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Was love invented by European poets in the middle ages, as C. S. Lewis claimed, or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this new guide to the latest thinking about emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, fro Was love invented by European poets in the middle ages, as C. S. Lewis claimed, or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this new guide to the latest thinking about emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, from anthropology and psychology to neuroscience and artificial intelligence, Emotion: The Science of Sentiment takes the reader on a fascinating journey into the human heart. Illustrating his points with entertaining examples from fiction, film, and popular culture, Dylan Evans ranges from the evolution of emotions to the nature of love and happiness to the language of feelings, offering readers the most recent thinking on real life topics that touch us all.


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Was love invented by European poets in the middle ages, as C. S. Lewis claimed, or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this new guide to the latest thinking about emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, fro Was love invented by European poets in the middle ages, as C. S. Lewis claimed, or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this new guide to the latest thinking about emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, from anthropology and psychology to neuroscience and artificial intelligence, Emotion: The Science of Sentiment takes the reader on a fascinating journey into the human heart. Illustrating his points with entertaining examples from fiction, film, and popular culture, Dylan Evans ranges from the evolution of emotions to the nature of love and happiness to the language of feelings, offering readers the most recent thinking on real life topics that touch us all.

30 review for Emotion: The Science of Sentiment

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Emotion: The Science of Sentiment (Very Short Introductions #81), Dylan Evans Was love invented by European poets in the middle ages, as C. S. Lewis claimed, or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this new guide to the latest thinking about emotions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Johan

    Maybe I'm too much of an anti-positivist to be able to enjoy this book. As an intro to emotions I'd say it's pretty good and written in a funny way with examples from sci-fi and robotics. But I'm having some problems with the fact that Evans constantly refers back to some kind of rather loosely defined primordial time of being when we were some sort of cave men. To me it just isn't relevant to speculate about the evolutionary roots of emotion, what matters is how emotions effect us today. Some of Maybe I'm too much of an anti-positivist to be able to enjoy this book. As an intro to emotions I'd say it's pretty good and written in a funny way with examples from sci-fi and robotics. But I'm having some problems with the fact that Evans constantly refers back to some kind of rather loosely defined primordial time of being when we were some sort of cave men. To me it just isn't relevant to speculate about the evolutionary roots of emotion, what matters is how emotions effect us today. Some of the research he quotes is also pretty shakey at least in ethical terms. One aparently found that rape victims responded slower to the Stroop test (saying what color the ink of a word is) when the words were related to rape. I mean, WTF they actually found rape victims and subjected them to that!?? So I do prefer more sociological or even psychological accounts of emotion to this, one thing could be to check out Thomas Scheff that is mentioned in the book also.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This book was required reading for my Psychology of Emotions class and I thoroughly enjoyed reading and discovering more about emotions. Dylan Evans writing is very accessible and interesting, for example: chapter two is titled, "Why Spock Could Never Have Evolved." I especially enjoyed reading about Paul Ekman's research in with the Fore in New Guinea. My very favorite quote: "Our common emotional heritage binds humanity together, then, in a way that transcends cultural difference. In all place This book was required reading for my Psychology of Emotions class and I thoroughly enjoyed reading and discovering more about emotions. Dylan Evans writing is very accessible and interesting, for example: chapter two is titled, "Why Spock Could Never Have Evolved." I especially enjoyed reading about Paul Ekman's research in with the Fore in New Guinea. My very favorite quote: "Our common emotional heritage binds humanity together, then, in a way that transcends cultural difference. In all places, and at all times, human beings have shared the same basic emotional repertoire."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bob Nichols

    Drawing from the prevailing literature, Evans summarizes what might be regarded as a prevailing view of emotions (the book’s subtitle is, “The Science of Sentiment”). Rather than casting emotions as solely negative (to be controlled), or positive (the glue that holds the social world together), Evans sees a blend of head (reason) and heart (emotion) that works together as “emotional intelligence,” an optimal emotion state that “involves having just the right amount” along the lines of Aristotle’ Drawing from the prevailing literature, Evans summarizes what might be regarded as a prevailing view of emotions (the book’s subtitle is, “The Science of Sentiment”). Rather than casting emotions as solely negative (to be controlled), or positive (the glue that holds the social world together), Evans sees a blend of head (reason) and heart (emotion) that works together as “emotional intelligence,” an optimal emotion state that “involves having just the right amount” along the lines of Aristotle’s golden mean. Evans then seams together nature (universal and biological emotions: joy, distress, anger, fear, surprise and disgust) with nurture (the culturally-specific emotions that “have elaborated on this repertoire, exalting different emotions, downgrading others, and embellishing the common feelings with cultural nuances…”). Evans adds one more category that he calls “higher cognitive emotions,” that “are universal, like basic emotions, but exhibit more cultural variation [and] also take longer to build up.” These he lists as love, guilt, shame, embarrassment, pride, envy and jealousy. Evans also distinguishes emotions that are immediate and short-lived from moods that last longer. Evans does not tie emotions to motivation that provides the “reason” for behavior. As an alternative perspective, emotions might be seen more broadly as the full suite of evolutionarily-derived motivation structures that support survival and that run across a continuum, from instinctive to disposition, to Evans’ more cognitively-directed emotions, and from immediate expressions to the more general moods that reflect one’s state with the world. These emotion structures function in an integrated way. They contain the ‘reason’ for behavior, which is what we need or don’t need, the specific objects (with memory recognition) that are pertinent to need and threats, and behavior (active seeking, or reactive defending) that links (instinctively, dispositionally, or consciously) relevant objects with the need or threat.* Even with Evans’ attempt to blend emotion and reason,** he keeps them in separate categories when they should be kept together, functioning as part of the same emotion structure. Ultimately, as far as personal behavior, we act or react to the world based on a needs and threats and ‘reason’ coordinates ends and means to help us solve our needs and to defend against threats. Cognition/consciousness does not replace emotions but overlay them. Evans himself suggests this point in his reference to Joseph LeDoux’s (1996) example of someone startled upon seeing a shadow on the pathway. Basic emotion kicks in first, but this is then followed by a conscious appraisal that brings in other clues that show that the shadow is a stick and not a snake, thereby relaxing the startle reaction. LeDoux suggests the possibility that at least some other emotions operate similarly. In an anger scenario, reason doesn’t replace anger but, rather, informs the body that its emotional well-being depends, for example, on not fighting back or quitting (a job) in a particular instance. Here mind contrasts the immediate with a broader context (or a longer-term and more overriding need) and performs its regulatory, adaptive function that way. The culture-specific emotions that Evans mentions are variations on an underlying theme. Evolution designs us to be part of a group because this was necessary for survival. The underlying need is to be part of a group, and this comes with a full repertoire of social emotions to make that happen. But the specific content (rules, dress, mores, etc.) varies by group and culture, just as Evans suggests. As a final note, pleasure (various forms) might be better seen as an emotional state, rather than just another emotion, where energy is quiet because need has been satisfied. Pain, in Schopenhauer’s sense, is also a need state (need to satisfy, need to defend) that is experienced as urge, frustration, fear or anger. But unlike pleasure, this pain state functions also to activate energy that, if of sufficient intensity, results in (motivates) behavior to satisfy or alleviate pain.*** *These emotions also can be experienced inwardly only, without behavior, when (1) they lack sufficient intensity; (2) they are masked so they are felt but not expressed; (3) they are suppressed because of the pain that is felt; or, (4) when they are overridden by broader, more important and longer-term interests or concerns. ** For example, Evans paraphrases Robert Frank: “Not only are there passions within reason, but there are reasons within passion.” *** This is akin to the utilitarian pleasure and pain notions as overarching emotions, except the utilitarian focus is on the external objects that stimulate pleasure or pain whereas Schopenhauer moves these inside, which is the basis for why the self cares in the first place (why pleasure or pain is experienced vis-à-vis specific stimuli). Seen this way, the self functions as an integrated entity that (1) wants/doesn’t want specific things; (2) “suffers” pain because of what it needs or doesn’t need, which supplies the motive force for overt action/reaction, and (3) experiences pleasure when there’s success. Evans’ account of moods also reflects this broader view of emotion. When one is in a good state, there’s joy, happiness or contentment (needs are being met). When one suffers from a long-standing feeling that needs are not being met, then depression results.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tien Manh

    As the title implies, a very short intro to emotions. Talks about emotions in an evolutionary-psychologyish way: conjectures and hypothesis of how they evolved. Discusses some of the more "complicated" social emotions such as jealousy, shame and greed. A point that gets repeated over and over is that it is meaningless to separate "heart" and "head". Reasons are based in emotions, which are in turn based on (past) reason. If you don't want to do something, the thought of doing that thing anticipat As the title implies, a very short intro to emotions. Talks about emotions in an evolutionary-psychologyish way: conjectures and hypothesis of how they evolved. Discusses some of the more "complicated" social emotions such as jealousy, shame and greed. A point that gets repeated over and over is that it is meaningless to separate "heart" and "head". Reasons are based in emotions, which are in turn based on (past) reason. If you don't want to do something, the thought of doing that thing anticipates an undesirable outcome, therefore you don't "want to" do it. Trust your emotions. Will need a more substantial read for those wanting to go deeper.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amirography

    a rather good book. Emotion is an understudied subject in cognitive science. This short introduction, though not comprehensive as it should not be, it creates a good priming.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Manuela

    Definitely opened the appetite, looking forward to reading an extended version.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Amazon Review: Was love invented by European poets in the Middle Ages or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this guide to the latest thinking about the emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, from anthropology and psychology to neuroscience and artificial intelligence, Emotion: The Science of Sentiment takes the reader on a fascin Amazon Review: Was love invented by European poets in the Middle Ages or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this guide to the latest thinking about the emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, from anthropology and psychology to neuroscience and artificial intelligence, Emotion: The Science of Sentiment takes the reader on a fascinating journey into the human heart.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fares D. Alahmar

    This book changed the way I look at emotions.. The author did great job explaining the evolutionary roots of emotions like love, anger, sadness, and even jealousy.. and how CRUCIAL they are for the survival of species. Emotions are not extra leftovers of logic and consciousness, they are sometimes logic itself protecting a specie from self-destruction and extinction.. 5 stars without hesitation!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nasir

    Very rarely you find a book covers the subject matter and is easy to read. Wonderful introduction to Emotions and its science. Thoroughly enjoyed reading it

  11. 4 out of 5

    Niyatee Narkar

    I appreciate the lucidity of the language used for it makes research in the area sound simpler to common masses. But I expected the inclusion of more research studies happening in the area. I liked the way the author has addressed the issue of how emotions affect our reasoning and vice versa. I too believe that it is high time we do away with the belief that emotions and logic are two mutually exclusive processes of the mind.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aarif Billah

    Another one of those books which I bought mindlessly based on the title. But this time, it worked out well. Dylan Evans writing is easy to understand which makes the reading very accessible and interesting. But the book is quite short, finished it around 2-3 hours. . It is really just an introduction, but a worthwhile one at that. . Read my full review https://aarifbillah.com/emotion-the-s... Another one of those books which I bought mindlessly based on the title. But this time, it worked out well. Dylan Evans writing is easy to understand which makes the reading very accessible and interesting. But the book is quite short, finished it around 2-3 hours. . It is really just an introduction, but a worthwhile one at that. . Read my full review https://aarifbillah.com/emotion-the-s...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sandeep Gautam

    A really short book that provides a basic overview of emotions and its relation to reason. The topics covered are eclectic and not comprehensive; Dylan does a good job of introducing emotional processes, to someone who is a novice, from his vantage point. I did lean a few new things, but believe there are better introductory texts around (though not as brief!)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jabeen

    An easy read about our emotions.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Great, short intro on the topic of Emotions.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jalen Lyle-Holmes

    I wanted more scientific information and less of him supporting his points with an anecdote or saying Aristotle believed it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve Frederick

    First half of book was 3 stars. Last 3 chapters were 1.5 stars

  18. 5 out of 5

    Teo 2050

    2016.04.18–2016.04.18 Contents Evans D (2001) (03:51) Emotion - A Very Short Introduction Preface List of illustrations • 01. Facial expressions of basic emotions • 02. Two self-portrait etchings by Rembrandt, 1630. Surprise and anger/contempt • 03. Four video stills of a New Guinea Highlander with different facial expressions, taken by Dr Paul Ekman • 04. Romeo and Juliet, 1884, by Sir Frank Dicksee (1853–1928) • 05. Leonard Nimoy as Mr Spock in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, 1982 • 06. 'You're so emot 2016.04.18–2016.04.18 Contents Evans D (2001) (03:51) Emotion - A Very Short Introduction Preface List of illustrations • 01. Facial expressions of basic emotions • 02. Two self-portrait etchings by Rembrandt, 1630. Surprise and anger/contempt • 03. Four video stills of a New Guinea Highlander with different facial expressions, taken by Dr Paul Ekman • 04. Romeo and Juliet, 1884, by Sir Frank Dicksee (1853–1928) • 05. Leonard Nimoy as Mr Spock in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, 1982 • 06. 'You're so emotional. . .' (cartoon by Jacky Fleming) • 07. The low and the high roads of the amygdala • 08. Cat, savage and prepared to fight. Wood engraving by Thomas William Wood (fl. 1855–1872) • 09. Location of the hippocampus and amygdala and surrounding cortical areas • 10. Jealousy and Flirtation, by Haynes King (1831–1904) • 11. 'It could be you', British National Lottery poster, with hand coming out of sky • 12. Mature man wearing headphones, eyes closed • 13. The priestess Ihat sniffing a lotus flower, Egyptian relief carving, c.2494–2345 BC • 14. People dancing at a rave • 15. The three versions of the critical eighth slide in the sequence used by Christianson and Loftus • 16. Graph of results from Mackie and Worth experiment • 17. Hitler addresses two million people on May Day, 1934 • 18. Hal from 2001: A Space Odyssey, 1968 • 19. Kismet, robot developed at MIT, which imitates a range of 'human' emotions. Here sadness, happiness, and surprise • 20. Mobile Assistant IV®, portable voice-operated computer by US firm Xybernaut • 21. The AIBO Entertainment Robot, produced by Sony • 22. Harrison Ford kissing Sean Young, from Blade Runner, 1982 1. The universal language • The cultural theory of emotion • Basic emotions • On being a wild pig • Enduring love? • Higher cognitive emotions 2. Why Spock could never have evolved • The value of basic emotions • The two routes to fear • The evolution of guilt, love, and revenge • Are emotions still useful today? • Jealousy: good or bad? • Moral sentiments 3. Short cuts to happiness • Adam Smith on the perils of good fortune • Talkin' blues • The pleasures of the senses • The chemical route to happiness • Bodily technologies of mood 4. The head and the heart • The mental spotlight • Emotion and memory • Funes – the man with the perfect memory • Judging people and evaluating arguments • Are two heads really better than one? • Sympathy and suggestion • Subliminal reactions to emotional faces 5. The computer that cried • Emotion is as emotion does • Why give computers emotions at all? • What if machines evolve emotions on their own? • The three laws of robotics • Will computers ever become conscious? Afterword: The heart has its reasons Further reading Source material Index

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Wright

    For the most part, this is a pretty good introduction to the scientific study of emotion, and an intriguing defense of emotional decision-making. On the other hand, I feel inclined to make a defense of my mentor C. S. Lewis, at whom the author makes an impertinent sideswipe. In discussing whether a new emotion can be 'invented', so to speak, he alleges that Lewis claims (in The Allegory of Love) that 'falling in love' was invented in romances of the high middle ages, then adduces the biblical 'So For the most part, this is a pretty good introduction to the scientific study of emotion, and an intriguing defense of emotional decision-making. On the other hand, I feel inclined to make a defense of my mentor C. S. Lewis, at whom the author makes an impertinent sideswipe. In discussing whether a new emotion can be 'invented', so to speak, he alleges that Lewis claims (in The Allegory of Love) that 'falling in love' was invented in romances of the high middle ages, then adduces the biblical 'Song of Songs' as evidence against this. This is a serious misrepresentation of what Lewis is saying. If the author had actually read the Allegory, he would realise that it is primarily a very high-level and scholarly analysis of various medieval- and renaissance-era works of romances (The Romance of the Rose, The Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queen and others). Lewis' claim is that many of our ideas of chivalrous romance stem from this period, not that there was some kind of sea-change in Western psychology. Anyway, apart from this particular calumny, the book is actually quite good, and I recommend it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sulaiman Dawood

    I bough this book for a mere 30 Rs/- from a newspaper kiosk on a Saturday morning when my car broke down and I decided to take a stroll across the street towards a local tea stall while searching for a mechanic nearby. No sooner had I gulped down my tea, I noticed an old man selling used books. Despite having a little amount of cash to spare, I decided to try out my luck. Fortunately, I got my hands on this book, which by far is one of the most enlightening books on emotions, and a must read for I bough this book for a mere 30 Rs/- from a newspaper kiosk on a Saturday morning when my car broke down and I decided to take a stroll across the street towards a local tea stall while searching for a mechanic nearby. No sooner had I gulped down my tea, I noticed an old man selling used books. Despite having a little amount of cash to spare, I decided to try out my luck. Fortunately, I got my hands on this book, which by far is one of the most enlightening books on emotions, and a must read for everyone who want a fundamental knowledge on the subject. Dylan has written, in a very easy-to-understand way, a book that tries to simplify the very complex question of what is an emotion in its entirety. I wouldn't spoil your many reasons for reading this book, and since I'm a very critical reader, I don't recommend every single book out there (specially books on science) to the general reader unless I know it's going to have a profound effect on their lives. This book will surely help me in compiling my dissertation.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul Baker

    This review contains spoilers! This over-simplistic view of human emotion is pure opinion, extrapolated from various "scientific" studies to arrive at generic conclusions. What really bothered me the most were two glaring errors of citation. First, to make a point, Dylan Evans tells us that the Vulcans of Star Trek could never have evolved without emotion. An author should never write about something if they have not researched it properly. In Star Trek Vulcan's evolved with emotion. In fact, the This review contains spoilers! This over-simplistic view of human emotion is pure opinion, extrapolated from various "scientific" studies to arrive at generic conclusions. What really bothered me the most were two glaring errors of citation. First, to make a point, Dylan Evans tells us that the Vulcans of Star Trek could never have evolved without emotion. An author should never write about something if they have not researched it properly. In Star Trek Vulcan's evolved with emotion. In fact, they feel deeply, but have created a system in order to suppress that emotion because of the damage it can cause. Factual error. The second factual error also involves science fiction. In discussing 2001: A Space Odyssey Evans describes HAL's meltdown while his memory is taken offline by saying he "...utters cries of pain and fear..." which is utterly wrong. HAL does not utter "agonizing screams" ever during the course of the film. When such gross factual errors occur in citations, how can one ever trust what the author has to say about anything else?

  22. 5 out of 5

    catechism

    pretty impossible to rate. Probably I should stop reading intro books for things I already know about, although I didn't realize that all the source material for this book was on my shelves until I, you know, looked at the list of source material. I guess I should have paid more attention to the prof in college who told me to always do that first (although the was a long time ago indeed, and I remember him saying it, so probably it isn't a matter of paying attention so much as of taking advice, pretty impossible to rate. Probably I should stop reading intro books for things I already know about, although I didn't realize that all the source material for this book was on my shelves until I, you know, looked at the list of source material. I guess I should have paid more attention to the prof in college who told me to always do that first (although the was a long time ago indeed, and I remember him saying it, so probably it isn't a matter of paying attention so much as of taking advice, at which I am notoriously bad (...sorry, this "review" has gone totally off the rails)). So I guess I'd say YOU should do that first if you're interested. it's a fine intro, easy to read and full of robots.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rin

    I think the book was a cool intro to emotions, but I hate when pop neuroscience books talk about cavemen or some prehistoric creature and what relevance today's feelings have to them. I feel it's the most lazy kind of derived drivel about nothing that non-professional writers do these days to sound more researched. Like, "I know I'm not an expert, but I was able to look up some anthropologist's fairy tale about how cavemen did things therefore I put in a little extra work! I think it's best to s I think the book was a cool intro to emotions, but I hate when pop neuroscience books talk about cavemen or some prehistoric creature and what relevance today's feelings have to them. I feel it's the most lazy kind of derived drivel about nothing that non-professional writers do these days to sound more researched. Like, "I know I'm not an expert, but I was able to look up some anthropologist's fairy tale about how cavemen did things therefore I put in a little extra work! I think it's best to stick to H. sapien sapien behavior and what our behaviors mean today. We are not less real or less "wild" than some animal we derived from. Anyhow, it was so frequent in this book that it bugged me. Had it stayed a philosophy book I might have enjoyed it much more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Ann Brickner

    This was a fun little read. A great introduction on how emotion has been studied -- what is currently known and unknown -- and how emotions serve, yet are also capable of paralyzing or endangering us. I was most interested in Evans discussion of emotions, consciousness, and robotics. It was the most fascinating section of this small book (meaning it freaked me out the most), and it's something I'd be interested in reading further about (there's suggested further reading at the end of the book!)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Derrick

    A good, broad primer. Nonverbal Communication is more incisive on the narrower topic of emotion, as defined as the basic emotions, but this book tackles philosophical issues, relation to AI, and more importantly the similarities and differences between emotion, mood, and affect. Also there is an understanding of non-basic higher cognitive emotions that came later in our evolutionary history, such as love, guilt, and revenge. These were likely developed to solve certain commitment problems—game t A good, broad primer. Nonverbal Communication is more incisive on the narrower topic of emotion, as defined as the basic emotions, but this book tackles philosophical issues, relation to AI, and more importantly the similarities and differences between emotion, mood, and affect. Also there is an understanding of non-basic higher cognitive emotions that came later in our evolutionary history, such as love, guilt, and revenge. These were likely developed to solve certain commitment problems—game theoretic, I mean.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kjn

    It began pretty well, even with a couple of semi-interesting facts, but then it quickly degenerated into a long ramble on the futility of AI without emotions. If, as the author is stating, emotions is a topic that doesn't get enough attention, then the author surely isn't helping to mediate that. Also the repeated point that Vulcans were impossible as they could not possibly have existed without emotions was kind of hurtful.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shaden Al-Laham

    Very interesting, although I wish if the author elaborated more in some points, the book is short and briefly answers many interesting questions; what are emotions, and why did they evolve? Could an “emotionless” species ever made it through evolution? Would it be more rational than us? Why emotions are usually viewed as the enemy of reason? Is it possible that the heart has its reason too?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steen Ledet

    Too shallow While especially the first few chapters are solid, the book slowly deteriorates into a weird transhumanist argument about robots evolving emotions. Yes, affective computing is important but why not emphasize animals as much?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This was so interesting! Best of the 'Very Short Introductions' series I've read so far.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Satisfactorily too short.

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