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A Princess of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the first of his famous Barsoom series. It is also Burroughs' first novel, predating his Tarzan stories. He wrote it between July and September 28, 1911, going through four working titles; initially, he was going to call it My First Adventure on Mars, then The Green Martians, Dejah Thoris, Martian Princes A Princess of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the first of his famous Barsoom series. It is also Burroughs' first novel, predating his Tarzan stories. He wrote it between July and September 28, 1911, going through four working titles; initially, he was going to call it My First Adventure on Mars, then The Green Martians, Dejah Thoris, Martian Princess, and finally Under the Moons of Mars.The finished story was first published under the last of these titles in All-Story as a six-part serial in the issues for February-July 1912. For the serial publication, the author's name was given as "Norman Bean"; Burroughs had chosen the pseudonym of "Normal Bean" as a type of pun stressing that he was in his right mind, being concerned he might suffer ridicule for writing such a fantastic story. The effect was spoiled when a typesetter changed "Normal" to "Norman" on the assumption that the former was a typographical error. The story was later published as a complete novel under the present title by A. C. McClurg in October 1917.Full of swordplay and daring feats, the story is considered a classic example of 20th century pulp fiction.


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A Princess of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the first of his famous Barsoom series. It is also Burroughs' first novel, predating his Tarzan stories. He wrote it between July and September 28, 1911, going through four working titles; initially, he was going to call it My First Adventure on Mars, then The Green Martians, Dejah Thoris, Martian Princes A Princess of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the first of his famous Barsoom series. It is also Burroughs' first novel, predating his Tarzan stories. He wrote it between July and September 28, 1911, going through four working titles; initially, he was going to call it My First Adventure on Mars, then The Green Martians, Dejah Thoris, Martian Princess, and finally Under the Moons of Mars.The finished story was first published under the last of these titles in All-Story as a six-part serial in the issues for February-July 1912. For the serial publication, the author's name was given as "Norman Bean"; Burroughs had chosen the pseudonym of "Normal Bean" as a type of pun stressing that he was in his right mind, being concerned he might suffer ridicule for writing such a fantastic story. The effect was spoiled when a typesetter changed "Normal" to "Norman" on the assumption that the former was a typographical error. The story was later published as a complete novel under the present title by A. C. McClurg in October 1917.Full of swordplay and daring feats, the story is considered a classic example of 20th century pulp fiction.

30 review for John Carter and the Giant of Mars, Limited Edition: Best books For Readers (Annotated by Edgar Rice burroughs.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ailish

    After reading the rest of the series, this is dreadfully disappointing. The characters and some elements of the plot are familiar, but it seems to have been written by ERB's son. The text reads like it was written to accompany a graphic novel or comic. The best thing about it is its brevity. After reading the rest of the series, this is dreadfully disappointing. The characters and some elements of the plot are familiar, but it seems to have been written by ERB's son. The text reads like it was written to accompany a graphic novel or comic. The best thing about it is its brevity.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Michael Gallen

    In this novella of Barsoom, which is third-person unlike most other stories in the franchise, Warlord John Carter and his wife Dejah Thoris are riding on a thoat in the forest, where the minions of a mad scientist named Pew Mogel kidnaps the latter. Carter thus sends a fleet to find his consort, finding that she is held in a deserted city on the banks of the dead sea at Korvas. The Warlord soon finds a prominent adversary, the titular giant, named Joog, whom he seeks to evade, fighting giant rat In this novella of Barsoom, which is third-person unlike most other stories in the franchise, Warlord John Carter and his wife Dejah Thoris are riding on a thoat in the forest, where the minions of a mad scientist named Pew Mogel kidnaps the latter. Carter thus sends a fleet to find his consort, finding that she is held in a deserted city on the banks of the dead sea at Korvas. The Warlord soon finds a prominent adversary, the titular giant, named Joog, whom he seeks to evade, fighting giant rats along the way. John Cater ultimately encounters Joog’s creator, Pew Mogel, who plots to transfer his brain to a younger body, being a synthetic man, and a pupil of Ras Thavas. Mogel unleashes malagors, with Carter afterward rescuing his wife from drowning in a cage. Helium’s forces come to fight Mogel’s, with several chapters narrating the battle that concludes the story, which is very much on par with its longer predecessors in the Barsoom series, if a bit derivative, and somewhat questionable in terms of nomenclature, particularly the name Pew and Helium.

  3. 5 out of 5

    jim miller

    I really enjoyed this book. The continuing love that John Carter has for Barsoom and Deja Thoris is confirmed in this book. His earthly power is displayed. Mr. Burrough's Son is a chip off the Old block. I am trying to read all of the Burroughs books. A few more to go. I really enjoyed this book. The continuing love that John Carter has for Barsoom and Deja Thoris is confirmed in this book. His earthly power is displayed. Mr. Burrough's Son is a chip off the Old block. I am trying to read all of the Burroughs books. A few more to go.

  4. 4 out of 5

    joseph anthony lumb brook

    I like Edgar rice Burroughs mars books but you could tell it was written by someone else (his son I believe)in a similar style so it was not quite up to his standard but it was readable so if you like the mars books you can read this too

  5. 4 out of 5

    John

    Written by Burroughs' son, this novel is god-awful. Apparently, it started out as a children's book; all I know is it reads like a bad '80s cartoon. It might make an OK bedtime story for your six-year-old, but that's about it. Plus, it's largely inconsistent with the rest of the John Carter series. Written by Burroughs' son, this novel is god-awful. Apparently, it started out as a children's book; all I know is it reads like a bad '80s cartoon. It might make an OK bedtime story for your six-year-old, but that's about it. Plus, it's largely inconsistent with the rest of the John Carter series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    More of a sketch than a fully developed novel.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Classic Burroughs

  8. 4 out of 5

    Allen Perry

    Not the best of the series but certainly not the worst either. Worth reading to complete the series at least.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cameron James

    This is the first of two stories that collectively make the book “John Carter of Mars,” the second of which I will be reading in the next month or two. John Carter and the Giant of Mars was really a chore to get through. Perhaps it’s because it’s written by his son and not Edgar himself, or perhaps its because my skimming of background information says this is meant for young readers… I don’t know. All I know is that this book is quite a slog to get through. The entire book is done in a telling r This is the first of two stories that collectively make the book “John Carter of Mars,” the second of which I will be reading in the next month or two. John Carter and the Giant of Mars was really a chore to get through. Perhaps it’s because it’s written by his son and not Edgar himself, or perhaps its because my skimming of background information says this is meant for young readers… I don’t know. All I know is that this book is quite a slog to get through. The entire book is done in a telling rather than showing narrative. (So, Burroughs tells us what the characters are doing, rather than showing us.) And the story is riddled with passive voice. If anything, it reads more like a lengthy summary of a novel, rather than an actual novel. Read the rest of my review at my blog: http://camerondjames.wordpress.com/20...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robert Lent

    It read like it was written by someone not really familiar with Barsoom. It's worth reading if you're a Barsoom fan, but only if you really liked the other books and just want a little more. There's one point in the books where the Jeddak of Helium summons Tars Tarkas. One does not summon Tars Tarkas. One requests his presence. The story did get better after the first quarter of the book. This book uses a lot of terminology different from the other books. For one, it calls the flyers Helium's ai It read like it was written by someone not really familiar with Barsoom. It's worth reading if you're a Barsoom fan, but only if you really liked the other books and just want a little more. There's one point in the books where the Jeddak of Helium summons Tars Tarkas. One does not summon Tars Tarkas. One requests his presence. The story did get better after the first quarter of the book. This book uses a lot of terminology different from the other books. For one, it calls the flyers Helium's air force, rather than Helium's navy, and the their flying craft are called planes rather than flyers as in the other books. It's just part of the style differences that I found rather off-putting. As a Barsoom fan, I don't regret reading it, but it is flawed.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jesse VanDeWalker

    A juvenile tale of Barsoom written by ERB's son, this short piece has all the requisite parts of a John Carter story but missing some crucial element. It's a story that likely wouldn't do well with today's youth for though the protagonist is possessed of powers beyond that of normal people, he isn't crippled by angst. Yet, that isn't the crucial missing element. In other Barsoom stories, the heroes are under some kind of threat or in perceivable danger, manufactured or not. Even in the clutches A juvenile tale of Barsoom written by ERB's son, this short piece has all the requisite parts of a John Carter story but missing some crucial element. It's a story that likely wouldn't do well with today's youth for though the protagonist is possessed of powers beyond that of normal people, he isn't crippled by angst. Yet, that isn't the crucial missing element. In other Barsoom stories, the heroes are under some kind of threat or in perceivable danger, manufactured or not. Even in the clutches of the giant Joog, the reader is never really in doubt of John Carter's supremacy and eventual victory.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    This enjoyable short novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs is easily obtainable in "Amazing Stories Fact and Science Fiction: Giant 35 Anniversary Issue". It has been well formatted for Kindle and other e-readers. "John Carter and the Giant of Mars" is a stand alone piece which has all the entertainment one finds in the rest of the series. There's lots of action and even a bit of humour in the story. Fans of the Barsoom series will want to get this and in this edition they will get a number of other enj This enjoyable short novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs is easily obtainable in "Amazing Stories Fact and Science Fiction: Giant 35 Anniversary Issue". It has been well formatted for Kindle and other e-readers. "John Carter and the Giant of Mars" is a stand alone piece which has all the entertainment one finds in the rest of the series. There's lots of action and even a bit of humour in the story. Fans of the Barsoom series will want to get this and in this edition they will get a number of other enjoyable works that appeared in "Amazing Srories".

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eduard Alexandru

    It was still good but here Dejah Thoris is portrayed more like a scared and powerless little damsel in distress, way different the the first book .. to me this was a little disappointing. Also, the story is narrated from a 3rd person's view which took me by surprise because the adventures in the first book were told by Jon Carter himself. I found that the storytelling in this book was laking flavor. It was still good but here Dejah Thoris is portrayed more like a scared and powerless little damsel in distress, way different the the first book .. to me this was a little disappointing. Also, the story is narrated from a 3rd person's view which took me by surprise because the adventures in the first book were told by Jon Carter himself. I found that the storytelling in this book was laking flavor.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Walker

    Typical John Carter Great series by Edgar Rice Burroughs. I first read John Carter of Mars when I was stationed overseas. I read John Carter of Mars and I was hooked. The series is a real page turner and hard to but down or find a place to stop. Even though this book was not written ERB it was written in his style. To anyone who likes Pulp Fiction I would highly recommend this book and I hope to see more from this author.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm

    It's hard to believe that ERB wrote this book. Other than the names of the main characters, it has little in common with any of the other Barsoom books. It is really, really awful, even more so if you are a fan of the other mars books. If I could give it zero I would. It's hard to believe that ERB wrote this book. Other than the names of the main characters, it has little in common with any of the other Barsoom books. It is really, really awful, even more so if you are a fan of the other mars books. If I could give it zero I would.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ajay Mangal

    Adventures of Legendary John Carter. Legendary beauty of Dejah Thoris, portrayal of a woman character, worth every adventure and worth dyeing for. Keeps you waiting for more. For those who love adventures. Great read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    terrible. utterly infantile and atrocious

  18. 4 out of 5

    SR

    Mediocre.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sergey

    Рассказ уровня школьного спектакля написанный сыном Эдрага Берроуза..

  20. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Really fun book! Need to already be familiar with the Barsoom -Mars- series to read it.So fun!

  21. 5 out of 5

    ricky

    Very good I love how inventive the author was in his creations based on the knowledge they had at the time of writing. Good old simple adventure that I thoroughly enjoyed.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christie Owens

    I brought a 1940 copy of this home from my grandmother's bookshelf. This copy is only 4x3", from The Little Book series. Fun little read. I brought a 1940 copy of this home from my grandmother's bookshelf. This copy is only 4x3", from The Little Book series. Fun little read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wyatt

  24. 5 out of 5

    Todd Campbell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gerald Creasy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Olga Frias

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  29. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  30. 5 out of 5

    Francis

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