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Another City, not my Own [Unabridged] [Audiobook]

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The Barnes & Noble Review In Another City, Not My Own: A Novel in the Form of a Memoir, Dominick Dunne, one of America's best-known commentators on justice, tackles perhaps the most scandalous abuse of justice and shares his most personal insights and experiences. Claiming he found it "inhibiting" to write about himself as Dominick Dunne, the author enlists the help of The Barnes & Noble Review In Another City, Not My Own: A Novel in the Form of a Memoir, Dominick Dunne, one of America's best-known commentators on justice, tackles perhaps the most scandalous abuse of justice and shares his most personal insights and experiences. Claiming he found it "inhibiting" to write about himself as Dominick Dunne, the author enlists the help of an alter ego from previous novels, Augustus Bailey. As Gus Bailey, Dunne returns to Los Angeles — a city he left two decades earlier amid great personal upheaval — to cover the O. J. Simpson trial — the Trial of the Century — for Vanity Fair magazine. With Bailey, we watch from the front row as the courtroom antics of F. Lee Bailey, Robert Shapiro, Judge Lance Ito, and Marcia Clark unfold. We mingle at exclusive parties, lunch at intimate gatherings, and travel on celebrity jets, all the while listening to Hollywood's biggest names speak candidly and irrepressibly about the case unfolding before them. Driving Bailey throughout the novel is the partiality of the judicial system — an injustice he experienced firsthand during the trial of his daughter's killer. From the outset of the Simpson trial, Bailey is outspokenly convinced of O. J.'s guilt — and equally vocal in his disdain for the fiasco the trial becomes. But that doesn't stop players on both sides of the case from confiding in the reporter. People talk to Gus Bailey — and Dominick Dunne. "I've been told I look like a defrocked priest," Dunne offered by way of explanation in a recent phone conversation. "People come to me to tellmethings." And the things they tell him make for a riveting and mesmerizing portrait of a city united by its obsession with the trial of O. J. Simpson. Before the live bn.com chat, Dominick Dunne agreed to answer some of our questions.Q: 


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The Barnes & Noble Review In Another City, Not My Own: A Novel in the Form of a Memoir, Dominick Dunne, one of America's best-known commentators on justice, tackles perhaps the most scandalous abuse of justice and shares his most personal insights and experiences. Claiming he found it "inhibiting" to write about himself as Dominick Dunne, the author enlists the help of The Barnes & Noble Review In Another City, Not My Own: A Novel in the Form of a Memoir, Dominick Dunne, one of America's best-known commentators on justice, tackles perhaps the most scandalous abuse of justice and shares his most personal insights and experiences. Claiming he found it "inhibiting" to write about himself as Dominick Dunne, the author enlists the help of an alter ego from previous novels, Augustus Bailey. As Gus Bailey, Dunne returns to Los Angeles — a city he left two decades earlier amid great personal upheaval — to cover the O. J. Simpson trial — the Trial of the Century — for Vanity Fair magazine. With Bailey, we watch from the front row as the courtroom antics of F. Lee Bailey, Robert Shapiro, Judge Lance Ito, and Marcia Clark unfold. We mingle at exclusive parties, lunch at intimate gatherings, and travel on celebrity jets, all the while listening to Hollywood's biggest names speak candidly and irrepressibly about the case unfolding before them. Driving Bailey throughout the novel is the partiality of the judicial system — an injustice he experienced firsthand during the trial of his daughter's killer. From the outset of the Simpson trial, Bailey is outspokenly convinced of O. J.'s guilt — and equally vocal in his disdain for the fiasco the trial becomes. But that doesn't stop players on both sides of the case from confiding in the reporter. People talk to Gus Bailey — and Dominick Dunne. "I've been told I look like a defrocked priest," Dunne offered by way of explanation in a recent phone conversation. "People come to me to tellmethings." And the things they tell him make for a riveting and mesmerizing portrait of a city united by its obsession with the trial of O. J. Simpson. Before the live bn.com chat, Dominick Dunne agreed to answer some of our questions.Q: 

30 review for Another City, not my Own [Unabridged] [Audiobook]

  1. 5 out of 5

    christa

    Dominick, Dominick, Dominick. (Shakes head and sighs). What a piece of work. Here is the precise formula my new bestie used to write his late-1990s Anti-Ode to OJ Simpson, the novel-ish memoir Another City Not My Own: Excerpt from "Vanity Fair" editorial on the trial. Scene in which Dominick Dunne, wearing the name of journalist Gus Bailey for the purposes of this piece, is conversing with someone along the lines of Nancy Reagan or Heidi Fleiss at a fancy schmancy Los Angeles eatery. Said famous Dominick, Dominick, Dominick. (Shakes head and sighs). What a piece of work. Here is the precise formula my new bestie used to write his late-1990s Anti-Ode to OJ Simpson, the novel-ish memoir Another City Not My Own: Excerpt from "Vanity Fair" editorial on the trial. Scene in which Dominick Dunne, wearing the name of journalist Gus Bailey for the purposes of this piece, is conversing with someone along the lines of Nancy Reagan or Heidi Fleiss at a fancy schmancy Los Angeles eatery. Said famous person will ply him for details about the trial, which he is watching from Goldman-family/Brown family-side seats in the downtown L.A. courtroom. He dishes on jurors' expressions, who OJ makes eye contact with, and some juicy nugget someone told him. He returns to his hotel room at Chateau Marmont and receives a telephone call from another source who wants to dish goodies on the key players. If the nugget is a reliable bit of info, he puts it under his tongue for use in his "Vanity Fair" missives or those moments when he is called upon to perform at dinner parties; If it is whack job hypothesis or hearsay, he tells the source: "I'll use it in the novel I'm writing about the case." It's all very self-referential, a snake swallowing it's own tail (tale?), and name droppy. In the arthritic claw of another writer, it would be satire. A caricature. A story about an insufferable writer who needs to keep reminding people that Frank Sinatra hates him and that the Bloomingdale family has forgiven him for turning them into characters in another of his novels. In Dunne's hands, it is exactly who he is: A starfucker. Both Dunne and the character he built in his own likeness have a shared desire to see OJ in stripes. Too many high-power people getting away with too many crimes. Both Dunne and Gus have a daughter who was strangled to death by an exboyfriend who ended up serving just a two-year sentence which led to a furious pursuit of justice -- particularly in cases where someone famous confuses a jury with a Heisman Trophy smile. Both Dunne and Gus make plenty of enemies along the way. When the story opens, Gus is dead. A deviation from his own story -- and a deviation that didn't stick. In Dunne's final novel "Too Much Money," which was released in 2009 after his death, Gus is alive! It's a miracle! There is this particularly insufferable moment when he is with his ailing ex-wife Peach. Their son is missing. He went on a hiking trip five days earlier and hasn't returned. He doesn't have food or water with him. The remaining members of the Dunne-er-Bailey family have gathered at Peach's house, but they haven't told her what is going on in the main rooms of the house. The phone calls, the food, the traffic. Finally he sits down with her and instead of just blurting the bad news, he reels off a list of names of people he's seen recently and meals he has enjoyed. Marcia Clark's clothing and a memory about Zsa Zsa Gabor's funeral. Finally he tells her, barely starting a new sentence to convey the information "Zander is missing." Then it's back to the talk-talk-talk and he closes with a memory of an infamous party they threw in the 1960s. She smiles. Despite this, despite all of this repetition and name dropping and hackneyed plot points and me-me-me-ism, I still am charmed by the old coot -- both Gus and Dunne. I think it's because I'm getting to know him so well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    This was my first book by Dominick Dunne. And I realized that the life of Gus Bailey (the fictional writer/journalist main character) is very similar to that of Dominick Dunne. So I imagine that Dunne created Bailey based on his own personal experiences, many of which were devastatingly heartbreaking. The book did its job by bringing back all of the memories we all must remember when Nicole Brown and Ron Goldman were murdered in Brentwood and the trial of OJ Simpson. This book is like a back-stag This was my first book by Dominick Dunne. And I realized that the life of Gus Bailey (the fictional writer/journalist main character) is very similar to that of Dominick Dunne. So I imagine that Dunne created Bailey based on his own personal experiences, many of which were devastatingly heartbreaking. The book did its job by bringing back all of the memories we all must remember when Nicole Brown and Ron Goldman were murdered in Brentwood and the trial of OJ Simpson. This book is like a back-stage pass to the courtroom drama, as Gus Bailey had a primo seat throughout the trial (as did Dominick Dunne in real life). So even though the book is described as "a novel in the form of a memoir" ... it is probably more memoir than novel. Bailey hobnobs will the rich and famous of LA and Hollywood, who were all riveted by the trial of the century. His dance card is full every night where all anyone wants to do is dish about the trial. (Lots and lots of name-dropping) As usual when I read, I googled alot, so I watched quite a few youtube clips from the trial. I can't say it was a fun read, since it rehashed such a horrific event, but it was interesting because of the insightfulness Dunne told through Gus Bailey. I've had this book forever, and it is an autographed copy from one of the great journalists of the day. RIP Dominick Dunne. I'm glad you got to tell your story of this trial of the century.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Kenney

    If you can call something as barbarous as being glued to the OJ Simpson Trial a guilty pleasure, well, that was me. Granted, I had a full time job so I wasn't glue-glued, but I surely read everything I could get my hands on about the trail and the personalities involved. Dominck Dunne is a shameless namedropper. I like this book very much. It definitely scratched an itch for me. If you can call something as barbarous as being glued to the OJ Simpson Trial a guilty pleasure, well, that was me. Granted, I had a full time job so I wasn't glue-glued, but I surely read everything I could get my hands on about the trail and the personalities involved. Dominck Dunne is a shameless namedropper. I like this book very much. It definitely scratched an itch for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    I was not impressed by this book at all wherein the fictional alter-ego of the author covers every sordid, over reported instant of the O.J. Simpson trial. His narrator's commentaray which is peppered with, "I would have him/her say this in my book" not only stretches the line between fact and fiction to it's limit, but is also an annoying device. I wish he had just wrote the book from the character's point of view and not his narrator's own. If you lived through the trial, don't waste your time I was not impressed by this book at all wherein the fictional alter-ego of the author covers every sordid, over reported instant of the O.J. Simpson trial. His narrator's commentaray which is peppered with, "I would have him/her say this in my book" not only stretches the line between fact and fiction to it's limit, but is also an annoying device. I wish he had just wrote the book from the character's point of view and not his narrator's own. If you lived through the trial, don't waste your time on this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tom Hartman

    Dominick Dunne had been sent to LA by Vanity Fair to cover the O.J. Simpson trial. He tells his story as a "novel" which allows his to use real names, but because these real people are speaking to a fictional character, this allows Dunne to include all types of gossip and hearsay for which a non-fiction book would require independent verification. By creating a "novel in the form of a memoir", he allows himself the freedom to experience the social culture of LA over time and in three separate li Dominick Dunne had been sent to LA by Vanity Fair to cover the O.J. Simpson trial. He tells his story as a "novel" which allows his to use real names, but because these real people are speaking to a fictional character, this allows Dunne to include all types of gossip and hearsay for which a non-fiction book would require independent verification. By creating a "novel in the form of a memoir", he allows himself the freedom to experience the social culture of LA over time and in three separate lives Dunne lived there: the first as a producer in the 1970s (he produced "Panic in Needle Park" and "The Boys in the Band"), the second in the 80s, when his daughter Dominique, star of "Poltergeist" was murdered by an abusive boyfriend (whose actions mirror those of OJ) and, finally, returning to LA as a heralded author while covering the trial. Yes, he name-drops all over the place but that's part of the point. While we "meet" everyone from Princesses Diana and Margaret to Nancy Reagan, Betsy Bloomingdale, Gore Vidal, Liz Taylor, Norman Lear, Gregory Peck, etc, etc, etc, the point of this is to show the cult of celebrity in society, particularly around a crime where almost everyone Dunne's fictional counterpart runs into has a piece of information. We meet a guard who overheard OJ confess to his pastor, the Rev. Rosie Grier while in jail; we learn how Liz Taylor introduced Johnnie Cochran to the LA social scene; how Doris Duke's gay male secretary ended up being Liz's butler and introducing Andrew Cunanan to people in LA; the claim (told by several Brits) that after the Rolling Stones played the Super Bowl, the guy who drove the Bronco weasled his way (with a large bag of cocaine) backstaged and told the "true" story of the murders to Keith Richards! While the incessant name-dropping does get repetitive, if you're the kind of person who can keep up with the pagaent of celebrities, you'll love this. Dunne, for his part includes enough about his own failings and faults that the "memoir" aspect holds up: his compulsion with the OJ stories that leave him enraged at the verdict; the pain when E! TV in an attempt to capitalize on his TV popularity as a trial commentator begins a documentary about his daughter's murder; his guilt at throwing away his first career on booze and drugs, his long-standing estrangement from his brother, the writer John Gregory Dunne (who wrote "Panic" and "True Confessions" and who was married to Joan Didion), and his divorce from his wife and her subsequent debilitation from MS. I enjoyed this book even though I understand why many other readers didn't.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    This was not the story of the O J Simpson trial. Rather it is the story of Dunne's covering the story, the interaction not only with the people involved in the trial, and his celebrated friends' reactions to the case. I liked it better than any of his other books. This was not the story of the O J Simpson trial. Rather it is the story of Dunne's covering the story, the interaction not only with the people involved in the trial, and his celebrated friends' reactions to the case. I liked it better than any of his other books.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chamie

    Great to listen to, love the dish! Now I have to read the Nicole Brown Simpson book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sara Cochran

    I might have loved it more the second time. I love Dunne and miss his presence on this earth.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    After watching the OJ Miniseries, this book was recommended to me. An interesting "fictional" following of the OJ Trial. After watching the OJ Miniseries, this book was recommended to me. An interesting "fictional" following of the OJ Trial.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    This was a guilty pleasure. I could not put it down.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Very chatty, name-dropping, genre bending. It says something that while I don't read People magazine or the society columns, I became engrossed in the story behind the story (of the OJ trial). It makes me want to make room on my nightstand for Dunne's other novels. Clever. Very chatty, name-dropping, genre bending. It says something that while I don't read People magazine or the society columns, I became engrossed in the story behind the story (of the OJ trial). It makes me want to make room on my nightstand for Dunne's other novels. Clever.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steve Shilstone

    Subtitled: A Novel in the form of a Memoir Proper subtitle: A Memoir in the form of a Novel Oh, oh, sad. Oh, oh, OJ. Oh, oh, empty Hollywood. Oh, oh, murder most foul.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mobeme53 Branson

    Horrific A novel about a fictional writer surrounding the O.J. Simpson trial. Too much name dropping and pandering to famous names. He even manages to work Andrew Cunanan, Versace's murderer, into the story. By the way, O.J. did it. Horrific A novel about a fictional writer surrounding the O.J. Simpson trial. Too much name dropping and pandering to famous names. He even manages to work Andrew Cunanan, Versace's murderer, into the story. By the way, O.J. did it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Thrasher

    Completely addictive audio book, narrated by the author himself. About the OJ Simpson trial, and a slice of time; if you were alive during the trial, you'll recognize each and every character (unless you were under a rock): Judge Ito, Robert Kardashian, the Goldman family, Marsh Clark, Johnny Cochran, the whole kit and kaboodle of them, up to and including OJ himself. The book is sprinkled with Hollywood elite - Elizabeth Taylor, Nancy Reagan, Kirk Douglas, etc. etc. etc. Kris Jenner and Harvey Completely addictive audio book, narrated by the author himself. About the OJ Simpson trial, and a slice of time; if you were alive during the trial, you'll recognize each and every character (unless you were under a rock): Judge Ito, Robert Kardashian, the Goldman family, Marsh Clark, Johnny Cochran, the whole kit and kaboodle of them, up to and including OJ himself. The book is sprinkled with Hollywood elite - Elizabeth Taylor, Nancy Reagan, Kirk Douglas, etc. etc. etc. Kris Jenner and Harvey Levin make appearances as well, their true fame (infamy?) to come much later (I wonder if Dunne knew how famous each of them would become).Keep on listening until the very end - I shrieked aloud with the kind of pleasure you get from a perfect (and perfectly surprising) ending. I never in a million years saw THAT coming.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Eh. I really liked several other Dominick Dunne books and adored his Court TV series, but this book just left me unimpressed and irritated with the ending. I suppose I should have done some research on this one, but I was in the bookstore and saw it on the shelf and had to have. THis was really hard to get through, what with all the name dropping. Also, the dialogue in this was just a little flimsy. I was really hoping for more. As other reviewers said, the "I will put this in my novel" or the V Eh. I really liked several other Dominick Dunne books and adored his Court TV series, but this book just left me unimpressed and irritated with the ending. I suppose I should have done some research on this one, but I was in the bookstore and saw it on the shelf and had to have. THis was really hard to get through, what with all the name dropping. Also, the dialogue in this was just a little flimsy. I was really hoping for more. As other reviewers said, the "I will put this in my novel" or the Vanity Fair article excerpts were overused and in the end, I hated Gus. "A Season in Purgatory" or "The Two Mrs Greenvilles" are much much better books

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    Dominick Dunne is one of my guilty pleasures of reading. His books are always a voyeuristic look into the lives and lifestyles of the rich and famous. Like so many of his other books, once I picked it up I could not put it down. Reliving the trial of OJ Simpson through the eyes of Dunne's antagonist, Gus Baily brought back the fascination and obsession we had with every aspect of this case. Only Dunne can fill in so many side stories, supporting players and the details of the Trial of the Centur Dominick Dunne is one of my guilty pleasures of reading. His books are always a voyeuristic look into the lives and lifestyles of the rich and famous. Like so many of his other books, once I picked it up I could not put it down. Reliving the trial of OJ Simpson through the eyes of Dunne's antagonist, Gus Baily brought back the fascination and obsession we had with every aspect of this case. Only Dunne can fill in so many side stories, supporting players and the details of the Trial of the Century. Taking liberties of writing as a fictional memoir only fuels the fire of celebrity gossip, speculation and of course the consequences of the jury's verdict.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    This book is a hopeless mishmash of fact and fiction that sells both genres short. No worries about Dunne overtaking Joe McGinniss' FATAL VISION or BLIND FAITH, Norman Mailer's THE EXECUTIONER'S SONG, Robert Graysmith's ZODIAC, or Diana Trilling's MRS. HARRIS in the true-crime sweepstakes. I don't agree with Ishmael Reed's notion that OJ might possibly be innocent, but I agree with Reed's attack on Dunne and this book. Read Marcia Clark's WITHOUT A DOUBT, Christopher Darden's IN CONTEMPT...but s This book is a hopeless mishmash of fact and fiction that sells both genres short. No worries about Dunne overtaking Joe McGinniss' FATAL VISION or BLIND FAITH, Norman Mailer's THE EXECUTIONER'S SONG, Robert Graysmith's ZODIAC, or Diana Trilling's MRS. HARRIS in the true-crime sweepstakes. I don't agree with Ishmael Reed's notion that OJ might possibly be innocent, but I agree with Reed's attack on Dunne and this book. Read Marcia Clark's WITHOUT A DOUBT, Christopher Darden's IN CONTEMPT...but skip this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sera

    Dunne wrote this book after the OJ trial in California. He provides an interesting look at life in Hollywood, murder and the justice system. It always amazes me how Dunne gets away with writing these books based on real life people and that people still talk to him and invite him to their parties. One never knows what he is going to disclose next, which is one reason why I really enjoy his books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peter Burton

    Speaking as an Australian who only knew the bare bones of the O.J.Simpson saga and who missed the recent mini series about it,I found this treatment of the drama strangely compelling.It's easy to read as all his books are and very interesting.Even the relentless name dropping is interesting as a window on a world completely beyond me.He also seems a likeable guy.I did see many years ago a documentary of his life that he made which drew me to his life. Speaking as an Australian who only knew the bare bones of the O.J.Simpson saga and who missed the recent mini series about it,I found this treatment of the drama strangely compelling.It's easy to read as all his books are and very interesting.Even the relentless name dropping is interesting as a window on a world completely beyond me.He also seems a likeable guy.I did see many years ago a documentary of his life that he made which drew me to his life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Young

    The first 10 chapters are littered with gratuitous name-dropping, clumsy dialogue, overwrought exposition, unsympathetic characters, and nothing resembling a coherent plot. Presumably the other 19 chapters are similarly constructed.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Did NOT realize this was a profile of the OJ Simpson case when I picked it up, but then, in the end the case winds up serving second role to the narrator’s social life and critiques of the case. Dunne uses one of his old reliable characters from another society novel, Gus Bailey, to stand in as his alter ego. In all aspects otherwise, the name dropping is authentic and prolific. It’s slightly confusing that Dunne connects his various story arcs and shamelessly promotes his other (much better) no Did NOT realize this was a profile of the OJ Simpson case when I picked it up, but then, in the end the case winds up serving second role to the narrator’s social life and critiques of the case. Dunne uses one of his old reliable characters from another society novel, Gus Bailey, to stand in as his alter ego. In all aspects otherwise, the name dropping is authentic and prolific. It’s slightly confusing that Dunne connects his various story arcs and shamelessly promotes his other (much better) novels such as People Like Us and The Two Mrs Greenvilles, particularly when Dunne created a much different conclusion for Bailey in the former novel. It’s disjointed to meet Bailey again and find he has very different feelings about the man who killed his daughter and walked after a two-year sentence. This winds up playing a major role in Bailey’s passionate opinions on the OJ case so it’s worth mentioning, and further has resonance with Dunne’s own personal history. Lots of baggage to unpack. Dunne’s brilliance in the two novels mentioned above shines in his character development. He gives the reader more than just a glimpse behind the velvet rope, he creates an understanding of the sentiments and motivations of the upper crust. The OJ Simpson case involved a very different set of players, West Coast not East Coast, different era, and very different milleu. All that said, Dunne never delves into the actual personalities involved in the case, even though they were larger than life and there was plenty of material. Instead he casts his alter ego as the central character and goes on and on and on and on and on about the glittering social events and people he rubs elbows with. Given how staunchly he holds the moral high ground in so many instances, it’s surprising he has no issue repeating unconfirmed theories and says on many occasions how the OJ case elevated his social status into the stratosphere. Seems crass to say the least. It’s also just not very well written. Sloppy notes slapped together on the fly and lots of very self-reverential excerpts of Bailey telling friends exactly how he’s going to shape that latest tidbit of gossip as another scene in his tell all. Great, just do that then! Show, don’t tell! It’s very distracting, as is the extent of the name dropping. He can’t just give you a roster of everyone in the room, he has to detail every event he ever attended with them and why they are so chummy, and whether they dropped him when he was down and out. It just gets boring and sad after awhile, all this trying so hard to prove himself. Bailey/Dunne’s obsession with the case mounts as the verdict looms and he becomes less like able with each passing page, especially the way he handles his son’s disappearance and major family events as afterthoughts to his social schedule. And then, the plot thickens. The narrator meets his end, so to speak, in a moment that Dunne has set up with three possible perpetrators. The resolution isn’t a surprise, it just doesn’t make much sense or relate back to the trial exactly, or Dunne/Bailey’s past with unsettled justice, it’s a real head scratcher. The best indictment of Dunne’s ardent desire for justice is the last scene. Bailey’s would be biographer discovers the identity of the perpetrator and faces a dilemma: call the police or save the reveal for the last chapter of his book?! Would a true justice seeker have to contemplate their own reward/fame/bestseller projections in that calculation?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Esther

    I was about fourteen pages into Dominick Dunne’s Another City, Not My Own, struggling a little, when it hit me. Something about the writing, something about the protagonist, Gus Bailey, was reminding me of someone, and in Chapter 2 it dawned on me who. (Whom? Dominick Dunne is big on his whoms, but oh well.) Anyway: Truman Capote! I felt like I'd stepped back twenty or thirty years to my Truman Capote phase, when I was reading everything he wrote, and everything about him that I could find. What I was about fourteen pages into Dominick Dunne’s Another City, Not My Own, struggling a little, when it hit me. Something about the writing, something about the protagonist, Gus Bailey, was reminding me of someone, and in Chapter 2 it dawned on me who. (Whom? Dominick Dunne is big on his whoms, but oh well.) Anyway: Truman Capote! I felt like I'd stepped back twenty or thirty years to my Truman Capote phase, when I was reading everything he wrote, and everything about him that I could find. What writer drops names, what writer is as starstruck as Truman Capote? Why, Dominick Dunne, apparently. From page 14 on I was hooked. Of course I was already familiar with Dominick Dunne from his pieces in Vanity Fair, but I had never till now read a novel of his. The O.J. Simpson case can be addictive in itself, and since I've been through an O.J. phase as well as a Truman Capote phase (and many, many other unrelated phases) and have not totally lost interest in the Nicole Brown Simpson/Ron Goldman murders, I was pleased to shell out a whopping buck fifty at Salvation Army, where I came across Another City, Not My Own. There wasn't much new there, at least of substance. But Dominick Dunne knew everybody who was anybody (including Truman Capote, of COURSE), so at various points in Another City, Not My Own, I found myself enlightened as to what Nancy Reagan, or Princess Diana, or Elizabeth Taylor, or Queen Noor of Jordan, just for starters, had to say to Dominick (excuse me, "Gus") about their views on O.J. and the Trial of the Century. Personally, I am not in love with royalty, or Hollywood, or the rich and the famous for being rich and famous, but I now love Dominick Dunne, at least a little. He is soooo Truman Capote-esque; I will have to keep an eye out at Salvation Army for more of his books. As I read Another City, Not My Own, I found myself wondering during those long dialogues between Gus and his famous friends if Dominick was—as Truman was, according to Truman—blessed with total recall, able to remember conversations verbatim without notes. As for the verdict, I do not see how it could have gone any other way, considering the times. Black men beyond number, year after year, decade after decade, century upon century, have been wrongfully punished—tortured and lynched at the whim of rogue whites (who themselves so often have gone unpunished for their crimes against African Americans), and incarcerated or put to death by the state—for crimes they have not committed. O.J. Simpson, personally, may have been an unenthusiastic, unengaged, and unwilling African American, a black man who preferred white society almost exclusively, but to his fellow African Americans, he was a hero. His acquittal may have been a travesty of justice, but for America’s people of color, who so desperately needed a very public win for one of the first times ever, the verdict of “not guilty” at the end of that race-driven, divisive trial was something to be relished and celebrated. Nicole and Ron were dead and beyond pain, so the true victims were their loved ones, who with O.J.’s acquittal did not see justice done. The innocent suffer when a murder is done. Nicole and Ron died, their loved ones suffered, O.J. and his team triumphed, and millions of Americans—if they were not white—for once were able to rejoice. Life is complicated, and Lady Justice is not blind.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Graceann

    A "novel in the form of a memoir;" this is genius. Bear with me. Dominick Dunne, for all the snark thrown at him over his career, for choosing gossipy, tabloid-friendly stories, and then covering them in sensationalist, sometimes sloppy ways, had a touch of the genius about him. Another City, Not My Own may be replete with repetition, a downpour of dropped names, and a lead character who loves himself quite a lot but, I repeat, it's got a touch of the genius about it. Bear with me. If this had be A "novel in the form of a memoir;" this is genius. Bear with me. Dominick Dunne, for all the snark thrown at him over his career, for choosing gossipy, tabloid-friendly stories, and then covering them in sensationalist, sometimes sloppy ways, had a touch of the genius about him. Another City, Not My Own may be replete with repetition, a downpour of dropped names, and a lead character who loves himself quite a lot but, I repeat, it's got a touch of the genius about it. Bear with me. If this had been written as a straightforward memoir, pure non-fiction, Dunne would have had to worry about being sued and about fact-checking. With as many names as he names here - everyone from the principals in the murders to the West Coast/East Coast elite among whom he mingles with a little too much enthusiasm - the indexing alone would have been a nightmare. As a novel, however, no matter what brickbats are thrown at him, he can claim literary license. Seriously, genius. "Gus Bailey," the character in the lead here, lost a daughter who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend, has two sons (one of whom, "Grafton," is a successful director who had a role in American Werewolf in London), and has been away from Los Angeles for a long time after losing his career to alcoholism and other personal issues. Strange, how all these things, other than the names, were true for Dominick Dunne, too. "Gus" is requested by his, and Dunne's, magazine, Vanity Fair, to attend the trial of O.J. Simpson for the murders of Brown and Goldman. Gus, like Dunne, is there for a year, and believes from the very start, based on the overwhelming evidence, that Simpson is guilty. Just about everything depicted here happened in the real world, right down to Dunne's reaction to the verdict, and his incendiary anger when speaking to the media afterward. The books that Gus has written in the past are given the titles of Dunne's own books, and are about the same subjects. Dunne's family is used, with names slightly changed. Dunne's feelings about various people in the trial, the media, and his own family are written into Gus's story. There's plenty to complain about here, but I couldn't bring myself to care too much, frankly, beyond the deduction of a star. The story was too entertaining, too compelling, too jaw-dropping, for me to do much more than roll my eyes when I encountered repetition (how many times do we need to be reminded that Gus's home is in Prud'homme, Connecticut?) or self-aggrandizement. Some scenes strained credulity and one was so ridiculous that I laughed out loud, but I can't deny that I enjoyed reading this. Dunne is such a raconteur, at times such a self-parody, that I can't help but offer a grudging admiration for this roman a clef.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    #10 of 120 books pledged to read during 2018 I've read this at least 4 times but picked it up again since I tend to read it every couple of years or so. This book is a VERY thinly disguised account of the author, called "Gus Bailey" here but it was actually Dominick Dunne himself, who covered the Simpson trial for Vanity Fair magazine. In fact it seems that mostly real names were used throughout, except that the Dunne family names had been changed. It is about the year or so that "Gus" spent writ #10 of 120 books pledged to read during 2018 I've read this at least 4 times but picked it up again since I tend to read it every couple of years or so. This book is a VERY thinly disguised account of the author, called "Gus Bailey" here but it was actually Dominick Dunne himself, who covered the Simpson trial for Vanity Fair magazine. In fact it seems that mostly real names were used throughout, except that the Dunne family names had been changed. It is about the year or so that "Gus" spent writing about and appearing on numerous interview/talk shows to discuss the trial, and the many celebrity friends, also obsessed with talking about the trial, with whom he got together regularly. If you are acquainted with the case and with the others he talks about, the book is hard to put down. One of my favorites.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    What a good book. It was kind of hard to follow who he was with or talking to at times because of all the different parties and phone calls, but it was such a good way of showing how OJ was used as an example by the black community. White men, white policemen, kill black people all the time and don’t even go to trial. So when a black man killed two white people and was acquitted, it was payback. Yet, the outrage of the white community showed the power available to white people and not black peop What a good book. It was kind of hard to follow who he was with or talking to at times because of all the different parties and phone calls, but it was such a good way of showing how OJ was used as an example by the black community. White men, white policemen, kill black people all the time and don’t even go to trial. So when a black man killed two white people and was acquitted, it was payback. Yet, the outrage of the white community showed the power available to white people and not black people and OJ was put back in his place (and ultimately served his time through an entirely unrelated crime).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    First Dominick Dunne book I’ve read although I’ve read some Vanity Fair articles and I was blown away! What an original book. It is technically a novel but 90% then f it is true. It follows the story of a fictional journalist,Gus who is obviously Dunne, as he covers the trial of O.J. Simpson. He name drops terribly as he describes how he become the king of L.L. Society with his tales of the lurid murders. Mixed in is the story of Gus’ (Dunne ‘s) daughter’s murder 15 years before, the Menendez bro First Dominick Dunne book I’ve read although I’ve read some Vanity Fair articles and I was blown away! What an original book. It is technically a novel but 90% then f it is true. It follows the story of a fictional journalist,Gus who is obviously Dunne, as he covers the trial of O.J. Simpson. He name drops terribly as he describes how he become the king of L.L. Society with his tales of the lurid murders. Mixed in is the story of Gus’ (Dunne ‘s) daughter’s murder 15 years before, the Menendez brothers and other high profile legal scandals. Truly riveting with the best ending I’ve ever read!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sally Nemetz

    For me, this book kind of dragged at times. So many references to Hollywood personalities. Then it was based on the true story of O.J. Simpson's murder of Nicole and Ron Goldman. My indignity of O.J.'s acquittal was awakened. The ending of the book was a surprise. I really love this author. He takes me out of my small little life, away from my selfcenteredness and away into his story. It's such a treat I'm not good at writing reviews. If a book grabs me and leaves my thoughts spinning and I wan For me, this book kind of dragged at times. So many references to Hollywood personalities. Then it was based on the true story of O.J. Simpson's murder of Nicole and Ron Goldman. My indignity of O.J.'s acquittal was awakened. The ending of the book was a surprise. I really love this author. He takes me out of my small little life, away from my selfcenteredness and away into his story. It's such a treat I'm not good at writing reviews. If a book grabs me and leaves my thoughts spinning and I want to reach out with pen and paper to thank the author I give them 5 stars. Now to hunt down more of his books! ☆☆☆☆☆

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Wellinger

    Ugh. What a strange, tireless rehashing of the O.J. trial, told through a fictitious Vanity Fair writer, who is actually Dominick Dunne, writing a book called Another City, Not My Own (huh?) It's mostly just snatches of hundreds of name-dropping conversations Dunne had with everyone from Lady Di to Jack Nicholson. There's some guilty pleasure wrapped into the reading of this – he did get a front row seat in Judge Ito's courtroom – but Dunne is so busy constantly congratulating himself for being Ugh. What a strange, tireless rehashing of the O.J. trial, told through a fictitious Vanity Fair writer, who is actually Dominick Dunne, writing a book called Another City, Not My Own (huh?) It's mostly just snatches of hundreds of name-dropping conversations Dunne had with everyone from Lady Di to Jack Nicholson. There's some guilty pleasure wrapped into the reading of this – he did get a front row seat in Judge Ito's courtroom – but Dunne is so busy constantly congratulating himself for being such a bicoastal bon vivant hat you want to smack him with a Bruno Magli loafer.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Grier

    I loved this book....with remembrances of all the OJ Simpson murder trial hysteria of summers past, this fictional tale brings it all back from the eyes of the rich and famous in Hollywood. With the trial and all the cast of characters,legal, police,Goldman and Nicole’s family and murderer himself being on the TV 24-7 it was not just an obsession for the common man but royalty and famous alike. Gus Bailey tells his tale like the best gossip columnist. I didn’t put it down. Crazy ending also. I l I loved this book....with remembrances of all the OJ Simpson murder trial hysteria of summers past, this fictional tale brings it all back from the eyes of the rich and famous in Hollywood. With the trial and all the cast of characters,legal, police,Goldman and Nicole’s family and murderer himself being on the TV 24-7 it was not just an obsession for the common man but royalty and famous alike. Gus Bailey tells his tale like the best gossip columnist. I didn’t put it down. Crazy ending also. I love Dominick Dunnes writing. Off to read another of his books!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Shumaker

    Engrossing I've read all of Dominick Dunne's novels except The Winners and have always been entertained; I also enjoyed his column in Vanity Fair. I'm not sure how I missed this book about the O.J. Simpson trial, perhaps I needed to wait until many years had passed. I found this novel about the trial brought it all back and I couldn't stop reading, this is full of delicious gossip and details of the trial best appreciated now in light of all that has happened. I loved this. Engrossing I've read all of Dominick Dunne's novels except The Winners and have always been entertained; I also enjoyed his column in Vanity Fair. I'm not sure how I missed this book about the O.J. Simpson trial, perhaps I needed to wait until many years had passed. I found this novel about the trial brought it all back and I couldn't stop reading, this is full of delicious gossip and details of the trial best appreciated now in light of all that has happened. I loved this.

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