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My Video Game Ate My Homework

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Meet Dewey Jenkins, a 13-year old school kid who's about to fail science class. Follow Dewey on an amazing adventure that leads him and his friends to a virtual world where they will have to overcome all sorts of digital creatures and solve a number of puzzles in order to get home. My Video Game Ate My Homework is a funny, fast-paced adventure that shows the importance of c Meet Dewey Jenkins, a 13-year old school kid who's about to fail science class. Follow Dewey on an amazing adventure that leads him and his friends to a virtual world where they will have to overcome all sorts of digital creatures and solve a number of puzzles in order to get home. My Video Game Ate My Homework is a funny, fast-paced adventure that shows the importance of cooperation and teamwork and the importance of using your own unique abilities to solve problems. It's illustrated in Hansen's light-hearted, cartoony style, and filled with lots of sight gags and nods to videogaming conventions.


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Meet Dewey Jenkins, a 13-year old school kid who's about to fail science class. Follow Dewey on an amazing adventure that leads him and his friends to a virtual world where they will have to overcome all sorts of digital creatures and solve a number of puzzles in order to get home. My Video Game Ate My Homework is a funny, fast-paced adventure that shows the importance of c Meet Dewey Jenkins, a 13-year old school kid who's about to fail science class. Follow Dewey on an amazing adventure that leads him and his friends to a virtual world where they will have to overcome all sorts of digital creatures and solve a number of puzzles in order to get home. My Video Game Ate My Homework is a funny, fast-paced adventure that shows the importance of cooperation and teamwork and the importance of using your own unique abilities to solve problems. It's illustrated in Hansen's light-hearted, cartoony style, and filled with lots of sight gags and nods to videogaming conventions.

30 review for My Video Game Ate My Homework

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Lower

    Super fun graphic novel! Wide appeal to lots of kids. Has everything from giant spiders and zombie rats to friendship and siblings fighting. Lots of fun, good lessons mixed into it it. Reminds of the Zita the Spacegirl series!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Graysen Thurman

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. (Graysen, age 7): I like how it started out in a restaurant and they were all having a good time, just the three of them. And then all of the sudden their other friend burst in and said, "There's an emergency!" And the other three said, "What??" And the fourth person said, "So, you guys heard I was sent to the principal's office?" I liked how the fourth person felt weird because he accidentally broke the reward for what the boy was going to do. And I like how when they were in the video game, the (Graysen, age 7): I like how it started out in a restaurant and they were all having a good time, just the three of them. And then all of the sudden their other friend burst in and said, "There's an emergency!" And the other three said, "What??" And the fourth person said, "So, you guys heard I was sent to the principal's office?" I liked how the fourth person felt weird because he accidentally broke the reward for what the boy was going to do. And I like how when they were in the video game, they found 8-bit and the bumblebee girl really really liked 8-bit. And I like how they defeated the big green monster. It was funny that the boy hadn't read the words on the buttons in the first room of the video game and he pushed the button that said "DON'T PUSH!" And he should have read it! Because, when he pushed the "DON'T PUSH!" button, a monster came out and killed him! In the video game. And as people know, in video games you can come back to life if there's more than one person. And it was awesome when The Ferginator turned into a real bear! And I remember when they tried to defeat the Mount Hamburger. The Mount Hamburger is so strong! And it was sad that they all got defeated and it was game over but then they grabbed the heart and the boy got one more try! And when he did the spell "Alphabetum!" the monster died.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sammie

    You can read my full review on my blog, The Bookwyrm's Den, here. Many thanks to NetGalley and DC Comics for a review copy in exchange for an honest, unbiased review. As a gamer, I feel like it’s my duty to pick up and read all the delightfully geeky books I can find. You know, for research. For the kids. Obviously. My Video Game Ate My Homework is a delightful graphic novel that captures both the adventure and spirit of a video game, but also the teamwork and camaraderie required. Kids seem to You can read my full review on my blog, The Bookwyrm's Den, here. Many thanks to NetGalley and DC Comics for a review copy in exchange for an honest, unbiased review. As a gamer, I feel like it’s my duty to pick up and read all the delightfully geeky books I can find. You know, for research. For the kids. Obviously. My Video Game Ate My Homework is a delightful graphic novel that captures both the adventure and spirit of a video game, but also the teamwork and camaraderie required. Kids seem to love graphic novels these days, and who can blame them? Our patrons, especially, love any sort of game-based books, and I can see this one being a bit hit among middle-graders. My Thoughts: - The artwork takes this video game adventure above and beyond. There are such cute little gamer graphics that really brought the video game feel to life, and I such appreciated that. They’ve all got new “character names” when they load. Their abilities are cute, and they discover new items along the way. The artwork was simple, yet pretty, and captured gaming in a way that felt much more immersive. I bought that we were journeying through a video game with the characters and was delighted to see little references that gamers will appreciate if they look carefully at the pictures. - The humor in this makes it a really quick, fun, entertaining read. I definitely laughed out loud a few times. The characters are … well, characters. It was sort of hard to take some of them seriously, which could be a bad thing, but I felt like the book was serious when it had to be, but for the most part, it keeps a pretty light atmosphere that made it a joy to read. - While this book does tackle a few important concepts, like friendship and asking for help, don’t expect anything too deep going in. The book does what it does quite effectively, which is gaming. There are some slightly heavier scenes that focus on teamwork and learning to ask for help, and I think those were done well, but the book is so short and focuses so much on the game that I don’t think they leave a lasting impression. This is another book meant for a younger MG audience, though, so I think it probably would have suffered from focusing too much on them, so this seemed like a nice balance of fun, while sneaking in some important life lessons while the kiddos weren’t looking.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    This was a fun graphic novel perfect for the middle school age or anybody who enjoys a fun, light-hearted story about video games and friendship. The story line was enjoyable and adventurous, and I love how the artwork lends itself well to a video game aesthetic. I wish we had such epic VR technology! It was also cool that this book included a variety of diversity, including a character who is dyslexic. I love the subtle nods to the story being set in the DC Universe without it focusing on speci This was a fun graphic novel perfect for the middle school age or anybody who enjoys a fun, light-hearted story about video games and friendship. The story line was enjoyable and adventurous, and I love how the artwork lends itself well to a video game aesthetic. I wish we had such epic VR technology! It was also cool that this book included a variety of diversity, including a character who is dyslexic. I love the subtle nods to the story being set in the DC Universe without it focusing on specific superheroes. Highly recommend to the intended audience. ~Thank you for the publisher for providing a free digital arc in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley~

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cass Moskowitz

    A fun graphic novel about the power of friendship and believing in yourself, with video games and a pet spider thrown in for fun! I loved the characters within and the cute references to games of all kinds. This will be a hit with kids who love video games but also love adventure and fun heroes to follow. The ending was a bit... abrupt, but I enjoyed this nonetheless.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cait Hutsell

    I loved this book. But I’m concerned that the main character presents as BIPOC and the author is White. Why was this choice made? When my BIPOC students are looking for a mirror in a text I want them to see authenticity. :(

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christine Irvin

    Dewey and his friends go on a wild adventure INSIDE A video game after the video game comes "alive" and swallows up his homework (a special project for the science fair). This graphic novel is sure to please comic book lovers and gaming geeks.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    Very cool how much thought was put into making this accessible. Really individual art style that I think kids will enjoy. Video game-y in a way that seemed genuine (makes sense due to Hansen's long video game involvement). Adorable robot companion which is always a plus.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    So DC is taking a stab at the highly lucrative field of non-superhero graphic novels for middle grade students, and I sincerely wish them well. This is the first of their DC Kids books that doesn't have a superhero that I've tried, and I think it worked at what it set out to do. Most notably, one of the main characters has dyslexia, and his personal growth is finding new tools to deal with his reading difficulties. His sister, on the other hand, learns how to support him without being overbearin So DC is taking a stab at the highly lucrative field of non-superhero graphic novels for middle grade students, and I sincerely wish them well. This is the first of their DC Kids books that doesn't have a superhero that I've tried, and I think it worked at what it set out to do. Most notably, one of the main characters has dyslexia, and his personal growth is finding new tools to deal with his reading difficulties. His sister, on the other hand, learns how to support him without being overbearing, which is also a good journey to see in a middle grade book. The actual fantasy elements were fine, if unexciting to me, but this is probably something the actual target audience will be much more interested in, especially the giant spiders.

  10. 5 out of 5

    BookCupid

    The dog excuse was a little more plausible. When Dewey's volcano project gets eaten by his video game, he and his friends must enter after it and beat it in order to get the work back on time. As a gamer, getting warped into a game would be perilous (I play Mortal Kombat mostly) and yet I could relate to the fascination of having to go through various levels and hidden clues. I loved the camaraderie that these guys shared. Not to mention, the way Dewey's dyslexia was dealt with. Sadly, I just co The dog excuse was a little more plausible. When Dewey's volcano project gets eaten by his video game, he and his friends must enter after it and beat it in order to get the work back on time. As a gamer, getting warped into a game would be perilous (I play Mortal Kombat mostly) and yet I could relate to the fascination of having to go through various levels and hidden clues. I loved the camaraderie that these guys shared. Not to mention, the way Dewey's dyslexia was dealt with. Sadly, I just couldn't find the book suspenseful enough.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Krys

    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher I was able to read this book in exchange for an honest review. *** Guess whose pre-ordering this book for her nephew? This person right here. My Video Game Ate My Homework is an adorable graphic novel about Dewey attempting to make the best science project possible to avoid having to go to summer school. He can create amazing things, but numbers and reading throw him off. His dyslexia affecting his life in ways that make it hard for him to explain to his twin s Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher I was able to read this book in exchange for an honest review. *** Guess whose pre-ordering this book for her nephew? This person right here. My Video Game Ate My Homework is an adorable graphic novel about Dewey attempting to make the best science project possible to avoid having to go to summer school. He can create amazing things, but numbers and reading throw him off. His dyslexia affecting his life in ways that make it hard for him to explain to his twin sister whose not affected in the same way. When a virtual reality game eats his science experiment it’ll take team work and really good friends to help Dewey come out on the other side. This comic is amazing and fun and sweet and I hope really good things for this story because it’s one of those stories that needs to be told.

  12. 5 out of 5

    liz

    In My Video Game Ate My Homework, Dewey Jenkins finds his science project- an immaculately engineered volcano that has to save his grade OR ELSE- absorbed into a futuristic augmented reality prototype, the Infinity Lens. He and his friends enter the Infinity Lens and become characters in the game to rescue the ersatz volcano. With colorful and active panels, author Dustin Hansen’s figures have a Gumby-like animation to them, harkening to his video game career. This work is greatly informed by hi In My Video Game Ate My Homework, Dewey Jenkins finds his science project- an immaculately engineered volcano that has to save his grade OR ELSE- absorbed into a futuristic augmented reality prototype, the Infinity Lens. He and his friends enter the Infinity Lens and become characters in the game to rescue the ersatz volcano. With colorful and active panels, author Dustin Hansen’s figures have a Gumby-like animation to them, harkening to his video game career. This work is greatly informed by his passions- readers who are also fans of Minecraft and DC superheroes will spot lots of easter eggs hiding in the backgrounds. Both Hansen and his main character Dewey also have dyslexia. The design for this comic has a number of accessibility adaptations built into it specifically addressing issues that can confuse readers who have dyslexia- including font selection and coloring, as well as the use of patterned backgrounds in both the margins and panels. In scripting the comic, Hansen makes generous use of emoji-like iconography for thought-bubble details, character background information is interpreted in stat charts, and several characters rely on non-verbal communication. The way Dewey sees words scrambled and transposed is represented throughout the comic for readers without dyslexia to begin to understand how confusing reading can be, and it is a major hurdle for him to overcome when he faces off against the big boss.

  13. 5 out of 5

    M.L. Little

    @kidlitexchange partner: My Video Game Ate My Homework by @dustinwrites. Releases 4.21 through @dccomics. Dewey has to overcome his challenges reading or else he’ll have to go to summer school. Is his volcano project good enough to win the grand prize of a new video game console? However, that becomes the least of his worries when he and his friends, while sneaking for a peek at the prize, accidentally trigger the device and get sucked into the game. Now they’ll have to team up and use their str @kidlitexchange partner: My Video Game Ate My Homework by @dustinwrites. Releases 4.21 through @dccomics. Dewey has to overcome his challenges reading or else he’ll have to go to summer school. Is his volcano project good enough to win the grand prize of a new video game console? However, that becomes the least of his worries when he and his friends, while sneaking for a peek at the prize, accidentally trigger the device and get sucked into the game. Now they’ll have to team up and use their strengths to win the game and get home. As a kid, I read mostly anything, but this is an example of where I would have drawn the line. I was never into video games OR superheroes (but I really like both now...). However, most kids really like video games and superheroes. So this book will be a blast for them. With tons of colorful art and computer-like graphics, it feels like being inside the game. The heart of the story is Dewey, and his friends, and their unique strengths and weaknesses. I like how the book gave them traits that were revealed inside the game. They all find out that they’re gifted in one way or another. My Video Game Ate My Homework releases April 21! Thanks @kidlitexchange for the review copy—all opinions are my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    This is a fandom-filled graphic novel that kids and grownups alike will love Dewey is a 13-year-old kid on the verge of flunking science when he and his friends gets sucked into a video game adventure that presents them with challenges, fights with digital monsters, and puzzles to solve. Loaded with sight gags and wink-nudges to video games, con life, and overall fandom, kids (and big kids, like me) will see themselves in Dewey and Co.  The book encourages readers to problem solve and emphasizes This is a fandom-filled graphic novel that kids and grownups alike will love Dewey is a 13-year-old kid on the verge of flunking science when he and his friends gets sucked into a video game adventure that presents them with challenges, fights with digital monsters, and puzzles to solve. Loaded with sight gags and wink-nudges to video games, con life, and overall fandom, kids (and big kids, like me) will see themselves in Dewey and Co.  The book encourages readers to problem solve and emphasizes the importance of cooperation and teamwork. The cartoony-realistic style and fantasy monsters are so much fun - perfect story to introduce if you have Dungeons & Dragons fledgling fans. If you have Secret Coders readers, give them this book, which will continue challenging their problem-solving skills and captivating them with a fun storyline. Dustin Hansen's also written the Microsaurs series, which never stays on my library shelves. (Which means I probably need to order them for my kid, because he would LOVE them.) I got to talk to him at Midwinter, and he's one of the nicest people ever.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    My Video Game Ate My Homework by Dustin Hansen, 160 pages, GRAPHIC NOVEL, DC Comics, 2020, $10. 9781401293260 Content G BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS – ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: HIGH Dewey Jenkins is 13yo and he has a serious problem. If he doesn’t pass his science class, he’s looking at summer school. Because he’s dyslexic and reading is difficult, he figures building a science fair volcano will be his ticket to success. Besides, first prize is to try out a new virtual reality console. Dewey’s best frie My Video Game Ate My Homework by Dustin Hansen, 160 pages, GRAPHIC NOVEL, DC Comics, 2020, $10. 9781401293260 Content G BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS – ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: HIGH Dewey Jenkins is 13yo and he has a serious problem. If he doesn’t pass his science class, he’s looking at summer school. Because he’s dyslexic and reading is difficult, he figures building a science fair volcano will be his ticket to success. Besides, first prize is to try out a new virtual reality console. Dewey’s best friend Ferg manages to get a sneak peak at the console and breaks it, so he brings it over for Dewey to fix. The game portal opens up and sucks in the volcano. Dewey, his twin sister, Beatrice, and friends Ferg and Katherine, enter the portal to salvage the volcano. Fun read with cool graphics. I liked the game symbols that popped up with names and skills and levels loading. The characters are likable. If you are a gamer, this book will feel familiar and immersive and reads as fast as playing a game. Michelle in the Middle https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2020...

  16. 5 out of 5

    RedPoppyReading

    My Video Game Ate My Homework, by @dustwrites , is a great book for video game fans! Dewey Jenkins must ace his final science project or he will have to attend summer school. He has the project all done and ready to turn in when he and his friends are sucked into a video game and the video game takes the project. The friends must beat the game to get the project back! Dewey must conquer his fears and use his dyslexia as a superpower. The friends recognize each other’s strengths making this an aw My Video Game Ate My Homework, by @dustwrites , is a great book for video game fans! Dewey Jenkins must ace his final science project or he will have to attend summer school. He has the project all done and ready to turn in when he and his friends are sucked into a video game and the video game takes the project. The friends must beat the game to get the project back! Dewey must conquer his fears and use his dyslexia as a superpower. The friends recognize each other’s strengths making this an awesome story about friendship and working together. Recommended for ages 8-12. Pick up this #graphicnovel today – it hit shelves on April 21, 2020. Thanks to @dccomics for sharing this #graphicnovelforkids with #kidlitexchange and thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book – all opinions are my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    April Gray

    This was fun and cute, not very deep, but it tried. Dewey, along with his twin sister Beatrice and a couple of their friends, Katherine and Ferg, team up to rescue Dewey's science project from a virtual reality game that ate it. Along the way, Dewey comes to terms with his dyslexia, and he and his sister come to an understanding that she can't always do things for him, but she can be there for him if he needs her. So, we do get a bit of warm fuzzy, but mostly this is a fast-paced adventure, beca This was fun and cute, not very deep, but it tried. Dewey, along with his twin sister Beatrice and a couple of their friends, Katherine and Ferg, team up to rescue Dewey's science project from a virtual reality game that ate it. Along the way, Dewey comes to terms with his dyslexia, and he and his sister come to an understanding that she can't always do things for him, but she can be there for him if he needs her. So, we do get a bit of warm fuzzy, but mostly this is a fast-paced adventure, because duh, they're in a video game, what do you expect? The art is colorful and cartoony, with lots of fun detail to get caught up in. The character 8-bit, a robot with a t.v. for a head, was my favorite, I think because of his resemblance to Canti from FLCL. Good fun! #MyVideoGameAteMyHomework #NetGalley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Mairson

    Dewey (playing to the librarian audience?) is a 13 year old kid (according to other reviewers, not my memory of the story) who loses his homework to a virtual reality video game adventure. To the tune of Stranger Things and ET for its group dynamics, this is the perfect end of school year adventure comic for middle grade readers. (Has coronavirus ended the 2019-2020 school year?) The art is lovely and there’s a not-too-forced theme of overcoming dyslexia and fear, and teamwork made great by playi Dewey (playing to the librarian audience?) is a 13 year old kid (according to other reviewers, not my memory of the story) who loses his homework to a virtual reality video game adventure. To the tune of Stranger Things and ET for its group dynamics, this is the perfect end of school year adventure comic for middle grade readers. (Has coronavirus ended the 2019-2020 school year?) The art is lovely and there’s a not-too-forced theme of overcoming dyslexia and fear, and teamwork made great by playing to individual strengths. Enjoyable, fast-paced read. May make readers want to play more video games.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    What a fun story! Graphic novels are just so cool. And this one is groundbreaking in all that they did to help kids with dyslexia be better able to read it. Dewey struggles with dyslexia and is failing science. He has to get an A in his science fair project or it’s summer school for him. Luckily, he’s really good at creating things with his hands . . . That is until the latest video game eats his homework. Now he and his friends have to go on an epic quest inside the video game to retrieve his ho What a fun story! Graphic novels are just so cool. And this one is groundbreaking in all that they did to help kids with dyslexia be better able to read it. Dewey struggles with dyslexia and is failing science. He has to get an A in his science fair project or it’s summer school for him. Luckily, he’s really good at creating things with his hands . . . That is until the latest video game eats his homework. Now he and his friends have to go on an epic quest inside the video game to retrieve his homework. The art is awesome, and the story is fun, and perfect for kids. A super quick read for those reluctant or struggling readers. Highly recommend this one!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Thanks to SLJ for a review copy of this book. Dewey Jenkins is determined to get an A+ on his volcano science project so that he doesn’t have to go to summer school. In addition, he has a chance to win a virtual reality video game console. Everything is just fine until Dewey’s best friend Ferg gets a hold of the console and breaks it. Ferg asks Dewey to help him fix it, and suddenly the two friends find themselves inside of a video game with Dewey’s sister Beatrice and her friend Kat. Worst of al Thanks to SLJ for a review copy of this book. Dewey Jenkins is determined to get an A+ on his volcano science project so that he doesn’t have to go to summer school. In addition, he has a chance to win a virtual reality video game console. Everything is just fine until Dewey’s best friend Ferg gets a hold of the console and breaks it. Ferg asks Dewey to help him fix it, and suddenly the two friends find themselves inside of a video game with Dewey’s sister Beatrice and her friend Kat. Worst of all, Dewey’s science project is along for the ride. Can he and his friends rescue and volcano and get back before the science fair?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Claiborne

    I received an ARC from School Library Journal and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Great graphic novel for younger readers! I love that it contains a character with dyslexia. I have several young patrons at the library dealing with dyslexia and it's so important for them to see themselves in a story. Love the video game elements throughout the book...it definitely helps keep the attention of gamers who may not particularly enjoy reading. The beautiful illustrations are just a bonus I received an ARC from School Library Journal and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Great graphic novel for younger readers! I love that it contains a character with dyslexia. I have several young patrons at the library dealing with dyslexia and it's so important for them to see themselves in a story. Love the video game elements throughout the book...it definitely helps keep the attention of gamers who may not particularly enjoy reading. The beautiful illustrations are just a bonus!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily G

    This was really cute, and I gave it a bonus star for centering on a character with dyslexia who faces his challenge to save the day. The issues the characters face are authentic within the story, I just wish a bit more care was taken in editing a few of the panel changes. Generally though, this will.be a GREAT book for budding readers and struggling students. I received an ARC of this title from the publisher.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    It's a very cute kid's graphic novel. There's no deep lesson just a fun adventure with one dyslexic kid solving a VR game with the help of his friends. This is more for 8 to 13 year olds. Thee star here is the art and the coloring. The kids look like Muppets with noses that stick straight out and eyes that look more like stick-on googly eyes. No eyelids or eyelashes here. The monsters they fight are pretty familiar and not too frightening. Everything resolves pretty easily.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lyle Vann

    Dustin Hansen did a wonderful job keeping my attention the whole way through this book and was very surprised to find out that he is dyslexic. I am also dyslexic and it is always awesome to see someone else who is that is not letting that stop them from doing awesome things like writing books and stuff.

  25. 5 out of 5

    J.D. DeHart

    Kudos again to DC Comics for embracing the youth and young adult audience that so greatly benefits from building readership around graphic novels and comic books. My Video Game Ate My Homework presents a likeable story that makes proper use of digital ideas. I love the creativity of this book, and I love how DC is pushing at the edges of what they typically publish. Bravo!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eliana

    A fun graphic novel that shows a group of friends working together, each drawing on their own strengths to overcome obstacles. The author provides a realistic description of the challenges faced by those with learning differences and even gives a tip to their friends trying to help. Kids will love this book!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    I got an advanced reader's copy at ALA Midwinter in 2020. I read this book with my 8 year old son. We really liked it! Such a creative story and I liked the video game elements throughout the book. I liked the diverse characters and the positive sibling relationship between two of them!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    This book is sure to be a hit with the ‘gamers’ and GN fans! Great story of friendship, academic struggles that are obvious, and emotional struggles that may not be. You can tell the author has experience in the gaming world- which will make this popular with even a reluctant reader!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Darth

    Definitely think most middle grade kids would love this little comic. Reminded me a bit of Minecraft mixed with a D&D adventure. It's one of the only comics/books I've seen with a protagonist who has dyslexia, so that was cool. Also, the kids totally look like Muppets. Definitely think most middle grade kids would love this little comic. Reminded me a bit of Minecraft mixed with a D&D adventure. It's one of the only comics/books I've seen with a protagonist who has dyslexia, so that was cool. Also, the kids totally look like Muppets.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Perfect for 8-12yr old range, especially if they love video games. The protagonist is a boy with dyslexia, they lightly touch on his struggles in school and with reading due to having this learning disability. Art was vibrant and fun.

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