counter create hit Armageddon: The Musical - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Armageddon: The Musical

Availability: Ready to download

From the point of view of 2050, you're history Theological warfare. Elvis on an epic time-travel journey - the Presliad. Buddhavision - a network bigger than God (and more powerful, too). Nasty nuclear leftovers. Naughty sex habits. Dalai Dan (the 153rd reincarnation of the Lama of that ilk) and Barry, the talkative Time Sprout. Even with all this excitement, you wouldn't t From the point of view of 2050, you're history Theological warfare. Elvis on an epic time-travel journey - the Presliad. Buddhavision - a network bigger than God (and more powerful, too). Nasty nuclear leftovers. Naughty sex habits. Dalai Dan (the 153rd reincarnation of the Lama of that ilk) and Barry, the talkative Time Sprout. Even with all this excitement, you wouldn't think a backwater planet like Earth makes much of a splash in the galatic pond. But the soap opera called The Earthers is making big video bucks in the intergalactic ratings race. And alien TV execs know exactly what the old earth drama needs to make the off-world audience sit up and stare: a spectacular Armageddon-type finale. With a cast of millions - including you! DON'T TOUCH THAT DIAL - IT'S GONNA BE A HELLUVA SHOW!


Compare

From the point of view of 2050, you're history Theological warfare. Elvis on an epic time-travel journey - the Presliad. Buddhavision - a network bigger than God (and more powerful, too). Nasty nuclear leftovers. Naughty sex habits. Dalai Dan (the 153rd reincarnation of the Lama of that ilk) and Barry, the talkative Time Sprout. Even with all this excitement, you wouldn't t From the point of view of 2050, you're history Theological warfare. Elvis on an epic time-travel journey - the Presliad. Buddhavision - a network bigger than God (and more powerful, too). Nasty nuclear leftovers. Naughty sex habits. Dalai Dan (the 153rd reincarnation of the Lama of that ilk) and Barry, the talkative Time Sprout. Even with all this excitement, you wouldn't think a backwater planet like Earth makes much of a splash in the galatic pond. But the soap opera called The Earthers is making big video bucks in the intergalactic ratings race. And alien TV execs know exactly what the old earth drama needs to make the off-world audience sit up and stare: a spectacular Armageddon-type finale. With a cast of millions - including you! DON'T TOUCH THAT DIAL - IT'S GONNA BE A HELLUVA SHOW!

30 review for Armageddon: The Musical

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This is the first novel in the Armageddon Series by “far-fetched fiction” writer Robert Rankin. Rankin is the author of one of my favorite books, The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse. I find his writing style to be similar to Terry Pratchett, another author I really enjoy. I thought I’d have a good chance of enjoying this novel when I chose it at random but it didn’t live up to my expectations. The overall plot seemed to ramble. Having several worlds, dimensions and time-planes involved This is the first novel in the Armageddon Series by “far-fetched fiction” writer Robert Rankin. Rankin is the author of one of my favorite books, The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse. I find his writing style to be similar to Terry Pratchett, another author I really enjoy. I thought I’d have a good chance of enjoying this novel when I chose it at random but it didn’t live up to my expectations. The overall plot seemed to ramble. Having several worlds, dimensions and time-planes involved likely added to the confusion. The characters included human-like, plant-based TV executives, a post-apocalyptic Earth that survives by watching TV, religious leader Dalai Lama Dan that controls his TV viewing population through narcotic Buddhabeer, and Elvis Presley with a time traveling brussel sprout embedded in his brain. The book does provide for some interesting social commentary about our relationship with religion and the media. It’s also full of British humor with puns and wordplay. At least it was a quick read. Like the book says, “Every mushroom cloud has a silver lining.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Si Jones

    This is the first Rankin book I read, back in the early 90's, and I've lost count of how many times I've re-read it since. This is the first Rankin book I read, back in the early 90's, and I've lost count of how many times I've re-read it since.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nini

    As always Robert Rankins alternate universe is one full of surprises. I am a fan of time sprouts and enjoyed the time travel in this story. I particularly enjoyed Rankins comic take on a post apocolyptic Earth and his views on realty TV and the ideas of a master plan I found to be as agreeable as they were hilarious. The unwitting hero Rex is a well written if put upon character and who doesnt love a bit of Elvis. My favourite parts of the story did focus around some of the "supporting cast" of As always Robert Rankins alternate universe is one full of surprises. I am a fan of time sprouts and enjoyed the time travel in this story. I particularly enjoyed Rankins comic take on a post apocolyptic Earth and his views on realty TV and the ideas of a master plan I found to be as agreeable as they were hilarious. The unwitting hero Rex is a well written if put upon character and who doesnt love a bit of Elvis. My favourite parts of the story did focus around some of the "supporting cast" of Cahracters and I literally LOL'd during the parts of the story concerning Eric and Rambo. Definitely worth a read and I will definitely be continuing with the adventures of Elvis and his time sprout in the remainder of the trilogy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pewterbreath

    There are people who would love Rankin's zany take on the apocalypse. For me it's way too freewheeling and manic for me to enjoy it. It's as if The Hitchhiker's Guide was rewritten by someone on speed, smooshing all sorts of ideas in an almost incomprehensible mish-mosh. We've got Elvis, we've got a talking sprout, a future incarnation of the Dalai Lama, Jesus and his twin sister Christine, television, and post nuclear mad max shenanigans. I can't say that this book has no redeeming features, no There are people who would love Rankin's zany take on the apocalypse. For me it's way too freewheeling and manic for me to enjoy it. It's as if The Hitchhiker's Guide was rewritten by someone on speed, smooshing all sorts of ideas in an almost incomprehensible mish-mosh. We've got Elvis, we've got a talking sprout, a future incarnation of the Dalai Lama, Jesus and his twin sister Christine, television, and post nuclear mad max shenanigans. I can't say that this book has no redeeming features, nor that there's not an audience for it. I can only say that I thoroughly did not enjoy it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    This is my first book by Robert Rankin and I came to it knowing almost nothing. It is indeed written in a style reminiscent of Douglas Adams' work - absurdist SF with caustic one liners and waaaaaay too much shit happening all the time. It's all about the fast paced, seemingly LSD and mushroom fueled story line, with weird characters doing odd things and a world built out of vulgarity and contradictions. I am 100% into that kind of stuff, if it's done right. I'm aware that not many readers can s This is my first book by Robert Rankin and I came to it knowing almost nothing. It is indeed written in a style reminiscent of Douglas Adams' work - absurdist SF with caustic one liners and waaaaaay too much shit happening all the time. It's all about the fast paced, seemingly LSD and mushroom fueled story line, with weird characters doing odd things and a world built out of vulgarity and contradictions. I am 100% into that kind of stuff, if it's done right. I'm aware that not many readers can sit through this kind of prose, because it is jumpy and fast paced, but give it a shot. As with the best in the genre, you might find that there is some astute social, political and in general human commentary underneath it all.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dane

    Rankin has been compared to Pratchett and Adams.. this is unfair. Rankin is Rankin in the same way as Pratchett is Pratchett, they shouldn't be compared because although both are brilliant they are brilliant in quite astoundingly different ways. All of Rankin's books have a different feel to them, and if you didn't know, you could swear that some were written by different authors.. but despite that there are always those rankin touches.. the Running Gag.. oh how we love the running gag.. not jus Rankin has been compared to Pratchett and Adams.. this is unfair. Rankin is Rankin in the same way as Pratchett is Pratchett, they shouldn't be compared because although both are brilliant they are brilliant in quite astoundingly different ways. All of Rankin's books have a different feel to them, and if you didn't know, you could swear that some were written by different authors.. but despite that there are always those rankin touches.. the Running Gag.. oh how we love the running gag.. not just running through chapters but running through every book. Armageddon the musical is a start of a trilogy of books all concerned with... yup, the end of the world. The good guys include Rex Mundi (King of the world, although only by name) Elvis Aron (or Aaron, no one is really sure) Presley.. Barry the loqacious sprout, what better could you ask for. The plot twists and weaves and is quite complex but it all makes sense and it all adds up to the really and tottaly unexpected trick ending (no, don't skip forward, you'll spoil it) I have heard it said that it's not as Rankin-esque as "The book of Ultimate Truths" but that's one of Rankin's Strengths, There's always something new. Buy this.. buy all his others too. You'll be happy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    This is a strange mix of Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, The Truman Show and Redshirts. And when I say strange I mean strange, but in a really good and fun way. People who can't laugh at Christianity or L. Ron Hubbard should probably steer clear though. This is a strange mix of Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, The Truman Show and Redshirts. And when I say strange I mean strange, but in a really good and fun way. People who can't laugh at Christianity or L. Ron Hubbard should probably steer clear though.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nen Simmons

    Earth is being manipulated by aliens who are using it as a reality TV show. Trouble is, ratings have now slumped for the post-apocalyptic world were everything is controlled by 3 main religions, so they decide to send a time-travelling sprout back to 1958 to contact Elvis Presley and alter the course of history. The fact that this plot seems perfectly plausible is testament to Robert Rankin's excellent rating and alarming imagination. Also has the usual running gags ( Ian Paisley etc) and the cu Earth is being manipulated by aliens who are using it as a reality TV show. Trouble is, ratings have now slumped for the post-apocalyptic world were everything is controlled by 3 main religions, so they decide to send a time-travelling sprout back to 1958 to contact Elvis Presley and alter the course of history. The fact that this plot seems perfectly plausible is testament to Robert Rankin's excellent rating and alarming imagination. Also has the usual running gags ( Ian Paisley etc) and the customary glossing-over of continuity errors that are his trade mark.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aletha Tavares

    hilarious!! its the future 2050- the characters of dalai lama, elvis priestly who the former thinks will kill him, is being brought back to earth to up the ratings of the soap opera the Earthers by the planet phnaargos, who feel that all that has been happening on earth is war , killings, blood violence & sex and need to inject the viewing with something different- but this goes awry thanks to the GOD wo is also side stepped by his sister. this si cosmic fun in all its galaxious humour

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gillian Taylor

    Absolutely, without a shadow of a doubt my favourite trilogy of all time. Rankin has been often compared to Pratchet, but in my opinion he outshines him by far. This book has elements from reality and a vast imagination inside of Rankin's mind that will make you take a look into your very soul and examine it. Barry the sprout is an inspiration to us all. Absolutely, without a shadow of a doubt my favourite trilogy of all time. Rankin has been often compared to Pratchet, but in my opinion he outshines him by far. This book has elements from reality and a vast imagination inside of Rankin's mind that will make you take a look into your very soul and examine it. Barry the sprout is an inspiration to us all.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    [Short and quick review from memory before I re-read and re-review at a later date: I mean, really. XD Just the title is bringing joy to me. I think this is the Rankin book that really made me love him quite severely.]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Doreen Dalesandro

    Genre: sci-fi humor Rating: 3.75 I listened to this book. One word describes this book: whacky! It is lots of fun! Robert Rankin does a great job narrating his book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Schecke

    I have enjoyed nearly everything I have read by Robert Rankin, especially his Brentford books. However, I really struggled with this one. The characters are two dimensional and very hard to keep track of. The plot is really convoluted and confusing and the narrative bounces all over the place. As a fan of Rankin, I went into this expecting a load of nonsense. But usually the nonsense is funnier and when things get truly chaotic, the chaos is more short-lived. I kept expecting the insanity to bui I have enjoyed nearly everything I have read by Robert Rankin, especially his Brentford books. However, I really struggled with this one. The characters are two dimensional and very hard to keep track of. The plot is really convoluted and confusing and the narrative bounces all over the place. As a fan of Rankin, I went into this expecting a load of nonsense. But usually the nonsense is funnier and when things get truly chaotic, the chaos is more short-lived. I kept expecting the insanity to build to a crescendo until some lady in a straw hat became an unexpected casualty. But more than anything, I expected the plot would move forward and start making sense before it became monotonous. Unfortunately that didn't happen. If you are new to Robert Rankin, I would recommend The Antipope as your port of entry. This one is a pass. 2/5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lance

    “ The universe started with a sound like a duck call, then a whistle, then an enormous wind-break.” This was my first Robert Rankin book, and I thoroughly enjoyed the surreal ride. Unable to pass up an author recommended by Sir Terry Pratchett (and interminably by my Goodreads Recommendations feed), I picked out the one that sounded the most epic to me. Post-nuclear Apocalypse. Armageddon. Aliens making reality TV out of human evolution. Although the premise is fairly similar to Terry Pratchett a “ The universe started with a sound like a duck call, then a whistle, then an enormous wind-break.” This was my first Robert Rankin book, and I thoroughly enjoyed the surreal ride. Unable to pass up an author recommended by Sir Terry Pratchett (and interminably by my Goodreads Recommendations feed), I picked out the one that sounded the most epic to me. Post-nuclear Apocalypse. Armageddon. Aliens making reality TV out of human evolution. Although the premise is fairly similar to Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens, which I found missed the mark for me when I read it in 2016, I personally preferred Rankin’s Armageddon: The Musical. I think the way it embraced its own naffness circumvented the problem of material dating, which affects all comedy writing. I enjoyed the literal depiction of the alien Phnaargs as green-skinned men, like the lowest budget extras in a 1980s episode of Staer Trek. “ The erect biped represents the universal architype when it comes to the ‘intelligent’ being. This has long been known to science-fiction aficionados and UFO contactees.” There was no attempt to make the visual epic or stylish, just a great commitment to mocking the era. Much of the book focuses on the squalid post-nuclear suburbia, a literal soap opera of the mundane lives of the survivors of the end of civilisation. “ When Rex had asked to be shown exactly where they were on the map, Uncle Tony had shaken his head, and said that he didn’t know. Then he had wept.” It’s a benighted world, where poverty and beaurocracy march on much as they do today. “Although the water was bit iffy, and lamb looked like it would be off the menu for some time, the TV was back on within the week, which can’t be bad by any reckoning.” Rankin cleverly subverts a lot of the 1980s-1990s middle class fear about the social implications of watching too much television by having literal food rations apportioned in accordance with how much television you watch and major religious figures preaching game shows instead of sermons. And who are these surviving religions? The Bhuddists, led by the Dhalai Lama. All fundamentalists, finally under the sway of L. Ron Hubbard. And … Wait for it … The Jesuits! Having attended Jesuit school for far too long as a teenager, this joke genuinely brought tears to my eyes. There aren’t enough literary jokes about Jesuits. Meanwhile, those green low-budget Phnaargs are meeting in soulless boardroom clashes to try and reverse the decrease in rating for hit reality TV show The Eathers. “‘Must I remind you that this series has an original script?’” (even if the was scheduled to end in the year 999 A.D.) Why are they so much more advanced than us if they look human? “On Phnaargos, the cathode ray-tube grew wild.” And every twig, flower, and clump off moss on Earth is a Phnaargian recording device. They epitomise everything ruthless and cut-throat about big media. “ Someone on fire jumped from a third floor window ‘Zoom in on the corpse. Hold and cut.’” “‘But they are our people, that is murder.’ ‘No, Morgowr, that is showbiz.’” But their public just aren’t that interested in watching bunker-bound humanity watching television (clearly the Phnaargs haven’t got Googlebox). Their great plan? Bring back popular character Elvis Presley with an infuriating time-travelling sprout. Even their attempt to bring Elvis forwards from 1958 looks like a terrible special effect. “‘Perhaps when you actually go back in time things aren’t the way they should be. Possibly when the present becomes the past it sort of decays.’” No wonder the human race isn’t up to much in the year 2050. “’ If only the morons had done what was required of them throughout their history they would all be living in Utopia now.’” As if a TV-addicted capitalist species knows anything about Utopia. The book is full of irreverent humour. There is total disregard for the forth wall. “‘Oh,’ said Deathblade Eric, ‘It’s us. I thought we were dead.’” Characters talk about escaping their own subplots to become major characters and vanishing from the plot. There are lots of splatterpunk deaths. There is a nuclear warhead called a “ Sneekie Reekie” It asks the characters too feel sorry for it when it’s found to be a bud. “ Death was always a squalid affair, but Rex, like all men, had laboured under the misconception that his would have some dignity about it.” The style is compelling, there’s something almost grimdark about its contempt for its own poignancy. The one aspect that I wasn’t comfortable about in this novel, and the reason that I had to deduct a star, was the consistent objectification of women. “The floor was littered with Coca Cola cans, empty Bourbon bottles, Kentucky Fried Chicken boxes, and several Chinese women in various states of undress.” See what I mean? I know that misogyny was rife in the 1980s power-media, but this relegation of women to furniture was never subverted or challenged. Almost all of the characters are male, and those few female characters are shrewish and only really appreciated for their bodies. If Rankin can modernise his writing more in his other works, I think he could be a new favourite author to rival Tom Holt. “‘God thrives on flattery, worship, and applause. He created man in his own image. So he’s only human after all. He created another planet, Phnaargos, and a race, the Phnaargs, whose job it was to stage-manage the whole show.’”

  15. 5 out of 5

    J.M.

    Read one book by this author already and enjoyed it so much I wanted to read another. My sister bought it for me for Christmas 2009. While I finished it, I didn't find it the "rip-roaring comedy" hailed by the critics on the cover. It was confusing at times but interesting enough to keep me reading. However, it's part of a trilogy, and I don't see myself rushing out to pick up the next volume any time soon. Read one book by this author already and enjoyed it so much I wanted to read another. My sister bought it for me for Christmas 2009. While I finished it, I didn't find it the "rip-roaring comedy" hailed by the critics on the cover. It was confusing at times but interesting enough to keep me reading. However, it's part of a trilogy, and I don't see myself rushing out to pick up the next volume any time soon.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Keith Davis

    Armageddon the Musical never seems to be quite as funny as it is trying to be. You get the impression that the author is trying very hard to be Douglas Adams or Terry Pratchett but not quite getting there. All the ingredients are there, but it is like a cake that fails to rise and you are left wondering if a step got missed somewhere in the recipe.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alesia

    A time-traveling sprout named Barry, that lives in Elvis Presley's head. What more do I need to say? A time-traveling sprout named Barry, that lives in Elvis Presley's head. What more do I need to say?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    This is just not doing it for me. On its way to the ditched stack.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mike Abney

    Entertaining, but probably not worth your time. Cons: The book is, frankly, a bit sexist. There is one female character (of maybe 3) with any authority however she is made out to be stuck-up, man-hating, and—in the end—incompetent. The next closest is essentially a fantasy love interest about whom I cannot say much more without spoilers. All other females mentioned in the book are there for the physical pleasure of the males. The book does some fun things with time travel, but the formatting, at l Entertaining, but probably not worth your time. Cons: The book is, frankly, a bit sexist. There is one female character (of maybe 3) with any authority however she is made out to be stuck-up, man-hating, and—in the end—incompetent. The next closest is essentially a fantasy love interest about whom I cannot say much more without spoilers. All other females mentioned in the book are there for the physical pleasure of the males. The book does some fun things with time travel, but the formatting, at least on the Kindle version, makes this even harder to follow than it needs to be. Scenes (and time) changes are run into each other without any visible spacing. It's used to good effect a few times, but becomes annoying after 50 or so times of not being used except as a way to be confusing. Pros: It's free on Kindle Unlimited, which is how I ran into it in the first place. There are some funny bits and some decent political and philosophical ideas and points made. Overall: The sexism isn't overt and is likely unintentional. If you can give that a pass, then the book is potentially worth reading. That said, I cannot recommend it. There are good ideas in there, but it is also quite clunky at times. I may attempt to read the second book (this is the first in a trilogy) since it is also free via Kindle Unlimited, but I am just as likely to pay to read something else to avoid it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    L J H

    Fantasy in the furthest reaches of the word. This book contains many complex plots/subplots. Characters that needed considerably more explanations than were given might have helped the story to flow a little better.(for me personally) But would have meant a much longer read. I would like to think I have a good imagination and quick wit. But..through this cramped and chaotic story I became confused much easier than I should. I love Terry Pratchett ..and was wholesomely recommended this book as bei Fantasy in the furthest reaches of the word. This book contains many complex plots/subplots. Characters that needed considerably more explanations than were given might have helped the story to flow a little better.(for me personally) But would have meant a much longer read. I would like to think I have a good imagination and quick wit. But..through this cramped and chaotic story I became confused much easier than I should. I love Terry Pratchett ..and was wholesomely recommended this book as being 'similar' to his style of writing. I found very little humour or likability in most of the characters..which is unlike me..as I do enjoy post apocalyptic/end of the world scenario as a rule. I appreciate this book is part of a series. So maybe the following parts do improve the enjoyment of the story

  21. 4 out of 5

    George Morrison

    Rankin's fantasy is chaotic, irreverent, and occasionally witty. I enjoyed it and recommend it for a light summer read. Set fifty years in the future, Armageddon provides a wry take on the dystopian futures that have become de rigueur in modern sci-fi, positing a world where we all sit around drinking Buddha-beer and watching TV (mandatory). How the world gets in that state is revealed in a layered approach throughout the novel and was well done. The characterizations are deliberately flat (and se Rankin's fantasy is chaotic, irreverent, and occasionally witty. I enjoyed it and recommend it for a light summer read. Set fifty years in the future, Armageddon provides a wry take on the dystopian futures that have become de rigueur in modern sci-fi, positing a world where we all sit around drinking Buddha-beer and watching TV (mandatory). How the world gets in that state is revealed in a layered approach throughout the novel and was well done. The characterizations are deliberately flat (and self-consciously so, which is part of the fun). It takes some time to develop empathy for the protagonist (Rex Mundi), and at first I was put off by the introduction of Elvis as a character, but Rankin manages to pull it off. And the aliens? They remind me of the old saying, "when you point your finger at somebody, there are four others pointing back at you."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marta

    Don’t ask me what this book is about... but it is funny. We got a time traveling Elvis, a completely evil but all powerful Dalai Lama, multiple layers of interplanetary reality TV, a send-up of media-controlled dumb masses, plant-based tehnology... it is all a mad dash, confusing, but readable, and fun. Rankin is often compared to Pratchett, and there are similarities in the humor, the crazy plots tgat bend in on itself, and casual playing with scientific concepts. But while Pratchett’s character Don’t ask me what this book is about... but it is funny. We got a time traveling Elvis, a completely evil but all powerful Dalai Lama, multiple layers of interplanetary reality TV, a send-up of media-controlled dumb masses, plant-based tehnology... it is all a mad dash, confusing, but readable, and fun. Rankin is often compared to Pratchett, and there are similarities in the humor, the crazy plots tgat bend in on itself, and casual playing with scientific concepts. But while Pratchett’s characters are drawn with compassion and great understanding and love for hunan failings, Rankin’s characters are often mean, shallow or incompetent, although always very self-referencing, which makes it not mean spirited overall. It is a fun light romp, great for vacation.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ru

    This was my introduction to Robert Rankin, and it almost broke my brain. It remains one of the most unhinged things I've ever read. This is Terry Pratchet, but without the worthiness. On speed, acid and magic mushrooms. Overall I probably prefer the less frenetic, more grounded humour of Rankin's Ealing books, but as an exercise in stark raving bonkers, I doubt this has an equal. That said, it's difficult to compare it with Rankin's other books in the same vein, because by the time I read them my This was my introduction to Robert Rankin, and it almost broke my brain. It remains one of the most unhinged things I've ever read. This is Terry Pratchet, but without the worthiness. On speed, acid and magic mushrooms. Overall I probably prefer the less frenetic, more grounded humour of Rankin's Ealing books, but as an exercise in stark raving bonkers, I doubt this has an equal. That said, it's difficult to compare it with Rankin's other books in the same vein, because by the time I read them my view of reality had already been permanently reset by this psychological hand-grenade of a novel. Read when completely unprepared, its effect was devastating: like being trapped in a cheese-dream which didn't stop even when I'd woken up. I howled and gibbered with laughter. Not just while reading it, either. The effect was cumulative. Recalling what I'd read, I found myself bursting into deranged laughter days later. Bystanders in shops would look at me strangely. I can't remember anything else that's had that effect, before or since. Its memory feels like one of those wince-inducingly insane things you do when you're young and irresponsible, which you can't quite bring yourself entirely to regret.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean Keefe

    I love Rankin, but I found this one to be a real stinker. I flunk the jokes flat, the plot inconsequential, and the whole thing devoid of his usual genius. Took me almost a week to get through, and I normally polish his books off in a couple of days. Ah well, with such a great catalogue as Rankin's, there's gotta be the odd one that doesn't match the heights of his other stuff. Onwards to better. I love Rankin, but I found this one to be a real stinker. I flunk the jokes flat, the plot inconsequential, and the whole thing devoid of his usual genius. Took me almost a week to get through, and I normally polish his books off in a couple of days. Ah well, with such a great catalogue as Rankin's, there's gotta be the odd one that doesn't match the heights of his other stuff. Onwards to better.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I’ve read quite a lot of Rankin books, not in order, obviously, and I always enjoy them. I struggled a little with this one, the plot moved just a little too much for me and I found it challenging to follow. I don’t know if that’s because I read it during lockdown when I found it difficult to concentrate or if this one is a little overly confusing! Still good to dip into Rankin’s chaotic mind, you need a good sense of humour to get through these days!

  26. 5 out of 5

    H.Friedmann

    Randomly found at a used bookstore. As if the cover wasn't enough of a clue, this is a completely absurd wackadoodle book. Dystopian in a way reminiscent of Terry Gilliam. More than once I found myself wondering what Rankin was on when he came up with this stuff. Consider yourself properly warned. But for all of that - enjoyable. Randomly found at a used bookstore. As if the cover wasn't enough of a clue, this is a completely absurd wackadoodle book. Dystopian in a way reminiscent of Terry Gilliam. More than once I found myself wondering what Rankin was on when he came up with this stuff. Consider yourself properly warned. But for all of that - enjoyable.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robert J.

    Robert Rankin is one of my favorite authors. He has this, strange, self referential lunacy that is at once slightly annoying and incredibly intriguing. You'll finish reading unsure what exactly you liked about it, but eager to read the next one. Robert Rankin is one of my favorite authors. He has this, strange, self referential lunacy that is at once slightly annoying and incredibly intriguing. You'll finish reading unsure what exactly you liked about it, but eager to read the next one.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christie

    Irreverent and Unexpected The craziest post-apocalyptic tale of the apocalypse ever. Elvis, aliens, and cannibals, oh my! Not for the easily offended, but definitely for fans of Douglas Adams and Terru Pratchett. Can't wait to read the next one. Irreverent and Unexpected The craziest post-apocalyptic tale of the apocalypse ever. Elvis, aliens, and cannibals, oh my! Not for the easily offended, but definitely for fans of Douglas Adams and Terru Pratchett. Can't wait to read the next one.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    In a bid to read outside of my comfort zone this year I gave this a go. I'm sure, to the right person, it's hilarious but I honestly have no idea what the hell was going on at most points! In a bid to read outside of my comfort zone this year I gave this a go. I'm sure, to the right person, it's hilarious but I honestly have no idea what the hell was going on at most points!

  30. 5 out of 5

    David Robert Bloomer

    Strange Elvis, a time sprout and a very very strange plot. Read it and ponder. Rankin certainly weaves a strange tale.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.