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“If you read only one book about democracy, The Turnaway Study should be it. Why? Because without the power to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy." —Gloria Steinem “Dr. Diana Greene Foster brings what is too often missing from the public debate around abortion: science, data, and the real-life experiences of people from diverse backgrounds…This shou “If you read only one book about democracy, The Turnaway Study should be it. Why? Because without the power to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy." —Gloria Steinem “Dr. Diana Greene Foster brings what is too often missing from the public debate around abortion: science, data, and the real-life experiences of people from diverse backgrounds…This should be required reading for every judge, member of Congress, and candidate for office—as well as anyone who hopes to better understand this complex and important issue.” —Cecile Richards, cofounder of Supermajority, former president of Planned Parenthood, and author of Make Trouble A groundbreaking and illuminating look at the state of abortion access in America and the first long-term study of the consequences—emotional, physical, financial, professional, personal, and psychological—of receiving versus being denied an abortion on women’s lives. What happens when a woman seeking an abortion is turned away? Diana Greene Foster, PhD, decided to find out. With a team of scientists—psychologists, epidemiologists, demographers, nursing scholars, and public health researchers—she set out to discover the effect of receiving versus being denied an abortion on women’s lives. Over the course of a ten-year investigation that began in 2007, she and her team followed a thousand women from more than twenty states, some of whom received their abortions, some of whom were turned away. Now, for the first time, the results of this landmark study—the largest of its kind to examine women’s experiences with abortion and unwanted pregnancy in the United States—have been gathered together in one place. Here Foster presents the emotional, physical, and socioeconomic outcomes for women who received their abortion and those who were denied. She analyzes the impact on their mental and physical health, their careers, their romantic lives, their professional aspirations, and even their existing and future children—and finds that women who received an abortion were almost always better off than women who were denied one. Interwoven with these findings are ten riveting first-person narratives by women who share their candid stories. As the debate about abortion rights intensifies, The Turnaway Study offers an in-depth examination of the real-world consequences for women of being denied abortions and provides evidence to refute the claim that abortion harms women. With brilliant synthesis and startling statistics—that thousands of American women are unable to access abortions; that 99% of women who receive an abortion do not regret it five years later—The Turnaway Study is a necessary and revelatory look at the impact of abortion access on people’s lives.


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“If you read only one book about democracy, The Turnaway Study should be it. Why? Because without the power to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy." —Gloria Steinem “Dr. Diana Greene Foster brings what is too often missing from the public debate around abortion: science, data, and the real-life experiences of people from diverse backgrounds…This shou “If you read only one book about democracy, The Turnaway Study should be it. Why? Because without the power to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy." —Gloria Steinem “Dr. Diana Greene Foster brings what is too often missing from the public debate around abortion: science, data, and the real-life experiences of people from diverse backgrounds…This should be required reading for every judge, member of Congress, and candidate for office—as well as anyone who hopes to better understand this complex and important issue.” —Cecile Richards, cofounder of Supermajority, former president of Planned Parenthood, and author of Make Trouble A groundbreaking and illuminating look at the state of abortion access in America and the first long-term study of the consequences—emotional, physical, financial, professional, personal, and psychological—of receiving versus being denied an abortion on women’s lives. What happens when a woman seeking an abortion is turned away? Diana Greene Foster, PhD, decided to find out. With a team of scientists—psychologists, epidemiologists, demographers, nursing scholars, and public health researchers—she set out to discover the effect of receiving versus being denied an abortion on women’s lives. Over the course of a ten-year investigation that began in 2007, she and her team followed a thousand women from more than twenty states, some of whom received their abortions, some of whom were turned away. Now, for the first time, the results of this landmark study—the largest of its kind to examine women’s experiences with abortion and unwanted pregnancy in the United States—have been gathered together in one place. Here Foster presents the emotional, physical, and socioeconomic outcomes for women who received their abortion and those who were denied. She analyzes the impact on their mental and physical health, their careers, their romantic lives, their professional aspirations, and even their existing and future children—and finds that women who received an abortion were almost always better off than women who were denied one. Interwoven with these findings are ten riveting first-person narratives by women who share their candid stories. As the debate about abortion rights intensifies, The Turnaway Study offers an in-depth examination of the real-world consequences for women of being denied abortions and provides evidence to refute the claim that abortion harms women. With brilliant synthesis and startling statistics—that thousands of American women are unable to access abortions; that 99% of women who receive an abortion do not regret it five years later—The Turnaway Study is a necessary and revelatory look at the impact of abortion access on people’s lives.

30 review for The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having—or Being Denied—an Abortion

  1. 5 out of 5

    Suzy

    Thank you to Scribner for an advanced copy of this book! THE TURNAWAY STUDY, aka the well-designed, longitudinal abortion research study we all needed. This multi-site, 21-state study directly compared outcomes for three groups of people who needed abortions: first-trimester patients, patients just below the gestational limit, and patients just above the limit. Participants were interviewed twice a year for 5 years about many aspects of their lives: their emotional, mental, and physical health, t Thank you to Scribner for an advanced copy of this book! THE TURNAWAY STUDY, aka the well-designed, longitudinal abortion research study we all needed. This multi-site, 21-state study directly compared outcomes for three groups of people who needed abortions: first-trimester patients, patients just below the gestational limit, and patients just above the limit. Participants were interviewed twice a year for 5 years about many aspects of their lives: their emotional, mental, and physical health, their feelings about abortion, their finances, their parenting decisions, and their children’s well being. PURPOSE OF THE BOOK: This book isn’t about moral arguments. It is just directly comparing women’s outcomes in these parallel situations. In a debate that has long depended on gut instincts from the anti-abortion side -- e.g. the incorrect anti-abortion argument that women probably feel long term shame and regret after having an abortion-- it is refreshing to hear facts that can directly disprove these claims. This is evidence that we need for court cases and political decision-making, even if the feminist arguments work for most pro-choice people. Will this change people’s minds if they are on the anti-abortion end of the spectrum? It may depend on why they actually hold those views. I think it is naive to say that statistics like these are enough to dramatically change the tides, especially when we have to consider some of the more fundamental reasons why politicians don’t want people to have abortions (like capitalism). TARGET AUDIENCE: As a scientist, I really appreciated the research design (so solid!) and discussions of things they wish they did differently (the researchers and I both wish they had included trans and non-binary participants, and people terminating pregnancies because of health risks). But, the target audience isn’t limited to scientists: the points are made clearly and concisely, and often repeated to ensure that people are able to come away with the key results of this multifaceted study. NARRATIVE STRUCTURE: This was less impressive than the research design. Between each section of the book, there is a long-form narrative from the POV of somebody in the study who had an abortion or was turned away from an abortion. These were a diverse group of narrators with different ethnic backgrounds, ages, employment statuses, and relationship and family situations, pro- and anti-abortion. I didn’t love that the same quotes were interspersed throughout the research chapters of the book: Foster still had to provide context about their backstories because we hadn’t always gotten to their long-form narrative yet, and it made things seem repetitive at times. AUTHOR’S PERSONAL ELEMENTS: Since they were limited, I felt like Foster’s own anecdotes and perspectives often felt out of place. There is one line about how we can’t blame “our growing waistline” on our children, an anecdote of waiting for an anti-abortion person to leave a party before sharing personal stories, etc. Near the end of the book, Foster shared stories of abortion from her own family, but this long personal story almost felt like an afterthought, especially in combination with its odd placement in between additional POVs and the concluding research chapters. I’ll leave you with some key findings from the book that I’ve been telling everybody who will listen: -No evidence was found that abortion hurts women: in fact, short-term mental health harm came from the denial of abortion services. It was most common to have no emotional long-term response to having had an abortion. -Women should be trusted: “We find that the reasons women give for wanting an abortion strongly predict the consequences they experience when they are denied that abortion.” -95% of the women who had abortions said having the abortion was the right decision for them. -Women who were denied abortion services experienced worse financial outcomes, and throughout the 5 year period, they did not catch back up to those who received an abortion. -Women who were denied an abortion were more likely to have poor emotional bonding with the child. -Women who received the abortion experienced a dramatic reduction in the incidence of abuse, unlike those who were turned away.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Nixon

    I am adopted, so my “pro choice” stance often baffles people. “How would I feel if my mother aborted me?” (Discusses Below). This incredible research study shows the affects abortion or not being able to get one has on women. If you believe that abortions hurt women (eg it causes depression) PLEASE READ THIS BOOK. 10-stars for the research, 10-stars for the writing, 10-stars for the narration. I AM PRO WOMEN. — For most of my life, I didn’t have an answer for the question posed to pro-choice adopt I am adopted, so my “pro choice” stance often baffles people. “How would I feel if my mother aborted me?” (Discusses Below). This incredible research study shows the affects abortion or not being able to get one has on women. If you believe that abortions hurt women (eg it causes depression) PLEASE READ THIS BOOK. 10-stars for the research, 10-stars for the writing, 10-stars for the narration. I AM PRO WOMEN. — For most of my life, I didn’t have an answer for the question posed to pro-choice adoptees “what if your mom...” UNTIL I read Freakanomics, which changed my entire perspective and beliefs on abortion. Prior to that book, my Catholic upbringing made me feel bad or guilty around abortion, but secretly I still wanted to know I would have that option if I got pregnant before I was ready. Then, as I got older and friends had abortions for myriads of reasons I came to the conclusion that My faith or my ethics or my views of morality cannot decide the fate of another adult. That is, my stance on abortion is not a question about my faith or my beliefs unless *I* am the person getting one. I recognized I did/do not want others beliefs to be made or treated as superior than my own nor did I want someone else’s opinion or belief to decide what happens to my body or my future or anything. Plus, I struggle to know the best course of action for me, the person I know more than anyone else—this means no other person, especially not a man, knows what’s better or best for me and equally, I cannot know what’s best for someone else. Science might, though and this book shows that... kind of. Anyway, FREAKANOMICS changed my opinion on abortions (they reduce crime and poverty) and now this book changed my opinion on adoption (because it shows how abortions help women in numerous ways, if they want one, and that turning a woman away can greatly greatly harm her). While I am grateful for the sacrifices my biological mother made, I also would be okay with not being born, if it had made her life better. If there was an option to push a button and “revert” I would, even knowing it would end my life. Thankfully, while the pregnancy was arduous on my mom, and the adoption heart breaking, my adoption was mostly positive FOR HER in that it did what it was supposed to do: my adoption gave her a more promising future; it gave her the chance to finish her education and get married/have kids when she was “ready” (older). While my childhood was not charmed (and I’m still coming to terms with the abuses I endured living in an alcoholic and narcissist nest + attachment issues) it could have been much worse and without my trials, I wouldn’t be where I am today, right? Would my life have been better if I was raised by a single teenage mother? I don’t know. I am grateful for my life, her life, and the subsequent lives that came out of my adoption, but I will forever and ever stand on the side that supports women and their right to an abortion. I will also respect every woman who has made that decision and if that is you, I want to say you are incredible. You are strong. You are resilient. And the choice you made was one choice but it does not define you in my eyes. Love to all you ladies!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leo Walsh

    Politicians and activists both pro and anti-abortion present many gory looks at the impacts of abortion. The anti-choice crowd crows on about potential health and mental traumas a woman aborting faces. While the pro-choice crowd points to the high mortality rate that old-school, do it yourself abortion methods, like inserting coat hangers into uteruses, used to cause and the high mortality rates of those procedures. None of those, though, is grounded in reality. Diana Greene Foster's THE TURNAWA Politicians and activists both pro and anti-abortion present many gory looks at the impacts of abortion. The anti-choice crowd crows on about potential health and mental traumas a woman aborting faces. While the pro-choice crowd points to the high mortality rate that old-school, do it yourself abortion methods, like inserting coat hangers into uteruses, used to cause and the high mortality rates of those procedures. None of those, though, is grounded in reality. Diana Greene Foster's THE TURNAWAY STUDY, however, is. Foster was the lead researcher on a deceptively simple, decade's long eponymous study performed by San Francisco University's medical school to study the impact of abortion on women's physical and psychological health. Here's what Foster's team did. They surveyed two groups of women entering several abortion clinics throughout the US, hoping to receive a late-term abortion. One group was just before the clinics' cutoff, and were granted an abortion. The second group was too late and were thus "turned away," leading to the study's "turnaway" name. And they followed up with these women for a decade with a long, involved questionnaire. The findings were stark. They present a much stronger, compelling case for allowing a woman power over her body than activists using hyperbolic "coathanger" tactics. Becasue abortion, it turns out, is better for the mother, better for her pre-existing children, and better for tax-payers since they consume fewer resources like SNAP benefits. Here are a few highlights, there are many others in the book, all of which were statistically significant: — Women receiving abortions fared better economically over the ten years based on objective data, like income and credit scores. — Women forced to give birth often stayed in abusive, physically dangerous relationships out of financial necessity, while women who received an abortion were able to free themselves, more often than not finding a better life-companion. — Women giving birth had a HIGHER RISK OF MORTALITY of serious physical injury due to childbirth when compared to women who received an abortion. — The already-born children of women who received an abortion were better fed, clothed and educated than the preexisting children of women forced to give birth. — The women receiving an abortion were not psychologically damaged, but were better off psychologically than were the women turned away. — Over 90% of the women who were pregnant practiced contraception, which failed. These facts are amazing. Like all scientific studies, they beg to be replicated, but as it stands there is a stark, rational case that abortions are not as dangerous as crazy anti-choice advocates like Project Rescue would have you believe. And lest you think the data would be dull, the science is peppered with several accounts of women, given in their own voices. Some were given abortions, others were turned away. All place real, human faces on those dry numbers, which is a huge part of what makes this book so captivating. Five stars for popularizing such an insightful, creative, and important study. While I doubt this will silence the blow-hards on either side, it places the debate on a solid empirical footing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Danielle H

    This was a really interesting book, and I think the fact that this research was done is incredibly important. However, reading it all from cover to cover (which is I know not a mandatory way to read a non-fiction text, of course) it did get somewhat repetitive at times.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    5 stars for the study itself and its findings, which are fascinating, monumentally important, and deserve to be shared and discussed widely. 4 stars for the writing, which was occasionally repetitive and somewhat dense in parts. In particular, the tables and graphical representations of data could have been a bit better introduced and easier to read. That said, the methodology and findings were generally presented in a readable and accessible way, which is always difficult to do in a book like th 5 stars for the study itself and its findings, which are fascinating, monumentally important, and deserve to be shared and discussed widely. 4 stars for the writing, which was occasionally repetitive and somewhat dense in parts. In particular, the tables and graphical representations of data could have been a bit better introduced and easier to read. That said, the methodology and findings were generally presented in a readable and accessible way, which is always difficult to do in a book like this. Moreover, the addition of first-person narratives from women who either had or were denied abortion was a wonderful humanizing touch that really brought home the importance of the research and helped to color the story told by the data. Ultimately, an important read for anyone concerned with reproductive justice (which should, of course, be all of us).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Blakeman

    A book about women’s ability and decisions to have an abortion is not going to be a best-seller where I live, which is a disappointment regardless of where one stands on this medical procedure. Good things: conversational writing style (not one of those books that reads like an academic paper), personal stories that help illustrate points, highlights of the findings that anyone can understand (even if they don’t like them). Unfortunate things: a long middle that kind of drags on; she makes her p A book about women’s ability and decisions to have an abortion is not going to be a best-seller where I live, which is a disappointment regardless of where one stands on this medical procedure. Good things: conversational writing style (not one of those books that reads like an academic paper), personal stories that help illustrate points, highlights of the findings that anyone can understand (even if they don’t like them). Unfortunate things: a long middle that kind of drags on; she makes her point and then makes it again and again; the personal stories start to run together and lose some of their impact. Worth a read but it probably could have accomplished the same things in a longform magazine article.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Hubbard

    "I wanted to hear from women who were actually experiencing what the rest of us debate in the abstract." - Diana Greene Foster The Turnaway Study is a meticulously researched book about abortion in the United States - specifically focused on women right around the end of the first trimester and beginning of the second and the effects of women who received abortions and those who were turned away (denied). The book is the result of a ten-year study in which Foster and her team compile research from "I wanted to hear from women who were actually experiencing what the rest of us debate in the abstract." - Diana Greene Foster The Turnaway Study is a meticulously researched book about abortion in the United States - specifically focused on women right around the end of the first trimester and beginning of the second and the effects of women who received abortions and those who were turned away (denied). The book is the result of a ten-year study in which Foster and her team compile research from nearly 1,000 women. Over the ten years, the women are contacted every six months to discuss their life - goals, current status, well-being, and so on. The stories that Foster highlights in the book are but a small percentage of those included in the study but they are profound and important. What this book does more than anything is given a voice to the real people affected by the access, or lack of access, to abortion - the women and her children. While it didn't change my opinion (I'm already pro-choice), it did solidify my beliefs and I think anyone and everyone should read this and bring an open mind!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    This is such an important book. It is the first reliable study to measure the effects of having and being denied an abortion. There are several surprises in some of the factors studied but the biggest takeaway is that having an abortion does not have a negative effect on the mental health of women. This is long been an argument for those who want to restrict abortion access and now we have evidence that they are wrong. I firmly believe that regardless of what your position on abortion is, your ar This is such an important book. It is the first reliable study to measure the effects of having and being denied an abortion. There are several surprises in some of the factors studied but the biggest takeaway is that having an abortion does not have a negative effect on the mental health of women. This is long been an argument for those who want to restrict abortion access and now we have evidence that they are wrong. I firmly believe that regardless of what your position on abortion is, your arguments need to be clear and based on evidence. So yes, I do recommend this book regardless of political position. It gives us facts and data but it also makes sure that the stories of women get told. There are some limits in the study and book. Only cis gendered women were studied and women going through a medically necessary abortions were excluded. There are a few other missed opportunities that the author admits to but these were the two most important missing factors. We do need to be more inclusive and less gendered in the way we discuss abortion but this study is a very important step. It’s also very interesting that the findings here were so close to what I found in my study of people seeking abortions in 1970s France. Abortion is such a common experience, not a very complicated procedure sought by people of all ages but the majority are married or in relationships, already have children, and primary seek abortions for financial reasons.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bryn

    This is a five-star in terms of sharing important information on a controversial topic that many people have strong, often unfounded opinions on. The author undertook a rigorous longitudinal study of 1,000 women who either received or were denied (for being too far along in the pregnancy) an abortion. The conclusions are clear. Abortion doesn't harm women. Abortion doesn't harm their existing or subsequent children. Women seeking abortion are often doing it for economic reasons. Let's just say i This is a five-star in terms of sharing important information on a controversial topic that many people have strong, often unfounded opinions on. The author undertook a rigorous longitudinal study of 1,000 women who either received or were denied (for being too far along in the pregnancy) an abortion. The conclusions are clear. Abortion doesn't harm women. Abortion doesn't harm their existing or subsequent children. Women seeking abortion are often doing it for economic reasons. Let's just say if you are refusing to wear a mask in a privately-owned public space, like the grocery store, as an infringement on your liberties, I *HIGHLY* recommend not telling any other woman EVER whether she should or should not be forced to carry a pregnancy to term and be financially and emotionally responsible for another human being for at least 18 years and tethered to a man who may or may not be abusive and who may or may not participate in the emotional or financial aspects of parenting. If you really want to help reduce abortion in this country, make birth control more accessible and affordable; raise the minimum wage; and work to control health care costs. However, this is a three-star in terms of readability and arc; there are so many non-fiction works written in a truly narrative, novelistic style that, I guess, I've, perhaps unfairly, come to expect it from all non-fiction works--and this didn't quite get there for me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I've always considered abortion in the abstract, but have rarely heard the intimate stories of women who seek them. This book was eye opening. Women seek abortions to avoid being tethered to an abusive partner, to delay parenthood until they are more emotionally and financially prepared, to improve their employment prospects, to allow for more resources to be given to existing children, to give themselves a chance to finish an education, find love, travel, or otherwise chase their dreams. Women w I've always considered abortion in the abstract, but have rarely heard the intimate stories of women who seek them. This book was eye opening. Women seek abortions to avoid being tethered to an abusive partner, to delay parenthood until they are more emotionally and financially prepared, to improve their employment prospects, to allow for more resources to be given to existing children, to give themselves a chance to finish an education, find love, travel, or otherwise chase their dreams. Women who seek abortions are not careless. They may lack access to or knowledge about birth control. Or they may have used birth control methods that failed. Women who seek abortions have carefully and thoughtfully considered the alternatives, and are confident in their decision. I was shocked to discover that the reason behind women seeking later abortions is that they didn't discover they were pregnant until they were further along. So it is a complete misconception that women purposely delay seeking abortions because they cannot decide whether to have one. So it is unhelpful and cruel for states to mandate ultrasound viewings and waiting periods. These barriers don't affect women's decisions and just delay abortions. These and all other barriers to abortion do not improve women's or children's lives. Access to safe and cheap abortions improve women's and children's lives.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    This book is impressive in not only the design of the study but all the information they discovered from it. It was data intensive with facts, percentages, and findings on every page, but the author broke it up with stories from women who represented those who received or were denied an abortion. Prior to this study, the effect abortion had on women’s mental state was unknown (and poor mental state) was often quoted as reason to limit access to or ban abortion. Because of this study, we know (of This book is impressive in not only the design of the study but all the information they discovered from it. It was data intensive with facts, percentages, and findings on every page, but the author broke it up with stories from women who represented those who received or were denied an abortion. Prior to this study, the effect abortion had on women’s mental state was unknown (and poor mental state) was often quoted as reason to limit access to or ban abortion. Because of this study, we know (officially) that that’s crap. Worth the read just to see the design of the study and it’s findings. At times it was hard to slog through, but if someone likes numbers this might be your jam. “To paraphrase Justice Ginsburg, abortion is not just about fetal versus women’s rights... It is about women’s control over their own lives.” The takeaway from this is simple. Trust women. Trust that they know what they are doing because they do.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anja

    This book was so thoughtful, well-researched, and accessibly easy-to-read that I was very impressed. Throughout the course of 10 years, women who've both had and been denied an abortion are surveyed about their aspirations, children (if they have any), relationships, and financial situations. The book aims to answer the fundamental questions of: "Does abortion hurt women?" and "What are the harms from not being able to access a wanted abortion?" I tried to check my opinions & beliefs at the door, This book was so thoughtful, well-researched, and accessibly easy-to-read that I was very impressed. Throughout the course of 10 years, women who've both had and been denied an abortion are surveyed about their aspirations, children (if they have any), relationships, and financial situations. The book aims to answer the fundamental questions of: "Does abortion hurt women?" and "What are the harms from not being able to access a wanted abortion?" I tried to check my opinions & beliefs at the door, and along with the researchers, was pleasantly surprised by some of the results. Other results, were not as surprising to me. Although every woman and woman's situation is different, there's enough similarities, even across racial, class, financial, and religious divides to really back up this ground-breaking work. My favorite part is how they received permission to share some women's stories, in their own words. It really put a human face to different experiences and made me think deeply about this issue from multiple viewpoints, which I appreciated. Also, the data accumulated is astounding and if you can't access or read the book, I would also suggest checking out the website: www.turnawaystudy.com Thanks to Scribner for awarding me a copy via a Goodreads giveaway. All views presented are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amie Devlin

    So I absolutely love the topic and content of this book, but found the author to be a little confused about her audience. The book was written like a very long academic article, which I don’t think was necessarily the right approach. As an epidemiologist, I appreciate her wanting to cover the survey and statistical methods, but some of it I found to be too detailed for this type of book. It also vaguely felt like she just concatenated all the published articles. Some of the same findings were re So I absolutely love the topic and content of this book, but found the author to be a little confused about her audience. The book was written like a very long academic article, which I don’t think was necessarily the right approach. As an epidemiologist, I appreciate her wanting to cover the survey and statistical methods, but some of it I found to be too detailed for this type of book. It also vaguely felt like she just concatenated all the published articles. Some of the same findings were repeated in several chapters, which made it felt like she potentially just rehashed the discussion sections of her sequential articles.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Juliette

    ****read the audiobook Dr. Foster brilliantly asked the questions what makes women seek an abortion and what happens to them after they get one or are turned away. It’s become so common to focus on the embryo/fetus, but no one ever seems to think about the woman herself, and what the consequences are for her if she is denied an abortion. Dr. Foster and her team followed over 1000 women, some who got their abortions, some who didn’t. In The Turnaway Study, Dr. Foster looks how the women looking ****read the audiobook Dr. Foster brilliantly asked the questions what makes women seek an abortion and what happens to them after they get one or are turned away. It’s become so common to focus on the embryo/fetus, but no one ever seems to think about the woman herself, and what the consequences are for her if she is denied an abortion. Dr. Foster and her team followed over 1000 women, some who got their abortions, some who didn’t. In The Turnaway Study, Dr. Foster looks how the women looking to get an abortion, their children and family’s lives are affected. Not only by asking about their emotional well being, but also their educational goals, career aspirations, financial successes. Dr Foster also discusses post 20 week abortions and why they occur. It’s easy to paint women having these procedures with a broad brush and say “you shouldn’t have waited so long”. The question is who put the stumbling blocks there causing women to have to wait longer in the first place? There are also some personal stories of women who went to get abortions and either got or were denied their abortions and how their lives progressed from there. The narration was stellar, absolutely perfect. This book is definitely worth the credit, I absolutely loved it! Happy listening/reading!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Dacyczyn

    This book was very interesting to me, but I'm setting it aside for now because it's too difficult of a topic this close to an election. Will revisit another time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    KellyAnn

    Highly, highly recommend for anyone with any opinion on abortion, and anyone who plans to be voting or talking about abortion. Interesting and engaging, 10/10

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    I am glad this book exists to refute unscientific, biased, and often batshit statements people (mostly cisgender men) make about abortion. I am also incredibly moved by and grateful for the author's efforts to present this information in an easy to understand and groundbreakingly inclusive manner. The book contains mass quantities of statistics about who has abortions, why they have them, and how their lives are better for being able to have them and worse when they are turned away. But it also i I am glad this book exists to refute unscientific, biased, and often batshit statements people (mostly cisgender men) make about abortion. I am also incredibly moved by and grateful for the author's efforts to present this information in an easy to understand and groundbreakingly inclusive manner. The book contains mass quantities of statistics about who has abortions, why they have them, and how their lives are better for being able to have them and worse when they are turned away. But it also includes individual stories that reflect diverse experiences and outcomes that may be more eye-opening to some readers. The writing itself is very good, so no one should be reluctant to pick this one up based on concerns that it might be too dry or technical. Overall, highly recommended; an especially good resource for students and those interested in how research on hot social topics is done.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I’m glad this book is out there and hope it helps destroy all the disingenuous talking points that abortion is bad for women. But I would have been just fine with only the recap in the Fresh Air interview. The author spent years on this so of course she wants to present every argument, every angle, and it’s just repetitive after a while. I was so mad I was shaking though when she recounted her time testifying in front of the Senate about this study (or was it the House?). It’s hard after reading I’m glad this book is out there and hope it helps destroy all the disingenuous talking points that abortion is bad for women. But I would have been just fine with only the recap in the Fresh Air interview. The author spent years on this so of course she wants to present every argument, every angle, and it’s just repetitive after a while. I was so mad I was shaking though when she recounted her time testifying in front of the Senate about this study (or was it the House?). It’s hard after reading these women’s stories to think about how willfully ignorant some people want to remain about women’s lives.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peter Z.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. You HAVE "the power to make decisions about [your] own bodies". You exercise that power when you decide to fuck somebody. Once you make that decision and you have a human being inside you, "democracy" does not mean 3 wolves can have a vote with 2 chickens over who gets to kill who for dinner. (Note to the stupid: We do not live in a democracy. Stop using that word. You do not understand what it means. We live in a constitutional republic. You can't violate someone's rights just because the majori You HAVE "the power to make decisions about [your] own bodies". You exercise that power when you decide to fuck somebody. Once you make that decision and you have a human being inside you, "democracy" does not mean 3 wolves can have a vote with 2 chickens over who gets to kill who for dinner. (Note to the stupid: We do not live in a democracy. Stop using that word. You do not understand what it means. We live in a constitutional republic. You can't violate someone's rights just because the majority voted to approve it.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wendy (bardsblond)

    In the 1980’s, President Reagan’s Surgeon General, C. Everett Koop, who was virulently opposed to abortion, upon being asked by Reagan to come up with evidence to show that women who obtained abortions suffered long-terms psychological consequences from the procedure, confessed that he had surveyed all the literature available and there simply was insufficient evidence from which to conclude that abortion was harmful to women. It was not until twenty years later that the author of The Turnaway St In the 1980’s, President Reagan’s Surgeon General, C. Everett Koop, who was virulently opposed to abortion, upon being asked by Reagan to come up with evidence to show that women who obtained abortions suffered long-terms psychological consequences from the procedure, confessed that he had surveyed all the literature available and there simply was insufficient evidence from which to conclude that abortion was harmful to women. It was not until twenty years later that the author of The Turnaway Study, Diana Greene Foster, sought to conduct the research that Koop could not find. Specifically, they sought to conduct a longitudinal prospective study that compared the long-term consequences of women who received abortions versus those who were denied them (because they presented for care after the abortion provider’s gestational limit). The study controlled for variables that could throw off the results of a study, including the psychological and physical effects of trying by failing to conceive; having a planned versus an unplanned pregnancy; plus she eliminated women whose loss of the fetus resulted from miscarriage. The authors wanted to focus on one thing; the outcome of both birth and abortion for women with unwanted pregnancies. Based on twice-yearly phone interviews with 1,000 women recruited from 30 abortion clinics in 21 states, Foster and her research team found that “women who received an abortion were either the same, or, more frequently, better off than women who were denied an abortion.” This was a rigorous study from a design standpoint. In terms of age, race, income level, and health status, the two groups of women closely resembled each other, and reflected the population of women nationwide seeking abortions. In general, the group of women who obtained abortions as compared to the group that was denied them, “were remarkably similar at the first interview. Their lives diverged thereafter in ways that were directly attributable to whether they received an abortion.” For those interested in following up on the study’s methodology and conclusions, it is available here: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mille/... Given the onslaught of attacks that women’s reproductive health is constantly barraged with in the United States, I’m so glad Foster conducted this study. So many unwise decisions have been issued by legislators and courts who presumed that women suffered ill effects from abortions without having any support for those conclusions. For example, in Gonzales v. Carhart, 550 U.S. 124 (2007), former Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the Supreme Court’s majority opinion, opined that it seemed “unexceptionable to conclude some women come to regret their choice to abort the infant life they once created and sustained.” He wrote that “severe depression and loss of esteem can follow.” However, Justice Kennedy was not relying on any empirical studies when he issued that opinion. The significance of this was not lost on Justice Ginsburg, who wrote in her dissenting opinion as follows: Revealing in this regard, the Court invokes an antiabortion shibboleth for which it concededly has no reliable evidence: Women who have abortions come to regret their choices, and consequently suffer from “[s]evere depression and loss of esteem.” (citation omitted) Because of women’s fragile emotional state and because of the “bond of love the mother has for her child,” the Court worries, doctors may withhold information about the nature of the intact D&E procedure… the Court deprives women of the right to make an autonomous choice, even at the expense of their safety. This way of thinking reflects ancient notions about women’s place in the family and under the Constitution—ideas that have long since been discredited. (citations omitted) … Though today’s majority may regard women’s feelings on the matter as “self-evident,” (citation omitted), this Court has repeatedly confirmed that “[t]he destiny of the woman must be shaped … on her own conception of her spiritual imperatives and her place in society.” (citation omitted) Gonzales, supra, 550 U.S. at 183-184. Well stated, Justice Ginsburg. Hopefully, The Turnaway Study gives Justice Ginsburg and others acting in defense of women’s reproductive health rights ammunition for their next argument.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Genna

    I received an arc from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The Turnaway Study is the result of a 10-year investigation and interviews with over 1,000 women in 21 states. It’s an exploration of science, politics, women’s rights, and the lives of women and children. An illuminating examination of the experiences of women who have or try to have an abortion and the impact of both birth and abortion on women experiencing unwanted pregnancies on their lives, their families, and their menta I received an arc from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The Turnaway Study is the result of a 10-year investigation and interviews with over 1,000 women in 21 states. It’s an exploration of science, politics, women’s rights, and the lives of women and children. An illuminating examination of the experiences of women who have or try to have an abortion and the impact of both birth and abortion on women experiencing unwanted pregnancies on their lives, their families, and their mental and physical well-being. What does banning abortion mean for those women and children? Foster acknowledges that science will never resolve the moral question of when a fetus becomes a person or whose rights should outweigh the other’s and instead chooses to focus on the data and how a lack of reliable studies of such have prevented objective legal decisions. The data from this study and its analysis is monumental and unprecedented. Abortion is a nuanced experience. Foster covers the numerous reasons women seek out abortions, including financial strain, rocky and sometimes dangerous relationships, and a desire to be the best parent they can to existing children. The Turnaway Study also seeks to understand why women choose to have abortions and why they choose to have them when they do. Every aspect of the women’s lives is considered, including the financial, educational, aspirational, and emotional impact of receiving or being denied an abortion, both short and long term. Foster affords women seeking abortions the respect they deserve in not questioning or rejecting their decision-making abilities and in acknowledging through a thorough study that these decisions are coming from a place of sound judgment and never from a place of malicious intent. Foster humanizes The Turnaway Study for the non-scientific reader by balancing the statistics and analysis with women’s experiences. These are not the sensationalized stories screeched back and forth by loudmouths from both the left and right to argue their respective opinion, but the honest experiences of real and diverse women across the economic spectrum and throughout the United States. Some of the stories shared are generally happy ones of dreams fulfilled and traumas overcome, while others are truly devastating. The most distressing data and stories from the study are those of women who died in childbirth or due to complications with their pregnancies following having been denied an abortion. The numerous challenges women face in preventing unwanted pregnancies are addressed and how these challenges differ for white women and women of color, including consistent access to contraception and a pervasive lack of contraceptive methods that meet women’s needs, generational trauma, and state mandated restrictions that delay access to abortion services but serve no medical purpose. It is easy to make untrue blanket statements about the women who seek abortions and those who support the right for women to do so. These harmful statements include dangerous and invalid misconceptions such as the belief that women who support the right to abortion hate children, or that women who seek abortions are irresponsible, selfish, and monstrous. But The Turnaway Study offers a humanized alternative while powerfully and thoroughly refuting the myth that abortion is dangerous and harmful to women. What is harmful to women in a myriad of ways, Foster proves, is the carrying of unwanted pregnancies to term, raising the resulting children, and, in many cases, placing children for adoption, a controversial and underaddressed and under addressed topic. The Turnaway Study is an enlightening and comprehensive study, a vital addition to a neglected body of research, and an essential read for everyone.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Ondrus

    Foster, Diana Greene. The Turnaway Study. Scribner, New York: 2020. Many of the stories here show poor women in abusive relationships seeking abortions. Some already have children. Overall the women’s stories show that women choose abortions because they are thinking of their own and the possible child’s well being, as well as the well being of the children they might already have. In all of the cases the women’s partners were not upstanding. Also, some did not know they were pregnant well into t Foster, Diana Greene. The Turnaway Study. Scribner, New York: 2020. Many of the stories here show poor women in abusive relationships seeking abortions. Some already have children. Overall the women’s stories show that women choose abortions because they are thinking of their own and the possible child’s well being, as well as the well being of the children they might already have. In all of the cases the women’s partners were not upstanding. Also, some did not know they were pregnant well into their pregnancies. This book would be great for a women’s studies class, even a few chapters. It would pair very well with the 2020 film Never Rarely Sometimes Always (1 hour 40 min) about an 18-year old girl in PA who gets pregnant and goes with her 20-year old female cousin to NYC for an abortion. The film deftly illustrates how a bad home life and bad relationships are a major pressure. It also shows the amount of agony and amount of time dealing with arranging an abortion that only then takes ten minutes to do. “Amongst those who received an abortion, 47% were in a very good relationship at two years. Among women denied, only 28% were in a very good relationship at two years”(235). The findings were that women chose abortions because the men and the relationships were not good. They did not want to be tied to these bad men by a baby. However, only 2.5% actually stated abuse as the reason for their abortion (233). AS to some belief that denying abortions will result in family life or marriages, most denied did not marry due to denial of abortion. “Only 3% of women denied abortions got married within the next two years. Coincidentally, 3% of those who were married at the time they became pregnant got divorced over that time period”(234). “Two years after seeking an abortion, just under two in five (37%) women were still in the relationship that conceived the pregnancy, and by five years, it was almost down to one in four (26%) (233). “Consistent with what we saw in our analysis of economic consequences for women, when a child’s mother is denied a wanted abortion, the child is more likely, over the next four years, to live in poverty (72% vs. 55%); to live in a household that receives public assistance (19% vs. 10%); and to live with adults who don’t have enough money to pay for food, housing, and transportation (87% vs. 70%), compared to children whose mother received an abortion, even though the two groups of kids were initially the same (202). Regarding the closure of abortion clinics, closures peaked at 800 open clinics at 2020 and the highest number of clinics was 2,700 in the early 1980s (277). The term “reproductive justice” was coined around 1994 by black feminist activists and scholars who met at a conference in Chicago. (279-280) There has already been a Supreme Court case in 1992 that eroded Roe v. Wade. This was called Planned Parenthood v. Casey which in its ruling “discarded the trimester framework, allowing restrictions on abortion throughout pregnancy so long as they don’t put an ‘undue burden’ on women”(287). So Roe v. Wade made it so that abortion was legal in first trimester ; it was possible for states to restrict in the second trimester and states could ban abortion in the third trimester (287). “Finally, if Roe were overturned and legality reverted to the states, the Turnaway Study suggests that a large fraction of women (my estimate: between a quarter and a third) would carry unwanted pregnancies to term “(288). Childbirth has a risk 14 times higher than for an abortion (306). “Most women having abortions beyond 20 weeks are between 20 and 24 weeks”( 306). “In most states, third-trimester abortion is banned except for fetal and maternal health reasons, which suggests that many patients over 24 weeks are seeking abortions for these reasons”(306). There is a notion that a couple having an unintended pregnancy brings the couple together; this study shows that is not the case. It only serves to preserve contact to often violent relationships (307).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Before our judges and policymakers consider redoing abortion rights or criminalizing abortion, I want them--and the voters and others responsible for elevating them to power-- to understand what banning abortion would mean for women and children. Wow, this book definitely takes an approach that feels so obvious but isn't talked about often. So many anti-abortion people are only thinking of fetuses, but we need to make sure that when it comes to legislation, we aren't guided by solely our emot Before our judges and policymakers consider redoing abortion rights or criminalizing abortion, I want them--and the voters and others responsible for elevating them to power-- to understand what banning abortion would mean for women and children. Wow, this book definitely takes an approach that feels so obvious but isn't talked about often. So many anti-abortion people are only thinking of fetuses, but we need to make sure that when it comes to legislation, we aren't guided by solely our emotions or religious beliefs. We need to think about real people with real lives and aspirations. That's Foster's main point through doing this study and writing this book. It's really impressive how much work went into the Turnaway Study, and I was glad to hear that it has been used in court cases before and is quoted often in various texts. There was really a lot of information gathered, and it obviously took a lot of time on the part of the researchers and the participants. It's quite shocking that something like this hadn't been done before, but at the same time, I think people would rather just spit out opinions instead of things based in research. As well, I found the organization of this book was really effective. Obviously there were things that were repeated many times or referred back to from previous chapters, but that's just to serve as a reminder. While I read this book in just a couple of days, I'm sure there were people that read this more casually and may have needed a reminder. The only complaint I have is that some of the stories that were shared didn't seem like they benefited the power of the text very much. I enjoyed hearing about the lives of the ten women that had various situations, but sometimes the stories seemed to verge on the...not unimportant, but just rambling on and on. I'm sure that they wanted to include as much of the participant's story as possible, but I feel like they could have been tweaked. One of my favorite anecdotes in this book was from Jessica who had an abortion. Her children came back from a carnival with anti-abortion balloons, and it was really the only time that she had a breakdown. This is something that I try to talk about with pro-life people to no avail: your language and approach is harmful to those who have had abortions. Even if they regret it, there is nothing they can now do! So standing on the side of the road with signs that say "Abortion is selfish" or things similar, it's harmful and selfish on YOUR part for not considering the situations of fully fledged people. These children with the balloons probably weren't aware of the many, MANY layers of reproductive choice, so we should leave children out of this fight! Too many times I see children along with the older people holding signs. They should be able to make their own EDUCATED choices. Really Foster succeeds in writing a book that is rather nonpartisan, by highlighting scientific evidence and proving that abortion should not be included in arguments about the environment, population control, or public health concern. It must be viewed through the lens of the people who have actually had abortions and those who encounter unwanted pregnancies in the future.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kea4

    The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having—or Being Denied—an Abortion by Diana Greene Foster Where to even start. Whatever side of the debate your on this book will not change your mind. This could have been an informative book but one thing that stands out immediately is the sample size of the study. Yes, this was a long-term study but you have less than 1,000 women taking part. Only about 3,000 people were asked and the study ends up with less then 1,000 tha The Turnaway Study: Ten Years, a Thousand Women, and the Consequences of Having—or Being Denied—an Abortion by Diana Greene Foster Where to even start. Whatever side of the debate your on this book will not change your mind. This could have been an informative book but one thing that stands out immediately is the sample size of the study. Yes, this was a long-term study but you have less than 1,000 women taking part. Only about 3,000 people were asked and the study ends up with less then 1,000 that’s pretty bad. I know this is addressed in the book but this is a way to small of a sample size. Instead of being neutral on the subject ‘The Turnaway Study’ keeps pushing that abortions are good. Comments such as ‘an abortion are safer than a pregnancy’ (yes it does say this several times). Or 1 in 3 women has had an abortion (What?). Comments like this make one start to question the numbers and the ‘facts’. Facts such as: Where was the full story of someone who regretted an abortion? Who funded the study? Most women don’t get child support then shouldn’t the clinic help people battle this legal issue? Adoption is less popular. Why because they don’t want anyone else to raise this child? Where is the push for adoption instead? The book answers its cruel to let women carry a child to term and because it’s unfair since there are too many kids in foster care? That’s what you’re going with? Now let’s talk about some of the examples in the book. The story of the woman who wanted an abortion of her miracle baby because she can’t deal with adoption. She had the first child placed for adoption but demanded it back. She was told she couldn’t have more kids because her husband had an issue and the miracle child happens but she didn’t want to go back and start all over and needs to focus on her daughter. This sounds like an immature and selfish person. Not to mention the fact that was she able to take back her child from adoption is just wrong. Where was teaching about the other options? Like adoption? We are told that contraceptives cost too much. Its cited as an issue but no argument is made that the clinics could give them away for free. Costs are brought up but it never explains why aren’t the abortions free since clinics receive funding? (again just a counter argument) Where is the argument made that financing needs to be taught in school? Since that is a common theme being brought up in the book. It’s all about the money. Also the argument that having an Abortion is about the children. People are thinking about their children or their future children yeah no I don’t think so. In truth this is a sad book. Instead of being balanced, it’s one-sided. https://theworldisabookandiamitsreade...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Roo Phillips

    Great book. Refreshing take on a hot button issue. The Turnaway Study is a review of a unique longitudinal data-driven study of women seeking abortion for unwanted pregnancies between 2008-2010. About 1,000 women participated and were tracked for 10 years. Foster (UCSF) recruited women that went seeking an abortion and follow both those that received the abortion and those that were denied the abortion. The purpose of the study was to put some data behind many claims purported by both pro-choice Great book. Refreshing take on a hot button issue. The Turnaway Study is a review of a unique longitudinal data-driven study of women seeking abortion for unwanted pregnancies between 2008-2010. About 1,000 women participated and were tracked for 10 years. Foster (UCSF) recruited women that went seeking an abortion and follow both those that received the abortion and those that were denied the abortion. The purpose of the study was to put some data behind many claims purported by both pro-choice and anti-abortion advocates that were not well substantiated. This is a great book for getting a better understanding of the long-term effects of unwanted pregnancies, and how they relate to receiving vs not receiving an abortion. The website below is where you'll find a high level summary of findings and explanations on the study design. But here are a few high level takeaways: - Abortion does not increase women’s risk of having suicidal thoughts, or the chance of developing PTSD, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, or lower life satisfaction. - 95% of women said abortion was the right decision for them. - Women who received a wanted abortion were more likely to have a positive outlook on the future and achieve aspi- rational life plans within 1 year. - Most women gave multiple reasons for seeking abortion, including finances, timing, issues with a partner, and the need to focus on their other children. The outcomes for women denied abortions bear out their concerns. - Most women who sought abortion after 20 weeks were delayed because they did not realize they were pregnant. Once women are delayed, financial and logistical barriers push them even later in pregnancy. - Being denied an abortion reduces women and children’s financial security and safety. - Existing children of women denied abortions were more than 3 times more likely to live in households below the federal poverty level and they were less likely to achieve developmental milestones than the existing chil- dren of women who received abortions. https://www.ansirh.org/research/turna...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sonja

    I gave the book a 3 because, while I was interested in the study, it was kind of dry - the best parts were the stories of the women who were involved in the study. I am totally pro-choice, cannot see why women might have to go backward if Roe V Wade is tossed aside. I am not pro-abortion but I also feel that women need to make their own choices when they get pregnant - there are many reasons why having a baby at a particular time is not a good idea. Besides, nobody has to get an abortion if they I gave the book a 3 because, while I was interested in the study, it was kind of dry - the best parts were the stories of the women who were involved in the study. I am totally pro-choice, cannot see why women might have to go backward if Roe V Wade is tossed aside. I am not pro-abortion but I also feel that women need to make their own choices when they get pregnant - there are many reasons why having a baby at a particular time is not a good idea. Besides, nobody has to get an abortion if they don't want one. And, until all of us women walk in the shoes of those who do get abortions, we have no right to judge them. I support Planned Parenthood with every fiber of my being and also donate to them monthly. Old white Republican men and Right to Lifers should read this book and get the hell out of women's rights and wanting them to be "barefoot and in the kitchen." Those days are over. PP does so much good for the poor and those living in rural areas in providing all kinds of healthcare and abortions are the lowest % of what they do. What the old guys should be doing is making sure all women can have birth-control, whether they can pay for it or not. That would totally bring down the abortion rate. Women have a hard enough job in life and shouldn't have to be subjected to what others think they should do.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ann Marie

    Even though this book is full of lists of very dry (but extremely important data) I am really glad I read it. It dispels essentially all of the myths of the forced-birth continent who are bent on destroying Roe v. Wade by making it so complicated to get an abortion in some states that only the already privileged and resourced women who can travel and pay can end unwanted pregnancies. These people don’t fight fair, and they have historically done this by using inaccurate and manipulative propagan Even though this book is full of lists of very dry (but extremely important data) I am really glad I read it. It dispels essentially all of the myths of the forced-birth continent who are bent on destroying Roe v. Wade by making it so complicated to get an abortion in some states that only the already privileged and resourced women who can travel and pay can end unwanted pregnancies. These people don’t fight fair, and they have historically done this by using inaccurate and manipulative propaganda about how abortion hurts women and ruins their lives. This study shows that the opposite is true. Problematically, people who believe in forced birth frequently don’t posses uteruses, don’t care about the lives of women in poverty and already challenging life circumstances, and certainly don’t do anything to better the lives of the children they work so hard to make sure are born to these women. They also don’t give a hoot about data from scientific peer reviewed studies that prove them wrong. I hope that this study serves women well in the court battles to come. Thank you to the author and all the scientists and women who participated in this study.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Petelin

    I’m so glad this study exists. Lawmakers have been enforcing policy based on their ideas about abortion rather than the lived reality of people who want the procedure. People from all walks of life get abortions. Abortion is not related to poor mental health, it’s not anyone’s main form of birth control, it’s safer than getting your tonsils removed, and 95% of people are satisfied with their abortion. Sixty percent of people who get abortions already have children. Dedicating their resources to I’m so glad this study exists. Lawmakers have been enforcing policy based on their ideas about abortion rather than the lived reality of people who want the procedure. People from all walks of life get abortions. Abortion is not related to poor mental health, it’s not anyone’s main form of birth control, it’s safer than getting your tonsils removed, and 95% of people are satisfied with their abortion. Sixty percent of people who get abortions already have children. Dedicating their resources to those kids is a very real concern. Women who were denied wanted abortions were more likely to experience poverty and abuse, along with any children they already had. The decision is easy for some and very difficult for others. This book acknowledges the cultural conversation while keeping science at the forefront. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in reproductive rights, equity, and the place of science in democracy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    How about that. Asking women how having or not being able to have an abortion affects them vs making assumptions. So many important points are made. So much information! "Abortion is not just about a woman's right versus an embryo's or fetus's rights; it's also about whether women get to have children when they are ready to care for them. Everyone cares about the well-being of children, and this study shows that when women are able to decide whether to carry a pregnancy to term, their children do How about that. Asking women how having or not being able to have an abortion affects them vs making assumptions. So many important points are made. So much information! "Abortion is not just about a woman's right versus an embryo's or fetus's rights; it's also about whether women get to have children when they are ready to care for them. Everyone cares about the well-being of children, and this study shows that when women are able to decide whether to carry a pregnancy to term, their children do better. This includes the children they already had at the time of the unwanted pregnancy - again, 60% of women seeking abortions are already mothers - and it also includes their future children." pg 214 "It is very, very difficult to find a job when you're pregnant, to keep a job when you're pregnant, and to find or maintain a job with a baby, especially if your partner is a douchebag." Brenda pg 265

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily Hewitt

    I had been reading this book over the summer and then set it down as I had a lot going on and couldn’t focus much on reading due to events in my own life and everything happening in the world. With the passing of RBG, finishing this book this November seemed especially timely. I would recommend this book to anyone seeking to learn more about the effects of abortion on women’s lives. This book is heavily data driven, and although that sometimes makes it difficult to read, it is incredibly importa I had been reading this book over the summer and then set it down as I had a lot going on and couldn’t focus much on reading due to events in my own life and everything happening in the world. With the passing of RBG, finishing this book this November seemed especially timely. I would recommend this book to anyone seeking to learn more about the effects of abortion on women’s lives. This book is heavily data driven, and although that sometimes makes it difficult to read, it is incredibly important in understanding the accuracy and validity of the study. Additionally, besides the statistics and findings based on surveying so many women, there are also personal stories and firsthand accounts from women who have either obtained or been denied an abortion. This makes the data found and analyzed in the study all the more relevant. Very glad a book and study like this exists, as it provides so much evidence as to why abortion must be legal and accessible for all women.

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