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American Jesus Volume 2: The New Messiah

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AMERICAN JESUS returns with THE NEW MESSIAH. A virgin pregnancy in '70s New York leads a young couple to flee for their lives, as evil forces close in to destroy them. Yet more bloodshed lies ahead for their daug


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AMERICAN JESUS returns with THE NEW MESSIAH. A virgin pregnancy in '70s New York leads a young couple to flee for their lives, as evil forces close in to destroy them. Yet more bloodshed lies ahead for their daug

30 review for American Jesus Volume 2: The New Messiah

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I don’t know about you but I’ve read a few books and seen a few shows/movies about the second coming of Jeebus so I’m familiar with the setup. And maybe that’s partly why I was so bored with American Jeebus: The New Mess, because it doesn’t add anything fresh to this subgenre, but it’s also just a really boring and unimaginative comic, like a lot of Mark Millar’s recent work. So it’s the usual routine: virgin birth, angel Gabriel, antichrist, oh god I’m yawning already… anyway this time Jeebus i I don’t know about you but I’ve read a few books and seen a few shows/movies about the second coming of Jeebus so I’m familiar with the setup. And maybe that’s partly why I was so bored with American Jeebus: The New Mess, because it doesn’t add anything fresh to this subgenre, but it’s also just a really boring and unimaginative comic, like a lot of Mark Millar’s recent work. So it’s the usual routine: virgin birth, angel Gabriel, antichrist, oh god I’m yawning already… anyway this time Jeebus is a black girl! That’s really it for the “plot”. Millar weaves recent history into his dull narrative - Waco was really about an attempt at taking out the new messiah and 9/11 was part of the antichrist’s devious plan to get the ball rolling on having us all microchipped or something astoopid. The story is plodding and never engaging. Nothing interesting happens until the generic bad guy shows up at the end for an X-Men 2 rip-off scene. The art is fugly - Millar’s worked with some of the finest comics artists around today on his Image titles; Peter Gross is definitely not among them. A dreary slog from tedious start to tedious finish. Now that you can ignore American Jeebus the comic you can soon ignore the TV show when it arrives on Netflix. Another Gross Millar crapfest!

  2. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Like most of Millar's stuff nowadays this is just decent. After 15+ years of waiting we get the second of the three part series of American Jesus. After the twist of the last one you'd expect them to go back to that character but instead we get a brand new character. I actually enjoyed the idea here, as a new character who is the new "Jesus" can counteract what happened in the last volume. So the idea was solid and the art was decent. But the dialogue is all over the place. Outdated slang at par Like most of Millar's stuff nowadays this is just decent. After 15+ years of waiting we get the second of the three part series of American Jesus. After the twist of the last one you'd expect them to go back to that character but instead we get a brand new character. I actually enjoyed the idea here, as a new character who is the new "Jesus" can counteract what happened in the last volume. So the idea was solid and the art was decent. But the dialogue is all over the place. Outdated slang at parts, super rushed execution for the 2nd half, and the villains be...well shit to be blunt. So overall a decent action followup to the 1st book but nothing special. Hopefully ends good.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aldo Haegemans

    3,6/5

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    This is a very short installment in Millar's take on the second coming and everything that hangs around it. That doesn't make this bad, unfortunately that does not make this great either. This time around we get the brief version of our other main character's life (conception to about 18). Worth it for seeing where the story is headed, but frustrated with this being short a short (digital floppies - 3) series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Oh dear. In belatedly catching the first American Jesus book by Mark Millar I mentioned his modern-day habit of starting a story to make a franchise and not to make a full story, and how he managed to produce an ending-that-was-a-beginning to that book that really satisfied. Well, here's the sequel, and it really can be said to be the sequel that nobody wanted. Last time round we had a kid with an easy way with miracles, and the world seeing him as the new messiah. Here we get a girl due a virgi Oh dear. In belatedly catching the first American Jesus book by Mark Millar I mentioned his modern-day habit of starting a story to make a franchise and not to make a full story, and how he managed to produce an ending-that-was-a-beginning to that book that really satisfied. Well, here's the sequel, and it really can be said to be the sequel that nobody wanted. Last time round we had a kid with an easy way with miracles, and the world seeing him as the new messiah. Here we get a girl due a virgin birth, and eighteen years later a bratty offspring, who doesn't think she could possibly be the second coming of anything. The problem is, neither can we. The 'angel' – for this story needs a Gabriel figure for the annunciation – yacks on about the satanic will, but comes across as about as sensible as David Icke. The book crams every crack-pot idea in, pretends that religion is just as good, and then proceeds to the new Bethlehem, which happens to be Wako. Wako, ffs. Now, I'm as much of an atheist as the next man, but even I don't get why the religious side of things here get belittled in such asinine, cheesy ways. The first book at least had a respect for religious thought. It carries on from there – the people in the compound looking after "Catalina" speaking like no religious person ever would, and coming on like stooges for the world's worst conspiracy writer. "[Priests] have no idea the Vatican is a serpent cult" indeed. Also, it soon becomes clear there will be a third part of this whole shebang, which might actually provide a good-versus-evil story with some kind of heft or purpose to it. For this volume, with such an attitude about it, and with such a boring must-get-plot-A-to-point-B-ready-for-the-sequel raison d'etre, is just a waste of time. A waste of time that still demands I try and come back for the conclusion, but that would be courtesy of what the first book did, and not what this limp stepping-stone of a "story" did. Sinful.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    Short and straight forward. A set-up for the next book really. More like an extended introduction. Last time we met the antichrist in an awesome twist. This time we meet the second coming. Next time they meet each other hopefully. 4 stars but only cause I’m happy to finally get more of this story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    Barely held me. Barely. I enjoyed the first installment but why skip all the action of what the parents went through or how they were hidden/socialized? I was right there with them at the end of that first one and this seems weak in comparison. They get points for Catalina being a black alternative-music enjoying, well-read teenage girl but that's about it. Curiosity might make me fall into the third installment one day, won't be soon tho.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Man-o-man, never before have I ever seen something so dynamic as this series in regards to how people look as the messiah. In the last issue we find that the traditional traits of the messiah actually has more to do with the anti-Christ. But even then, he ends up isolated from human feelings sometimes because of his awakening out of survival and because humans can't reach him spiritually anymore. But for Catalina and her family, you really have to wonder what people actually need in their lives. Man-o-man, never before have I ever seen something so dynamic as this series in regards to how people look as the messiah. In the last issue we find that the traditional traits of the messiah actually has more to do with the anti-Christ. But even then, he ends up isolated from human feelings sometimes because of his awakening out of survival and because humans can't reach him spiritually anymore. But for Catalina and her family, you really have to wonder what people actually need in their lives. After her mother's virgin pregnancy she has to give up everything to raise their daughter in a gated community that functions more like a cult. As someone who also felt how forced and isolating Christianity can be, this hit very close. Catalina was essentially raised like a child all her life and ended up hating all of it. She feels that she never earned anything and with the community's gated attitudes it was hard to blame her. In fact the community act like how some devout Christians who have made news act. Not the smiting sects like the KKK but the socialistic ones who are more or less militant hippies. They see the world as corrupt per its foundations in greed and entropy. And the method in which Catalina gains her power and her mom's attempts to convince her are absolutely terrifying. She straight up points a gun at her new friends, who are actually pretty decent. And Catalina's powers evoke images of a vengeful god instead of someone who inspires others. It really brings up the question is that if she's supposed to be the savior of the world, does that mean Catalina has to destroy it first?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Fifteen years ago, when everyone was first losing patience with Mark Millar, he did a book with Peter Gross called Chosen, about the second coming. Except - psych! - the twist was that we'd actually been following the Antichrist all along. This was moderately clever, but really not helped by the amount of gruesome detail ladled on for the reveal. Now, finally, we get the second volume (cf my previous comments about Millar being a lot quicker to begin stories than continue them). This time there' Fifteen years ago, when everyone was first losing patience with Mark Millar, he did a book with Peter Gross called Chosen, about the second coming. Except - psych! - the twist was that we'd actually been following the Antichrist all along. This was moderately clever, but really not helped by the amount of gruesome detail ladled on for the reveal. Now, finally, we get the second volume (cf my previous comments about Millar being a lot quicker to begin stories than continue them). This time there's no real curveball, unless you count the way the eventual miracles look a lot like standard superpowers, exactly the sort of shock and awe stuff Jesus pointedly refused to do first time around (well, unless you count some of the loopier apocryphal gospels). Our heroine has grown up in a Waco-style cult compound, her life rigorously controlled, told she's the messiah - and she is. She's been told she's not allowed near mass media because the world outside is under the sway of her Adversary - and it is. Really, the main interest lies in wondering: given that Millar is Christian, one of comics' few out Brexiteers, and also all for Scottish independence, might he actually believe some of this Satanic world government, 'RFID chips are the Devil's mark', David Icke-meets-Left Behind lunatic eschatology? Is he planning to use his Netflix millions to turn free Caledonia into a stronghold against the Beast? Because if so, that might make for a considerably better story than this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Harry Sabs

    It’s good! kinda. It’s very ok. I love where it’s going but it was a little bit anticlimactic. Not much happens apart from set up...set up...set up...something cool happens, end. It’s obviously a set up volume before the main event but realising that kinda sucks given the vast chasm between volumes. Just waiting for the bomb to finally drop.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sean Goh

    Teenage angsty politically correct JC leads us readers through a big yawn. skip.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ushnav Shroff

    Jesus Christ/Catalina, what a short but exhilarating ride.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Costello

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Johnnene

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Chase

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Ramsden

  19. 5 out of 5

    Simon J.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael DeLong

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nate

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elpalan07

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  24. 5 out of 5

    Yu Fung Leung

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Parker Wise

  27. 4 out of 5

    John B

  28. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian Anderson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

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