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Never Stop Dancing: A Memoir

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A story of grief, male friendship, and healing conversations. “Be present,” “cherish each day,” “always say I love you.” John Robinette lived those words. Or so he thought. Then his wife, Amy, was killed instantly in a pedestrian accident. John’s world shattered, and he began the grueling task of parenting two young boys in a house filled with vibrant, bittersweet memories. A story of grief, male friendship, and healing conversations. “Be present,” “cherish each day,” “always say I love you.” John Robinette lived those words. Or so he thought. Then his wife, Amy, was killed instantly in a pedestrian accident. John’s world shattered, and he began the grueling task of parenting two young boys in a house filled with vibrant, bittersweet memories. As the grief closed in around him, John’s close friend, author Robert Jacoby, saw John struggling and proposed an unusual idea: to interview him over the course of the first year after Amy’s death. Robert’s hope was to meet John directly in his experience of sorrow, explore his grief with him, and discover what lessons might be learned. Born of a year’s worth of candid interviews, Never Stop Dancing avoids clichéd takeaways about grief and healing to chart a deeper, thornier examination of loss and regret. Robert and John are transformed through their shared experience, too, emerging strengthened and with an abiding male friendship that cuts against the grain of pop-culture trends of quick fixes and easy answers. This memoir-in-conversation provides hard-won reassurances that one can and does go on after loss.


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A story of grief, male friendship, and healing conversations. “Be present,” “cherish each day,” “always say I love you.” John Robinette lived those words. Or so he thought. Then his wife, Amy, was killed instantly in a pedestrian accident. John’s world shattered, and he began the grueling task of parenting two young boys in a house filled with vibrant, bittersweet memories. A story of grief, male friendship, and healing conversations. “Be present,” “cherish each day,” “always say I love you.” John Robinette lived those words. Or so he thought. Then his wife, Amy, was killed instantly in a pedestrian accident. John’s world shattered, and he began the grueling task of parenting two young boys in a house filled with vibrant, bittersweet memories. As the grief closed in around him, John’s close friend, author Robert Jacoby, saw John struggling and proposed an unusual idea: to interview him over the course of the first year after Amy’s death. Robert’s hope was to meet John directly in his experience of sorrow, explore his grief with him, and discover what lessons might be learned. Born of a year’s worth of candid interviews, Never Stop Dancing avoids clichéd takeaways about grief and healing to chart a deeper, thornier examination of loss and regret. Robert and John are transformed through their shared experience, too, emerging strengthened and with an abiding male friendship that cuts against the grain of pop-culture trends of quick fixes and easy answers. This memoir-in-conversation provides hard-won reassurances that one can and does go on after loss.

30 review for Never Stop Dancing: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie DeMoss

    This is a really strong memoir of the first year of the author's life after his wife unexpectedly passed away. The description of the grief and pain after hearing of his wife's death in a pedestrian accident is so raw that the reader will feel it too. The pain is so real it becomes almost physical pain for the reader as well. The author describes having to tell his small children and having to rebuild his life, and does not hold back or try to sugarcoat anything. If you would like to read a real a This is a really strong memoir of the first year of the author's life after his wife unexpectedly passed away. The description of the grief and pain after hearing of his wife's death in a pedestrian accident is so raw that the reader will feel it too. The pain is so real it becomes almost physical pain for the reader as well. The author describes having to tell his small children and having to rebuild his life, and does not hold back or try to sugarcoat anything. If you would like to read a real and raw story of the aftermath of a tragedy in one small family, you should read this book. I received an advance copy of this book from BookSirens. My review is voluntary.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Herbivorous

    The bulk of this book was derived from a series of conversations between two friends over the first year after author John Robinette's wife was killed. The resulting document honors the confusion and anger of grief, as John grapples with questions from the profound to the mundane as he tries to put his life back together for himself and his two young boys. The book is written in the first person, primarily in John's voice but with chapters framed by short sections where Robert talks about his exp The bulk of this book was derived from a series of conversations between two friends over the first year after author John Robinette's wife was killed. The resulting document honors the confusion and anger of grief, as John grapples with questions from the profound to the mundane as he tries to put his life back together for himself and his two young boys. The book is written in the first person, primarily in John's voice but with chapters framed by short sections where Robert talks about his experience in recording these conversations. The accounts maintain the visceral, in the moment intensity of John's grief and loss, as stated directly to a trusted confidante. The reader feels the power of an intimate living room conversation, where you look up and realize that hours have passed. I am in awe of the editing and curation that must have been required to maintain the essence and power of these conversations, transformed from recorded conversation to first-rate personal essays. The authors avoid the temptation to add later perspectives to the narratives, or over-reach from broader points, carefully preserving and bravely owning the perspectives of the moment. Regardless of your own experiences, the book is a worthwhile read. If you have experienced a similar loss or are supporting someone who has, you'll get even more from the book: an honest companion who has been there, and will share his darkest moments with you.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Captures John’s voice. Reading this feels like having a conversation with him. It was good to finally hear/read the whole story of what happened. I liked the detail on coping with daily life with the kids. Also the material on dating. And the reflections on yin yang and the boys’ questions.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kayo

    Sad book, but also gives hope. Much to think about with this book. Definite must read! Thanks to author,publisher and Netgalley for the chance to read this book. While I got the book for free,it had no bearing on the rating I gave it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Happy Booker

    Never stop dancing is a Memoir. The book is written about grief, friendships and love. The loss of John’s wife is the prominent and most impactful part of the content. The loss truly moves his home and world, and as he grieves over the absence of his wife, he raises two young boys. Robert, who is John’s friend, interviews him for the first year, and the book becomes a back and forth dialogue of memories retold by him. The literature is a good representation of the struggles people go through aft Never stop dancing is a Memoir. The book is written about grief, friendships and love. The loss of John’s wife is the prominent and most impactful part of the content. The loss truly moves his home and world, and as he grieves over the absence of his wife, he raises two young boys. Robert, who is John’s friend, interviews him for the first year, and the book becomes a back and forth dialogue of memories retold by him. The literature is a good representation of the struggles people go through after a loss. Counselling and psychology are the essences of the story. John’s wife, Amy, dies from a sudden pedestrian accident leaving questions in John’s mind about life, death and the true meaning of existence. The book is not religious but does touch spiritual matters. Anyone who is going through a loss and grief would find this book interested. The book is compelling and allows the reader to know that it is good to have a friend when you are struggling to deal with specific issues that hurt the mind and the soul.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    3.5 stars. Never Stop Dancing: A Memoir is an interesting experiment where one man (Robert Jacoby) records several interview sessions with a close but removed friend (John Robinette) after the sudden and senseless death of said friend's wife. By close but removed, I mean that they have a sort of instant kinship and make time to meet up but aren't integrated into each other's lives. As such, the interviewer, Jacoby, had never met his friend's wife. But the kinship was such that Robinette was willi 3.5 stars. Never Stop Dancing: A Memoir is an interesting experiment where one man (Robert Jacoby) records several interview sessions with a close but removed friend (John Robinette) after the sudden and senseless death of said friend's wife. By close but removed, I mean that they have a sort of instant kinship and make time to meet up but aren't integrated into each other's lives. As such, the interviewer, Jacoby, had never met his friend's wife. But the kinship was such that Robinette was willing and open to have recorded interview sessions with Jacoby to discuss his loss and grieving in sessions spaced out over the year following his wife's death. Her death, and the bulk of the interview sessions, took place nearly a decade before the memoir's publication. The interviews appear to be transcribed but edited, so they read like blog posts rather than a magazine Q&A. The strength of the memoir lies in the fact that Robinette is well-spoken and philosophical. He seems to relish in the chance to talk about his wife, his love, his loss, and the sense he has tried to make of the world despite the pain it causes. The details about his wife's death and his grief are raw and unflinching. There's a lot to his grief and coping that people are sure to relate to, especially when dealing with sudden and tragic loss. However, Robinette, like most philosophers, can be long-winded and repetitive. This is natural, given the nature of people and covering the same topic, but it did sort of skew the book towards the end to something a bit redundant and removed. Jacoby's detailing of their friendship's history and growth, as well as how the two relate during the interview sessions are interesting and relevant. However, between interview sessions, he adds the same basic summary about his own emotional distress, his empathy, his own personal history, and his gratefulness for the life of his current partner present at his side. These feel long-winded and self-serving, and become increasingly redundant after the first one. Jacoby also presses Robinette to discuss his religious viewpoints several times despite Robinette summing up his feelings succinctly early on. A very religious person, it felt like Jacoby was pushing to get some sort of religious epiphany story out of Robinette; it felt heavy-handed and discomfiting and is one of the biggest drawbacks to the memoir, in my opinion. Overall, a solid and impactful memoir, and something I'm sure is to be appreciated by anyone else processing a traumatic loss.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Thanks to Netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review. I went into reading this having no idea what it was about. I picked it because after doing a bunch of genealogy for a family member who is interested in such things, I knew that John Robinette is probably a distant cousin of mine (and also Joe Biden's). This story delves into the deepest and saddest aspects of life. The narrative is unusually constructed. John tells the story to his good friend over an extended course of ti Thanks to Netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review. I went into reading this having no idea what it was about. I picked it because after doing a bunch of genealogy for a family member who is interested in such things, I knew that John Robinette is probably a distant cousin of mine (and also Joe Biden's). This story delves into the deepest and saddest aspects of life. The narrative is unusually constructed. John tells the story to his good friend over an extended course of time. His friend adds his observations and a bit of is own life story in the retelling. John clearly came from a fantastic family. He's a man of means who lives what seems to be a typical upper middle class life. He's the sort of person who does everything in order at the right time and seems to have everything under control, even under the most trying circumstances. I found this interesting, since I was comparing his reactions and his family to how it would be for me, and realized how different it was. I realized that neither I or the people around me were like John. Of course, we would never have his resources, but it was more than that. He seemed so steady. Then, John added some revelations that made me realize that even John had some pretty significant failings. I've thought alot about John and his little boys. This book made me sad. This book made me think. That's a good thing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Sometimes it's important, necessary really, to revisit pain to learn from it and move through it. Robert Jacoby met with his friend John Robinette several times over the course of the first year after John’s wife Amy’s unexpected accidental death. He recorded in this memoir John’s thoughts, feelings, and memories: deep thoughts about life and death, as well as sweet memories about Amy and their two sons. Beautifully woven together, this book was difficult to read in small bits. Instead, I found m Sometimes it's important, necessary really, to revisit pain to learn from it and move through it. Robert Jacoby met with his friend John Robinette several times over the course of the first year after John’s wife Amy’s unexpected accidental death. He recorded in this memoir John’s thoughts, feelings, and memories: deep thoughts about life and death, as well as sweet memories about Amy and their two sons. Beautifully woven together, this book was difficult to read in small bits. Instead, I found myself engaged for long periods of reading to get the entire story before setting the book aside for something lighter. Each time I came back though, I was drawn in again by John’s frank honesty. It’s like sitting with a friend telling you what he’s going through. It’s not easy, but you want to be there to offer comfort and support. You want to understand. And that’s why I feel Never Stop Dancing is an important book. It can help people better understand the grieving process from the outside. Many times I read something John told Robert and thought, “I never thought of that. I want to remember that when I come to a situation like this in my life.” It also made me cherish my life and what I have even more than I do. I received an advanced review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Goth Gone Grey

    Beautiful, eloquent, difficult read Exploring one man's journey through a year of grief, as told to a friend, this is not a lightweight, frivolous read. It starts with the raw emotion borne and carried by unexpected tragedy, and slowly turns to introspection as time passes. The style of interviews every few months to check in and see how John's faring show the grief process in his life in a unique, yet universal fashion. The writing is personal, raw and heartfelt, with moments of questioning, and Beautiful, eloquent, difficult read Exploring one man's journey through a year of grief, as told to a friend, this is not a lightweight, frivolous read. It starts with the raw emotion borne and carried by unexpected tragedy, and slowly turns to introspection as time passes. The style of interviews every few months to check in and see how John's faring show the grief process in his life in a unique, yet universal fashion. The writing is personal, raw and heartfelt, with moments of questioning, and seeking explanation. Many of the stages of grief are eloquently expressed. An example: "Imagine your life unfolding along the branches of a tree. When you are born, all the branches and leaves are possibilities. As we age we make choices, things happen, and we find ourselves on one of the limbs—well, there are moments when the limb branches into two new branches. I caught myself thinking, “Is this something that would have happened when Amy was alive, or not?” Are the branches completely separate now? I am now standing certainly on this other branch—the one where Amy is dead. But I’m so close to the other branch where Amy continues to live that I can still see what was possible. But now, as time is moving on, the two branches are drifting farther apart." I received a copy of this book for review purposes.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sindhu S

    On a day pretty much like any other, John Robinette receives the devastating news that his wife Amy is killed in a senseless accident. His friend Robert Jacoby, a writer, tries to help by interviewing him several times as a means to share John’s grief. The book is a detailed account of those interviews. It is a sad, poignant memoir written using Robert and John’s voices. Apart from describing big and small moments in John’s life after Amy, it also focuses on both authors’ thoughts on philosophy, On a day pretty much like any other, John Robinette receives the devastating news that his wife Amy is killed in a senseless accident. His friend Robert Jacoby, a writer, tries to help by interviewing him several times as a means to share John’s grief. The book is a detailed account of those interviews. It is a sad, poignant memoir written using Robert and John’s voices. Apart from describing big and small moments in John’s life after Amy, it also focuses on both authors’ thoughts on philosophy, religion, faith, God, etc. Just as it discusses the sadness of life without Amy, the book is quite open about John’s efforts to find a new partner. Most importantly, the portrayal of the friendship between John and Rob in the journey from grief to hope is wonderful. This book is a few pages too long, monotonous, and at times repetitive to be great. However, it is well-written, relevant, and useful to grief-stricken people, especially those who have recently lost a loved one. Note: I received a copy of this book free from BookSirens in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    Although extremely sad situation I felt the book went a little too long and not a great deal different to many others that have written about similar situations, not a lot of content that held my concentration. Sorry I couldn’t give it a five star.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    The Review This novel was emotionally and beautifully written. While steeped in tragedy and pain, the bond created by these events and the painful process of grief have given readers and the authors alike an experience like no other. In this novel, the eloquently written interviews between two friends take readers through John’s painful journey through the sudden loss of his wife. From the heartbreaking moment he’s confronted with the news, having to tell all his family about it, the first time h The Review This novel was emotionally and beautifully written. While steeped in tragedy and pain, the bond created by these events and the painful process of grief have given readers and the authors alike an experience like no other. In this novel, the eloquently written interviews between two friends take readers through John’s painful journey through the sudden loss of his wife. From the heartbreaking moment he’s confronted with the news, having to tell all his family about it, the first time his sons are confronted with Mother’s Day and more all bring the heartbreak and pain of loss to the forefront. However as the interviews grew on, both Robert and John began to examine some of life’s toughest questions in the face of such a painful tragedy. From whether or not “God” is in fact all powerful or more of a being still prone to mistakes, how we converse and treat those who have lost someone, the falsehood that somehow men are supposed to have their lives together more readily than women in the face of tragedy, and finally the ultimate lesson of living in the moment with those you love rather than worrying about a future that hasn’t happened yet, all these lessons are found and experienced firsthand by the authors as they go on this emotional journey together. The Verdict A truly well written, evenly paced read that challenges readers to examine life, the bonds they share with those they love and the painful truth behind grief that most self-help books and quick fixes won’t tell you. As someone who lost a close family member this year, I could relate to the author’s struggles in a lot of ways, but as the book shows as well, grief is different for everyone. Both physically and mentally the grieving process changes and grows for each individual person, and respecting that and helping those in grief to find their way through is sometimes the best way to come together in the face of tragedy. If you haven’t yet, be sure to grab your copy of “Never Stop Dancing: A Memoir” by John Robinette and Robert Jacoby today!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Hatcher

    “Never Stop Dancing”, by John Robinette and Robert Jacoby (Inner Harbor House, LLC, Takoma Park, 2019) reads like a cathartic tide of empathy and tragedy cresting from book to reader and back again. If it strains you much after the first 60% of text (and it may), do not put it down. Like those books we read in high school English class, it has a way of sticking to you that more entertaining and easier paced texts lack. It is heavy for the right educational and humanistic reasons. I received this “Never Stop Dancing”, by John Robinette and Robert Jacoby (Inner Harbor House, LLC, Takoma Park, 2019) reads like a cathartic tide of empathy and tragedy cresting from book to reader and back again. If it strains you much after the first 60% of text (and it may), do not put it down. Like those books we read in high school English class, it has a way of sticking to you that more entertaining and easier paced texts lack. It is heavy for the right educational and humanistic reasons. I received this free advance reader copy via BookSirens.com in exchange for an honest review. Robinette recounts and philosophizes upon the tragic loss of his spouse which occurred with no prior warning. The loss devastated both him and his two sons, spurring him to share some very saccharine - free experiences and revelations. While I thought that some middle sections could be abbreviated to no ill effect, he provides a steady supply of substantive insight. I also think that the book is especially well suited for people who have a loved one diagnosed with a terminal illness, i.e. innocent persons awaiting a “preplanned” death. Among other lessons, Robinette illustrates how absurdly we expect the male of the species to 'hold it together'. He holds life together while confessing to weeping on numerous occasions - far more so than the stereotypical male ever would admit to doing. More importantly, he allows himself to do so. I was struck by the simple and practical advice he offered on maintaining an intense, friendship based relationship: "For a couple years running we would plan a quarterly date, a weekday date. It was actually easier to do this than to get a babysitter. I would take a weekday off on a day she didn’t work, and we’d spend the whole day together. We’d get the kids off to school. We’d go to breakfast together. There’s a restaurant in town, Mark’s Kitchen. We’d usually start there, and she’d order pancakes, coffee, and orange juice, and I’d order an omelet and coffee. Sometimes we’d go catch a matinee in Silver Spring or in Bethesda. Sometimes we’d go to a park and just talk. We’d go to lunch, maybe something a little bit upscale, and have a glass of wine, then come back home, and make love." His ground level and no - holds - barred take on religion is most refreshing: "Mankind-in-God’s-image suggests to me that God has His issues, too. And as we evolve as a species, and God gets smarter and learns more about being a God, He’s still prone to mistakes, which is why Amy got killed. Because that’s clearly an error. This thinking doesn’t necessarily negate God’s existence, but it negates the all-powerful, all-knowledgeable God, because He can’t be. I think He’s struggling to keep it going, keep it together. He’s like an adolescent God." He has contempt for the “higher plan” concept of theology. So far as I could tell, he is an atheist - in - training or in full. His having attained this status via tragedy helps to remove a certain stigma that the Book of Job scripture fosters. Reasoned convictions are what they are regardless of motivations. He also provides cogent advice on how to greet and converse with someone who has just lost a loved one. I leave that for the reader to discover. One final example of wisdom comes in the Afterward of the book, in which he explains how to remain close to in-laws. People try to please or avoid in-laws often when they really should be looking for the same qualities that attracted them to their son or daughter to begin with. The qualities won't be hard to find and should be easy to connect to. I had never thought of that! Robinette continues to cherish his parents by marriage. So, while the book is a heavy one and starts with an aura of the 'touchy - feely', I am glad to have read it. It is humanizing with a large dose of the universal, in part because the decorum of male reserve is not exalted. Yet it is seasoned with some strategic male brusqueness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura Frank

    This book is for everybody, man or woman. It’s easy to connect with John and Robert. Struggling through devastating loss and supporting that person. So thought provoking I took notes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lou Barber

    On April 29th 2010, John Robinette said goodbye to his wife Amy and went to work. Just a normal day. But John's life, and that of their two boys Adam and Bryan, was to be changed forever that day. Amy was crossing the road on her way to work when she was hit by a truck driver and killed instantly. John's friend Robert Jacoby sat down with John and conducted a series of interviews documenting the first year following Amy's death. This memoir, or rather, this 'testament to love and life' is the re On April 29th 2010, John Robinette said goodbye to his wife Amy and went to work. Just a normal day. But John's life, and that of their two boys Adam and Bryan, was to be changed forever that day. Amy was crossing the road on her way to work when she was hit by a truck driver and killed instantly. John's friend Robert Jacoby sat down with John and conducted a series of interviews documenting the first year following Amy's death. This memoir, or rather, this 'testament to love and life' is the result of those interviews. We travel with John through the four seasons and feel the immediate all-encompassing grief as he struggles merely to function in the first few days and weeks following Amy's sudden death. John has no choice but to put one foot in front of the other, as he has two young sons that he is now solely responsible for. He talks about the importance of community, and finding others who have experienced death themselves. He is brutally honest about the agony of grief, and the loneliness that surrounds him. The crisis of faith, and the signs that comfort. The self-medicating with alcohol. The well-meaning, but unhelpful words that are uttered because we live in a world that has no ritual or convention for dealing with death - 'it seems only recently that we've pushed the experience of death and grieving so far away from us that we've made it foreign'. He speaks about the 'firsts' that fill him with sorrow - first Mother's Day, first Christmas, first birthdays without her. As the first anniversary approaches, their final interview is scheduled. John has been able to learn lessons from Amy's death. He is a better and more present father, he is able to open his heart again and find love. He is able to live with his grief which will always be part of him, but it no longer defines him Robert's aim in writing the book was to show that 'in this life of pain and sorrow there is great joy and beauty, too. And there are gifts to be found in grief. I wanted to know what could be salvaged, what might be learned, and after, what new life might be found and enjoyed'. I wholeheartedly believe he accomplished this in Never Stop Dancing. A truly beautiful testament to the life of Amy and John.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Garber

    I've read books on death but this book is like no other, in a good way. Robert interviews John over and over starting from right after he loses his wife in a tragic accident until a year after the death. John opens up much more then you would expect and shares it ALL. All his thoughts, all his fears, all his memories, what it's REALLY like after losing someone you love and having to raise two boys on your own. The book is gripping, I had trouble putting it down. I've been lucky that I haven't r I've read books on death but this book is like no other, in a good way. Robert interviews John over and over starting from right after he loses his wife in a tragic accident until a year after the death. John opens up much more then you would expect and shares it ALL. All his thoughts, all his fears, all his memories, what it's REALLY like after losing someone you love and having to raise two boys on your own. The book is gripping, I had trouble putting it down. I've been lucky that I haven't really lost anyone in my family yet (knock on wood) other than a few people I barely knew when I was a kid. I went through my husband's family's many deaths but although those were traumatic, it's not the same as losing your own parent or sibling. This book gave me access to what it would be like if someone close to me passed. It's scary to see how much your life would change. But although it's scary, it makes me feel more prepared for it when it does happen. Death is inevitable after all. Another side effect it had which is hard to talk about, is it had an affect on my occasional suicidal feelings that I get as part of my Bipolar (not right now.) When I was highly suicidal, my husband and I would discuss it and I'd say no one would care, they'd be better off etc. He would say the death would affect him and the kids in a large way and they'd be changed forever. Not just their feelings but things like income and the house and such. It was hard for me to see it that way. I understand it more when I'm not suicidal but I didn't REALLY understand till I read this book. What I'm saying is, if you suffer from suicidal feelings, you should read this book to see what your death would REALLY be like for your loved ones. Even if you don't have a husband/wife or kids, there are people out there who love you who WOULD suffer greatly. I'd love to see this book picked up by a big publisher where it could be promoted more widely because it's a worthwhile book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maria Martino

    Beautiful and honest story of grief and loss. The raw emotion felt as we read about the author’s year after the loss of his wife makes us realize how important it is to really live in the moment. Highly recommend

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carla Ammerman

    Beautiful story of love, loss, family and friendship. This is not an easy read, if you have ever lost a loved one, it is raw and emotional. But somehow, in the end, you are left with feelings of hope and healing. Thank you to both authors for sharing your heart so openly with the world.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Padmini Roy

    A sad yet hopeful tale of love and loss. At times difficult to read but death is not an easy topic. Written with great sensitivity. Received my copy from Book Sirens and though free, this has no reflection on my review of the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    I may be biased because I know the author, but I loved this book. So beautiful, and sad and hopeful at the same time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Levesque

  22. 5 out of 5

    BookNerdBetty

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Hampton

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pat Liberatore

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jon Mueller

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Ferragut

  28. 4 out of 5

    Beth Blevins

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gulnar

  30. 5 out of 5

    Betsy A Izes

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