counter create hit The Agony of Education: Black Students at a White University - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Agony of Education: Black Students at a White University

Availability: Ready to download

The Agony of Education is about the life experience of African American students attending a historically white university. Based on seventy-seven interviews conducted with black students and parents concerning their experiences with one state university, as well as published and unpublished studies of the black experience at state universities at large, this study capture The Agony of Education is about the life experience of African American students attending a historically white university. Based on seventy-seven interviews conducted with black students and parents concerning their experiences with one state university, as well as published and unpublished studies of the black experience at state universities at large, this study captures the painful choices and agonizing dilemmas at the heart of the decisions African Americans must make about higher education.


Compare

The Agony of Education is about the life experience of African American students attending a historically white university. Based on seventy-seven interviews conducted with black students and parents concerning their experiences with one state university, as well as published and unpublished studies of the black experience at state universities at large, this study capture The Agony of Education is about the life experience of African American students attending a historically white university. Based on seventy-seven interviews conducted with black students and parents concerning their experiences with one state university, as well as published and unpublished studies of the black experience at state universities at large, this study captures the painful choices and agonizing dilemmas at the heart of the decisions African Americans must make about higher education.

38 review for The Agony of Education: Black Students at a White University

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Very enlightening and disturbing. The authors describe pervasive patterns of racial discrimination, harassment, marginalization, and alienation of black students, based on data gathered from focus groups of students and parents at a large state university. They back up their data with many studies conducted at colleges and universities across the country from the 1970's to the early 1990's, when this book was written. (One of the most disturbing facts is that the studies seem to show a steady in Very enlightening and disturbing. The authors describe pervasive patterns of racial discrimination, harassment, marginalization, and alienation of black students, based on data gathered from focus groups of students and parents at a large state university. They back up their data with many studies conducted at colleges and universities across the country from the 1970's to the early 1990's, when this book was written. (One of the most disturbing facts is that the studies seem to show a steady increase in racial victimization of black students over this period, although by page 187, the authors haven't commented on this.) Critics of higher education have often attributed black students' lower achievement and graduation rates to individual and familial factors such as motivation, intelligence, and family priorities. This book demonstrates that at a historically white university, black students face challenges that can distract them from intellectual and personal development, ones that white students (especially men, although the authors seldom mention this) do not face. Large majorities in the cited studies often report verbal abuse by white students, and many report physical threats or attcks, or property damage. The focus group members describe being frozen out by white students in computer labs and dining halls, being told by professors that they would fail, and being expected to represent all black people in class discussions. The authors introduce anthropological ideas to ground their discussion, especially the idea of the meaning of space--in this case, "white space." They show how historically white universities are seen by white students and faculty as "white space" and black people (and also, presumably, others of color) as intruders. When a black person appears in "white space," white people may not be consciously aware of intrusion, but they are aware of something amiss, and they react with more or less hostility, more or less judgment, more or less threat. This book is fascinating, well-constructed, tightly written, and painful for me to read as a white person. White people seldom have the opportunity or the need to face our own internal racism. We rationalize it: "I didn't move my purse away because he is black, I did it because..." Actually, I did it because he is black. It was a knee-jerk reaction and I need to face it. The shame of facing, accepting, and really trying to change my racism costs me far less than my racist actions cost the black people I meet. In this book, the students' and parents' anecdotes are the best part: personal, vivid and real. The depictions of "white space" especially resonate with me. I have been reading this book on the bus which, in my town, is used mostly by people of color. It is defninitely not white space, and I often feel like an intruder, an outsider. Often, no one sits with me. In the final chapter, the authors describe racism not as a set of ideas but as a thought process, a lens by which people process information. I like this; it explains why racism is so intransigent, so difficult to get rid of, and why new racist ideas keep popping up in my mind. A male grad school colleague once told me there was "no more sexism in this country," and I said to myself, "who am I to assume there is no more racism?"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    This is a hard book to read. I noted that it has a 1996 copyright and has probably sat on my "unread books" pile for the best part of a decade. The book chronicles the struggles of black students at a predominantly white, large State University that is not identified. The big question for me in reading this book is whether to accept the "racialized society" approach in analyzing the experience of black students. This sees white students as insensitive and at least latently racist, university str This is a hard book to read. I noted that it has a 1996 copyright and has probably sat on my "unread books" pile for the best part of a decade. The book chronicles the struggles of black students at a predominantly white, large State University that is not identified. The big question for me in reading this book is whether to accept the "racialized society" approach in analyzing the experience of black students. This sees white students as insensitive and at least latently racist, university structures as unfriendly to blacks and favorable to whites, and university administrators and faculty (mostly white) as perpetuators of this system, despite their liberal pretensions. The evidence of this study makes a strong case for all these structures being in place and making the experience of blacks in such institutions one of agony. Students experience differential treatment from advisors and faculty, are assumed to be there simply because of affirmative action rather than ability, and often get the subtle message of "not welcome here." Universities in North America are embedded in a larger social context. One of the unanswered questions in this study for me was how the experience of racialized society effects the "entry posture" of black students coming into white institutions. How do their prior experiences shape their experience of the university? The authors call for a mix of university leadership, multiculturalism, and greater representation of blacks in faculty and administration as steps toward remedying this situation. The one thing not discussed is the importance of experiential or action-based learning in breaking down racialized structures. Reading this book sixteen years after its publication date also left me wondering whether there has been progress (or regress) during this time. My own anecdotal observation of the university where I do campus ministry is that there has been good university leadership and a multicultural ethos fostered and yet incidents of racism persist and in listening to black students responses, one senses the continuing pain and frustration over the lack of progress on many fronts, ranging from racial stereotyping to faculty hiring. It seems we are yet a long way from King's "beloved community."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura Antonow

    This was one of the most important books I've ever read. I head Joe Feagin, one of the authors, speak here at the university a couple years ago, and I was impressed by his knowledge of race and racism and his passion for confronting it head on. This book does exactly that as it explores the experience of black students in predominantly white universities. Especially given our recent racist events on campus, it is apparent from this study that a campus climate of racism extends well beyond "a few This was one of the most important books I've ever read. I head Joe Feagin, one of the authors, speak here at the university a couple years ago, and I was impressed by his knowledge of race and racism and his passion for confronting it head on. This book does exactly that as it explores the experience of black students in predominantly white universities. Especially given our recent racist events on campus, it is apparent from this study that a campus climate of racism extends well beyond "a few bad apples" and is typically an institution-wide problem - students, faculty, staff, and administrators all playing a role. Campus racism - sometime subtle, sometimes not - is a problem that must be addressed head on, with frank discussions about racism and white privilege, not simply increasing enrollment of students of color. The authors suggest that thoughtful policies and programs supporting multiculturalism on campus are the only way to remedy a racist climate, but there is often resistance from faculty and administrators (and I'll add alumni, in our case) for fear of "minority dominance," which is seen as a threat to the white establishment. A very thought-provoking read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Great to read, and also really really hard. So long after the Civil Rights laws that made predominantly white universities more accessible to people of color, but so far to go to make things really accessible.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jason Rivera

  6. 4 out of 5

    Glenda Nelms

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amber Garrison Duncan

  8. 5 out of 5

    C

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nelson Clark

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  11. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  12. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  13. 4 out of 5

    guermo

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christine Taylor

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mi’Chelle

  16. 5 out of 5

    Unree Westley

  17. 5 out of 5

    A. Casey

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jason Haas

  19. 4 out of 5

    Khixaan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joy334

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julie Knutson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil P. Freeman

  23. 5 out of 5

    Yasmin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Korri

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ann

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Mcgonigle

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Uwagboi

  30. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Echewune

  31. 5 out of 5

    Michael Strode

  32. 4 out of 5

    Queen

  33. 5 out of 5

    Hesy-Ra

  34. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Ryan

  35. 5 out of 5

    J G

  36. 5 out of 5

    Marla

  37. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  38. 5 out of 5

    Lou

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.