counter create hit The Ghosts of Sherwood - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Ghosts of Sherwood

Availability: Ready to download

Carrie Vaughn's The Ghosts of Sherwood revisits the Robin Hood legend with a story of the famed archer's children. Everything about Father is stories. Robin of Locksley and his one true love, Marian, are married. It has been close on two decades since they beat the Sheriff of Nottingham with the help of a diverse band of talented friends. King John is now on the thro Carrie Vaughn's The Ghosts of Sherwood revisits the Robin Hood legend with a story of the famed archer's children. Everything about Father is stories. Robin of Locksley and his one true love, Marian, are married. It has been close on two decades since they beat the Sheriff of Nottingham with the help of a diverse band of talented friends. King John is now on the throne, and Robin has sworn fealty in order to further protect not just his family, but those of the lords and barons who look up to him – and, by extension, the villagers they protect. There is a truce. An uneasy one, to be sure, but a truce, nonetheless.But when the Locksley children are stolen away by persons unknown, Robin and Marian are going to need the help of everyone they’ve ever known, perhaps even the ghosts that are said to reside deep within Sherwood.And the Locksley children, despite appearances to the contrary, are not without tricks of their own…At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.


Compare
Ads Banner

Carrie Vaughn's The Ghosts of Sherwood revisits the Robin Hood legend with a story of the famed archer's children. Everything about Father is stories. Robin of Locksley and his one true love, Marian, are married. It has been close on two decades since they beat the Sheriff of Nottingham with the help of a diverse band of talented friends. King John is now on the thro Carrie Vaughn's The Ghosts of Sherwood revisits the Robin Hood legend with a story of the famed archer's children. Everything about Father is stories. Robin of Locksley and his one true love, Marian, are married. It has been close on two decades since they beat the Sheriff of Nottingham with the help of a diverse band of talented friends. King John is now on the throne, and Robin has sworn fealty in order to further protect not just his family, but those of the lords and barons who look up to him – and, by extension, the villagers they protect. There is a truce. An uneasy one, to be sure, but a truce, nonetheless.But when the Locksley children are stolen away by persons unknown, Robin and Marian are going to need the help of everyone they’ve ever known, perhaps even the ghosts that are said to reside deep within Sherwood.And the Locksley children, despite appearances to the contrary, are not without tricks of their own…At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

30 review for The Ghosts of Sherwood

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Robin Hood and Marian, 16 years later! Plus three kids. (They got busy!) Add kidnappers (who are maybe in a little over their heads). Review first posted on Fantasy Literature: In The Ghosts of Sherwood, the first of Carrie Vaughn’s two recent Robin Hood novellas, Vaughn revisits the lives of Robin of Locksley and Marian, some eighteen or twenty years after King Richard the Lionheart typically brings about the end of Robin Hood’s merrie (and highly illegal) adventures in Sherwood Forest. King Joh Robin Hood and Marian, 16 years later! Plus three kids. (They got busy!) Add kidnappers (who are maybe in a little over their heads). Review first posted on Fantasy Literature: In The Ghosts of Sherwood, the first of Carrie Vaughn’s two recent Robin Hood novellas, Vaughn revisits the lives of Robin of Locksley and Marian, some eighteen or twenty years after King Richard the Lionheart typically brings about the end of Robin Hood’s merrie (and highly illegal) adventures in Sherwood Forest. King John, for better or worse, has held the throne of England for many years now, and Robin and other barons have successfully pressed for the legal reforms that led to the signing of the Magna Carta. There are divisions between the nobles, however, and Robin of Locksley still has many enemies. After an absence of many months, Robin and Marian are returning home to their three children: Mary, about age sixteen and a gifted archer; John, a few years younger, and Eleanor, about age nine, who is mute. The family is delighted to be reunited, though Mary and John have a habit of spatting and Marian is annoyed with Robin for arranging a marriage for Mary without consulting either her or Mary first, though Robin protests that he won’t force Mary’s hand. But the dust hasn’t even had time to settle before the three Locksley children are kidnapped. The Ghosts of Sherwood is a light, quick read that captures the adventurous spirit of the classic Robin Hood tales, while adding some depth to the characters. Vaughn writes primarily from Marian’s and her daughter Mary’s points of view, splitting her time fairly equally between the two generations. She delves into the hearts of her characters, bringing them to life as they interact with each other and deal with the concerns of life in early thirteenth century England, and with the changes and new priorities that age and experience and family life bring.Twenty years ago Robin would have taken up the bow and shot the man’s cap off. Marian felt him tense beside her. Gathering up his civility like scattered coins. For a moment, she had no idea what he was going to do.The Ghosts of Sherwood is similar in style to Robin McKinley’s 1988 novel The Outlaws of Sherwood, if rather less harrowing in the climactic scene. In her blog, Vaughn comments: “it’s fun. It’s light. Robin and Marian get to keep their happy ending, they love and support their children. It’s about friends and family and standing together against the world … No matter how dark things get, Robin still has hope and still fights.” That sense of hopefulness and togetherness permeate the pages of this novella. It’s escapist, but it also suggests that loyalty, courage and love go a long way toward combatting the evils of this world. The Ghosts of Sherwood is over too soon: it feels more like the first several chapters of a longer work, than a stand-alone novella. And in fact, Vaughn has just published a second book in this ROBIN HOOD STORIES series, The Heirs of Locksley, which I dove into immediately upon finishing this one. Hopefully there will be more Locksley family stories to come! 3.5 stars. Thanks to Tor for the ARC!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨

    THE CHILDREN OF ROBIN HOOD HAVE HIS GUMPTION This short novella takes us back to Sherwood, only this time Robin Hood and the Merry Men aren't our heroes - his children are. Mary, John and Eleanor. I am happy ro report that even though they grew up as noble children, they still have their father's mischievous spark. That was probably my favourite part of this book. 👍 WHAT I LIKED 👍 The children: I really liked how Robin's three children are the center of this book. I liked seeing how they worked to THE CHILDREN OF ROBIN HOOD HAVE HIS GUMPTION This short novella takes us back to Sherwood, only this time Robin Hood and the Merry Men aren't our heroes - his children are. Mary, John and Eleanor. I am happy ro report that even though they grew up as noble children, they still have their father's mischievous spark. That was probably my favourite part of this book. 👍 WHAT I LIKED 👍 The children: I really liked how Robin's three children are the center of this book. I liked seeing how they worked together to get out of a sticky situation. And I liked how they seemed to have gotten all the best parts of their father. Robin: Seeing Robin as a protective father was exactly what I didn't know I needed. 👎 WHAT I DISLIKED 👎 Length: This had the potential to be so much more than just a novella. I could have been an epic novel. As it was, it just felt rushed and shallow. Which is really, really sad, because all the right ingredients were there. ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review Follow me for more book loving content! Blog ✨ Facebook ✨ Instagram ✨ Twitter Blog Post: 9 'You Are not Alone' Books with Isolated Characters

  3. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    The only real problem with this novella is that it is too short! I loved that this story was dedicated to Errol and Olivia; as corny as that film is, it was a formative event of my childhood. The Ghosts of Sherwood is a dense little story giving us a glimpse into what the midlife lives of Robin and Marian have become, and introducing their three children, Mary, John, and Eleanor. Watching events play out, it's clear these children have inherited some smarts and skills from their parents. A ton of The only real problem with this novella is that it is too short! I loved that this story was dedicated to Errol and Olivia; as corny as that film is, it was a formative event of my childhood. The Ghosts of Sherwood is a dense little story giving us a glimpse into what the midlife lives of Robin and Marian have become, and introducing their three children, Mary, John, and Eleanor. Watching events play out, it's clear these children have inherited some smarts and skills from their parents. A ton of potential is hinted at by this short, introductory-feeling novella, which leaves me excited for the next installment due in August (The Heirs of Locksley). I hope this becomes a longer series. Bottom line: you should definitely read this if you are a fan of Robin Hood stories.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Beth Cato

    I received an advance copy of this book via NetGalley. The Ghosts of Sherwood is a fast, thoroughly enjoyable read that picks up on the adventures of an older Robin and Marian and their three children. I expected it to be novel-length and was surprised (but not unpleasantly so) to find it was a novella. This is only fantasy in that it re-imagines their lives. It's not a deep, heavily-researched historical fiction piece, either, but one very accessible to anyone familiar with the Robin Hood Legend I received an advance copy of this book via NetGalley. The Ghosts of Sherwood is a fast, thoroughly enjoyable read that picks up on the adventures of an older Robin and Marian and their three children. I expected it to be novel-length and was surprised (but not unpleasantly so) to find it was a novella. This is only fantasy in that it re-imagines their lives. It's not a deep, heavily-researched historical fiction piece, either, but one very accessible to anyone familiar with the Robin Hood Legend. For me, the stars of the story were the children. The eldest, Mary, is a smart teenage girl. When she and her siblings are captured by enemies of her father, they must use their wits to stay alive and well as their parents come to the rescue. The youngest child, Eleanor, is depicted as autistic. As the parent of an autistic child, I loved seeing a realistic portrayal, especially within a loving, supportive family. I'm glad this is listed on book sites as Robin Hood Stories #1, because I would love to read more of Vaughn's take on the famous family.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yogaa Lakshmi

    It is a really quick read (112 pages I think) but is thrilling and action packed nonetheless. I found this book really interesting. I just don't know what genre to categorise it in because of everything (and that's why I love it). In short, it is a must-read book and I totally recommend it to everybody. I thank NetGalley and the publisher for providing me this amazing read

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (he/him/his)

    I received an ARC from Tor.com in exchange for an honest review! Short book, so a short review. This one is really quick to read. I think I read it in about an hour, but I could have read it faster. It's years after Robin Hood defied King John and, now, he has to make nice with him as he's the new king with Richard I dead. That leaves his children at their home. Things happen and they need rescuing. Overall, this was a cute little book. The only thing is that I wanted more of it. I wanted it to be I received an ARC from Tor.com in exchange for an honest review! Short book, so a short review. This one is really quick to read. I think I read it in about an hour, but I could have read it faster. It's years after Robin Hood defied King John and, now, he has to make nice with him as he's the new king with Richard I dead. That leaves his children at their home. Things happen and they need rescuing. Overall, this was a cute little book. The only thing is that I wanted more of it. I wanted it to be longer so I could feel more of the characterizations and plot. However, it was still good! I just wanted a bit more to it so I could get a feel for Vaughn's vision of this world. Good thing there's a second book, though!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    Review My only complaint about The Ghosts of Sherwood is that it was far too short. I didn’t realize when I began reading it that it was essentially a novella- otherwise I probably would have slowed down my reading so I could have enjoyed it for longer. As it was, I ended up reading it in just one sitting because it’s only a little over 100 pages. Despite its short length, though, it still managed to fully set the scene and develop the characters, aided by the fact that many of the characters Review My only complaint about The Ghosts of Sherwood is that it was far too short. I didn’t realize when I began reading it that it was essentially a novella- otherwise I probably would have slowed down my reading so I could have enjoyed it for longer. As it was, I ended up reading it in just one sitting because it’s only a little over 100 pages. Despite its short length, though, it still managed to fully set the scene and develop the characters, aided by the fact that many of the characters were ones most readers will already know well. I felt fully transported to Sherwood Forest, almost as if I were there following along with the familiar and new characters alike. Reading about Robin’s children carrying on his legacy within Sherwood Forest was a fascinating spin on the legends of one of the most famous literary outlaws. No longer fighting injustices, Robin Hood & Co. are simply trying to enjoy a life of relative solitude on their land with their loved ones. However, that tranquility soon becomes jeopardized because, well, this is a story about Robin Hood after all. Final Thoughts Robin Hood, Maid Marian, and the Merry Men are well known and loved fictional icons so it was a delight to be able to read a story that posed, “Okay, but what happened afterward?” Set several years after the events most of us are familiar with, the story focused on Robin and Marian’s precocious children. This was a charming read that all fans of Robin Hood should pick up for a bit of a getaway to Sherwood Forest. Read my full review on my blog! Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for a copy of this in exchange for a review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen)

    A huge thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a free ecopy of this book in exchange for an honest review! 4,5/5 The Ghosts of Sherwood is a lovely little book set after the legend of Robin Hood. He and Marian have settled down, had three kids, and do their best to still make things fairer for everyone. This book follows the POVs of Marian and Mary, their eldest daughter. Its focus on the women is a wonderful breath of fresh air to this legend I adore. Also, reading about Sher A huge thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a free ecopy of this book in exchange for an honest review! 4,5/5 The Ghosts of Sherwood is a lovely little book set after the legend of Robin Hood. He and Marian have settled down, had three kids, and do their best to still make things fairer for everyone. This book follows the POVs of Marian and Mary, their eldest daughter. Its focus on the women is a wonderful breath of fresh air to this legend I adore. Also, reading about Sherwood Forest makes me want to go back asap; it's just so gorgeous there! The book starts a bit slow, and it's not until the halfway point the kidnapping the synopsis promises occurs. Given the book's size, however, halfway is not very far off. The pacing is nice and comfortable, and lets you get to know these (new) characters before expecting you to care for them. Mary is not ready to be a grown up, to be married, and she much prefers being alone in Sherwood Forest. Her younger brother John was probably the least fleshed out character. Their younger sister Eleanor is an instant favorite, however! I absolutely adore this 8 year old's spirit and bravery! I cannot wait to see more of her. Marian, while clearly a mother, is still the same woman at heart that we've come to know and love. Her spirit has not diminished, and she is still as fierce as ever. Besides the main story, it was so wonderful to see so many of my beloved characters again, and honestly, when Much was mentioned I was over the moon! He gets ignored so often, and he is one of my favorites. Seeing Robin all responsible, though, took some getting used to, but a fox never loses its cunning. The book starts with him and Marian away to meet the King, after Robin rebelled with several barons to ensure safety of people's lands. He may be older now, a father, and more responsible, but he's Robin Hood still as well as Robin of Locksley! Four and a half stars because of the book's length. I'm sure there's a reason for it, but I feel that with just a bit more pages the characters and stories could have been fleshed out just a little better, so I would have gotten involved on their own merits, and not on their parents'. Cannot wait for the next one of this new series!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Received to review via Netgalley; publication date 9th June 2020 I was eager to snap this up when I saw it on Netgalley, because Robin Hood stories are kind of a Thing for me. I did a module on Robin Hood stories during my BA, wrote a handful of my essays about it, and have always rather enjoyed Robin Hood stories. (Starting in childhood with Enid Blyton’s Tales of Daring Adventure, which is the only book handed down from both my parents. I believe I still have both their copies, with Dad’s in a Received to review via Netgalley; publication date 9th June 2020 I was eager to snap this up when I saw it on Netgalley, because Robin Hood stories are kind of a Thing for me. I did a module on Robin Hood stories during my BA, wrote a handful of my essays about it, and have always rather enjoyed Robin Hood stories. (Starting in childhood with Enid Blyton’s Tales of Daring Adventure, which is the only book handed down from both my parents. I believe I still have both their copies, with Dad’s in a better state and retaining its dustcover. I have also frequently heard the stories of my mother as a child deeply concerning her parents by sobbing inconsolably over the death of Robin Hood.) So, this fairly gentle story fits right into that warm and cosy spot in my heart. Robin and Marian are married and respectable, with three children; it’s sort of inserted into real history, with King John signing the Magna Carta in part because of Robin’s insistence and William Marshall showing up to say hi. The story also tries for realism in discussing their relationship, Marian’s pregnancies, the way they fit into the world. At the start of the novella, they’re returning from London, with Robin having decided that their eldest daughter will marry — and Marian isn’t happy. It carries on in this rather domestic way, until the children are kidnapped by a band of men… and a much-missed friend, long absent from Robin’s circle after his first decision to respect King John’s succession to the throne, witnesses the kidnapping and rushes to Robin for help. Things move a lot faster at that point, and from the blurb it feels like that’s meant to be the centre of the story. It doesn’t feel like it, though, and I was surprised to learn there’s meant to be another linked book. I was happier with it as a sort of coda to the Robin Hood story; as the introduction to something more, it actually feels lacking for me, because I didn’t connect to the original characters in that way. I thought it was about Robin’s group, his relationship with Marian, and how an outlaw steps out of legend and becomes part of the world. I’m less interested in reading for the kids — I just liked seeing the old gang come back together.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    This is a very fast-reading novella featuring the next generation of Locksleys (or Hoods?), and their adventures in the familiar Sherwood Forest. John has assumed the throne and while there's peace in England, it's an uneasy one and the alliances and treaties are tenuous. The three children of Robin and Marian become pawns and prove their worth for the legacy. It's a very enjoyable story, much more Errol Flynn than Kevin Costner. Many characters from the original legends make an appearance, and This is a very fast-reading novella featuring the next generation of Locksleys (or Hoods?), and their adventures in the familiar Sherwood Forest. John has assumed the throne and while there's peace in England, it's an uneasy one and the alliances and treaties are tenuous. The three children of Robin and Marian become pawns and prove their worth for the legacy. It's a very enjoyable story, much more Errol Flynn than Kevin Costner. Many characters from the original legends make an appearance, and Vaughn does a terrific job of defining characters with brevity. I had the opportunity to spend a couple of days in the area of the story a couple of years ago on vacation (it was -cold- there... in -July-!), and very much enjoyed this story allowing me to remember the sights. I'm anxious to get ahold of the second novella in the set now.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bea

    Not bad, though I did doze off while listening. Nice to see the next generation.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abbie | epochnovels

    A short and sweet novella about life after the legend. "Robin of Locksley and his one true love, Marian, are married. It has been close on two decades since they beat the Sheriff of Nottingham with the help of a diverse band of talented friends. King John is now on the throne, and Robin has sworn fealty in order to further protect not just his family, but those of the lords and barons who look up to him – and, by extension, the villagers they protect. There is a truce. An uneasy one, to be sure, b A short and sweet novella about life after the legend. "Robin of Locksley and his one true love, Marian, are married. It has been close on two decades since they beat the Sheriff of Nottingham with the help of a diverse band of talented friends. King John is now on the throne, and Robin has sworn fealty in order to further protect not just his family, but those of the lords and barons who look up to him – and, by extension, the villagers they protect. There is a truce. An uneasy one, to be sure, but a truce, nonetheless. But when the Locksley children are stolen away by persons unknown, Robin and Marian are going to need the help of everyone they’ve ever known, perhaps even the ghosts that are said to reside deep within Sherwood. And the Locksley children, despite appearances to the contrary, are not without tricks of their own..." This was super fun! It read like a fairytale, and not only did I love seeing the interactions between the Locksley children, but of course, the interactions between Robin, Marian, and the classic Merry Men gang. "'Do you know where the children are?' Marian asked softly. 'The children you took?' His attention caught, he gazed on her, and his look of wonder turned to anguish. 'Oh Holy Mary in Heaven forgive me, please forgive me, I didn't know!' He clasped his hands in prayer, his whole body shaking. 'Well, that's something,' Robin said, baffled." The descriptions of the nature surrounding the Locksley manor (especially Sherwood forest) completely drew me in, as well. I loved the dynamics between Mary, John, and Eleanor. The writing definitely reminded me of reading a classic legend or folk tale. Though it was short, it was a nice little adventure filled with heart! Big thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for sending me this ARC!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Wolf

    A short, fun adventure starring Robin Hood and Marian's children. I'm looking forward to part 2, coming later this summer!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hobart

    This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- “Can you tell how the mood is from here? How the journey went?” “I won’t know how it went until I see Father’s face,” she said. “And see if he smiles or frowns?” “No. And see if his smile is glad or wicked.” Her father would be smiling in any case. That right there? That's the line that sold me, I love that take on Robin Hood—between screen and print, all you can find lately is earnest, serious, Robin Hood as populist rebel with almost all th This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- “Can you tell how the mood is from here? How the journey went?” “I won’t know how it went until I see Father’s face,” she said. “And see if he smiles or frowns?” “No. And see if his smile is glad or wicked.” Her father would be smiling in any case. That right there? That's the line that sold me, I love that take on Robin Hood—between screen and print, all you can find lately is earnest, serious, Robin Hood as populist rebel with almost all the fun sucked out of it. Vaughn's Locksley contains those elements, sure—but he's also the outlaw in search of adventure, who enjoyed what he was doing. Always smiling--it's just a matter of what kind of smile he wore. We rejoin the Earl after the signing of the Magna Carta (which he was instrumental in getting that rascal King John to sign). He's had to do the unthinkable—bowing the knee to John after Richard's death—in order to protect his lands, his friends, and his wife. With Marian's help to contain his impulses*, he's become a responsible member of the nobility, doting father, and law abiding citizen. * To be fair, Marian misses the adventures, too. But she's not at that stage in her life anymore. All that other stuff? Well, he's content to leave that to the bards and storytellers. So much so that his own children aren't sure how much to believe, "Everything about Father is stories." At least, that's what his eldest daughter, Mary, says. But after she and her siblings are kidnapped, they'll all get a better idea just what their father is capable of. That's all I'm going to say about that. This is very much a "pilot episode" of a novella. We meet the kids—Mary, John, and Eleanor—catch up with a couple of the Merry Men, see where Robin and Marian are in their lives and so on. Vaughn balances that with the kidnapping story. The kidnapping is a quick and almost-too-neat story solely because of the space she has to tell it. If Vaughn hadn't had to establish so much in these 112 pages, you get the feeling that the kidnapping wouldn't have been resolved quite as neatly. My sole complaint—and it's a big one—is that this is a novella, and not a collection of novellas/short stories. I just needed more of everything—the kids, Robin, Marian, the other members of Robin's band. This is a great introduction to this world and these characters, with a little bit of drama. But having been introduced, I want to read the next one. Or, the next five or so. But no. Tor is making me wait until August for the second one. Which is simply unfair. While my tongue is firmly in my cheek above, there is a kernel of truth to my gripe—I'm 97% sure that this thing has legs and that I'm in for several more (even if it's currently slated to be a duology, but I'm hoping that changes), but I'm going to have to wait to really commit until August when The Heirs of Locksley is scheduled to be released. But in the meantime? This was a quick and fun read, full of promise, and one I heartily recommend.

  15. 5 out of 5

    J.A. Ironside

    ARC received from Tor.com via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This was a super quick read - only about 112 pages - but I loved every moment of it. Like most UK kids, I grew up with the Robin Hood legends, and I've always had a soft spot for the stories and various permutations thereof. Even knowing most of what lay behind the legends and gaining an understanding of that uneasy period in Saxon-Norman history has not dulled my appreciation. Which means I can go either way on a retelling ARC received from Tor.com via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This was a super quick read - only about 112 pages - but I loved every moment of it. Like most UK kids, I grew up with the Robin Hood legends, and I've always had a soft spot for the stories and various permutations thereof. Even knowing most of what lay behind the legends and gaining an understanding of that uneasy period in Saxon-Norman history has not dulled my appreciation. Which means I can go either way on a retelling, reimagining or sequel. Happily, Vaughn nails the 'what happens next' of Robin Hood with this fun addition to the canon. Told in third person from Marian and her daughter, Mary's POVs, this is a fast paced and engaging treat. Robin Hood is a slippery character to pin down - as you would expect from someone who started out as a personification of the Green Man, Robin Goodfellow and possibly a real Saxon who was declare 'Nīðing' (an unperson who could be killed without consequences by anyone who wanted to do so), adding snatches of several historical figures and a vast body of lore both ancient and modern. I like Vaughn's depiction of a Robin Hood in his forties with a castle, lands, family and earldom to protect and care for. There are still flashes of the wicked, mirthful mischief maker who defied a Norman prince in favour of supporting the true king, but he's been tempered with age and responsibility, and by his quick witted and carefully schooled wife. This is not strictly speaking a historical novella. For a start, we have no evidence that Robin Hood or Robin of Lockesley ever existed as a single entity and we can be pretty sure that Marian did not, but was instead an allegorical presence to symbolise duty and honour, added to the tale by a French poet. However, tiny, deft touches establish this piece of fable/ fantasy firmly in 12th C England and there are pleasing historical details. I really liked the characters. Marian is more than just the paragon of beauty and goodness; Robin is occasionally rash and ill-tempered as well as brave and generous; Mary was very resourceful. There are cameos from Much, Scarlett, Tuck and others. But the star of the book for me was the silent, ten year old Eleanor who manages to trump everyone with a combination of intelligence and rare insight into human nature. I know another reviewer was a little disappointed that not much seems to happen and that's true if what you're referring to is physical action. However, this is as much a character study, depicting interaction between a well rounded set of characters and is therefore about internal journey as much as outward action. However, I completely agree that this is very short. I would have liked to have gone on to The Heirs of Locksley straight away. Thoroughly enjoyable. Can't wait for book 2.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dale Russell

    Times change... Legends age... and the world that you fought so hard to restore and to protect doesn't always want to play by your rules. So it is with Robin of Locksley and his Maid Marian - now his beloved wife of many years - and the three children that they have borne and raised together. But, the peace that has been settled upon England since the return of Richard the Lionheart is showing signs of falling back into the turmoil of conflict and bloody battle and Robin and Marian only want to pr Times change... Legends age... and the world that you fought so hard to restore and to protect doesn't always want to play by your rules. So it is with Robin of Locksley and his Maid Marian - now his beloved wife of many years - and the three children that they have borne and raised together. But, the peace that has been settled upon England since the return of Richard the Lionheart is showing signs of falling back into the turmoil of conflict and bloody battle and Robin and Marian only want to protect their lives and their children from its inevitable horror. Unfortunately, there are those who see the coming troubles as an opportunity and that opportunity might only be secured by controlling the uncontrollable. To do that, they must take the one thing that means more to Locksley than life itself. So begins the first of a projected two part story crafted by the author of so many other wonderful stories, Carrie Vaughn. Carrie has written a story and an adventure that follows what seems to be the natural progression of the life of those heroes and legends and builds a world that captures the feel and atmosphere of those stories. Robin is older and has accepted the world that he lives in more than his more combative youth. Marian is still as strong willed and caring as she always has been. And the author has brought in many of the old companions from the old adventures. While this is a fairly short story - 92 pages in total - Carrie develops the tale well and lets the adventure unfold as it will. As stated earlier, this is the first of a proposed two part story with the second coming soon.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patty Smith

    Many thanks to NetGalley, Carrie Vaughn, and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for an ARC in exchange for an honest book review of The Ghosts of Sherwood. My thoughts and opinions are 100% my own and independent of receiving an advance copy. Robin is all grown up and married to Marion. They have three children and life is busy. The king is dead and in his place is King John. Although they were enemies, Robin has sworn fealty to him in order to keep his men, the villagers and anyone else who was loyal to him sa Many thanks to NetGalley, Carrie Vaughn, and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for an ARC in exchange for an honest book review of The Ghosts of Sherwood. My thoughts and opinions are 100% my own and independent of receiving an advance copy. Robin is all grown up and married to Marion. They have three children and life is busy. The king is dead and in his place is King John. Although they were enemies, Robin has sworn fealty to him in order to keep his men, the villagers and anyone else who was loyal to him safe. Peace is precarious at best. Mary, his eldest child, is growing and at an age to be married. She is more like Robin every day, headstrong, brave, and an excellent shot with a bow and arrow. She loves to wander the woods. She is aware of a strange ghost that appears when she wanders the woods but she never feels danger from him, but rather a protective spirit. On one of her journeys into the woods, her younger brother and sister follow her. They are captured by bandits who want to use the children as leverage to get Robin’s allegiance and obedience. The children are in grave danger to be sure. Robin and Marion have no idea where they could be. Does the band of merry men get back together to help find them? Or will Robin be forced to trade his allegiance for his children’s lives? This is a short novella that hopefully will set up a series of adventures for Robin’s children. Robin and Marion are still deeply in love so that was very satisfying. They are now bound by grown up things and can’t wander the way they used to. The children have forced them to settle down in ways that having children do. Mary was an excellent character and would be able to take the lead in a new story. The youngest child doesn’t speak, but proves to have wit, character and bravery so I would love to know more about her. The least interesting child was John, although I’m not sure if he is just young, didn’t have a chance to develop in this story, or is just uninteresting, although that would be a shame. We get to catch up with a few of the men from the original group. It was just enough of a tease of what they are doing to keep me interested in finding out more. Just because they are older, doesn’t mean they can’t be interesting. I would love for them to be included in future books. Of course the villains are still around and they have even more power now. Hopefully there will be more. If not, this is a wonderful glimpse into the life that Robin and Marion have made for themselves. It is a bit of nostalgia and makes me want to go back and read the original “Merry Adventures of Robin Hood” by Howard Pyle.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Like putting on an old coat or stepping into a familiar room and breathing in the scent of home, Ghosts of Sherwood is the continuation of the Robin Hood legend that I have been craving for years: comfortable, engaging, full of memory and love. The kids are brave and smart, the legends are older and maybe a little wiser, but no less wickedly charming. The story is all new and oh-so-familiar, and my heart is so full of joy--I was grinning the whole time I was reading. I have but one request: more Like putting on an old coat or stepping into a familiar room and breathing in the scent of home, Ghosts of Sherwood is the continuation of the Robin Hood legend that I have been craving for years: comfortable, engaging, full of memory and love. The kids are brave and smart, the legends are older and maybe a little wiser, but no less wickedly charming. The story is all new and oh-so-familiar, and my heart is so full of joy--I was grinning the whole time I was reading. I have but one request: more please. More, more, more.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This is just so perfect that I consumed it in one sitting -- my only complaint is I want more of it. But apparently, there is a second one out already, so off I'm off to go procure a copy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marzie

    This is a short novella, first in a new series by popular genre fiction author Carrie Vaughn. Vaughn envisions Robin Hood's world almost two decades after Robin and Marian marry. They have three children, Mary, John, and Eleanor. At the start, Robin and Marian are fighting because Robin has tried to make a match for Mary's hand in marriage without consulting either Marian or Mary. Marian is worried for Mary, and also worried for their youngest, Eleanor, who is very attached to Mary and who appea This is a short novella, first in a new series by popular genre fiction author Carrie Vaughn. Vaughn envisions Robin Hood's world almost two decades after Robin and Marian marry. They have three children, Mary, John, and Eleanor. At the start, Robin and Marian are fighting because Robin has tried to make a match for Mary's hand in marriage without consulting either Marian or Mary. Marian is worried for Mary, and also worried for their youngest, Eleanor, who is very attached to Mary and who appears to be mute. Robin is rather care-weary after years of dealing with safeguarding his position after King Richard's death. John is now King and is apparently still resentful of Robin of Locksley's role in the past. So when the three children are kidnapped, Robin and Marian fear the worst. Joining forces with old allies like Will and Little John, they piece together what has happened and go in pursuit of their children. But it might just be that the children are more capable than they realize. This was an enjoyable, though brief, story. I look forward to seeing where Vaughn goes from here in the series. If Mary, now archer of legend, is her principle protagonist, I'd be thrilled to keep reading. The second book in the series, The Heirs of Locksley , releases on August 4, 2020.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andi

    Robin Hood has always been one of my favorite stories - the various movies and TV shows lent to my obsession. I saw this was coming out and I quickly requested a copy. Little did I know it would be so painfully short, I probably would have waited for the actual copy and several other installments to come out. For a short mini tale, it's not a bad continuation of the story. I have no issue with the characters or the danger they go through. What hurts this short story is the fact that it is so dread Robin Hood has always been one of my favorite stories - the various movies and TV shows lent to my obsession. I saw this was coming out and I quickly requested a copy. Little did I know it would be so painfully short, I probably would have waited for the actual copy and several other installments to come out. For a short mini tale, it's not a bad continuation of the story. I have no issue with the characters or the danger they go through. What hurts this short story is the fact that it is so dreadfully short that nothing honestly happens up until the 75% mark. Then when things happen that you want to know more of it ends and you have to wait for the next installment. I can't tell if this book is supposed to be for teens, it was originally released in a magazine or if it's part of an anthology. The fact that I finished it in less than a half an hour has me a bit worried on how they're going to market it - but I am not in charge of that. The point is this book is a good start but lacks as a short story and a part one to a series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    LAPL Reads

    The earliest references to Robin Hood date back to the 14th century, and the earliest surviving copies of the story are from the 15th century. The details may change, but the core of the legend concerns a nobleman turned outlaw with a band of followers known as the Merry Men. He is a highly skilled archer and swordsman, who is loyal to the absent King Richard. He challenges the treatment of common people by Prince John and the Sheriff of Nottingham by robbing the rich and giving to the poor. He The earliest references to Robin Hood date back to the 14th century, and the earliest surviving copies of the story are from the 15th century. The details may change, but the core of the legend concerns a nobleman turned outlaw with a band of followers known as the Merry Men. He is a highly skilled archer and swordsman, who is loyal to the absent King Richard. He challenges the treatment of common people by Prince John and the Sheriff of Nottingham by robbing the rich and giving to the poor. He also has a legendary romance with Maid Marion. The story is one of the best-known British folktales and has been retold in virtually every form of media over the centuries. Now Carrie Vaughn adds another tale to the Robin Hood legend in The Ghosts of Sherwood. Robin Locksley and Marion are now married with three children. It has been almost two decades since Robin’s exploits with his Merry Men in Sherwood Forest against Prince John, who is now King. There is a fragile truce, but it could be shattered at any time. And, that time may have come when Robin and Marion’s children are abducted from the forest. While their parents gather their old allies to retrieve them, the Locksley children will prove to their captors that kidnapping them may not have been the wisest choice. In The Ghosts of Sherwood author Carrie Vaughn adds her own story to the centuries old legends of Robin Hood. The characters are older, and some of them are commensurately wiser, and they are dealing with the increasing responsibilities of being parents and nobles under the reign of a king they challenged before he took the throne. Mary, the real focus of the story, is Robin and Marion’s eldest daughter, whose betrothal in marriage to another local landowner is being explored by Robin, much to Marion’s consternation. Mary is smart, restless, and cunning in a difficult situation, and she is every bit her parent’s child, as are her siblings. The Ghosts of Sherwood is an exciting and interesting addition to the lore of Robin Hood. For more background information on the novella’s creation, read the author’s interview on LAPL's website: https://www.lapl.org/collections-reso... Daryl M., Librarian, West Valley Regional Branch Library

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Dacyczyn

    All Robin's children inherited his smile, and his aim. This was a fun little novella about Robin Hood and Marian that feels a little bit like an epilogue to the original tale. This takes place many years later, after they've had three children, and are no longer outlaws. The plot in this novella centers around the kidnapping of the three children (Mary, John, and Eleanor), as well as a look at what life is like for Robin now that he has had to shift tactics to diplomacy rather than thievery, espe All Robin's children inherited his smile, and his aim. This was a fun little novella about Robin Hood and Marian that feels a little bit like an epilogue to the original tale. This takes place many years later, after they've had three children, and are no longer outlaws. The plot in this novella centers around the kidnapping of the three children (Mary, John, and Eleanor), as well as a look at what life is like for Robin now that he has had to shift tactics to diplomacy rather than thievery, especially after Prince John inherited the throne from King George. This was well written, paced well, and the characters felt believable. In some ways it helps to tell a mini-sequel to a well-known story because you don't have to spend a lot of time explaining who the characters are; the reader already knows. The author just has to flesh them out enough so that you know WHICH version of these characters you're dealing with, and then you can get down to business. The eldest child, Mary (who's not really a child any more as she's nearing the age to get married), is pretty much the "main" character of their portions of the story. She's smart and resourceful without being unrealistically gifted (unlike in the OTHER Robin Hood book I just quit, which was also about Robin Hood's daughter, only she was totally dumb while also being insanely skilled). The other two children weren't quite as substantial, but this was a pretty short book. We get a little glint at Eleanor's possibilities near the end, but it didn't last very long. I suppose this leads into my main gripe with this book: it was too damn short! At only a 100ish pages, I wanted this to be longer! This short book felt like a tantalizing taste at a bigger book that I'll never get to read. It was primarily focused around one quick episode and a little bit of exposition, but I wanted MORE! I wanted to see how Mary dealt with her impending adulthood and the expectations to wed advantageously. I wanted to see how John dealt with being his notorious father's heir. And I wanted to see what other impish things Eleanor would get up to while everyone underestimated her. Sigh. Oh well. Maybe the author will take the feedback from this wee novella, and develop a sequel that does justice to these characters. Do it. Do it now!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Darcy

    Interesting take on the Robin Hood fairy tale. I like that they are happy, living their lives, but have the same worries that the rest of us do. Hope your kids marry well and not to piss off your spouse. Not sure that Robin is doing that great, but it's good that he raised his kids to kick ass. I loved how the girls were able to take care of business themselves.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I liked this a lot. I'm a sucker for any and all retellings of the Robin Hood legend, and this one went in a different direction than any I've read, focusing more on the children of Robin and Marian. However, I wish there'd been MORE between the parents and kids; there was very little interactions with all of them, especially Mary and her father, which was a major focus. So I can't wait to read the sequel so I can hopefully get that! Rating: maybe 3.5 stars

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julia M

    Well Met! This is quite a departure from The Kitty Norville Saga but quite amusing in its own way. I am looking forward to the next book in the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah McManus

    This was so sweet.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Corley Elizabeth

    3.5 stars. For such a short novella, this was a lot of fun and had enough backstory to where I felt like I wasn't missing too much. I just wish it had been longer, which I think is most people's complaint. But there's another book coming out, so hopefully that will help to make up for the short length some!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I went through a series of feelings about this book. The first was anticipation. I've been a long-time fan of the author, since the early Kitty Norville books, loved the Golden Age supers novels, and have been impressed by her short fiction. Recently, I enjoyed a side novel in the Kitty Norville series, made up of several shorter pieces (a "fixup"). While Robin Hood is pretty well-trodden ground, I felt confident that Carrie Vaughn was up to the task of making it fresh and giving it a new angle, I went through a series of feelings about this book. The first was anticipation. I've been a long-time fan of the author, since the early Kitty Norville books, loved the Golden Age supers novels, and have been impressed by her short fiction. Recently, I enjoyed a side novel in the Kitty Norville series, made up of several shorter pieces (a "fixup"). While Robin Hood is pretty well-trodden ground, I felt confident that Carrie Vaughn was up to the task of making it fresh and giving it a new angle, lifting it above the tropes of the often-told story. So the next emotion I experienced was slight disappointment, when I first saw that this was a novella (less than 20,000 words), and then, as I began to read, found that it unfolded at first as a linear story such as I've often seen written by new professional writers: competent, certainly, but not promising to rock my world. Fairly ordinary Robin Hood fanfic, I felt, without any fantasy elements or new twists; just "here is Robin as a middle-aged family man, after Prince John has legitimately ascended to the throne, and here are his kids, and here is the political situation, and now we will have a crisis." But by the end, I had been drawn into the plight of the children, and was thoroughly ready for a tension-filled escape/rescue, and felt the family's emotion around it. So even though this is quite a straightforward story, and (like many novellas) it feels like it wants to be longer, and it leaves a lot at the end not fully resolved, on the whole I enjoyed it, and felt it was done with the skill I've come to expect from this author.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality There’s a theory going around that people are re-reading and re-watching old favorites right now because they not only already know how they end, but that not-exactly-foreknowledge removes the tension of not knowing that everyone is going to be okay, because it’s already happened. So to speak. There may also be a trend towards re-tellings as this uncertain season goes on. In a re-telling, we either already know how it’s going to go – and just want to see it Originally published at Reading Reality There’s a theory going around that people are re-reading and re-watching old favorites right now because they not only already know how they end, but that not-exactly-foreknowledge removes the tension of not knowing that everyone is going to be okay, because it’s already happened. So to speak. There may also be a trend towards re-tellings as this uncertain season goes on. In a re-telling, we either already know how it’s going to go – and just want to see it told differently (By Force Alone by Lavie Tidhar looks like it’s going to be one of those) or because we already know the characters and want to see them in new adventures. We don’t have to get to know new people because we’re already familiar with the cast. The Other Bennet Sister by Janice Hadlow falls into this category and does VERY WELL with it. The Ghosts of Sherwood is also this particular variety of re-telling. We ALL have at least a nodding acquaintance with Robin Hood’s story – if only from movies like Disney’s 1973 animated version, with a surprisingly sexy fox as Robin. (Which is being remade as a live-action hybrid, Yikes!) Meaning that we all know these characters to some extent, and we know the outline of the original story. Making it ripe for an extension. Leading to The Ghosts of Sherwood, the first novella in The Robin Hood Stories. Which, at least from this opening, read like “Robin Hood, the Next Generation”. Which has its bit of irony, as Star Trek Next Gen also did a takeoff episode on Robin Hood, but more in the vein of Men in Tights. The episode is best known for Worf’s line, “I am NOT a merry man.” I digress, but this does go to show just how ubiquitous the legend of Robin Hood is. As The Ghosts of Sherwood opens, Robin and Marion are on their way back from Runnymede, from the signing of the Magna Carta, setting this story in 1215. Robin, as the Earl of Locksley, was one of the barons who rebelled against King John’s rule – yet again in Robin’s case – and brought him to the bargaining table. There is still no love lost between Robin and King John, not even 20 years after the events that made their way into legend. But Robin and Marion have changed – as has King John. Robin and Marion are married, and are part of the nobility of England, as fractured as it was at that time. The surviving members of Robin’s band of outlaws are part of their household at Locksley. And they have three children, Mary, John and Eleanor. Mary, the oldest, is 16, Eleanor is 8 and John is somewhere in between. They are all as familiar with Sherwood as they are with their own house, but Mary seems to be the one who is most like her father, and most at home in the forest that is part of their home and heritage. This story is, not exactly a passing of the torch, but rather a story that shows that the younger generation is willing to pick up that burden when the time comes. The children are kidnapped in the forest by, not outlaws but rather men loyal to the barons who opposed their father over the Magna Carta. But the children have no certainty that their parents even know they are missing. It is up to them to use the cunning they inherited from both their parents, all the talents they can muster, as well as the legends that make Sherwood a place of menace to outsiders – so that they can rescue themselves. Escape Rating A-: First, this was a lovely little story. It does a terrific job of portraying Robin and Marion’s post-outlaw life in a way that seems fitting. They are older, occasionally wiser, and often tireder than they were back in the day. And that’s the way it should be. The details also do a terrific job of placing the story firmly within a historical, rather than mythical, legendary or fantasy context. If Robin existed, he would have been one of the nobles forcing King John to the bargaining table and the Magna Carta. It’s impossible to imagine that the enmity they felt for each other during King Richard the Lionhearted’s absence on Crusade, especially Robin’s armed rebellion, would ever have faded. As this story opens, John is nearly at the end of his reign, and Robin and Marion are no longer the young rebels they once were. (I’m saying the above in spite of the story being billed as historical fantasy. So far, at least, there are no fantastic elements – in spite of Mary referring to her mysterious protector as “The Ghost”. Maybe in a future installment?) The focus of this story is on their children, particularly 16-year-old Mary, as she faces the decisions of oncoming adulthood. But the story also deals with the politics of the country as one king’s reign is about to end and his heir is a child of nine. That forces are jockeying for power, and that Robin will have influence and could possibly be influenced is a part of his times. So the story has large implications for the future of England, and the future stories of the series. At the same time, it’s very small and intimate. Three children, kidnapped, forced to rely on their wits and each other, figuring out how to get the better of their captors in spite of the odds. By banding together. That the story works so well on both levels gives me high hopes for the future stories in the series. I’m very much looking forward to reading The Heirs of Locksley later this summer. Because I want more.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.