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‘The entire Dalek race, wiped out in one second. I watched it happen. I made it happen!’ The Doctor and Rose arrive in an underground vault in Utah in the near future. The vault is filled with alien artefacts. Its billionaire owner, Henry van Statten, even has possession of a living alien creature, a mechanical monster in chains that he has named a Metaltron. Seeking to ‘The entire Dalek race, wiped out in one second. I watched it happen. I made it happen!’ The Doctor and Rose arrive in an underground vault in Utah in the near future. The vault is filled with alien artefacts. Its billionaire owner, Henry van Statten, even has possession of a living alien creature, a mechanical monster in chains that he has named a Metaltron. Seeking to help the Metaltron, the Doctor is appalled to find it is in fact a Dalek – one that has survived the horrors of the Time War just as he has. And as the Dalek breaks loose, the Doctor is brought back to the brutality and desperation of his darkest hours spent fighting the creatures of Skaro… this time with the Earth as their battlefield.


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‘The entire Dalek race, wiped out in one second. I watched it happen. I made it happen!’ The Doctor and Rose arrive in an underground vault in Utah in the near future. The vault is filled with alien artefacts. Its billionaire owner, Henry van Statten, even has possession of a living alien creature, a mechanical monster in chains that he has named a Metaltron. Seeking to ‘The entire Dalek race, wiped out in one second. I watched it happen. I made it happen!’ The Doctor and Rose arrive in an underground vault in Utah in the near future. The vault is filled with alien artefacts. Its billionaire owner, Henry van Statten, even has possession of a living alien creature, a mechanical monster in chains that he has named a Metaltron. Seeking to help the Metaltron, the Doctor is appalled to find it is in fact a Dalek – one that has survived the horrors of the Time War just as he has. And as the Dalek breaks loose, the Doctor is brought back to the brutality and desperation of his darkest hours spent fighting the creatures of Skaro… this time with the Earth as their battlefield.

30 review for Doctor Who: Dalek

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    Wow! You feel as if you have been exterminated by the time you get to the end of this book. It's stuff of nightmares all the extras even a Dalek biography this 100% more than what was shown on the TV. Background stories that have you crying. Wow! You feel as if you have been exterminated by the time you get to the end of this book. It's stuff of nightmares all the extras even a Dalek biography this 100% more than what was shown on the TV. Background stories that have you crying.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul Griggs

    Like many fans who became professional writers, Robert Shearman grew up on the Target novelisations and now, given the chance to represent his classic Ninth Doctor adventure, he does so in a style inspired by Malcolm Hulke as he expands on the background of many of his characters. It also gives us a look at the story minus Russell T Davies own polish showing minor differences to the dialogue and plotting while still presenting the story that is recognisably “Dalek”. Masterpiece.

  3. 4 out of 5

    TheGeekProblem

    Of course I picked the book as soon as it was out. This is one of my favourite episodes of series one and I’m so happy they made the novelisation. It took me a while to finish it but here I am with an honest review of the book. Overall? It needed more Doctor and Rose. Don’t get me wrong, the parts we get of Rose were really good, her thoughts and her personality shined through amazingly and I loved that. And the Doctor was just amazing to read. But I felt like they were side stepped just to give a Of course I picked the book as soon as it was out. This is one of my favourite episodes of series one and I’m so happy they made the novelisation. It took me a while to finish it but here I am with an honest review of the book. Overall? It needed more Doctor and Rose. Don’t get me wrong, the parts we get of Rose were really good, her thoughts and her personality shined through amazingly and I loved that. And the Doctor was just amazing to read. But I felt like they were side stepped just to give all the characters that died in the episode a little back story. Like, no, I don’t want to read about the soldier that told Rose and Adam to run; no, I don’t want to read about the guy that tortured the Dalek, I didn’t even know he had a name; and I definitely don’t want to know about Van Statten’s character. I want to read about the Doctor struggling and Rose’s compassion, not about a side character that I didn’t even know had a name on the episode. I didn’t like the changes they did for the character of Goddard and the end of Van Statten. I really liked the idea of Goddard being a smart, power hungry woman just because and at the end taking charge of everything and wiping out Van Statten’s memories as retaliation for everything that had happened. I don’t know, I felt like it was a good ending for their characters and instead we get this ending that it’s a little more compassionate to Van Statten and I thought it was a bit boring. The imagery was really good, there were bits of cut scenes that you didn’t understand until they finally made sense and created this beautiful fantasy world of escapism. There was also this final tender moment where the Doctor and Rose talk after the whole ordeal and it’s just so sweet and you can see how much they love each other. All in all, pretty good, perfect to pass the time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    Adapted by the original author from his TV script, itself loosely (very loosely) based on an audio doctor who script (jubilee starring colin baker) this novel had so much potential. It's an action packed episode which I enjoyed despite not being convinced by the resolution. Unfortunately the book falls short for me. The writing is fine but the excitement of the story is gone. It feels a bit flat. There are several chapters of extra material but it consists of character backstories that actually Adapted by the original author from his TV script, itself loosely (very loosely) based on an audio doctor who script (jubilee starring colin baker) this novel had so much potential. It's an action packed episode which I enjoyed despite not being convinced by the resolution. Unfortunately the book falls short for me. The writing is fine but the excitement of the story is gone. It feels a bit flat. There are several chapters of extra material but it consists of character backstories that actually don't add much to the story. There are changes to the episode that don't quite work as well including a very flat end for the dalek compared to what was shown on screen. And considering this is a story that showcased the return of the daleks the dalek is not well served in the book. A backstory chapter for the dalek is confused and doesn't really work. The sequences for the dalek onscreen which were brilliant are glossed over for the most part in the novel. In fact much of the original episode seems to be glossed over. Robert shearman is an author lauded for his doctor who audio stories but I never found his audio scripts that riveting. Dalek was for me his best doctor who story, unfortunately the book is just a bit of a disappointment. It is well written but its surprisingly dull. It does have a great cover though and I will read it again. I'll probably enjoy it more on a second read knowing what to expect. As ever... feel free to disagree and needless to say if my opinion changes on a second read I'll write a new review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kieran McAndrew

    The Doctor and Rose Tyler find themselves in a bunker half a mile below Utah where a multi billionaire has a secret collection of alien artefacts, including an old enemy of the Doctor's. Shearman adapts his television episode version of the Big Finish audio play 'Jubilee' and this works well in the main, though Henry van Statten's back story is weak and Adam Mitchell does not feel right. The Doctor and Rose Tyler find themselves in a bunker half a mile below Utah where a multi billionaire has a secret collection of alien artefacts, including an old enemy of the Doctor's. Shearman adapts his television episode version of the Big Finish audio play 'Jubilee' and this works well in the main, though Henry van Statten's back story is weak and Adam Mitchell does not feel right.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    "Dalek" is a perfect episode of "Doctor Who". It’s got great character work, thrilling action sequences, and an expertly crafted and executed plot. The idea of novelizing the episode must have been a daunting one for Robert Shearman, the episode’s original writer and the author of this new Target novelization. How do you successfully translate the episode’s bone-chilling tension into prose? The answer, in "Dalek"’s case, is that you don’t. Instead, Shearman takes the opportunity to delve deeper "Dalek" is a perfect episode of "Doctor Who". It’s got great character work, thrilling action sequences, and an expertly crafted and executed plot. The idea of novelizing the episode must have been a daunting one for Robert Shearman, the episode’s original writer and the author of this new Target novelization. How do you successfully translate the episode’s bone-chilling tension into prose? The answer, in "Dalek"’s case, is that you don’t. Instead, Shearman takes the opportunity to delve deeper into the story, stretching out the backstories of all of the characters and allowing the narrative a lot of room to breathe. This results in a compelling novel, but one that lacks the tension and focus of the episode it’s adapting. It’s a fun read—but a wildly different experience when compared to the episode. On the surface, Robert Shearman’s novelization of "Dalek" closely follows the events of the episode. The Doctor and Rose pick up a distress signal and arrive in Henry Van Statten’s underground alien museum. They find a lone Dalek chained up, having been subjected to various forms of torture to get it to talk. Naturally, the Dalek (with a little inadvertent help from Rose) breaks free and reins terror on almost everyone trapped in the fortress. It’s a simple plot, but one that allowed the episode’s direction and character work to take center stage. The episode works as well as it does because it’s brilliantly directed, Rose and the Doctor are given a lot of great character work to play with, and Billie Piper and Christopher Ecclestone take that character work and deliver breathtaking performances. You lose all of these qualities in a novelization, as the reader only has whatever the writer’s written to go off of. Now, to be fair, Shearman has a true gift with words. His prose is so easy to read, striking a perfect balance between description, emotion, and action. There’s never a dull moment in the book, and you get the impression Shearman has a perfect understanding of the story he wants to tell—and that understanding results in an expertly crafted narrative. The problem is that, compared to the episode, Shearman’s novelization of "Dalek" is rather unfocused. If you’ve always found yourself wanting to know the backstories of all of the side characters, then Shearman’s novelization is the book for you. Every single side character—Van Statten, Goddard, Adam, Simmons, Bywater, and the Dalek—gets an expanded backstory. These backstories mostly enrich the characters, giving readers a much better understanding of why certain people do certain things. Surprisingly, the Dalek ends up being one of the most compelling characters, with Shearman emphasizing how unique this particular Dalek is when compared to its brethren; how its personality has been shaped by the specific trauma it’s undergone. However, these expanded backstories come at the cost of the book’s main characters and the story’s tension. The Doctor and Rose receive the least attention of any of the named characters in the book, often fading into the background as Shearman focuses extensively on another side character. We still get all of the powerful moments from the episode, with the Doctor showing exactly how he came to have the reputation he has. But these moments fall a bit flat when we spend so little time with the Doctor and Rose. When the main characters fade away into the background, it’s kind of hard to care about their journeys. They don’t seem to be at the top of Shearman’s list of concerns, so they’re not at the top of ours either. The same is generally true for the book’s plot. The episode is a tightly-paced, claustrophobic affair—similar, in many ways, to Ridley Scott’s "Alien" film. Everyone is trapped in this fairly small location with an alien hellbent on killing them. Everything that happens in the episode is in service of this plot, and then tension just keeps increasing with every moment that passes. This isn’t the vibe emitted by the novel. Here, everything feels a bit more relaxed. Shearman takes his time putting all of the pieces on the board, and then he takes even more time slowly moving them from Point A to Point B. Those expanded backstories are scattered throughout the book, often placed at pivotal moments in the narrative. And, unfortunately, they tend to grind the narrative to a screeching halt. It’s hard to go from a thrilling action scene to a very lengthy delve into the backstory of a character who’s either just been killed or is just about to be killed while still maintaining any kind of tension. And that’s exactly what the novel lacks—tension. Now, the story works reasonably well without this tension, becoming more of an examination of how these individual people react in the face of certain Dalek-related death. But the lesser tension is very noticeable and sometimes detracts from the book’s effectiveness. I understand, and appreciate, the desire to use a novelization to delve deeper into underexplored characters, but there’s a balance between doing that and still focusing on the narrative’s core elements—and I’m just not sure Shearman’s "Dalek" novelization struck that balance. This doesn’t end up being a deal-breaker or anything, but it is a bit of a disappointment. Ultimately, whether or not you enjoy Robert Shearman’s novelization of "Dalek" is gonna depend on what you wanted out of it. If you wanted something as tense and thrilling as the original TV episode, you’ll be wildly disappointed. But if you wanted a nice, expansive look at the story that acts more as a complementary companion to the story, instead of a replacement for it, then you’ll be enraptured by this book. All of the added character beats are, pun-intended, fantastic. But they come at the cost of some of the narrative’s best elements. The Doctor and Rose fade into the background some, and the story’s nowhere near as tense as it could be. But it’s still a fun read. It’s a wildly different experience when compared to the episode, but it’s not a bad time. It’s just… different. In good ways and bad ones. And that’s probably how these Target novelizations should be. Overall, "Dalek" is a fun read and a lovely companion to one of my favorite "Doctor Who" episodes. It’s well worth a read, even if it’s not perfect.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Kresal

    Back in the 1970s and into the 1980s, the only way fans of Doctor Who often could encounter an older story was by reading it. The Target novelizations were slim books, frequently running little more than 150 pages. Yet, they became the cornerstone of the show's merchandise. These days, of course, that isn't the case with options, including DVDs and streaming platforms. That hasn't stopped such demand for new Target-style novelizations of twenty-first-century episodes, which BBC Books began oblig Back in the 1970s and into the 1980s, the only way fans of Doctor Who often could encounter an older story was by reading it. The Target novelizations were slim books, frequently running little more than 150 pages. Yet, they became the cornerstone of the show's merchandise. These days, of course, that isn't the case with options, including DVDs and streaming platforms. That hasn't stopped such demand for new Target-style novelizations of twenty-first-century episodes, which BBC Books began obliging with in 2019, with a new batch released in spring 2021. One of the most anticipated was Dalek, the novelization of the 2005 episode that brought Doctor Who's greatest monster back to the screen and penned by its original scriptwriter, Robert Shearman. When the original Target books were in their heyday, they generally came in two types. The first, and by far the most common, were straightforward adaptations of the episodes that (at worst) felt like a copy and paste of the script with a few lines of description and "said" added. On the other hand, you would also get books that expanded upon the televised stories with more detail and backstories or, in some cases, reinstating material cut for time. Shearman's Dalek falls into the latter category, and the results are nothing short of intriguing. For starters, Shearman interspaces little interludes at intervals between moments from the TV episode. These various “Tales” by Shearman, they offer insights into the past lives of the characters we meet in the underground base in Utah. They range from Dalek torturer Simmons and how billionaire Henry van Statten acquired the Dalek to an almost complete reinvention of the Diana Goddard character. The best of them, The Soldier's Tale, comes late in the book but is a powerful and even unsettling piece of storytelling in its own right. Each of them, and one about the guard who helps Rose and Adam escape to safety about midway through the narrative, are highlights. Together, they tell the story of how they ended up half a mile underground in Utah while adding to its emotional pull. Those aren't the only changes that Shearman makes. Fans of the TV episode (as this reviewer is), you're going to be surprised by how much Shearman essentially rewrites the episode. Character introductions are moved about or reimagined, and pieces of dialogue (such as the exchange between van Statten and Goddard about who the next US President should be) get moved around. Elsewhere, moments such as the Cyberman's head in the museum are entirely missing. Shearman also puts in much of his trademark dark humor, toned down during the original TV episode's adaptation from the Big Finish story Jubilee, including a delicious flashback to a golf game with the US President. Many of the changes work wonderfully in context though I can't help feeling that the changes to the ending undermine the characters of van Statten and Goddard to an extent. In doing so, Shearman creates a version of Dalek (to paraphrase the strapline of the Virgin New Adventures of yesteryear) broader and deeper than what viewers saw in 2005. Perhaps the best way to sum up this version of Dalek is that it isn't so much a novelization as it is a slight reimagining of it in prose. From expanded character backstories to new twists on familiar scenes, Shearman creates an intriguing new take on his classic episode. For fans of one of the best episodes of the 2005 series or Shearman's writing, Dalek is simply a must for their collection.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kaoru

    In a recent interview with the Doctor Who Magazine, Shearman said that (and I'm paraphrasing here because I don't have a copy of said issue at hand) when he was attempting to write this novelization he came to realize that regarding the plot there wasn't all that much to the TV episode. Overall it's just a bunch of people running away from a Dalek. So to make the story novel-worthy he had to look into the 'past' and expand on the characters' backgrounds, which is achieved by a myriad of extended In a recent interview with the Doctor Who Magazine, Shearman said that (and I'm paraphrasing here because I don't have a copy of said issue at hand) when he was attempting to write this novelization he came to realize that regarding the plot there wasn't all that much to the TV episode. Overall it's just a bunch of people running away from a Dalek. So to make the story novel-worthy he had to look into the 'past' and expand on the characters' backgrounds, which is achieved by a myriad of extended flashbacks between chapters. The result is something that could probably be viewed from two sides. They barely have an impact on the main story, so one might very well argue that it's obvious that they're only there to stretch things out to make up enough pages for a novel (with a quite large font size). On the other hand they weave a web of lore around the van Statten basement that is just as interesting to read as to see all its pieces falling into place over the course of the pages. Not to mention that they're often the best part of the book, showing some shearmansian moments that one didn't get to see that much in the transmitted episode. As neat as 'Dalek' on TV was, it had very little of one would come to expect from a Shearman-penned story, and it probably could have been written by anybody. But here, in all these little side-arms, we get them all; the grotesque black humor, the slightly warped characters and delicious nastiness sprinkled over the dialogue. Paired with the main thread as seen on TV it works and it doesn't work at the same time. I'm not sure if it all fully gels, but at the very least it makes for an interesting read, especially for those who come to this book mainly because it was written by Shearman, not just because it's Doctor Who and it has a Dalek in it. What's still intact however is the certain blend of wishy-washy magic wand plotting that used to be predominant in the RTD years. I've been trying to wrap my mind around the idea and logistics behind Rose's time-traveler touch somehow bringing the Dalek fully back to life when the episode aired, and I'm still not buying the twist in 2021. So what would have happened if the Doctor had touched it? Would it have gone timelord? Would it have regenerated after it blew itself up? And since when was this a thing in the first place? Why did it never happen before when either the Doctor or one of his companions touched a battered Dalek, and why did it never happen again? I had completely forgotten how this era of the show was littered with these not fully thought through moments like these. They might have been convenient for the script of the day, but they were headaches for the viewers who caught them. Shearman doesn't attempt to make this point any more plausible than it was on TV, instead he rushes through it as quickly as he can, drawing attention towards it as little as possible. I don't blame him, however, because sometimes there's only so much that one can do. After all, to appreciate Doctor Who you sometimes just have to keep an eye or two closed and generously overlook a flaw.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    A novelisation of Shearman's own script, featuring Christopher Ecclestone's Ninth Doctor and Rose Tyler. Receiving a distress signal, the Doctor and Rose arrive in a secret facility beneath the Utah desert, where a ruthless billionaire is keeping and torturing a captured alien being. However, the so-called Metaltron is far from harmless and is stirred into action by the arrival of the Doctor. This story marked the first appearance in the relaunched series of Doctor Who of the Time Lord's most ico A novelisation of Shearman's own script, featuring Christopher Ecclestone's Ninth Doctor and Rose Tyler. Receiving a distress signal, the Doctor and Rose arrive in a secret facility beneath the Utah desert, where a ruthless billionaire is keeping and torturing a captured alien being. However, the so-called Metaltron is far from harmless and is stirred into action by the arrival of the Doctor. This story marked the first appearance in the relaunched series of Doctor Who of the Time Lord's most iconic enemy and, unfortunately, its biggest flaw is its own title (not to mention the image on the cover). When I saw this on TV the first time (when it aired way back in 2005), I missed the title card and was therefore blown away by the scene in which the Doctor enters the darkened cell of the 'Metaltron' and says he's the Doctor and he's there to help. There's a brief pause and then, with lightbulbs flashing, the shadowed creature responds in that iconic metallic tone "Doc-tor? The Doc-tor?!" and then the Dalek is revealed, to the Doctor's horror. It remains one of my favourite scenes in Who but its impact will always be lessened by knowing that it's a Dalek. The way the story is written deliberately plays up the ambiguity of the Metaltron's identity but isn't self-aware enough to realise that the title has already spoiled the reveal. Imagine if 'The Sixth Sense' was called 'He's A Ghost The Whole Time'. But, aside from that one nitpick, this is a truly great Doctor Who story. It re-establishes exactly what makes the Daleks such a threat but also examines the fear and hatred that they and the Doctor have for each other. One of the best bits of the aforementioned meeting of Doctor and Dalek is the way that the Doctor goes from screaming terror to gloating over his role in wiping out the Dalek race ("I watched it happen. I made it happen!"). Having these two age-old enemies meet as the sole surviving members of their respective races, the last survivors of the Time War, makes for some very poignant explorations of them both. We're truly brought to understand not only how ruthless the Daleks are, but also how ruthless the Doctor is capable of being when trying to stop them. It's a real watershed moment for the Ninth incarnation and I love it. Shearman expands on the original story by fleshing out the backstories of many of the supporting characters with, it has to be said, mixed results. However, the best of these new inclusions is where we see the Dalek participating in the Time War, coming face to face (face to eyestalk?) with the War Doctor amid the Fall of Arcadia. It's a nice touch that brings the two main characters full circle in a way that wasn't possible when this was originally scripted due to the details of the Time War being so sketchy at that point (it wasn't until eight years later that we met John Hurt's War Doctor). * More reviews here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com *

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sam Whale

    Well, I read this in a day which I've not done with a book book in a while. 2005's Dalek is one of the best episodes of Doctor Who, which is, in my opinion, the best show ever made. So when Rob Shearman decided to go back and adapt the story 16 years later I had to pick it up and while I think the episode is the stronger story overall, this adaptation works so well as a book. The inclusion and expansion of characters like Simmons, Diana, and the guards make the human element of their character m Well, I read this in a day which I've not done with a book book in a while. 2005's Dalek is one of the best episodes of Doctor Who, which is, in my opinion, the best show ever made. So when Rob Shearman decided to go back and adapt the story 16 years later I had to pick it up and while I think the episode is the stronger story overall, this adaptation works so well as a book. The inclusion and expansion of characters like Simmons, Diana, and the guards make the human element of their character much stronger. Who they are and what lead them to this underground alien base where they never see the sun is interesting and will make their deaths much more emotional next time I watch the episode. I think seeing things directly from the Daleks viewpoint was a stroke of brilliance and the cunning, anger, hatred as well as the sorrow and pain which emanates from it in every page made is so much more sympathetic as a creature and its journey that much more harrowing. Overall Dalek is a great read and while the emotional core isn't quite as tight as the episode (I didn' quite cry) and it lacks the visual factor of the episode, the book more than makes up for it with deep dives into the secondary and terchuary characters and some great POV moments from the Dalek.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Reece

    Amazing, I really hope one day they make a book of the empty child episodes. Those were my favourite and most feared episodes of Doctor Who when I was growing up in the 2000’s. I read this as an audiobook. It was great as I was not expecting there to be any sound effects to help with immersion. I liked that it had the same scenes as the episode. Even better, it has more time and room for character development and that’s cool. If the whole first two seasons of Doctor Who could be books, I’d be ve Amazing, I really hope one day they make a book of the empty child episodes. Those were my favourite and most feared episodes of Doctor Who when I was growing up in the 2000’s. I read this as an audiobook. It was great as I was not expecting there to be any sound effects to help with immersion. I liked that it had the same scenes as the episode. Even better, it has more time and room for character development and that’s cool. If the whole first two seasons of Doctor Who could be books, I’d be very happy ☺️

  12. 4 out of 5

    Avril

    I was the wrong audience for this. Doctor Who is comfort viewing for me. This book adds a backstory to all the minor character and every backstory is awful. I can see what the author is doing; reminding us that people who become involved in the acquisition and torture of ‘aliens’ are horrible people, but I needed comfort from my Doctor Who, not ‘gritty realism’. I won’t be reading this again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris Griffin

    Rob Shearman proves what a great writer he is. The additional passages interspersed through the text give us greater insight into the characters, which is exactly what I want from a novelisation. I already thought Dalek was a great episode, and this has just enhanced it. Thoroughly recommended to any Dr Who fan.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    A few bits that felt a little awkward, but overall this is an adaptation of a great episode that really felt like it was using its format well - which isn't always the case when Doctor Who stories get translated from television to prose. A few bits that felt a little awkward, but overall this is an adaptation of a great episode that really felt like it was using its format well - which isn't always the case when Doctor Who stories get translated from television to prose.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Watson

    An excellent novelisation of an excellent TV episode. RS has managed to improve what was already a wonderful story. The additional chapters concentrating on some of the periforal characters are heartbreakingly beautiful.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ian Robinson

    Robert Shearman adapts his TV episode into an exciting and thoughtful book which fills in the backstory of those involved while staying true to the original. An excellent novelisation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex Beresford

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve Cooper

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  20. 5 out of 5

    J

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shane O'Carroll

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dan Billing

  23. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robert Rattray

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jae

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sapient

  28. 5 out of 5

    Iain

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mr Ben Bradford

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