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MUTANTS ARE FOREVER! The Resurrection Protocols have changed everything for mutantkind. No more can humans' hate and fear take their lives from them. But...what else has it changed? COLLECTING: X-MEN (2019) 7-11 MUTANTS ARE FOREVER! The Resurrection Protocols have changed everything for mutantkind. No more can humans' hate and fear take their lives from them. But...what else has it changed? COLLECTING: X-MEN (2019) 7-11


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MUTANTS ARE FOREVER! The Resurrection Protocols have changed everything for mutantkind. No more can humans' hate and fear take their lives from them. But...what else has it changed? COLLECTING: X-MEN (2019) 7-11 MUTANTS ARE FOREVER! The Resurrection Protocols have changed everything for mutantkind. No more can humans' hate and fear take their lives from them. But...what else has it changed? COLLECTING: X-MEN (2019) 7-11

30 review for X-Men by Jonathan Hickman, Vol. 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Hickman continues to make the X-Men interesting once more. I absolutely loved the first issue featuring the Crucible and how mutants are still dealing with the fallout from Decimation. Then the X-Men need to deal with the king egg the New Mutants brought home from space as it's actually a Brood egg and then entire Brood race is coming for it. The last two issues are loose Empyre tie-ins in that the X-Men fight the Cotati. Hickman makes it work without feeling like a tie-in. I do think reading th Hickman continues to make the X-Men interesting once more. I absolutely loved the first issue featuring the Crucible and how mutants are still dealing with the fallout from Decimation. Then the X-Men need to deal with the king egg the New Mutants brought home from space as it's actually a Brood egg and then entire Brood race is coming for it. The last two issues are loose Empyre tie-ins in that the X-Men fight the Cotati. Hickman makes it work without feeling like a tie-in. I do think reading the X-titles in the order they were published like the Dawn of X series does help instead of one book collections like this. The books are feeding off each other at times.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    I continue to enjoy Hickman’s spin on X-Men immensely, though I can’t tell if it’s because it’s really good, the preceding years have been so bad, or if I’m just so relieved to see Cyclops being cool again and not being a douche bag (or a dead douche bag). The Empyre-related issues break up the flow a bit (I’ll have more to say about that when I get around to reviewing Empyre), but I’m ready for more.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Another solid world-building volume of Jonathan Hickman's mutant renaissance. Still not sure about loving or hating the X-Men turned into a morbid death cult sect (with the hinted Summers/Logan free-love sub-plot bordering to something like Manson Family... Oh, Good Grief), but besides that this was a very entertaining read. And the brutal Crucible first issue collected here was a real ☆☆☆☆☆ one... I was litterally suffering together with Sam and Melody Guthrie. Kudos to the author for turning a co Another solid world-building volume of Jonathan Hickman's mutant renaissance. Still not sure about loving or hating the X-Men turned into a morbid death cult sect (with the hinted Summers/Logan free-love sub-plot bordering to something like Manson Family... Oh, Good Grief), but besides that this was a very entertaining read. And the brutal Crucible first issue collected here was a real ☆☆☆☆☆ one... I was litterally suffering together with Sam and Melody Guthrie. Kudos to the author for turning a couple of Empyre event tie-in issues into two decent/great Vulkan's/Magneto's tales, and I just loved Exodus' role as teacher and storyteller. 'Nuff said.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    OK, the artwork is consistently great in this volume and that explains its high rating from me. As for the story, well, I’m on record as being in the very small minority of people who hate the new ‘Hickman-X-Verse’ but one issue in this collection (#7) actually offended me and I am not easy to offend! I listen to GWAR, fer Chrissakes! I’ve been called sick and twisted many, many times! Yet I actually found the concept of de-powered mutants queuing up for suicide-by-Apocalypse so they could be re OK, the artwork is consistently great in this volume and that explains its high rating from me. As for the story, well, I’m on record as being in the very small minority of people who hate the new ‘Hickman-X-Verse’ but one issue in this collection (#7) actually offended me and I am not easy to offend! I listen to GWAR, fer Chrissakes! I’ve been called sick and twisted many, many times! Yet I actually found the concept of de-powered mutants queuing up for suicide-by-Apocalypse so they could be replaced by a clone of their original powered self offensive! Go figure! Let’s not forget these characters are not actually being resurrected, folks; they’re being killed off and replaced by clones with psychically installed recordings of their memories. I hate to break it to you but every X-Man Hickman has killed off and replaced is no more the original character resurrected than Ben Reilly was Peter Parker resurrected. Sorry to piss in your milkshake! Of course, you could say the same thing about every Star Trek character that’s ever been ‘beamed up’. All the transporters do is disintegrate the original and create an exact copy in a new location... but I digress... Back to this book: #7: story 1*, artwork 4* #8: story 3*, artwork 4* #9: story 3*, artwork 4* #10: story 2*, artwork 4* #11: story 2*, artwork 4* #12: story 2*, artwork 4* Overall: 3.083 stars, rounded down.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Hickman delivers another great volume! Similar to the last volume most stories feel disconnected in a sense but that's because Hickman is focusing on SO many X-men you give time to each one in each story. Issue 7, which focuses on the Resurrection process with Apocalypse, Issue 9 with my boy Broo, and issue 11, which is a tie-in but intense showcase for magneto in both his leadership and power are the highlights of this volume. This isn't to say Issue 10 isn't good too, because it is, but you mi Hickman delivers another great volume! Similar to the last volume most stories feel disconnected in a sense but that's because Hickman is focusing on SO many X-men you give time to each one in each story. Issue 7, which focuses on the Resurrection process with Apocalypse, Issue 9 with my boy Broo, and issue 11, which is a tie-in but intense showcase for magneto in both his leadership and power are the highlights of this volume. This isn't to say Issue 10 isn't good too, because it is, but you might not know the members and have less of a reason to care. Issue 8 is solid but it's more of a lead up for issue 9 which helps with a major twist at the end. Overall, if looking for world building like no other, X-Men is the book you NEED to be reading. A 4 out of 5.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Finally delving back into the HiX-Men-verse, starting with the next volume of the main series. This continues to be a very good book, and Hickman keeps delivering amazing ideas and concepts in between insightful character development and clever world-building. The only thing keeping my rating from full 5 stars here is the dreaded, mandatory Empyre crossover tie-in. And I have to give Hickman credit here, too — he does his absolute best to make those last two issues as standalone as possible. The Finally delving back into the HiX-Men-verse, starting with the next volume of the main series. This continues to be a very good book, and Hickman keeps delivering amazing ideas and concepts in between insightful character development and clever world-building. The only thing keeping my rating from full 5 stars here is the dreaded, mandatory Empyre crossover tie-in. And I have to give Hickman credit here, too — he does his absolute best to make those last two issues as standalone as possible. They still feel a bit tacked-on, but only slightly, and do just as much for the X-Men as they do for Empyre (presumably, haven’t read it myself). Oh, and that Crucible issue? Fantastic. One of his best X-issues to date, including anything from HoXPoX.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tiago

    Jonathan Hickman truly is re-inventing the X-Men, there's so many plotlines building up in these new titles, so far I'm loving all the reworks he's doing to the characters and old storylines, and after reading the last issue, looks like the origins of mutantdom is about to be seriously expanded. The anthology style might not be for everyone though, as an individual book, this volume feels a bit disconnected, you kinda need to read most of Dawn of X in reading order for these issues to really shin Jonathan Hickman truly is re-inventing the X-Men, there's so many plotlines building up in these new titles, so far I'm loving all the reworks he's doing to the characters and old storylines, and after reading the last issue, looks like the origins of mutantdom is about to be seriously expanded. The anthology style might not be for everyone though, as an individual book, this volume feels a bit disconnected, you kinda need to read most of Dawn of X in reading order for these issues to really shine, and they DO shine, almost all of them. I liked the focus on a single character/subject in each issue, and the artwork is in a really sweet spot for me, really starting to dig Leinil Francis Yu's style. Stuff I'm on the fence so far, the threesome (foursome?) relationship is kinda gross, and the story is getting a bit too religious for my taste, also, the floral/nature theme is starting to feel overused with all these titles.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Still early in the Hickman X-Men era, these stories still feel a bit episodic, but if I know Hickman, things will tie together in interesting ways later. This volume opens with a story about a new mutant rite called the Crucible, which is left mysterious for the good first half of the opening issue, but once you learn more, it's very interesting to see how the mutants of Krakoa deal with those who still suffer the fallout of Scarlet Witch's great sin of mutant eradication, and how they earn thei Still early in the Hickman X-Men era, these stories still feel a bit episodic, but if I know Hickman, things will tie together in interesting ways later. This volume opens with a story about a new mutant rite called the Crucible, which is left mysterious for the good first half of the opening issue, but once you learn more, it's very interesting to see how the mutants of Krakoa deal with those who still suffer the fallout of Scarlet Witch's great sin of mutant eradication, and how they earn their rebirth back into mutant society. This was truly a fascinating exploration of an idea, told mostly through conversations Cyclops has with Wolverine and then Nightcrawler about the moral implications of these new mutant rites and laws. The next two issues connect the King Egg from the New Mutants' recent space adventures with the Starjammers (and just illustrates how important it is to be reading all of these titles of the new mutant era, damn you Marvel--I'd complain if I wasn't enjoying them all so much, with the exception of Fallen Angels, which was canceled because apparently many others felt the same way) and the Brood into a storyline that is most assuredly planting seeds that will come to fruition later. This arc was also my introduction to mah boy Broo, who I will now have to go and read the earlier tales of. Concluding the volume are two Empyre tie-ins, which is an "event" I had absolutely zero interest in, but thankfully Hickman keeps these focused on the X-Men/Krakoa story, tying in the invasion of the Cotati plant-people into the recurring theme of Krakoa's early days of fighting for survival against external threats and their developing defense. The first issue shows us some of what Gabriel Summers went through after the War of Kings story (another one I had no interest in and did not read), and as he deals with the Cotati threat on the moon he inadvertently draws their attention to Krakoa on Earth. The second issue is a story of Magneto's heroism told through the eyes of Exodus and the children he relates the tale to. It says a lot about Hickman's ability as a writer that I was interested in these tangential side stories to an event that I couldn't have cared less about. I'm a bit skeptical as to whether issue 12 will be included in this volume--all the marketing currently says no, but that issue was a lead-in to the X of Swords story that looks like it's going to be quite the epic X-Men event. It lays out some historical groundwork for where that story is going, but it also serves as a nice conclusion to the story of the Summoner and his Arakkii game, so I could see it being included here. It's inclusion or omission has no bearing on my rating of this book, however. Hickman has continued to expand on the X-Men mythology in fascinating new ways that other writers are going to be pulling from for decades to come. Leinil Francis Yu does all of the artwork in this volume save for one issue, and as always, it is beautiful to look at. I hope they keep him on board this book for a long time, and that any fill-in artists are capable of achieving that same high standard. I've been an X-Men fan since the early 90s, but I don't think I've been this excited about them since those days. Can't wait to see where Hickman takes us on this journey.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    I do love the fact that Hickman can put his own stamp on the X-Men universe without losing anything that makes them the X-Men. We've got a Brood story, a story about the Summers', a two-issue Empyre tie-in that reminds us what a badass Magneto is, and a story about how killing the X-Men just makes them mad. And throughout each of the five issues, Hickman's threads contineu to weave, tightening as we head towards X Of Swords and beyond. Hell, the dude manages to do an Empyre tie-in and STILL get I do love the fact that Hickman can put his own stamp on the X-Men universe without losing anything that makes them the X-Men. We've got a Brood story, a story about the Summers', a two-issue Empyre tie-in that reminds us what a badass Magneto is, and a story about how killing the X-Men just makes them mad. And throughout each of the five issues, Hickman's threads contineu to weave, tightening as we head towards X Of Swords and beyond. Hell, the dude manages to do an Empyre tie-in and STILL get his own story points going on as well, something that other writers often struggle with. And again, the book looks great. Leinil Yu pencils four issues, while Mahmud Asrar pops up for an issue as well; I do love it when Marvel throw their top talent at their top books, because it always pays off. X-Men can feel a little fragmented at times, because it's telling a story that's much larger than what we can see just yet, but it does it with flair and fun at all times. Hickman's clearly having a blast, and I certainly am as well. (He even made me like Vulcan in one issue, when I'd hated the guy for YEARS, so that's an accomplishment to be proud of as well!)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian Garthoff

    I could’ve done without Marvel shoehorning Empyre into X-men but the series was largely unaffected by it. The Breakaway Xmen/Empyre is collected separately and all together decent, but 10 & 11 just feel tacked on and unnecessary. We’re a year into Hickman’s Xverse and it’s been solid overall with moments of greatness. Hoping this next full scale X of Swords event delivers something better and moves across each X series in a meaningful or just fun way.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Guess I gotta go figure out how that brood story ended, which series is it in?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Q.

    Why is every issue of this comic about a different storyline? What is happening

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christian Zamora-Dahmen

    I found this second set of X-Men books to be much more meaningful and interesting than the first one. it doesn’t expand over a lot of books to tell good stories and that’s something I appreciate. Hickman does realize that in one single issue, a great story can be told and that’s so much welcomed and needed at a time of never ending events. This series is expanding on what the new status for the X-men, on what the whole Krakoa thing means to to mutant kind. It comes off as believable and cohesive, I found this second set of X-Men books to be much more meaningful and interesting than the first one. it doesn’t expand over a lot of books to tell good stories and that’s something I appreciate. Hickman does realize that in one single issue, a great story can be told and that’s so much welcomed and needed at a time of never ending events. This series is expanding on what the new status for the X-men, on what the whole Krakoa thing means to to mutant kind. It comes off as believable and cohesive, and as a result, it makes you love being an X-Men fan these days.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adan

    There are a lot of aliens in this collection, as well as a lot of Summers and New Mutants, but the most important thing that happened in this book was the very real flirting between Logan and Scott, and oh man they’re totally bi and in a thruple with Jean. Also, Nightcrawler may be starting a new mutant religion, and Broo might be the new Emperor of all Brood.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    "Bobby... Why were you talking to a Kree Accuser in our living room?" "Bobby... Why were you talking to a Kree Accuser in our living room?"

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Taking us from the amazing first Volume up to the beginnings of their role in Empyre, X-Men Vol 2 keeps the amazing Hickman run going with 3 storylines. Highlights: - Since the events of "Decimation/House of M", there are certain mutants who never regained their abilities. With the new laws of Krakoa, that makes some "still technically human" residents in need of making a decision. The Ruling Council has come up with the ceremony of Crucible. In Crucible, a mutant who never got their powers back Taking us from the amazing first Volume up to the beginnings of their role in Empyre, X-Men Vol 2 keeps the amazing Hickman run going with 3 storylines. Highlights: - Since the events of "Decimation/House of M", there are certain mutants who never regained their abilities. With the new laws of Krakoa, that makes some "still technically human" residents in need of making a decision. The Ruling Council has come up with the ceremony of Crucible. In Crucible, a mutant who never got their powers back shows their dedication to their mutant heritage and cause by fighting in an arena to the death. This way, they are able to be brought back by The Five and their powers will be restored. This time, Melody Guthrie (Aero) faces down Apocalypse and earns her right. As a side, both Cyclops and Nightcrawler discuss the moral implications of the ceremony. - In the first Volume of New Mutants, part of the team headed out to space to deal with the Shi'Ar. Wolfsbane has brought back a souvenir, but she doesn't know what it is. Broo comes to visit the team and exclaims that they have brought home a Brood King Egg... which he says right before the Brood begin to invade Earth trying to get it back and destroy it. Cyclops, Havok and more of the Summers Family grab the King Egg and head out to space. The Brood soon follow, but stop when Broo, in a fit of hunger, has eaten the King Egg. We have yet to see the ramifications of what that will do. Is he King of the Brood now? - As part of the beginning of the tie-in to Empyre, we see the establishing of a Cotati base on the moon (they look like Groot to me... guess I'll find out when I read Empyre). The only three left in the Summers Home are Vulcan, Petra and Sway (recently resurrected after dying during the events of Deadly Genesis... old comic) and they do their best to fight, but are too intoxicated to stop their advance on Earth. As the Cotati land on Krakoa, they begin to fight the mutants, and Magma and Iceman combine their powers to make lots of metal shards for Magneto to use. (I assume the story will pick up more in Empyre: X-Men) Another great Volume by Hickman. There hasn't been a part of Dawn of X that I haven't liked in some way, shape, or form. Keep up the great work X Books!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Waskett

    This was a bizarre selection of stories, which might follow on from one another but I'm not sure. We find out how the Mutants who were depowered can become Mutants again and it's a bit harsh to be honest. Though it's good to see Cannonball, Husk, Icarus and Aero back together again. We have a fight with the Brood, we have Sway and Petra getting very drunk, we have Vulcan having some serious issues going on, but not sure which are in his head and not. We have Magneto being all Magneto and we have This was a bizarre selection of stories, which might follow on from one another but I'm not sure. We find out how the Mutants who were depowered can become Mutants again and it's a bit harsh to be honest. Though it's good to see Cannonball, Husk, Icarus and Aero back together again. We have a fight with the Brood, we have Sway and Petra getting very drunk, we have Vulcan having some serious issues going on, but not sure which are in his head and not. We have Magneto being all Magneto and we have the Summers family going on Holiday. We also have the Starjammers and The Imperial Guard. This is all awesome. But the stories stop and start in very odd places and though they seem to interlink, I can't tell how and whether they're finished or are going to be got back to at a later stage. Except for Vulcan and the three Aliens, that came out of nowhere and I have no idea where it is heading to.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    It's interesting that Hickman continues to use the core X-Men book to tell very scattered short tales, but on the other hand it's delightful to see him focus on members of the very large cast that are usually neglected. The best of this volume is "Lifedeath" (#7), which focuses on the Guthrie clan, the Summers clan, and the resurrection protocol. Every part of that is terrific, but especially the repercussions of the protocol. The other great issue is "Fire" (#10), because it gives some of the be It's interesting that Hickman continues to use the core X-Men book to tell very scattered short tales, but on the other hand it's delightful to see him focus on members of the very large cast that are usually neglected. The best of this volume is "Lifedeath" (#7), which focuses on the Guthrie clan, the Summers clan, and the resurrection protocol. Every part of that is terrific, but especially the repercussions of the protocol. The other great issue is "Fire" (#10), because it gives some of the best attention ever to Vulcan, and even connects things up to his last appearance in the War of Kings. (We also get what I suspect will be the best crossover between the lack-luster Empyre and the well-lustred X-Men.) The other issues are all fine. The two-issue Brood storyline has some nice background. The final Empyre story really pays some attention to whom the X-Men are in bed with. Hickman is doing a great job of really examining this weird, wonderful new state of the X-Men.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Subham

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a fun read and then again this time is 2 issue stories. The 7th one is Crucible, after the events of M Day, mutants lost their power but here they have to fight in a Gladitorial arena against Apocalypse and die and then be reborn as that happens with Melody. Its a fun issue and shows the dark life in Krakoa and also Nightcrawler starting his own religion. 8th and 9th - Cyclops and Starjammers and Shi'aar vs Kree accuser and Brood and Broo becoming the King of the Broo. It was a fun story This was a fun read and then again this time is 2 issue stories. The 7th one is Crucible, after the events of M Day, mutants lost their power but here they have to fight in a Gladitorial arena against Apocalypse and die and then be reborn as that happens with Melody. Its a fun issue and shows the dark life in Krakoa and also Nightcrawler starting his own religion. 8th and 9th - Cyclops and Starjammers and Shi'aar vs Kree accuser and Brood and Broo becoming the King of the Broo. It was a fun story and shows that X-Men have got a new army. 10th & 11th - One focusing on Vulcan and something "fire" (some modification) done to him and his evil self might soon come out and the other Magneto being badass and tying into Empyre. These two issues were better than most Empyre tie-ins. It was an overall a fun read yeah and continues to build up this Krakoan life and era.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    I really want to like this - Hickman's work setting up the entire new X-Men world has been outstanding, but this continuing line is just not doing it. It seems he has too many ideas and switches between a thousand plot lines from issue to issue. I'm sure he has a plan and they will eventually connect, but it's far too disjointed to enjoy month to month. This series has been going on for about a year, but the hodgepodge nature continues to be a problem. Having to shoehorn in the Empyre storyline I really want to like this - Hickman's work setting up the entire new X-Men world has been outstanding, but this continuing line is just not doing it. It seems he has too many ideas and switches between a thousand plot lines from issue to issue. I'm sure he has a plan and they will eventually connect, but it's far too disjointed to enjoy month to month. This series has been going on for about a year, but the hodgepodge nature continues to be a problem. Having to shoehorn in the Empyre storyline certainly didn't help. Hickman seems way too wrapped up in some very meta ideas, and frankly the result is a very poor story with occasional bright spots. If you're looking for a good X-men line, go for X-Force or the new Wolverine story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    Hickman’s X-Men continues to be a thing of beauty though its, albeit elegant, ties to Marvel’s Empyre event make me worry about the main X-Men book going forward, particularly as I know immediately after this volume the book crosses over with every other X-Men book on stands right now. I’m hoping this remains a run that I can continue to appreciate on its own trade paperback by trade paperback, but those are concerns beyond this book. This book is very cool.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dovydas

    Resurrections, intergalactic wars, and the talking trees attacking the Earth. So much stuff packed into these few issues, but everything's executed really well. Hickman, as always, writes very well and plants seeds for the future in every page. The artwork's fantastic as well. This just keeps getting better and better. Resurrections, intergalactic wars, and the talking trees attacking the Earth. So much stuff packed into these few issues, but everything's executed really well. Hickman, as always, writes very well and plants seeds for the future in every page. The artwork's fantastic as well. This just keeps getting better and better.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dimitrios

    It's so great to read a book where anything can happen. Unpredictable. That is what this new take on the X-Men brings. Love it and all the morally questionable things going on, and really, being asked. What is good and what id bad? For whom? And who decides? Something ominous but oh so good about mutant children cheering on Magneto as their hero. It's so great to read a book where anything can happen. Unpredictable. That is what this new take on the X-Men brings. Love it and all the morally questionable things going on, and really, being asked. What is good and what id bad? For whom? And who decides? Something ominous but oh so good about mutant children cheering on Magneto as their hero.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mr Alexander

    This is...fine. It has some good moments, but it's SO disjointed. I'm pretty sure I said the same thing about the first volume. I like the individual issues mostly. I just want more forward motion with the overall X-story I guess. This is...fine. It has some good moments, but it's SO disjointed. I'm pretty sure I said the same thing about the first volume. I like the individual issues mostly. I just want more forward motion with the overall X-story I guess.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    Beginning with a philosophical meditation on what it means to be alive and ending by defining heroism, the rollicking story in the middle nearly disappears - but not quite. A solid continuation of Hickman's X-vision, and no suffering from 2and collection falloff. Beginning with a philosophical meditation on what it means to be alive and ending by defining heroism, the rollicking story in the middle nearly disappears - but not quite. A solid continuation of Hickman's X-vision, and no suffering from 2and collection falloff.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I hope normal 'viewing' resumes after X of Swords. And there is so much build of so many storylines in the first 12 issues of X-men that I am excited too explore. I am excited for Broo also... Hopefully he will be sticking around in future arcs. I miss him being featured I X-men titles. I hope normal 'viewing' resumes after X of Swords. And there is so much build of so many storylines in the first 12 issues of X-men that I am excited too explore. I am excited for Broo also... Hopefully he will be sticking around in future arcs. I miss him being featured I X-men titles.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Still not really sure what’s going on after a year of reading this series but I think it’s almost there, which I guess means Hickman is doing what he does best.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marvel Grrrl

    #11 is definitely the best issue in the Dawn of X X-Men run. I hope to see more writing like that going forward!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kaiulani

    Just not into this series. It’s vague, disjointed and lacks any semblance of emotion.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    I liked volume 2 but it felt like a slighty wattered down colume of East of West. Good but not awesome. 3.5 stars

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