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20XX, Vol. 1

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From JONATHAN LUNA (ALEX + ADA, GIRLS, THE SWORD) and LAUREN KEELY in her writing debut comes a sci-fi thriller set in a not-so-distant future-a world of norms and syms, divided by fear. Syms, a small percentage of the population with telekinetic abilities, form gangs to survive. But division only breeds more division, and as their relationship grows amid the often dramati From JONATHAN LUNA (ALEX + ADA, GIRLS, THE SWORD) and LAUREN KEELY in her writing debut comes a sci-fi thriller set in a not-so-distant future-a world of norms and syms, divided by fear. Syms, a small percentage of the population with telekinetic abilities, form gangs to survive. But division only breeds more division, and as their relationship grows amid the often dramatic, sometimes violent, and always complex social landscape of sym gang rivalries, Mer and Nuon experience this firsthand. Collects 20XX #1-6


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From JONATHAN LUNA (ALEX + ADA, GIRLS, THE SWORD) and LAUREN KEELY in her writing debut comes a sci-fi thriller set in a not-so-distant future-a world of norms and syms, divided by fear. Syms, a small percentage of the population with telekinetic abilities, form gangs to survive. But division only breeds more division, and as their relationship grows amid the often dramati From JONATHAN LUNA (ALEX + ADA, GIRLS, THE SWORD) and LAUREN KEELY in her writing debut comes a sci-fi thriller set in a not-so-distant future-a world of norms and syms, divided by fear. Syms, a small percentage of the population with telekinetic abilities, form gangs to survive. But division only breeds more division, and as their relationship grows amid the often dramatic, sometimes violent, and always complex social landscape of sym gang rivalries, Mer and Nuon experience this firsthand. Collects 20XX #1-6

30 review for 20XX, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Cool concept that just went way off course. Not even sure what was going on in the end. Way too much dialogue - needed more showing than telling.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Richard Blackmore

    DNF The Luna Brothers exemplify everything that is wrong with the Comic industry (I can’t speak on Marvel and DC Comics as I haven’t read them), and are a huge part of my decision to not continue to consume nonliterary comics and manga in the future. I have found most manga and comics to be overtly sexist, misogynistic, unimaginative, and unintelligent garbage. They are the equivalent of a diet of candy and twinkies for the brain. While they may be pleasurable in the moment, once you finally clos DNF The Luna Brothers exemplify everything that is wrong with the Comic industry (I can’t speak on Marvel and DC Comics as I haven’t read them), and are a huge part of my decision to not continue to consume nonliterary comics and manga in the future. I have found most manga and comics to be overtly sexist, misogynistic, unimaginative, and unintelligent garbage. They are the equivalent of a diet of candy and twinkies for the brain. While they may be pleasurable in the moment, once you finally close the book you find yourself hungry and unfulfilled. There are exceptions. I have heard that Neil Gaiman’s Shadowlands series is fantastic and look forward to reading it in the future. I read the comic book adaptation of Gaiman’s American Gods and found it to be an enjoyable read that added depth to the original novel. The Saga series, while over sexual in my opinion, had quite a lot to say about human rights, immigration, and the difficulties that people of color and minorities face in the real world. Neon Genesis Evangelion is a sci fi masterpiece and I quite enjoyed it. Tokyo Ghoul tackles the experience of bisexuality in contemporary Japan through a unique sci fi/fantasy lens. While DeathNote does get tedious the deeper you get, it does explore the philosophy of good and evil in an original, exciting way. And finally, Attack on Titan (which I have watched, but not yet read), quite possibly the most popular manga of all time, offers a bold, fresh take on human nature, while providing an entertaining and thrilling monster story. Unfortunately, I have found these to be the exception, rather than the rule. I imagine it is very difficult to take complex ideas and translate them into a visual format, using only the most constricted word count to communicate what the heck is going on. But this is not an excuse for the reduction of quality seen in most comic books, not to mention the overt misogyny which is inexcusable in 2020. In this comic, the Luna Brothers took an original idea (a symbiotic virus that grants some “lucky” individuals with superhuman powers, while killing the vast majority), left it out on the counter for a month to decay, before haphazardly throwing it together at the last minute, while ignoring anything intelligent that could possibly come out of it. Rather than deliberating on the impact that powers could have on society in any intelligent manner, the Lunas seem content to drastically oversimplify gang violence, while taking every opportunity they can to ogle the protagonist. There is not a shred of self awareness to support any satirical objective on the behalf of the the author or artist, leading me to believe that these two really are as racist and misogynistic as their “art” suggests.

  3. 5 out of 5

    KaitLphere

    A West Side type story with an LGBT and sci-fi spin. There was a texture over the grayscale art that was distracting for me and I lost track of some of the numerous secondary characters. Otherwise, an engaging story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Too wordy, bad story. Sorry my review is just as awful lol. Kinda surprised I gave any of the issues more than one star though tbh. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2 Too wordy, bad story. Sorry my review is just as awful lol. Kinda surprised I gave any of the issues more than one star though tbh. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A deliberately unspecified near-future year, haunted by a pandemic, where facemasks are both ubiquitous and politicised? And the series started last year? Exciting. Prescient. I like it. Except that after that little detail, it starts to fall apart. The oceans have risen, but the setting is also stacked with such default SF impedimenta as proper cybernetics and flying cars. And whereas Sarah Pinsker's A Song For A New Day wowed me by getting detail after detail of the hateful 'new normal' correc A deliberately unspecified near-future year, haunted by a pandemic, where facemasks are both ubiquitous and politicised? And the series started last year? Exciting. Prescient. I like it. Except that after that little detail, it starts to fall apart. The oceans have risen, but the setting is also stacked with such default SF impedimenta as proper cybernetics and flying cars. And whereas Sarah Pinsker's A Song For A New Day wowed me by getting detail after detail of the hateful 'new normal' correct ahead of time, 20XX has that first detail of plague and alienation right, and then calls most everything else wrong, instead leaving most of life unchanged. So despite this being an disease with a survival rate of 1%, instead of the other way around, office work and commuting still seem to be the norm, which now seems crazy. Sometimes, as with the social scenes in bars, the disconnect is positively heartbreaking. Oh, and this plague gives the survivors superpowers. Which inevitably leave them hated and feared by the norms. And from there we're into the usual piffle, another X-Men by way of Romeo & Juliet retread, in which the first pass dialogue sees most of the characters talking either like refugees from a direct-to-streaming action film, or in reheated therapy-speak. "And try not to dwell on what we might have done. That kind of thinking can lead you down a dangerous path – one where you'll do anything for a sense of control. Often the end result is worse – and more out of control – than where you began." That all in one, hardly atypical speech balloon. It's not all bad. Luna's art is still clean and expressive, less prone to stiffness and unconvincing perspective than it used to be – and he draws an excellent cat. There's some nice Sherlock-style stuff with characters receiving emails during scenes, except 20XX adds an extra note of realism by having some of them be totally irrelevant, like a 30% off sale at HandbagDepot. Also, the survivors' powers each give them control over different but specific and limited stuff, ranging from the obvious (wood, metal), to the protagonist's useful, gruesome speciality (soft tissues), to...synthetic fibres? Which we don't see in use in the story, but I'm almost tempted to persevere with the series just in hope of seeing someone trying to be a fearsome posthuman armed only with nylonkinesis. (Edelweiss ARC)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    Since the Luna Brothers stopped working together, I've found myself less and less interested in their work. They seem to pair with unambitious writers whose ideas never quite click. So I crossed my fingers, and picked this one, written by first time comic creator, Lauren Keely. While I agree with some of the reviews that it doesn't *quite* live up to its premise, and the clean cut, greyscale art seems an odd choice for a book that deals with telekenetic gang violence, I did love all of the charac Since the Luna Brothers stopped working together, I've found myself less and less interested in their work. They seem to pair with unambitious writers whose ideas never quite click. So I crossed my fingers, and picked this one, written by first time comic creator, Lauren Keely. While I agree with some of the reviews that it doesn't *quite* live up to its premise, and the clean cut, greyscale art seems an odd choice for a book that deals with telekenetic gang violence, I did love all of the characters, and found myself wanting more of the story. The setup is a world where a massive epidemic hits and the disease has a 99% kill rate, with the rare survivors getting some sort of telekentic powers. Ok. Our protagonist then stumbles into a Gang Incident (not a war, there isn't a war during this volume) that results in her accidentally using her power for the first time. I enjoyed that the gang portion of the book was focused on keeping peace, with the violent members being excommunicated from their respective gangs. I'm hoping it will lead to some even more irregular plot points (for a sci-fi gang book) in future volumes. If you can handle the static grayscale art (it isn't bad by any stretch, but the style isn't for everyone) then you should pick this up. It's got lgbta characters, a lot of dialogue, and interesting turns in the plot. I reccomend it for people who like sci-fi comics but are kind of tired of the same old same old sci-fi comics.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Once more with this month's batch of graphic novels I find a fine idea dealt with poorly. Here we have a society where everyone wears nappies on their face to protect them for an airborne virus. A virus that manages to kill 99% of people, and leaves the survivors a symbiote with the invader, and with psychic abilities. Our heroine could be a great way in to that, what with her new-found abilities, and her potential new girlfriend, and her new love of the sort of Robot Wars-by-telekinesis that ac Once more with this month's batch of graphic novels I find a fine idea dealt with poorly. Here we have a society where everyone wears nappies on their face to protect them for an airborne virus. A virus that manages to kill 99% of people, and leaves the survivors a symbiote with the invader, and with psychic abilities. Our heroine could be a great way in to that, what with her new-found abilities, and her potential new girlfriend, and her new love of the sort of Robot Wars-by-telekinesis that acts as a sport, but no – we get gangs biffing each other up about drugs, and an errant cousin. Yawn. I suppose I have to make it clear I'd have disliked that side of things even without the coronasniffle parallels, but with so much of this being 2020 and not just 20XX, it does perhaps feel an even greater missed opportunity. The sparse, clear design of the art also seems to go against the crime aspects of the book, and feels counter-intuitively quiet in comparison with all the machinations of the gangs.

  8. 4 out of 5

    The Lost Dreamer

    This might be the kind of book that you keep reading just because it constantly feels like it's on the verge of delivering something thrilling or, at least, interesting, but never quite does. In the end, it's not too bad, but also never too good. The whole worldbuilding is ok, with an intriguing disease that can cause some original superpowers. But the extent of such a situation isn't explored beyond the gang guerrilla that, quite frankly, is quite tasteless. The protagonist is fine as well, alt This might be the kind of book that you keep reading just because it constantly feels like it's on the verge of delivering something thrilling or, at least, interesting, but never quite does. In the end, it's not too bad, but also never too good. The whole worldbuilding is ok, with an intriguing disease that can cause some original superpowers. But the extent of such a situation isn't explored beyond the gang guerrilla that, quite frankly, is quite tasteless. The protagonist is fine as well, although I didn't even feel any particular interest in her. She's a little bit lame, takes stupid decisions and is absurdly attached to a cousin that she knows nothing about. Some of the secondary characters might be interesting, but their plots are all buried by the gang war, and they don't seem to have any particular agenda. The relationships between them lack any passion or depth. Everything is just fine. The art is a little bit more attractive. Lots of interesting details hidden in what seems to be a minimalistic page, and a well developed visual style for the dystopic world. But it's not enough. In the end, there is way too much text for such a simple plot. It's like the intentions are good, but no one in this team really bothered to deliver something special.

  9. 5 out of 5

    -RadioactiveBookworm-

    You know how I feel about books about people with powers, and if you don't here's a reminder. I love them most of the time! Especially when there's something relatable to our own world it. And that's why I loved this book. Super relatable even now in the midst of a lockdown, the future world that Mer lives in is not only filled with some really interesting tech, but one with a virus that kills most of the people that catch it. If you can live through it, however, you're really a changed person, You know how I feel about books about people with powers, and if you don't here's a reminder. I love them most of the time! Especially when there's something relatable to our own world it. And that's why I loved this book. Super relatable even now in the midst of a lockdown, the future world that Mer lives in is not only filled with some really interesting tech, but one with a virus that kills most of the people that catch it. If you can live through it, however, you're really a changed person, quite literally. You have powers, but you're also completely segregated from the people without. But you're immune from catching it again. Check out my full review here! https://radioactivebookreviews.wordpr...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Poley

    This starts like a COVID-era take on mutants. Survivors of a deadly virus develop unknown mutant powers and are forced to the edges of society. Part of this feels like it was written in the 90s but staged in an 80s post-apocalypse – we've got a gang war between the East side and West side mutants, people have bizarre powers, and no one is looking for a cure. This was a pretty random discovery for me – I'd enjoyed Jonathan Luna's Girls last year and had just added him to the invisible list I keep This starts like a COVID-era take on mutants. Survivors of a deadly virus develop unknown mutant powers and are forced to the edges of society. Part of this feels like it was written in the 90s but staged in an 80s post-apocalypse – we've got a gang war between the East side and West side mutants, people have bizarre powers, and no one is looking for a cure. This was a pretty random discovery for me – I'd enjoyed Jonathan Luna's Girls last year and had just added him to the invisible list I keep of creators to follow up on. Luna's work is good, but there's an indy vibe that keeps me engaged, an unsettled feeling that the stories are being told by people who are making things up as they go along.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Good and relevant comic series about a virus and its after-effects. This series (Volume 1 - more to follow) deals with a virus which either kills or gives powers to those who survive. It deals with this isolated and alienated part of society, divided into gangs. Mer has ot learn how to adapt to this new world and this leads to bloodshed and death. Ending on a bit of a cliff-hanger, it's a good series although the artwork, although clear and monochrome, doesn't deal with facial expressions at all Good and relevant comic series about a virus and its after-effects. This series (Volume 1 - more to follow) deals with a virus which either kills or gives powers to those who survive. It deals with this isolated and alienated part of society, divided into gangs. Mer has ot learn how to adapt to this new world and this leads to bloodshed and death. Ending on a bit of a cliff-hanger, it's a good series although the artwork, although clear and monochrome, doesn't deal with facial expressions at all (deliberately?). I enjoyed it and will probably read more when it comes out. I received a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Review written for potential professional publication for Diamond Bookshelf.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelly K

    2.5 stars Loved the first issue but after that it was just ok. I was a bit more interested in learning more about what was happening in the world as a whole than just the main character.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Janine Roos

    DNF at about 50% A pretty awesome concept, but nothing actually happens, I don't like the art at all, and there is way too much talking that doesn't add anything to the story. DNF at about 50% A pretty awesome concept, but nothing actually happens, I don't like the art at all, and there is way too much talking that doesn't add anything to the story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Hogmire

  16. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  18. 4 out of 5

    William

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  20. 5 out of 5

    mariam reads

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joel

  22. 5 out of 5

    J.R.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Imogene

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  25. 5 out of 5

    Yanni

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Brewer-Berres

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Schoen-McCullough

  29. 4 out of 5

    Larry

  30. 4 out of 5

    Devon Munn

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