counter create hit The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do about It - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do about It

Availability: Ready to download

A definitive and compelling book on one of today's most prevalent illnesses. In 2020, an estimated 5.8 million Americans had Alzheimer's, and more than half a million died because of the disease and its devastating complications. 16 million caregivers are responsible for paying as much as half of the $226 billion annual costs of their care. As more people live beyond their A definitive and compelling book on one of today's most prevalent illnesses. In 2020, an estimated 5.8 million Americans had Alzheimer's, and more than half a million died because of the disease and its devastating complications. 16 million caregivers are responsible for paying as much as half of the $226 billion annual costs of their care. As more people live beyond their seventies and eighties, the number of patients will rise to an estimated 13.8 million by 2025. Part case studies, part meditation on the past, present and future of the disease, The Problem of Alzheimer's traces Alzheimer's from its beginnings to its recognition as a crisis. While it is an unambiguous account of decades of missed opportunities and our health care systems' failures to take action, it tells the story of the biomedical breakthroughs that may allow Alzheimer's to finally be prevented and treated by medicine and also presents an argument for how we can live with dementia: the ways patients can reclaim their autonomy and redefine their sense of self, how families can support their loved ones, and the innovative reforms we can make as a society that would give caregivers and patients better quality of life. Rich in science, history, and characters, The Problem of Alzheimer's takes us inside laboratories, patients' homes, caregivers' support groups, progressive care communities, and Jason Karlawish's own practice at the Penn Memory Center.


Compare

A definitive and compelling book on one of today's most prevalent illnesses. In 2020, an estimated 5.8 million Americans had Alzheimer's, and more than half a million died because of the disease and its devastating complications. 16 million caregivers are responsible for paying as much as half of the $226 billion annual costs of their care. As more people live beyond their A definitive and compelling book on one of today's most prevalent illnesses. In 2020, an estimated 5.8 million Americans had Alzheimer's, and more than half a million died because of the disease and its devastating complications. 16 million caregivers are responsible for paying as much as half of the $226 billion annual costs of their care. As more people live beyond their seventies and eighties, the number of patients will rise to an estimated 13.8 million by 2025. Part case studies, part meditation on the past, present and future of the disease, The Problem of Alzheimer's traces Alzheimer's from its beginnings to its recognition as a crisis. While it is an unambiguous account of decades of missed opportunities and our health care systems' failures to take action, it tells the story of the biomedical breakthroughs that may allow Alzheimer's to finally be prevented and treated by medicine and also presents an argument for how we can live with dementia: the ways patients can reclaim their autonomy and redefine their sense of self, how families can support their loved ones, and the innovative reforms we can make as a society that would give caregivers and patients better quality of life. Rich in science, history, and characters, The Problem of Alzheimer's takes us inside laboratories, patients' homes, caregivers' support groups, progressive care communities, and Jason Karlawish's own practice at the Penn Memory Center.

49 review for The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do about It

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    "The Problem of Alzheimer's" is the first book I have finished reading in 2021, and I have to say I started this year off right. It was a shock that this was the first book as I am not someone who reads medical-based non-fiction often. I don't remember what I expected it to be – maybe more slow-paced with that typical all-knowing doctor tone. However, the book is a real story - a compelling and comprehensive one that works to untangle a modern-day medical crisis. Karlawish is an intelligent indiv "The Problem of Alzheimer's" is the first book I have finished reading in 2021, and I have to say I started this year off right. It was a shock that this was the first book as I am not someone who reads medical-based non-fiction often. I don't remember what I expected it to be – maybe more slow-paced with that typical all-knowing doctor tone. However, the book is a real story - a compelling and comprehensive one that works to untangle a modern-day medical crisis. Karlawish is an intelligent individual who has personal and professional knowledge, but he doesn't overplay his words. He talks straight. His openness and honesty are rarely seen in the non-fiction genre. I don't think there's anyone who wouldn't benefit from reading this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Simms

    A very detailed and informative book on the history of Alzheimer's disease, with disappointingly few takeaways for moving forward. The book opens with the modern history of Alzheimer's starting in the 1980s up through around 2013, as the medical establishment begins to reassess Alzheimer's as a major cause of senile dementia and begins to make some breakthroughs for diagnosing the disease while a patient is still alive. Then, though, it takes a curious detour back to Alois Alzheimer himself and A very detailed and informative book on the history of Alzheimer's disease, with disappointingly few takeaways for moving forward. The book opens with the modern history of Alzheimer's starting in the 1980s up through around 2013, as the medical establishment begins to reassess Alzheimer's as a major cause of senile dementia and begins to make some breakthroughs for diagnosing the disease while a patient is still alive. Then, though, it takes a curious detour back to Alois Alzheimer himself and the earliest history of the disease (and its subsequent fall out of the spotlight). The book's narrative momentum suffers here. It seems like it would have made more sense to tell the history of Alzheimer's treatments linearly; as it is, the first part is a story of scientific progress and achievement (with setbacks, both medical and political, along the way), and then the second part feels like a storyteller pausing in the middle of the action to give an exhaustive backstory of a minor character. Yes, Alois Alzheimer and his contemporaries were major figures in the initial descriptions of the disease that bears his name. But the first part of the book already established that the disease was not a major target of study or medical attention and understanding, and by that point we don't really need to know exactly why. I found myself impatiently skimming sections talking about economic conditions in inter-war Germany, anxious to get back to the more interesting stuff about ongoing breakthroughs in Alzheimer's care. Unfortunately, the book doesn't really have that much to offer on that front either, in the end. Part of that is just a terrible byproduct of Alzheimer's research at this time. It's not cured; there's no magical treatment; this is not a story of how we "beat" a disease, and there's not going to be a triumphant climax. But I was hoping for some more concrete good news on either a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's writ large or actionable advice for dealing with Alzheimer's disease in loved ones or in yourself. Maybe I expected too much of the book, but my expectations were a little disappointed. If you want to know, in sometimes overly-exhaustive detail, the history of Alzheimer's and the medical techniques used to diagnose it (if not exactly treat it, yet), then read this book. It certainly provides that in spades, and has a good amount of thought-provoking and interesting asides (such as the discussion of whether to follow a pre-Alzheimer's person's living will or trust the person that occasionally surfaces from the dementia, even when their wishes disagree, or the anecdotes about different methods that have been used to alleviate people's disorientation). Just, maybe read Part 2 before Part 1.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    THE PROBLEM OF ALZHEIMER'S by Jason Karlawish received starred reviews from Kirkus ("an outstanding primer") and Library Journal ("a must-read"). I have ordered a copy for our high school library since this is a high interest topic for many of our students. They are watching parents face tough choices with respect to care for grandparents as well as dealing with their own feelings of missing the grandparent they once knew and fear about the disease in general. Karlawish, University of Pennsylvan THE PROBLEM OF ALZHEIMER'S by Jason Karlawish received starred reviews from Kirkus ("an outstanding primer") and Library Journal ("a must-read"). I have ordered a copy for our high school library since this is a high interest topic for many of our students. They are watching parents face tough choices with respect to care for grandparents as well as dealing with their own feelings of missing the grandparent they once knew and fear about the disease in general. Karlawish, University of Pennsylvania professor and co-director of Penn Memory Center, has subtitled his book "How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It." He divides the book into sections titled Alzheimer's Unbound; The Birth of Alzheimer's Disease; Living Well in the House of Alzheimer's, and A Humanitarian Problem. He reviews key points in the history of the disease (including founding of Alzheimer's Association in 1979 and scientific papers labeling it the "disease of the century" in 1981 and a 2009 report titled A National Alzheimer’s Strategic Plan), tracing "the story of how once upon a time, Alzheimer's was a rare disease, and then it became common, and then it turned into a crisis." As with climate change, scientists have been warning us about the physical, emotional, and economic impact of dementia as members of our society age, leading to questions of policy and government involvement. Karlawish describes scientific advances, opportunities in social, environmental, and psychological interventions for patients and caregivers, as he "explains why and what we have to do." This call to action is an extremely valuable resource written in an accessible manner, complete with notes, a glossary, selected bibliography, and helpful index.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel Chin

    This is a "must read." Whether you have been impacted by Alzheimer's disease, concerned about your own future, or simply interested in learning more about the disease this book will grab your attention and never let go. The author tells a fascinating story about how we got to where we are today and the influences culture, society, and politics had on the science itself. He tells personal stories from his own clinic and weaves everything together to share a message that we can do better for each This is a "must read." Whether you have been impacted by Alzheimer's disease, concerned about your own future, or simply interested in learning more about the disease this book will grab your attention and never let go. The author tells a fascinating story about how we got to where we are today and the influences culture, society, and politics had on the science itself. He tells personal stories from his own clinic and weaves everything together to share a message that we can do better for each other. The book is more than a historical account of Alzheimer's disease, it is a call to action with proposed ideas on how we can improve the care for people with cognitive impairment and the caregivers who support them. As a Geriatrician, an educator, and a family member of someone affected by the disease, I recommend this book to patients, caregivers, health care providers, students, community members, and anyone invested in a better tomorrow.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    Unfortunately, almost all of us have dealt with the problem of dementia in our own families or know others who have. A diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease is a terrifying proposition and still carries a great deal of stigma. It was fascinating to read the historical background of this disease, including the political roadblocks. I was most impressed with the author's concern for treating his patients with respect and dignity. Thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the advance copy to read a Unfortunately, almost all of us have dealt with the problem of dementia in our own families or know others who have. A diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease is a terrifying proposition and still carries a great deal of stigma. It was fascinating to read the historical background of this disease, including the political roadblocks. I was most impressed with the author's concern for treating his patients with respect and dignity. Thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the advance copy to read and review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    William T

    This is a good book and a necessary book. While we don't have any Alzheimer disease in our close family, we do have some experience with the disease second hand. If nothing else, you should read this book to understand what others are going through, where we are in the science and what we need to do as a society. There is much to praise in this author's writing and in this author's chosen career. This is a good book and a necessary book. While we don't have any Alzheimer disease in our close family, we do have some experience with the disease second hand. If nothing else, you should read this book to understand what others are going through, where we are in the science and what we need to do as a society. There is much to praise in this author's writing and in this author's chosen career.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anujna

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erica

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Dasaro

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laird2

  11. 5 out of 5

    SeaShore

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  13. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie Ottley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frank Loorie

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Pirone

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mignon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna Reeves

  23. 5 out of 5

    auntbessieisagoodbook.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Becky

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amie's Book Reviews

  29. 5 out of 5

    Merete Aasen

  30. 4 out of 5

    KeBOBster

  31. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

  32. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  33. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Hammelef

  34. 4 out of 5

    Steven Schend

  35. 4 out of 5

    Towandajane

  36. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  37. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

  38. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  39. 4 out of 5

    Tess Marie

  40. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  41. 4 out of 5

    Arianne Garana

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

  43. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  44. 5 out of 5

    Liz Bowcutt

  45. 5 out of 5

    Lori Bennett

  46. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  47. 5 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  48. 5 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  49. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Adams

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.