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‘We must get to the bottom of this dark and queer business, no matter what the cost!' Something ghastly is afoot in Victorian Yorkshire. Something that kills. Bodies are washing up in the canal, their skin a waxy, glowing red… But just what is this crimson horror? Madam Vastra, Jenny and Strax are despatched to investigate the mystery. Strangely reluctant to assist their enq ‘We must get to the bottom of this dark and queer business, no matter what the cost!' Something ghastly is afoot in Victorian Yorkshire. Something that kills. Bodies are washing up in the canal, their skin a waxy, glowing red… But just what is this crimson horror? Madam Vastra, Jenny and Strax are despatched to investigate the mystery. Strangely reluctant to assist their enquiries is Mrs Winifred Gillyflower, matriarch of ‘Sweetville’, a seemingly utopian workers’ community. Why do all roads lead to the team's old friends Clara and the Doctor? Who is Mrs Gillyflower's mysterious silent partner Mr Sweet? And will the motley gang be in time to defeat the mysterious power that threatens all the world with its poison?


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‘We must get to the bottom of this dark and queer business, no matter what the cost!' Something ghastly is afoot in Victorian Yorkshire. Something that kills. Bodies are washing up in the canal, their skin a waxy, glowing red… But just what is this crimson horror? Madam Vastra, Jenny and Strax are despatched to investigate the mystery. Strangely reluctant to assist their enq ‘We must get to the bottom of this dark and queer business, no matter what the cost!' Something ghastly is afoot in Victorian Yorkshire. Something that kills. Bodies are washing up in the canal, their skin a waxy, glowing red… But just what is this crimson horror? Madam Vastra, Jenny and Strax are despatched to investigate the mystery. Strangely reluctant to assist their enquiries is Mrs Winifred Gillyflower, matriarch of ‘Sweetville’, a seemingly utopian workers’ community. Why do all roads lead to the team's old friends Clara and the Doctor? Who is Mrs Gillyflower's mysterious silent partner Mr Sweet? And will the motley gang be in time to defeat the mysterious power that threatens all the world with its poison?

30 review for Doctor Who: The Crimson Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    As a fan of Mark Gatiss’ writing and have fond memories of the Matt Smith era of Doctor Who, I was always going to enjoy this. I am aware that some of Gatiss’ Doctor Who writing can be hit and miss for some people, but this most certainly is not the case for me. The Crimson Horror is one of my favourite episodes and this is a fresh take on it. As it is mostly told from Jenny Flint’s perspective. I always adored the trio of Jenny, Madame Vastra and Strax on the television show, and they are portr As a fan of Mark Gatiss’ writing and have fond memories of the Matt Smith era of Doctor Who, I was always going to enjoy this. I am aware that some of Gatiss’ Doctor Who writing can be hit and miss for some people, but this most certainly is not the case for me. The Crimson Horror is one of my favourite episodes and this is a fresh take on it. As it is mostly told from Jenny Flint’s perspective. I always adored the trio of Jenny, Madame Vastra and Strax on the television show, and they are portrayed so well in this novella. Also Jenny and Vastra’s relationship is so sweet. Gatiss really shines when he writes stories with a Victorian era setting. The chapter written from the Eleventh Doctor’s perspective is really enjoyable because he captures the voice of the character so well. I am very pleased with the new collection of Doctor Who Target novels, as I have always been meaning to read some of the older ones. Fans have always talked about being very fond of them. From this new collection, I am considering reading Dalek next (soon), followed by the novelisation of the Doctor Who Movie.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    Very enjoyable, but very cluttered. There isn't a bit of Victoriana that Mark Gatiss doesn't try to mine or pastiche...including various Victorian-set episodes of "Doctor Who". And then there is the inclusion of the Victorian version of James Bond's SPECTRE, which takes us into the realms of loopy. It can feel rather relentless at times, but it's mitigated by a new bonus opening story, set before the actual episode, and lots of first-person POVs from the characters. Strax, as usual, steals the s Very enjoyable, but very cluttered. There isn't a bit of Victoriana that Mark Gatiss doesn't try to mine or pastiche...including various Victorian-set episodes of "Doctor Who". And then there is the inclusion of the Victorian version of James Bond's SPECTRE, which takes us into the realms of loopy. It can feel rather relentless at times, but it's mitigated by a new bonus opening story, set before the actual episode, and lots of first-person POVs from the characters. Strax, as usual, steals the show with his hilarity.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What muddle, tried to be cleaver by adding more than than the episode over 60 pages that are not in the television episode but don't work. Unless you an expert in Doctor who The in female jokes and reference to River Song. Mark Gatiss Newton Aycliffe boy has done what no other Doctor Who star and writer has done appearances in the show and written episodes. Dame Dina Rig played the horrible old hag in the episode and Mr Sweet is. I love what has done to Stax What muddle, tried to be cleaver by adding more than than the episode over 60 pages that are not in the television episode but don't work. Unless you an expert in Doctor who The in female jokes and reference to River Song. Mark Gatiss Newton Aycliffe boy has done what no other Doctor Who star and writer has done appearances in the show and written episodes. Dame Dina Rig played the horrible old hag in the episode and Mr Sweet is. I love what has done to Stax

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kieran McAndrew

    Bodies are appearing around Sweetville, near Bradford at the end of the nineteenth century and the Pater Noster Team meets the Doctor when he infiltrates the village to uncover its secret. Gatiss uses the epistolary style well, capturing the feel of 'Dracula' crossed with 'Sherlock Holmes' and deepens the episode with some sly digs at 'Britain's Got Talent'. Bodies are appearing around Sweetville, near Bradford at the end of the nineteenth century and the Pater Noster Team meets the Doctor when he infiltrates the village to uncover its secret. Gatiss uses the epistolary style well, capturing the feel of 'Dracula' crossed with 'Sherlock Holmes' and deepens the episode with some sly digs at 'Britain's Got Talent'.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris Griffin

    I confess to not being a fan of the original story. It All felt lightweight, and finding the book fleshed out with a new adventure taking up the first third of the book didn’t add any depth. It also didn’t help that the new story as a knock off Britains Got Talent in Victorian times wasn’t gripping The passages by Strax remind us what a great character he is, and those by Jenny are well written and sound like the actress delivering the lines. She is the star of the book, the Doctor, Clara and Vas I confess to not being a fan of the original story. It All felt lightweight, and finding the book fleshed out with a new adventure taking up the first third of the book didn’t add any depth. It also didn’t help that the new story as a knock off Britains Got Talent in Victorian times wasn’t gripping The passages by Strax remind us what a great character he is, and those by Jenny are well written and sound like the actress delivering the lines. She is the star of the book, the Doctor, Clara and Vastra seem to hardly be in it. Not Mark Gatiss’s best effort 🙁

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kaoru

    I don't know what Gatiss rode here. The constant shifting from one character's viewpoint to another gets irritating quickly, makes the plot hard to follow and makes it seem utterly disjointed. Paired with countless sideshows and a whole pre-story that is roughly 60 pages long and doesn't connect all that much to what comes after, this book is quite a mess, I'm afraid. For some reason though, the editor thought it was all fine and perfectly releasable. What can you do. I don't know what Gatiss rode here. The constant shifting from one character's viewpoint to another gets irritating quickly, makes the plot hard to follow and makes it seem utterly disjointed. Paired with countless sideshows and a whole pre-story that is roughly 60 pages long and doesn't connect all that much to what comes after, this book is quite a mess, I'm afraid. For some reason though, the editor thought it was all fine and perfectly releasable. What can you do.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Before reading Gatiss' novelization, I'd only seen The Crimson Horror once or twice, right around the time of its initial airing. And very little of it stuck with me over the years. So, I went into this with no expectations, simply hoping for something enjoyable. And, at first, it seemed promising. The idea of telling a Doctor Who story in an epistolary format is a neat one. It's just a shame that Gatiss doesn't really stick with it. Jenny narrates most of the book, with a few sections from Ada Before reading Gatiss' novelization, I'd only seen The Crimson Horror once or twice, right around the time of its initial airing. And very little of it stuck with me over the years. So, I went into this with no expectations, simply hoping for something enjoyable. And, at first, it seemed promising. The idea of telling a Doctor Who story in an epistolary format is a neat one. It's just a shame that Gatiss doesn't really stick with it. Jenny narrates most of the book, with a few sections from Ada Gillyflower, the Doctor, Strax, and Jonas Thursday. The problem is that all of these segments are mixed together with more traditional prose. The book tries to handwave this away by suggesting Jenny is filling in the gaps all "authory," but it proves very distracting. Those segments never sound like they're written in her voice, so it breaks the illusion of this being a collection of documents and audio recordings explaining the tale of "The Crimson Horror." And that's really a shame as the epistolary stuff works remarkably well, adding a new twist on a familiar story. Strax's stuff is a bit uneven (but often funny), it's nice getting to hear directly from the Doctor, and Gatiss has such a strong grasp on Jenny's voice that you can easily imagine it in your head as you're reading it. Overall, I just wish the book had fully committed to the epistolary style. I think it would've been far more engaging that way. The Crimson Horror is one of those Doctor Who stories that are kind of light on plot and heavy on atmosphere. And that creates a sizable problem for a novelization of the episode. How do you stretch a plot that already felt pretty thin into a 200-page novel? Gatiss's answer is to not stretch it much and add a (mostly unconnected) prequel instead. In fact, The Crimson Horror doesn't start until 40% of the way into the novel. Now, to be fair, the prequel adventure is rather fun, and it ends up being more interesting than the portion of the book that actually adapts its namesake's episode. But it is weird that you have to read nearly half the book to reach the beginning of the story you've set out to read. I don't want to go into any real detail about the prequel story, since it is totally new to the novelization, but I do think it's worth a read. As for The Crimson Horror, itself, I'm not sure there's enough there to please anyone who's not a hardcore fan. While the various points of view do beef up the characters some, the book speeds through its plot so quickly that the actual mystery itself feels like an afterthought. A lot of the emotional beats land much better, particularly those involving Ada, but I can't help feeling like the actual mystery is just as middling here as it is in the episode. Sure, this book was never gonna rock the boat, or anything, but I would've liked to spend more time beefing up the central mystery of The Crimson Horror some. Maybe it could've leaned harder into the Sherlock Holmes aspect of the mystery or something, I don't know. As it is, it's just kind of perfunctory—which is rather disappointing given how fun the prequel story is. Overall, Mark Gatiss's novelization of The Crimson Horror ends up being about as average as the episode, itself, is. The added prequel is reason enough to give the book a read, but it does come at the cost of properly expanding the main story's narrative. The epistolary angle is neat, but it's not executed as consistently as I'd like. And, ultimately, it's still the same story as the TV version, with all the pros and cons that come with that. While it does provide a noticeably different experience when compared to the episode, I'm not sure the novelization is really any better. It's just a different version of the same thing. And, sure, it's not the job of a novelization to radically change the story, but the best ones can often enrich the experience. I don't think The Crimson Horror really does that outside of the added character moments. It's just a fun, extended prequel followed by a pretty average, though creative, retelling of the TV episode. The novelization won't suddenly make you a fan of the episode, but the added character moments and genuinely enjoyable prequel make it worth a read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Kresal

    Back in the 1970s and into the 1980s, the only way fans of Doctor Who often could encounter an older story was by reading it. The Target novelizations were slim books, frequently running little more than 150 pages. Yet, they became the cornerstone of the show's merchandise. These days, of course, that isn't the case with options including DVDs and streaming platforms. That hasn't stopped such demand for new Target-style novelizations of twenty-first-century episodes, which BBC Books began obligi Back in the 1970s and into the 1980s, the only way fans of Doctor Who often could encounter an older story was by reading it. The Target novelizations were slim books, frequently running little more than 150 pages. Yet, they became the cornerstone of the show's merchandise. These days, of course, that isn't the case with options including DVDs and streaming platforms. That hasn't stopped such demand for new Target-style novelizations of twenty-first-century episodes, which BBC Books began obliging with in 2019, with a new batch released in spring 2021. Among the latest entries was The Crimson Horror, the 2013 Eleventh Doctor episode that focused on the Paternoster Gang, adapted by its original writer, Mark Gatiss. When the original Target books were in their heyday, they generally came in two types. The first, and by far the most common, were straightforward adaptations of the episodes that (at worst) felt like a copy and paste of the script with a few lines of description and "said" added. On the other hand, you would also get books that expanded upon the televised stories with more detail and backstories or, in some cases, reinstating material cut for time. The Crimson Horror falls very much in the latter category, helping the 45-minute episode become a 200-page novel. Gatiss accomplishes that in no small part by adding what is, in effect, a prologue to the TV episode. One set a few years before with the Eleventh Doctor involved in an adventure with Madame Vastra and Jenny Flint before Strax becomes a part of the gang. This new prologue from Gatiss, set around a theatre holding something akin to a talent competition TV show a century ahead of time, is a fun little piece of work in its own right. Indeed, it would have been a neat separate short story elsewhere. As a prologue to The Crimson Horror, it's still neat but doesn't connect to the events of the episode quite as much as Gatiss (though the character of Jenny Flint, whose memoir makes up much of the narrative both here and throughout the novelization) lets on. Even so, for fans of this Doctor and the Paternoster Gang, it's something that makes the novelization a worthwhile venture. The same is true of those familiar with Gatiss's work at large. His love of Victoriana is apparent throughout, including the epistolary format that echoes Bram Stoker's Dracula, among other references to people and events of the period. There's also Gatiss referencing numerous Doctor Who stories set in the same period, with part of the fun of this being in trying to spot the references as they come up. The sixties spy-fi influence on the episode is also on display here, including introducing a Victorian equivalent of James Bond villains SPECTRE, of which Mrs. Gillyflower is a member, as well as some of Paternoster Gang's antics. For those, such as this reviewer, who enjoyed the episode on-screen, it's something that adds all the more to the flavoring Gatiss brought to the episode some eight years ago. What makes the novelization work so well is Gatiss's choice of the epistolary format. Gatiss transfers his script to the page through memoirs and diary entries, allowing perspectives on the episode's events from Jenny, Strax, and even the Doctor himself, plus a couple of supporting characters, all collected together into a single volume well after the fact. Not only does this allow Gatiss to tell the story of the episode without cheating the reader, but it also allows him to expand upon it with each point of view presenting a slightly different take on events that explores backstories and thinking behind the plot. Making so many voices distinct is a challenge, one that Gatiss rises to with apparent ease. Though the extended prologue comes across as filler more than a proper expansion of the TV episode's narrative, The Crimson Horror's novelization remains worth seeking out. Partly for how Gatiss's love of the elements that influence his original script shines through in prose but also for how his choice of perspectives expands neatly upon the screen version. It's also an absolute pleasure to behold it and a great way to spend a few hours like it's 2013 all over again.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jack Rogers

    The Crimson Horror was a stand out episode from Series 7 of Doctor Who which was first broadcast on the 4th of May 2013. The basic premise of the story followed the Paternoster Gang (Jenny, Madame Vastra and Strax) as they are hired to investigate a series of peculiar deaths up in Bradford. The victims of the so called "Crimson Horror" wind up in the local canals, terror glued to their faces and layered in a sticky red pigmentation. Sending Jenny to infiltrate a recent enterprise known as Sweetv The Crimson Horror was a stand out episode from Series 7 of Doctor Who which was first broadcast on the 4th of May 2013. The basic premise of the story followed the Paternoster Gang (Jenny, Madame Vastra and Strax) as they are hired to investigate a series of peculiar deaths up in Bradford. The victims of the so called "Crimson Horror" wind up in the local canals, terror glued to their faces and layered in a sticky red pigmentation. Sending Jenny to infiltrate a recent enterprise known as Sweetville which has opened up in Bradford under the ownership of the prim and proper Mrs Gillyflower; we soon learn there is a deeper mystery being hidden behind the factory doors of Sweetville and at the heart of it is the Doctor! The narrative for the most part is a very faithful recreation of the episode's original plot. A running pattern I've noted here is a lot of these Target novelisations are penned by the original screenwriters so there's a lot of respect for the original script in these adaptions. Mark Gatiss who wrote the episode seems to have lost no footing in treading back through the clever story beats of his script. I appreciate how well he captures the story unfolding from different perspectives and the format in which the narrative is being told is appropriate to the time period it's set in. While also re-telling the original story I also have to commend Gatiss for adding a sort of mini-prelude to the Crimson Horror at the beginning of the book. He creates a completely original tale that spans for about 50 pages or so and it works as a really nice side story. If anything it cements how much I'd be happy see Gatiss write more novels for the Patermonster Gang, he seems to get their characters down brilliantly and he is great at writing Victorian era based stories. In terms of pacing and tone I can't find much to find fault with here. Gatiss keeps the story moving forward constantly while giving the reader just enough context and exposition to follow things easily. I also enjoyed how while this is an episode of Doctor Who, the majority of the story plays through the perspective of other characters. I'm always a fan of the stories that utilise the Doctor as a secondary character more than a main character because it feels a lot more interesting. The Patermonster Gang are the main conduits for the story and they are used in clever and creative ways that makes them feel relevant. I enjoy how much humour Gatiss utilises in the story too. In a sense it's not a very serious story, it's filled with a lot of silly stuff but I think it get's away with the silliness by balancing it with other elements of character building and mystery. The Crimson Horror is just as good in novel form as it is in TV form. It succeeds in telling a funny and entertaining story with great characters and a interesting setting. I know Mark Gatiss is no longer writing for Doctor Who and it's stories like this that make that fact all the sadder, I loved his work!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    The novelisation of Gatiss' own script for an episode featuring Matt Smith's Eleventh Doctor and his companions Clara, Vastra, Jenny and Strax. The Victorian detectives of the Paternoster Gang team up with the Doctor to solve two cases, the first of which features a series of grim decapitations and the second of which sees the wicked Mrs Gillyflower plotting to overthrow the world order from within Sweetville, a perfect town with a dark secret. I'm a big fan of the Paternoster Gang, especially St The novelisation of Gatiss' own script for an episode featuring Matt Smith's Eleventh Doctor and his companions Clara, Vastra, Jenny and Strax. The Victorian detectives of the Paternoster Gang team up with the Doctor to solve two cases, the first of which features a series of grim decapitations and the second of which sees the wicked Mrs Gillyflower plotting to overthrow the world order from within Sweetville, a perfect town with a dark secret. I'm a big fan of the Paternoster Gang, especially Strax; with their odd camaraderie, their humorous bent and their Victorian aesthetic, they're just thoroughly enjoyable characters to operate alongside the Doctor. I therefore was pleased by Gatiss' decision to tell this story largely from Jenny's perspective (with a few combat reports from Strax too) and in her Cockney housemaid vernacular, giving this book a unique feel in keeping with its setting. Whilst the events of the main story unfold more or less identically to those seen onscreen, almost the entire first half of this book is taken up by a separate (albeit linked) and entirely new adventure for the main players. This means that even those very familiar with the televised version of the story will find a lot here that's brand new, which is a novel and appreciated approach to a novelisation. There's plenty of Gatiss' wry humour on offer here too, not least in his parody Victorian version of Britain's Got Talent. In fact, with the humour, the Gothic sensibilities and the Victorian setting, this book has Gatiss' distinctive style woven throughout it. Personally, I'm a fan of his writing, so that's just fine by me. * More reviews here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com *

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Rating between 3 & 3.5 When the story originally aired I didn't really like that much, despite the guest turn of Diana Rigg and the return of the Paternoster Gang. This adaptation by MG takes the story and adapts it in an epistolary style, whilst also adding an earlier unseen adventure/investigation between the Paternoster Gang and Doctor 11. The new story was an entertaining one that was very enjoyable, that takes up about 40% of the novel's length - which did surprise me a bit. The actual adaptat Rating between 3 & 3.5 When the story originally aired I didn't really like that much, despite the guest turn of Diana Rigg and the return of the Paternoster Gang. This adaptation by MG takes the story and adapts it in an epistolary style, whilst also adding an earlier unseen adventure/investigation between the Paternoster Gang and Doctor 11. The new story was an entertaining one that was very enjoyable, that takes up about 40% of the novel's length - which did surprise me a bit. The actual adaptation expanded on the tv series slightly but not with that much additional story, just minor background to build the world a bit bigger. The epistolary style worked for me the majority of the time, the sections where Jenny wrote of things she wasn't directly involved with in her 'authory-style' are the parts which didn't quite hit the mark. Perhaps if MG ha simply written those in prose style with no explanation it would have flowed better for me. Overall though a surprisingly enjoyable read even if it was only a couple of hours reading time. An overall rating was difficult as the story is too slight to reach higher than than 3.5, but is definitely better than an average 3.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rhys Causon

    I don’t know why I decided to give this adaptation four stars. Maybe it’s because it’s a great adaptation of my favourite Matt Smith story, once it actually gets to it half way through. Though the front half of the story is dedicated to filling in some much needed backstory for the Paternoster Gang (in a story I would have called The Siren’s song or something just as generic as that) the second half does a great job of covering The Crimson Horror beat for beat. And with the inclusion of multiple I don’t know why I decided to give this adaptation four stars. Maybe it’s because it’s a great adaptation of my favourite Matt Smith story, once it actually gets to it half way through. Though the front half of the story is dedicated to filling in some much needed backstory for the Paternoster Gang (in a story I would have called The Siren’s song or something just as generic as that) the second half does a great job of covering The Crimson Horror beat for beat. And with the inclusion of multiple narrators it makes sense that it jumps around more so than some other Target adaptations (looking at the Dalek Target Adaptation there). So while the first half wasn’t what I expected it was nice to read and the second half was just as enjoyable as the episode itself. Another solid Target Book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Theaker

    Madame Vastra (Silurian), Jenny Flint (human) and Strax (Sontaran) investigate odd goings-on in Bradford. Not bad, but this was never one of my favourite Mark Gatiss stories. I had hoped he would read the audiobook himself (his reading of Planet of the Daleks was superb), but since much of it is from Jenny's point of view, Catrin Stewart is an even better choice. The sections from Strax's point of view are very amusing, and read by Dan Starkey. The book reminded me of Alan Dean Foster's Star Tre Madame Vastra (Silurian), Jenny Flint (human) and Strax (Sontaran) investigate odd goings-on in Bradford. Not bad, but this was never one of my favourite Mark Gatiss stories. I had hoped he would read the audiobook himself (his reading of Planet of the Daleks was superb), but since much of it is from Jenny's point of view, Catrin Stewart is an even better choice. The sections from Strax's point of view are very amusing, and read by Dan Starkey. The book reminded me of Alan Dean Foster's Star Trek Logs, in how so much of it is new. We're two-thirds in before the Doctor and Clara get involved in the main adventure.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ian Robinson

    A gloriously fun romp, improving on the TV episode and providing a fast-paced read. It’s over 60 pages before anything from the TV episode appears, with a ‘prequel’ story set among London’s theatre district being a great deal of enjoyment although not really having much to do with the main story. The characters are a lot of fun, and I particularly enjoyed the first-person narratives from Strax, Jenny, and others. There are some aspects that are rather cheekily glossed over (the ‘rejuvenation mac A gloriously fun romp, improving on the TV episode and providing a fast-paced read. It’s over 60 pages before anything from the TV episode appears, with a ‘prequel’ story set among London’s theatre district being a great deal of enjoyment although not really having much to do with the main story. The characters are a lot of fun, and I particularly enjoyed the first-person narratives from Strax, Jenny, and others. There are some aspects that are rather cheekily glossed over (the ‘rejuvenation machines’ and Mr Sweet’s origin, for instance) the extended page count could have been useful for but these are minor issues.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Mills

    Minus one star for the drawn-out and dull Simon Cowell parody, but this is otherwise a fun (and major) expansion of Gatiss's 2013 TV episode. The blend of imagined Victoriana and 1960s spy-fi will be a familiar delight to fans of his Lucifer Box books. He builds a whole world around the Paternoster Gang and I hope he gets the chance to follow up on some the threads he lays here. Minus one star for the drawn-out and dull Simon Cowell parody, but this is otherwise a fun (and major) expansion of Gatiss's 2013 TV episode. The blend of imagined Victoriana and 1960s spy-fi will be a familiar delight to fans of his Lucifer Box books. He builds a whole world around the Paternoster Gang and I hope he gets the chance to follow up on some the threads he lays here.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Welton

    A great holiday read. Very easy, good humour, lots of references to pop culture from the 70’s to present day sneaked in. Felt a bit like Moonraker, book & film which I don’t think is accidental knowing the author is a Bond fan. Good knowledge, and an obvious love for this period of time from the author.

  17. 5 out of 5

    F.R.

    A good third of this book is actually additional material to the TV episode. And Gatiss more than knows his way around Victoriana, conjuring these characters, the place and the kind of book this would be if it was written in 1884.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Needham

    Fun from start to finish, and you can tell Gatiss enjoyed it too. Definitely give it a go if you want to read someone being very (justifiably imo) rude about Bradford

  19. 4 out of 5

    Duncan Steele

    Turgid. I knew there was a reason I couldnt remember anything about the TV version, this is a painfully slow adaptation.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    Victorian larks from the pen of mister mark gatiss, Esquire. Based on his own script this is great fun. It's well written and as you'd expect from him an excellent representation of the Victorian era. I like the way this story has been expanded. Instead of increasing the doctor's role within the story of the crimson horror the author instead opts to give us a new section, essentially a short story, of 60 pages that features the doctor, vastra and jenny set before the events of the battle of demo Victorian larks from the pen of mister mark gatiss, Esquire. Based on his own script this is great fun. It's well written and as you'd expect from him an excellent representation of the Victorian era. I like the way this story has been expanded. Instead of increasing the doctor's role within the story of the crimson horror the author instead opts to give us a new section, essentially a short story, of 60 pages that features the doctor, vastra and jenny set before the events of the battle of demon's run. Its very funny and links into the main story. I liked this idea as the crimson horror was a story that focused more on the characters of vastra, jenny and strax and extending the doctor and clara sequences, although it would have been welcome would also have detracted from the focus of the early part of the tale. This story is a favourite of mine and the book does it justice. The characters are captured perfectly and the book is a joy. I just wish the rate of releases for new target books would be increased! We need mark to adapt the unquiet dead next, or victory of the daleks. No wait... cold war. No... empress of mars... or maybe all of them. The crimson horror is great stuff and a welcome addition to the doctor who shelves.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lira

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

  23. 4 out of 5

    Louisa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Cook

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sean Urry

  27. 5 out of 5

    M Lyons

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna Secret Poet

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vamshi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alex Beresford

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