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The Clicking of Cuthbert: Love is a fever which, so to speak, drives off without wasting time on the address.

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"Vladimir specialized in grey studies of hopeless misery, where nothing happened till page 380, when the muzhik decided to commit suicide."The Clicking of Cuthbert is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, all with a golfing theme. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 3 February 1922. The most popular humor book for individuals who are going to ov "Vladimir specialized in grey studies of hopeless misery, where nothing happened till page 380, when the muzhik decided to commit suicide."The Clicking of Cuthbert is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, all with a golfing theme. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 3 February 1922. The most popular humor book for individuals who are going to overcome depression.Who but P.G. Wodehouse could have extracted high comedy from the most noble and ancient game of golf? And who else could have combined this comedy with a real appreciation of the game, drawn from personal experience? Wodehouse's brilliant but human brand of humor is perfectly suited to these stories of love, rivalry, revenge, and fulfillment on the links.While the oldest member sits inside the clubhouse quoting Marcus Aurelius on patience and wisdom, outside on the green the strongest human passions burn. All human life is here, from Sandy McHoots, the cocky professional, to shy Ramsden Waters, whose only consolation in life is golf. Even golf-haters will not be able to resist stories which perfectly combine physical farce and verbal wit with a galler


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"Vladimir specialized in grey studies of hopeless misery, where nothing happened till page 380, when the muzhik decided to commit suicide."The Clicking of Cuthbert is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, all with a golfing theme. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 3 February 1922. The most popular humor book for individuals who are going to ov "Vladimir specialized in grey studies of hopeless misery, where nothing happened till page 380, when the muzhik decided to commit suicide."The Clicking of Cuthbert is a collection of ten short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, all with a golfing theme. It was first published in the United Kingdom on 3 February 1922. The most popular humor book for individuals who are going to overcome depression.Who but P.G. Wodehouse could have extracted high comedy from the most noble and ancient game of golf? And who else could have combined this comedy with a real appreciation of the game, drawn from personal experience? Wodehouse's brilliant but human brand of humor is perfectly suited to these stories of love, rivalry, revenge, and fulfillment on the links.While the oldest member sits inside the clubhouse quoting Marcus Aurelius on patience and wisdom, outside on the green the strongest human passions burn. All human life is here, from Sandy McHoots, the cocky professional, to shy Ramsden Waters, whose only consolation in life is golf. Even golf-haters will not be able to resist stories which perfectly combine physical farce and verbal wit with a galler

30 review for The Clicking of Cuthbert: Love is a fever which, so to speak, drives off without wasting time on the address.

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pramod Nair

    “In the days of King Arthur nobody thought the worse of a young knight if he suspended all his social and business engagements in favour of a search for the Holy Grail. In the Middle Ages a man could devote his whole life to the Crusades, and the public fawned upon him. Why, then, blame the man of today for a zealous attention to the modern equivalent, the Quest of Scratch! *” P.G. Wodehouse, who was an avid Golfer himself, thus describes the devotion for the sport felt by one of the characters f “In the days of King Arthur nobody thought the worse of a young knight if he suspended all his social and business engagements in favour of a search for the Holy Grail. In the Middle Ages a man could devote his whole life to the Crusades, and the public fawned upon him. Why, then, blame the man of today for a zealous attention to the modern equivalent, the Quest of Scratch! *” P.G. Wodehouse, who was an avid Golfer himself, thus describes the devotion for the sport felt by one of the characters from a story, which appear in this anthology of ten short stories, all written with a golfing theme. ‘The Clicking of Cuthbert’, published in 1922, is the first book in the ‘golf series’, which presents the reader with humorous tales pivoting around golfers and golfing adventures. Each of these golf stories are narrated by a central character named ‘Oldest Member’ – just like Mr. Mulliner from the Mulliner stories series – who over drinks, either at the smoking room or terrace of an unnamed golf club house, shares the anecdotes about golfers to the fellow club members as inspiration. In these stories the reader will come across some of the most amusing comical situations penned by Wodehouse. In the title story ‘The Clicking of Cuthbert’, we meet ‘Cuthbert Banks’, an amateur golfer and a resident of Wood Hills, a picturesque settlement that was going through a bitter rivalry between the local literary society and the local Golf club. When the literary society was having one of it’s sessions at Mrs. Smethurst's house, which stood near to the golf links, a shot taken by ‘Cuthbert’ foozles and the ball accidentally smashes through the window of the house and narrowly miss hitting the chief guest of the session ‘Raymond Parsloe Devine’, a rapidly rising young novelist. Cuthbert goes inside Mrs. Smethurst’s house to play his ball from where it lay, and meets ‘Adeline’, the most beautiful girl he has ever met and instantly falls in love. But Adeline loathes golfers and is in search for an ‘intellectual’ person and she is full of adoration for Raymond. Cuthbert joins the literary society to impress Adeline, and this leads to further hilarious moments. At the time of his joining, the literary society was studying works by ‘Vladimir Brusiloff’ - a Russian novelist who specialized in “gray studies of hopeless misery” and in whose books “nothing happened till page 380” – and Cuthbert who hasn’t read anything other than golf guides soon find himself sitting painfully through these sessions, while watching Adeline and her fascination for Raymond. These descriptions of Cuthbert sitting in “his usual place in a distant corner where, while able to feast his gaze on Adeline, he had a sporting chance of being overlooked or mistaken for a piece of furniture” is laced with good Wodehousian humor. The reader can also detect some fine samples of Wodehouse’s ability to evoke laughter through punchy dialogs within this short story. From a setting when all odds are against Cuthbert, Wodehouse shows his mastery in weaving intertwined comical events and reversals of fortunes, which drives the story of Cuthbert and Adeline ahead and the reader is left with the sensation of pure delight. Even though this formula of evoking humor from a mishmash of comical situations and confusion arising out of misunderstanding is a common attribute of Wodehouse tales, his talent in making each of the stories loaded with fresh humor is applaudable. The stories “A Mixed Threesome” and “Sundered Hearts” presents the reader with the adventures of “Mortimer Sturgis”, the man who took up Golf at 38 and who then left the girl he was engaged to because he hadn’t the time to combine Golf with his courtship, a series of confusions and pandemonium finally leading to his marriage. The anthology has seven more stories, with each offering its own share of eccentric characters, funny situations and dialog based comedy, which offered a highly enjoyable reading experience. In these stories the reader can easily detect the flair associated with Wodehousian tales as they are from an era when Wodehouse was already a skilled writer. These lightweight stories are perfectly recommended for relaxed, fun reading. Even though these stories have a lot of golfing jargon, you don’t have to be a Golf fan to fully enjoy these stories. * (view spoiler)[A golfer whose handicap is zero is called a "scratch golfer". The higher the handicap of a player, the poorer the player is relative to those with lower handicaps. So attaining a zero handicap or attaining 'a scratch' is a quest for golfers. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    These pretend to be golf stories, but they aren't. They're the same old delightful Wodehouse: the right sort of young man is pining for a girl, difficulties ensue, he gets the girl anyway. And there's a lot of golf club paraphernalia lying about, and golf games of great importance in settling the matter. Most of it, to be honest, is told in rather out of date slang on golf, which makes the whole experience less realistic and more magical, like fairy tales. Fun stuff These pretend to be golf stories, but they aren't. They're the same old delightful Wodehouse: the right sort of young man is pining for a girl, difficulties ensue, he gets the girl anyway. And there's a lot of golf club paraphernalia lying about, and golf games of great importance in settling the matter. Most of it, to be honest, is told in rather out of date slang on golf, which makes the whole experience less realistic and more magical, like fairy tales. Fun stuff

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ian Wood

    Fore! Some years ago a friend of mine encouraged me to take up Golf so I could join him in a strange world of tournaments, competitions and social events that would otherwise be closed to me. He offered to take me out on a round to get me into the ‘swing’ of things. Some five hours, one hundred and sixty strokes (a very liberal scoring procedure was employed) and five lost balls later both he and I were suffering some frustration. I went to a driving range but had to be smuggled out of the back Fore! Some years ago a friend of mine encouraged me to take up Golf so I could join him in a strange world of tournaments, competitions and social events that would otherwise be closed to me. He offered to take me out on a round to get me into the ‘swing’ of things. Some five hours, one hundred and sixty strokes (a very liberal scoring procedure was employed) and five lost balls later both he and I were suffering some frustration. I went to a driving range but had to be smuggled out of the back door should the gentleman in the next booth regain consciousness whilst I was still on the premises. I booked an hour with a ‘Pro’ who refunded my money after thirty five minutes. Not to be put off I had a second round with my friend who, on the sixth green, told me that if I didn’t give up golf he would. So I approached Wodehouse’s collection of Golf stories ‘The Clicking of Cuthbert’ with some trepidation. However I was mistaken to be suspicious, these stories mixing the trials and tribulations of golf with the golfer’s attempts to succeed in love or other worthwhile pursuits really are a triumph. The Oldest Member of the club sums up all aspects of golf in the most wonderful language , such as the following description of weekend golfers ‘Like all Saturday foursomes, it is in difficulties. One of the patients is zigzagging about the fairway like a liner pursued by submarines. Two others seem to be digging for buried treasure or killing snakes. The remaining cripple, who has just foozled a mashie-shot, is blaming his caddie.’ And so I have found a way to participate in the world of golf which was closed to a man of my sporting prowess. Whilst my peers go out for eighteen holes I hole up with the Oldest Member on the terrace of the Mavis Bay golf links and laugh at them. Like the Oldest Member I’m not averse to putting myself on the outside of a cup of Tea and a slice of Cake.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Ten stories, all with the common theme of golf and its tortures. Amusing but not particularly laugh out loud funny. Some great turns of phrase and wonderful images but I have noticed one constant. This is the second volume of his short stories that i have read and though i am always aware of which character I am supposed to like, I almost inevitably find them annoying and self-obsessed. In this volume, which is largely tongue-in-cheek, perhaps that is not a real problem but i carry the horrible Ten stories, all with the common theme of golf and its tortures. Amusing but not particularly laugh out loud funny. Some great turns of phrase and wonderful images but I have noticed one constant. This is the second volume of his short stories that i have read and though i am always aware of which character I am supposed to like, I almost inevitably find them annoying and self-obsessed. In this volume, which is largely tongue-in-cheek, perhaps that is not a real problem but i carry the horrible suspicion that i am going to loathe all his heroes and feel sorry for all his villains.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    A collection of golf stories, mostly narrated by the Oldest Member. Even a non-golfer such as myself can enjoy these short stories!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aditya

    What I know about golf - nil. What I thought about the sport in general - Boring. What the central theme of the stories in this book was - Golf. And yet here I am rating a book about golf as magnificent, which just goes to show the genius of Wodehouse. All the stories in this book had me in splits. Don't worry if you find golf to be the most boring sport ever invented, because this book will still be funny. What I know about golf - nil. What I thought about the sport in general - Boring. What the central theme of the stories in this book was - Golf. And yet here I am rating a book about golf as magnificent, which just goes to show the genius of Wodehouse. All the stories in this book had me in splits. Don't worry if you find golf to be the most boring sport ever invented, because this book will still be funny.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abhi

    "Their friendship ripened rapidly, as friendships do in the South of France. In that favoured clime, you find the girl and Nature does the rest." "I am not a married man myself, so have had no experience of how it feels to have one's wife whizz off silently into the unknown; but I imagine it must be something like taking a full swing with the brassey and missing the ball." "A young woman of singular beauty and rather statuesque appearance came out of the club-house carrying a baby swaddled in flan "Their friendship ripened rapidly, as friendships do in the South of France. In that favoured clime, you find the girl and Nature does the rest." "I am not a married man myself, so have had no experience of how it feels to have one's wife whizz off silently into the unknown; but I imagine it must be something like taking a full swing with the brassey and missing the ball." "A young woman of singular beauty and rather statuesque appearance came out of the club-house carrying a baby swaddled in flannel. As she drew near the table she said to the baby: 'Chickety wicketty wicketty wipsey pop!' In other respects her intelligence appeared to be above ordinary." "Their house was not far from the links; Eunice was not engaged to be married; and the aunt made a hobby of collecting dry seaweed, which she dried and pasted in an album. One sometimes thinks that aunts live entirely for pleasure." Didn't want to write a review for this book; thought I'd take some extracts out of it instead. One word for anything that is PGW: sublime.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    The Oldest Member no longer plays golf, but sits on the terrace of the golf club and watches others play. Younger players come to him for advice and he tells them stories of golfers and romance. Funny, but if I was a golfer and understood anything at all about the game I probably would have thought it even funnier.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Also free on Project Gutenberg. And granted, I did start reading Wodehouse with Wodehouse's first book of short stories -- so maybe the progression makes sense -- but this book was all about golf, and I hate golf, and this was still the best Wodehouse I've read yet. Freaking hilarious. Also free on Project Gutenberg. And granted, I did start reading Wodehouse with Wodehouse's first book of short stories -- so maybe the progression makes sense -- but this book was all about golf, and I hate golf, and this was still the best Wodehouse I've read yet. Freaking hilarious.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hillary

    Miraculously, this set of golf stories suffers not at all from the fact I know very, very little about golf (most of my knowledge of the sport comes from a Nancy Drew book). I was still able to follow along perfectly well, and all the stories were hilarious.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Alfonseca

    Ten short stories about how golf can help men marry beautiful girls, or alternatively, escape from girls who hate golf.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ivor Armistead

    You don’t have to a golfer to love this book, but it helps.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve Shilstone

    What a relief to step from the dystopian reality of the world into the lark strewn meadows of Wodehousian bliss.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek Dafria

    My copy of the book The Clicking of Cuthbert has a short commentary from Stephen Fry, which goes like this -- "You don't analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and glory." I could not have said it any better. Maybe literature scholars dissect the work of P.G. Wodehouse and place it certain categories and genres, but for someone like me, his work is pure genius, beyond comparison and above categorisation. It is not the work of a mortal, but that of a literary God, who is rich My copy of the book The Clicking of Cuthbert has a short commentary from Stephen Fry, which goes like this -- "You don't analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and glory." I could not have said it any better. Maybe literature scholars dissect the work of P.G. Wodehouse and place it certain categories and genres, but for someone like me, his work is pure genius, beyond comparison and above categorisation. It is not the work of a mortal, but that of a literary God, who is rich with his narration, and clever with his words. The Clicking of Cuthbert has ten short stories revolving around the game of golf, most of them narrated by a fellow known as the Oldest Member who treats golf as one of the greatest religions known to man. But even though the green pastures of a golf course regularly form the backdrop of these stories, the incidents that occur with the protagonists are to do with a lot more than golf (the Oldest Member would be aghast on reading this line!). The theme of love and courtship is the most common and also gives the biggest laughs. P.G. Wodehouse has a way with words that is uniquely his; the tone of his story-telling has a soothing touch to it, which is mixed well with humour to put the reader in one of his best moods. The same holds true for The Clicking of Cuthbert, which is one of his best works that I have read, though again I repeat, we cannot and probably should not judge Wodehouse. His work has stood the test of time, and it is just a privilege to be able to get to read such books. So if you are hunting for something that will make you lighten up and enjoy life a bit more, The Clicking of Cuthbert is a good recommendation!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tanmay.

    Started reading this book on net on a dull monday morning in Office.(Ya I do that. :p) And trust me nothing could have been more refreshing. I was suggested about Wodehouse books by my friend before.I had even began with one but left in between because of the arduous verbiage and unfamiliar slangs. So was bit hesitant before starting this.But it "clicked".:) The book is collection of short stories themed around the game of golf and the extent to which it worshippers go to preserve their love for it.Th Started reading this book on net on a dull monday morning in Office.(Ya I do that. :p) And trust me nothing could have been more refreshing. I was suggested about Wodehouse books by my friend before.I had even began with one but left in between because of the arduous verbiage and unfamiliar slangs. So was bit hesitant before starting this.But it "clicked".:) The book is collection of short stories themed around the game of golf and the extent to which it worshippers go to preserve their love for it.The plots built around it are really funny. The author's passion for the game is quite evident from the details with which the golf has been described. The type of humor is romantic comedy.But it has delightful sarcasm,wit,quips intertwined within it. The author ability to incite humor from supposedly ordinary scenarios is truly amazing. And dont worry if you are not the greatest fan of golf(Like me).Because all the golf jargon somehow doesnt spoil this beautiful comedy.It wont bore a bit once you get hang of it and you'll never know when you have finished it. The best book of this genre I've read so far. If you appreciate pleasant witty humor or want to have a quick laugh this book is definitely for you. Looking forward to more from him.:)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zee

    Much too much golf. Perhaps golf aficionados will love this collection of stories as told by the Oldest Member of a country club, each story its own chapter told in typical PGW style. I, however, tired of the high jinks partway through. There are gems of phrasing, clever twists, and the occasional chortle, but like that uncle who thinks he's the cat's pajamas, Uncle has overstayed his welcome. Nevertheless, all hail PGW for blazing the trail by creating a language and a style that has delighted Much too much golf. Perhaps golf aficionados will love this collection of stories as told by the Oldest Member of a country club, each story its own chapter told in typical PGW style. I, however, tired of the high jinks partway through. There are gems of phrasing, clever twists, and the occasional chortle, but like that uncle who thinks he's the cat's pajamas, Uncle has overstayed his welcome. Nevertheless, all hail PGW for blazing the trail by creating a language and a style that has delighted and inspired so many, including me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Beautiful, light and sunny. Wodehouse's golf stories are perfect for any occasion. Might consider taking up golf now. Beautiful, light and sunny. Wodehouse's golf stories are perfect for any occasion. Might consider taking up golf now.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nullifidian

    I don't even play golf, but I was reduced to tears of laughter at these stories, so I hope that other readers whose only acquaintance with the game is occasionally seeing Tiger Woods on a magazine cover at the grocery store won't let their unfamiliarity lead them to pass by these marvelous vignettes. With the exception of the final story, "The Coming of Gowf", a Gilgamesh-epic of the green, all the stories are narrated by The Oldest Member and feature the familiar Wodehouse types of well-meaning I don't even play golf, but I was reduced to tears of laughter at these stories, so I hope that other readers whose only acquaintance with the game is occasionally seeing Tiger Woods on a magazine cover at the grocery store won't let their unfamiliarity lead them to pass by these marvelous vignettes. With the exception of the final story, "The Coming of Gowf", a Gilgamesh-epic of the green, all the stories are narrated by The Oldest Member and feature the familiar Wodehouse types of well-meaning fools and their star-crossed loves. The title character is one such, a mental nonentity who joins the Wood Hills Literary Society for the sake of a girl he loved at first sight ever since he dropped in unexpectedly on a literary gathering after a nasty slice of his nearly caused him to decapitate an emerging novelist. As a minus quantity in the brains department, he finds the rigors of the life literary to be a tough slog, and never more so than when reading the works of Vladimir Brusiloff. As Wodehouse writes, in his inimitable way: “This Vladimir Brusiloff to whom I have referred was the famous Russian novelist, and, owing to the fact of his being in the country on a lecturing tour at the moment, there had been something of a boom in his works. The Wood Hills Literary Society had been studying them for weeks, and never since his first entrance into intellectual circles had Cuthbert Banks come nearer to throwing in the towel. Vladimir specialized in grey studies of hopeless misery, where nothing happened till page three hundred and eighty, when the moujik decided to commit suicide. It was tough going for a man whose deepest reading hitherto had been Vardon on the Push-Shot, and there can be no greater proof of the magic of love than the fact that Cuthbert stuck it without a cry. But the strain was terrible and I am inclined to think that he must have cracked, had it not been for the daily reports in the papers of the internecine strife which was proceeding so briskly in Russia. Cuthbert was an optimist at heart, and it seemed to him that, at the rate at which the inhabitants of that interesting country were murdering one another, the supply of Russian novelists must eventually give out.” As always with Wodehouse's stories, matters work themselves out in the end. They're the perfect pick-me-up: heartwarming and uproariously funny.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sequoyah

    In theory, I believe anyone can fully appreciate the game of golf, yet, in practice, I have seldom felt as despondent as I have while playing some of my worst matches. Regardless, these short stories by Wodehouse, despite being nearly a century removed (originally published in 1922), genuinely capture the ambiguities that come with playing such an infuriating game. And it is hilarious. I’m not sure if you need to have played golf to fully appreciate these stories, maybe at least the understanding In theory, I believe anyone can fully appreciate the game of golf, yet, in practice, I have seldom felt as despondent as I have while playing some of my worst matches. Regardless, these short stories by Wodehouse, despite being nearly a century removed (originally published in 1922), genuinely capture the ambiguities that come with playing such an infuriating game. And it is hilarious. I’m not sure if you need to have played golf to fully appreciate these stories, maybe at least the understanding of how difficult a game it is and how absolutely demolishing it is to one’s ego certainly would help. My favorite story is one where these two buffoons want the same girl, so they decide to play a single hole to determine who gets the girl and who has to move from town. The kicker is that the hole is sixteen miles long. One lad has his ball picked up by a dog, and another gets his ball stuck in a car, and they both end up near the hole with over a thousand strokes when the girl they are playing for comes out of a shop to see them complaining about the rules and how they need a third opinion. She helpfully tells them she knows someone who might be able to break the argument: her fiancé who has been away at a golf tournament. Some of my favorite quotations: “George had a good job with the old-established legal firm of Peabody, Peabody, Peabody, Peabody, Cootes, Toots, and Peabody.” “The eye of the Oldest Member was thoughtful and reflective. When it looked into yours you saw in it that perfect peace, that peace beyond understanding, which comes at its maximum only to the man who has given up golf.” “When I played, I never lost my temper. Sometimes, it is true, I may, after missing a shot, have broken my club across my knees; but Idid it in a calm and judicial spirit, because the club was obviously no good and I was going to get another one anyway.” “What she wanted was a great, strong, rough brute of a fellow who would tell her not to move her damned head; a rugged Viking of a chap who, if she did not keep her eye on the ball, would black it for her.”

  20. 5 out of 5

    Luke Paulsen

    This is the first P.G. Wodehouse book I've read, and I have to believe I'm missing something. Yes, it's funny and well-written. In fact there were several moments that delighted me. But I'd always heard Wodehouse spoken of in superlatives, and from this collection I'm just not seeing it. His stories seemed somehow obvious. It's as if Wodehouse had brainstormed a list of possible premises for a comedy sketch about-- in the case of this collection-- golf and romance, and then simply wrote the firs This is the first P.G. Wodehouse book I've read, and I have to believe I'm missing something. Yes, it's funny and well-written. In fact there were several moments that delighted me. But I'd always heard Wodehouse spoken of in superlatives, and from this collection I'm just not seeing it. His stories seemed somehow obvious. It's as if Wodehouse had brainstormed a list of possible premises for a comedy sketch about-- in the case of this collection-- golf and romance, and then simply wrote the first story that came to mind around each of them. By which, as usual, I don't mean to say that it's badly done. Given the general high esteem for Wodehouse I have to assume I'm missing something here. Maybe I'm blinded by hindsight to his inventiveness and interesting writing. Or maybe I just don't appreciate the things that others like about him. I can certainly report that the prose is clever, in that wonderful roundabout English way; and also that the stories are always good for a chuckle and occasionally for more than that. Wodehouse's humor-- which seems to be mostly based on exaggeration and caricature-- sometimes hit for me and sometimes missed. Beyond that I have to admit I didn't notice much worth reporting. At any rate, I'll have to track down one of Wodehouse's better-known novels (the Jeeves and Wooster ones, I think?) at some point, and see how that reads. Sometimes short stories don't show off writers at their best. For now, I can only say that I found The Clicking of Cuthbert to be reasonably entertaining-- but not much more than that.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Grace Crandall

    There’s a kind of comedy that runs itself ragged by being too flippant to induce any feeling other than existential despair, and this book is a lovely example of it. The stories in The Clicking Of Cuthbert revolve, largely, around romantic love and golf. Most are framed stories, told to exasperated young golfers by an old sage in the local country club. The humor comes from the seriousness and reverence with which golf is treated and the general melodramatic ridiculousness of the characters invo There’s a kind of comedy that runs itself ragged by being too flippant to induce any feeling other than existential despair, and this book is a lovely example of it. The stories in The Clicking Of Cuthbert revolve, largely, around romantic love and golf. Most are framed stories, told to exasperated young golfers by an old sage in the local country club. The humor comes from the seriousness and reverence with which golf is treated and the general melodramatic ridiculousness of the characters involved. Some of the stories are genuinely funny, even heartwarming; but once the initial hilarity of ‘people treat golf like a religion!’ Is over, there isn’t much else to sustain the rest of the book. I still enjoyed most of the book enough to have given it three or four stars, though. The thing that shot the rating down to two was a scene in the second-to-last story (‘The Rough Stuff’) in which the main character—a fully grown man—kicks a toddler and is not immediately punched in the face for it. It was supposed to be funny, but it soured my stomach, and I’m still more than a little bitter about it. I’ll still be reading more P.G. Wodehouse in the future, but I wouldn’t recommend this particular work to anyone.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Frankham

    So many chuckles and more from this great set of stories from the 1920s. The golf club’s Oldest Member is the Ancient Mariner as he uses his oft-told stories to give lessons in life to the callow members needing advice. Wonderful. The GR blurb: ‘Who but P.G. Wodehouse could have extracted high comedy from the most noble and ancient game of golf? And who else could have combined this comedy with a real appreciation of the game, drawn from personal experience? Wodehouse's brilliant but human brand o So many chuckles and more from this great set of stories from the 1920s. The golf club’s Oldest Member is the Ancient Mariner as he uses his oft-told stories to give lessons in life to the callow members needing advice. Wonderful. The GR blurb: ‘Who but P.G. Wodehouse could have extracted high comedy from the most noble and ancient game of golf? And who else could have combined this comedy with a real appreciation of the game, drawn from personal experience? Wodehouse's brilliant but human brand of humor is perfectly suited to these stories of love, rivalry, revenge, and fulfillment on the links. While the Oldest Member sits inside the clubhouse quoting Marcus Aurelius on patience and wisdom, outside on the green the strongest human passions burn. All human life is here, from Sandy McHoots, the cocky professional, to shy Ramsden Waters, whose only consolation is golf. Even golf-haters will not be able to resists stories which perfectly combine physical farce and verbal with a gallery of unforgettable characters.’

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    Oh, so funny! While not quite of the caliber of a Jeeves and Wooster, this collection of stories about golf are a pure delight. Anyone who plays the sport would appreciate the humor and drama that Wodehouse captures, especially if you have a historical background in the game, as terms like “mashie,” “niblick,” and “spoon” are used generously. Anyone looking for a light read, and, of course, any Wodehouse fan, will find nothing but mirth here. Lighthearted romances abound as the Oldest Member cons Oh, so funny! While not quite of the caliber of a Jeeves and Wooster, this collection of stories about golf are a pure delight. Anyone who plays the sport would appreciate the humor and drama that Wodehouse captures, especially if you have a historical background in the game, as terms like “mashie,” “niblick,” and “spoon” are used generously. Anyone looking for a light read, and, of course, any Wodehouse fan, will find nothing but mirth here. Lighthearted romances abound as the Oldest Member consoles and counsels a young generation of golfers. His presence lends a loose sense of unity to the collection that actually is quite effective. It is also one of the reasons I disliked the final story (comparatively), as he is not present. Throughout the tales, Wodehouse points out the follies of both love and golf—and the terrible calamities that exist when they collide. I loved the title story, which makes fun of pompous literary types.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joe Stevens

    The title story is superb and by itself a five star story. Whether or not you read the rest of the book hunt down and read this public domain story. Sadly the other stories in this collection can't live up to this story. Several are quite good, but too many become variations on a theme of romance and the superiority of golf with interchangeable characters. Wodehouse plots can have a certain sameness to them, but when spread and intertwined across novels which have entertaining characters, brilli The title story is superb and by itself a five star story. Whether or not you read the rest of the book hunt down and read this public domain story. Sadly the other stories in this collection can't live up to this story. Several are quite good, but too many become variations on a theme of romance and the superiority of golf with interchangeable characters. Wodehouse plots can have a certain sameness to them, but when spread and intertwined across novels which have entertaining characters, brilliant wordplay and laugh out loud situations, this is less obvious. In close proximity with lesser characters, it just becomes too obvious. The better stories in this collection feature golf a bit more on the periphery, while those that give hole by hole accounts can drag even though some of the descriptive work of a summer day on the course is mid-form Wodehouse. This is a collection to read after you've read the great sagas and want a change of pace or unexplored Wodehouse.

  25. 5 out of 5

    William Leight

    [3.5 stars] One of the clear indications of Wodehouse's genius is that this book of short stories about golf -- and not just about golf, but singing golf's praises -- can be enjoyed by a decided non-golfer like myself. Partly this is because Wodehouse is deliberately over-the-top here, starting with the title story, in which Cuthbert wins the affections of the girl he loves after an avant-garde Russian novelist declares that he was looking forward to meeting Cuthbert because of how good a golfer [3.5 stars] One of the clear indications of Wodehouse's genius is that this book of short stories about golf -- and not just about golf, but singing golf's praises -- can be enjoyed by a decided non-golfer like myself. Partly this is because Wodehouse is deliberately over-the-top here, starting with the title story, in which Cuthbert wins the affections of the girl he loves after an avant-garde Russian novelist declares that he was looking forward to meeting Cuthbert because of how good a golfer Cuthbert is. This kind of ridiculousness plays to Wodehouse's strengths with comic dialogue and funny situations: the characters are entirely unmemorable but there's no need for them to be anything else. Wodehouse would write better short stories later but these are still a perfectly good way to kill a couple of hours.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Karandeep

    3.5 Having set the bar so high with Jeeves and Wooster, I was hoping this too would be somewhere close. The writing style of the author is nice, I like it but the stories are not all that entertaining. Having read so many of his books, the underlying theme gets repetitive and he tries hard to make it sound funny and that's where I get bored. Here too,10 stories and the underlying theme of most are same and the progression of the character arcs are similar. So what now? You read them at leisure. Som 3.5 Having set the bar so high with Jeeves and Wooster, I was hoping this too would be somewhere close. The writing style of the author is nice, I like it but the stories are not all that entertaining. Having read so many of his books, the underlying theme gets repetitive and he tries hard to make it sound funny and that's where I get bored. Here too,10 stories and the underlying theme of most are same and the progression of the character arcs are similar. So what now? You read them at leisure. Someone like me who wants to finish this and is impatient, this may just not hold your attention.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shrewbie Spitzmaus

    One of Plum's absolute best! A hilarious collection of golf stories that had me longing to be back on the "links" with every page... the final story ("The Coming of Gowf") is, for me, one of Wodehouse's very finest and most hilarious (and that's saying a lot!)... I literally laughed out loud (and very loud) more times than I could count! It was also interesting to hear how golf lingo has changed over the years; for example, apparently back when this was written "bogey" meant what today is called One of Plum's absolute best! A hilarious collection of golf stories that had me longing to be back on the "links" with every page... the final story ("The Coming of Gowf") is, for me, one of Wodehouse's very finest and most hilarious (and that's saying a lot!)... I literally laughed out loud (and very loud) more times than I could count! It was also interesting to hear how golf lingo has changed over the years; for example, apparently back when this was written "bogey" meant what today is called "par"... and a 7 iron was called a "mashie niblick"... and so on... HIGHLY recommended especially for anyone who loves the beloved and accursed game of golf!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jay Dewey

    A funny book based in the language and practice of golf as could only be told from a Wodehouse point of view, a viewpoint that I had to remind myself every couple of minutes that this vernacular slapstick was meant to be funny, not laugh out loud funny, but in a dry wit British sort of way, one that does not always carry over well to the American trained mind less accustomed to fine points of language and more interested in the drama of a story rather than its humor. But who can knock a Wodehous A funny book based in the language and practice of golf as could only be told from a Wodehouse point of view, a viewpoint that I had to remind myself every couple of minutes that this vernacular slapstick was meant to be funny, not laugh out loud funny, but in a dry wit British sort of way, one that does not always carry over well to the American trained mind less accustomed to fine points of language and more interested in the drama of a story rather than its humor. But who can knock a Wodehouse - well done.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Bethea

    Collection of short stories, all related to golf in some way. Not quite as laugh out loud rousing as most wodehouse I have read, but still entertaining and funny enough. Relies a decent amount on knowledge of the game, not so much for plot but for appreciating some of the wordplay and exaggeration. Almost all of the stories revolve around some man and woman either in love or trying to be, and how golf either ruined/saved/set in motion their relationship.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    I can't abide golf, but PGW was on good form when he wrote these; I laughed out loud several times. My only cavil was that the plotlines of some stories were a little repetitious, but, hey, you don't read Wodehouse for the plot. "Well, the natives seemed fairly friendly, so I decided to stay the night." I made a mental note never to seem fairly friendly to an explorer. If you do, he always decides to stay the night. I can't abide golf, but PGW was on good form when he wrote these; I laughed out loud several times. My only cavil was that the plotlines of some stories were a little repetitious, but, hey, you don't read Wodehouse for the plot. "Well, the natives seemed fairly friendly, so I decided to stay the night." I made a mental note never to seem fairly friendly to an explorer. If you do, he always decides to stay the night.

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