars. Thanks to NetGalley for a copy in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    This was really good. I’ll be posting a full review closer to the release date in June.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

    A modern-day Wonder Woman graphic novel that has Diana fighting for justice as a refugee in NYC.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    We think we know this story...Diana, a young Amazon, comes to our world to fight evil...usually played as historical fiction. Here, tho, 16-year-old Diana Prince, our Amazon Princess, accidentally travels to our world, trying to save poor refugees from drowning...she is rounded up and lands in a refugee camp. Then to NYC where her learning curve is steep, and she wonders if she will ever find her way hope to her beloved island with women who are strong and loyal and true. The longer she stay in " We think we know this story...Diana, a young Amazon, comes to our world to fight evil...usually played as historical fiction. Here, tho, 16-year-old Diana Prince, our Amazon Princess, accidentally travels to our world, trying to save poor refugees from drowning...she is rounded up and lands in a refugee camp. Then to NYC where her learning curve is steep, and she wonders if she will ever find her way hope to her beloved island with women who are strong and loyal and true. The longer she stay in "our" world, them more disillusioned she becomes...and the more ashamed I became of this world she tries to navigate. We see inhumanity and evil and cruelty. But Diana puts a new family together and she begins to see where she can contribute. I loved the updated setting, the fierceness of the young people Diana finds, and her determination to contribute. Loved this book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stefani Putria

    Maybe best interpretation of wonder woman in Modern Day with all the focused how being strong women by helped others that need help and standing for the weakest. Also, the story remain me how to be humble and strong from inside and outside. Also, this graphic novel has a good illustrated and I love how the goddess draw with featuring all races and different shape of body that giving message what ever race and how shape your body you're still goddess. 💙💙💙

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Wow. This graphic novel hit on so many points. I loved how Diana is repeatedly challenged. Her coming-of-age is complicated. At first she needs to adjust to life as an “adult” on the island of Themyscira, and then she needs to navigate the scary place called Earth. She takes on the task of helping the refugees… and she makes big decisions that will shape her future. And the art! The colors connect so well with the story arc and the artwork is drawn in a perfect combination of the realism of the r Wow. This graphic novel hit on so many points. I loved how Diana is repeatedly challenged. Her coming-of-age is complicated. At first she needs to adjust to life as an “adult” on the island of Themyscira, and then she needs to navigate the scary place called Earth. She takes on the task of helping the refugees… and she makes big decisions that will shape her future. And the art! The colors connect so well with the story arc and the artwork is drawn in a perfect combination of the realism of the refugee experience and the fantasy of the superhero. There are actions scenes and heartfelt drama, and each coloring perfectly accents the feelings and emotions. I read through this book twice to really get the experience and I’m sure you will too. Pick this up for a complete story, a wonderful take on Diana’s character, and some well-placed social commentary. 4.5 out of 5. Thank you to NetGalley, DC Comics, and the authors for an advanced copy for review. For my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2020/05/28/wo... For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  27. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Thank you to NetGalley, Laurie Halse Anderson, and DC Entertainment for the opportunity to read Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed in exchange for an honest review. First and foremost, I really wanted to read this because I greatly admire Laurie Halse Anderson as a writer, and I was not disappointed. This comic reimagines the origin story of Wonder Woman, known as Diana. While some of the beginning is similar--an exclusive island of all females, Amazons, hidden by a barrier from the rest of the world--t Thank you to NetGalley, Laurie Halse Anderson, and DC Entertainment for the opportunity to read Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed in exchange for an honest review. First and foremost, I really wanted to read this because I greatly admire Laurie Halse Anderson as a writer, and I was not disappointed. This comic reimagines the origin story of Wonder Woman, known as Diana. While some of the beginning is similar--an exclusive island of all females, Amazons, hidden by a barrier from the rest of the world--the twist this takes highlights very serious and real issues in the world today. This volume contains some historical elements as well as exploring issues such as human trafficking, homelessness, war, and immigration. I found the way this was written to be quite educational and appreciated the course our sixteen-year-old protagonist went in this new Wonder Woman beginning. This book also explores important topics to a teenage audience, such as family, friendship, and finding one's place in the world. Also, the art is pretty darn amazing. This is a lovely fresh start!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lost in Book Land

    Welcome Back, Today is an exciting day! It's Tuesday which means book release day! There are so many new releases coming out today that I can not wait to dive into. I have pre-ordered a ton of new books and one of the books on my list is Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed, a book that I was super fortunate to be able to read early! I have been reading a lot of the new DC comics and really enjoying my time with them. This one might be in my top five favorites so far (definitely top two, the other one in Welcome Back, Today is an exciting day! It's Tuesday which means book release day! There are so many new releases coming out today that I can not wait to dive into. I have pre-ordered a ton of new books and one of the books on my list is Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed, a book that I was super fortunate to be able to read early! I have been reading a lot of the new DC comics and really enjoying my time with them. This one might be in my top five favorites so far (definitely top two, the other one in the top two I will be talking about soon)! SPOILERS AHEAD Diana is about to turn 16, she has been going through some tough times but now that her birthday is upon her she is excited to be entering into the Amazon Tribe. In the middle of Diana's birthday celebration, people from the outside world break through the barrier into and the Amazons must act fast to get them out and close the barrier. However, in this process, Diana decides to jump in the water and leave the barrier to save people who are drowning. While she is saving the people the barrier closes and Diana is now stuck in the outside world. She finds herself in a war-torn country, living in a refugee camp, trying to help the people the best she can. That is until one day, she meets two gentlemen who notice her helping the people and offer to take her back to NYC with them where she can attend school and make even more differences in the world. Diana agrees to go with them to NYC where she learns more about herself, her people, the outside world, and how she can help everyone with her powers. In all honestly, before reading this I did not know a lot about Wonder Woman. I have seen the movie but that is literally it. So this graphic novel was a whole new thing for me and I enjoyed it so much. I loved the art style, the colors, the characters, and the story. I was utterly hooked by the story of this graphic novel, from start to end. Then once the story ended I wanted more, I found myself sitting in front of my laptop being like no where are the other pages? (Because I just wanted to keep reading anything in this storyline). I am really hoping (fingers crossed) that there will be a second graphic novel in this new series because I can not get enough of this storyline (I have read it three times now). Goodreads Rating: 5 Stars **Thank you so much to the publisher for the ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ula

    4 out of 5 🌟Wonder not-yet-a-Woman, a social justice warrior Wonder Woman, as every comic character from both DC and Marvel worlds, has been recreated multiple times with a new origin story. Sometimes they are related to each other, and sometimes they built with totally different narration. 'Tempest Tossed' belongs to that second category, the plot is unlike any other iteration of Diana's beginnings. That creates a great opportunity to jump on the Wonder Woman's bandwagon even for readers who don 4 out of 5 🌟Wonder not-yet-a-Woman, a social justice warrior Wonder Woman, as every comic character from both DC and Marvel worlds, has been recreated multiple times with a new origin story. Sometimes they are related to each other, and sometimes they built with totally different narration. 'Tempest Tossed' belongs to that second category, the plot is unlike any other iteration of Diana's beginnings. That creates a great opportunity to jump on the Wonder Woman's bandwagon even for readers who don't know DC Universe. Amazons live in Themyscira, a secret island far from civilization, unbeknown to people. Loosely based on Greek mythology, these warriors are the favorite making of the Ancient Greeks' Goddesses. Wonder Woman vel Princess Diana is a teenager, or rather a "changeling", as she's called on her island. Diana has never been outside of Themyscira and amidst the story's events, she gets to know our world and tries to make sense of it. 'Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed' is both hilarious and heartbreaking graphic novel. On the one hand, the book shows teens' problems and challenges of puberty. Diana's learning about our world is full of gags about nowadays slang and technology. And it is funny, like mentioned "changeling" as a way to call teenagers - doesn't that feel true? On the other hand, Diana receives brutal lessons about life on Earth, when she tries to understand social un-justice and poor living conditions that some children experience. I believe that comics would've opened my eyes to the issues I've never thought about as a teen and reading it now, I didn't feel it was forced or cheesy. I enjoy my reading time and I'm looking forward to the next volumes. Thank you Netgalley and the publisher DC Entertainment for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and feelings are my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paige Green

    Disclaimer: I received an e-arc from the publisher and edelweiss. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed Author: Laurie Halse Anderson Book Series: Standalone? Not sure but hope for more Diversity: Immigrants shown and are apart of the narrative, lots of different ethnicities shown as well Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: Graphic novels, DC universe, superhero, female superhero Publication Date: June 2, 2020 Publisher: DC Pages: 193 Recommended Age: 16+ (child abuse mentioned T Disclaimer: I received an e-arc from the publisher and edelweiss. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed Author: Laurie Halse Anderson Book Series: Standalone? Not sure but hope for more Diversity: Immigrants shown and are apart of the narrative, lots of different ethnicities shown as well Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: Graphic novels, DC universe, superhero, female superhero Publication Date: June 2, 2020 Publisher: DC Pages: 193 Recommended Age: 16+ (child abuse mentioned TW, child sexual abuse mentioned TW, violence) Synopsis: Princess Diana believes that her 16th birthday will be one of new beginnings--namely acceptance into the warrior tribe of Amazons. The celebrations are cut short, however, when rafts of refugees break through the Themysciran barrier. Diana tries to help them, but she is swept away by the sea--and from her home--thus becoming a refugee herself. Now Diana must survive in the world outside of Themyscira for the first time; the world that is filled with danger and injustice. She must redefine what it means to belong, to be an Amazon, and to make a difference. Review: Holy cow this book was amazing! I've always been a bit of a fan of Wonder Women and I loved what the author did for this book. The character development was amazing, the story was heart pounding, the world building was expertly done, and all of the diversity and inclusion!! I liked how the author even weaved in real world issues like immigration and child trafficking into this story. I loved this so much! My only issue is the length. The book is so short and I want more. I feel like with a longer book the author could have done more for the character development of all the characters but it was damn near perfect as is! Verdict: I definitely recommend this one!

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