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Author of Empire of Sand and Realm of Ash Tasha Suri's The Jasmine Throne, beginning a new trilogy set in a world inspired by the history and epics of India, in which a captive princess and a maidservant in possession of forbidden magic become unlikely allies on a dark journey to save their empire from the princess's traitor brother. Imprisoned by her dictator brother, Mali Author of Empire of Sand and Realm of Ash Tasha Suri's The Jasmine Throne, beginning a new trilogy set in a world inspired by the history and epics of India, in which a captive princess and a maidservant in possession of forbidden magic become unlikely allies on a dark journey to save their empire from the princess's traitor brother. Imprisoned by her dictator brother, Malini spends her days in isolation in the Hirana: an ancient temple that was once the source of the powerful, magical deathless waters — but is now little more than a decaying ruin. Priya is a maidservant, one among several who make the treacherous journey to the top of the Hirana every night to clean Malini’s chambers. She is happy to be an anonymous drudge, so long as it keeps anyone from guessing the dangerous secret she hides. But when Malini accidentally bears witness to Priya’s true nature, their destinies become irrevocably tangled. One is a vengeful princess seeking to depose her brother from his throne. The other is a priestess seeking to find her family. Together, they will change the fate of an empire.


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Author of Empire of Sand and Realm of Ash Tasha Suri's The Jasmine Throne, beginning a new trilogy set in a world inspired by the history and epics of India, in which a captive princess and a maidservant in possession of forbidden magic become unlikely allies on a dark journey to save their empire from the princess's traitor brother. Imprisoned by her dictator brother, Mali Author of Empire of Sand and Realm of Ash Tasha Suri's The Jasmine Throne, beginning a new trilogy set in a world inspired by the history and epics of India, in which a captive princess and a maidservant in possession of forbidden magic become unlikely allies on a dark journey to save their empire from the princess's traitor brother. Imprisoned by her dictator brother, Malini spends her days in isolation in the Hirana: an ancient temple that was once the source of the powerful, magical deathless waters — but is now little more than a decaying ruin. Priya is a maidservant, one among several who make the treacherous journey to the top of the Hirana every night to clean Malini’s chambers. She is happy to be an anonymous drudge, so long as it keeps anyone from guessing the dangerous secret she hides. But when Malini accidentally bears witness to Priya’s true nature, their destinies become irrevocably tangled. One is a vengeful princess seeking to depose her brother from his throne. The other is a priestess seeking to find her family. Together, they will change the fate of an empire.

30 review for The Jasmine Throne

  1. 4 out of 5

    chai ♡

    If your thing is “morally grey lesbians who long to set an empire ablaze and are set ablaze by their longing for each other/washing each other’s hair/holding sharp-edged knives to each other’s ribs/kissing beneath a waterfall” you should definitely pre-order this book! Full review to come.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    ↠ 5 stars It begins with a burning and an exile. Malini is a traitor — a vengeful princess banished to the Hirana, a ruined temple, to atone for her crimes. Kept under lock and key, she grows weaker under the watchful eye of her caretaker, facing almost certain death. Priya is a maidservant tasked with taking the treacherous path to the Hirana every night to care for the captive princess. The job is dangerous, accompanied by the risk of revealing her most well-kept secret, and when Priya is attac ↠ 5 stars It begins with a burning and an exile. Malini is a traitor — a vengeful princess banished to the Hirana, a ruined temple, to atone for her crimes. Kept under lock and key, she grows weaker under the watchful eye of her caretaker, facing almost certain death. Priya is a maidservant tasked with taking the treacherous path to the Hirana every night to care for the captive princess. The job is dangerous, accompanied by the risk of revealing her most well-kept secret, and when Priya is attacked one evening, she reveals a power long kept buried to the last person she intends, the princess herself. Having witnessed Priya’s true nature, Malina and Priya are bound together on a journey that will have them uncovering the hidden power behind the ancient temple and setting them on a path to transform an empire. It may have taken me a moment to fully immerse myself in the world of The Jasmine Throne, but once I did, it was impossible to put down. Tasha Suri has seamlessly combined everything I adore about fantasy into one novel, full of intricate history backdrops and character-driven storylines. Add to the list that this includes morally grey lesbians set in an Indian-inspired fantasy world, and you'll understand why I went absolutely feral over this. There are almost ten different points of view combined throughout the entire story, which is no easy feat to accomplish, but one that was pulled off beautifully by Suri. While most of the book concentrates on the journey of Priya and Malini, the other points of view added a much-needed interlude, providing a necessary perspective on significant events taking place. Where this really wowed me though, was in the complexity of the plot and the depth of each of the characters. This is a slow-building story, with simmering tensions that wait until the last second to boil over, allowing for the motivations of both characters to be carefully picked apart. Just like the pacing, the romance was the most satisfying slow-burn, developing from reluctant allies to something much stronger. Truly, the best part of the story was watching these two women come together to strive to gain power and get their revenge. The romantic development alongside all of that really outsold this for me. With evocative language, an incredible magic system, and compelling characters, Tasha Suri once again makes her mark on the fantasy genre. The Jasmine Throne is a delicately layered story meant to be savored slowly and devoured with care. A triumphant start to what is sure to be an outright amazing series. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this arc in exchange for an honest review Trigger warnings: blood, gore, violence, murder, poisoning, torture, public execution, homophobia, forced drug use, body horror, suicidal thoughts, self-mutilation, abusive family member

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ellie (faerieontheshelf)

    5 gleaming, golden, sapphic stars. This is my first full 5 star read of the year, and a new favourite. I have found a new epic fantasy series to fill the void left behind by The City of Brass and The Poppy War trilogies. It is an examination of how women are seen as monstrous - whether it's due to actual magical abilities, or simply the fact that they're clever. It is also full of sapphic yearning (the waterfall scene!), sprawling and lush worldbuilding on an epic scale, and rich politics. It lo 5 gleaming, golden, sapphic stars. This is my first full 5 star read of the year, and a new favourite. I have found a new epic fantasy series to fill the void left behind by The City of Brass and The Poppy War trilogies. It is an examination of how women are seen as monstrous - whether it's due to actual magical abilities, or simply the fact that they're clever. It is also full of sapphic yearning (the waterfall scene!), sprawling and lush worldbuilding on an epic scale, and rich politics. It looks at how nations are pulled into dominant empires, and the way independent cultures and traditions are left to wither and die. It shows how religion can be twisted to drive reasoning of the wrong kind, and how history can be sharpened into a tool. In short, it is a nuanced book with many developed themes. Suri did such a wonderful job. Malini and Priya lead the way as POV characters, but they are supported by others such as Ashok, Rao and Bhumika. (Note: I loved how The Jasmine Throne had 3 such different main female characters - Priya, the lowly handmaiden whose kindness is not a weakness, and who harbours a secret; Malini, sister of the empress with a temperament like a snake in the grass, or a knife cloaked in silk; Bhumika, level-headed and wise, mother-to-be and protector of everyone less fortunate.) All POVs were engaging, and I streamed through the book. Pacing was spot on. Everything was pretty spot on, in my opinion: characterisation, worldbuildng, development. Perhaps some will find the first half slow because it leans more into development and politics, but I love that so it was not a problem for me. It was also beautifully written. The dialogue and prose was exceptional, and I have tabbed so many beautiful lines that I know I'll just be liberally sprinkling quotes all across my final review. [clenches fist] honestly? this book was just fabulous. And the fact that it's dedicated to Suri's partner (I believe?) is really really sweet. Can't wait for book 2 and to see more of Malini, my morally grey queen empress. will write/ post a more developed review closer to the release date! Thank you so much to Orbit Books UK for providing me with a review copy <3 * Listen up all, this book is SAPPHIC. - morally grey vicious lesbians? check - traitor prince? check - f/f enemies to lovers? check check CHECK - evocative Indian folklore? check - am I in love? helllaaa yes check [x] edit: this cover is BEAUTIFUL it gives me so much serotonin omg

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    Finally! The epic fantasy book I have been searching all year for. I love fantasy and there is nothing I would rather read then some sapphic fantasy. While I have read some okay and even some good fantasy books this year, there has not been anything I thought was great… well that is until now. I had high expectations for this book and it was exactly the type of fantasy that I want to read. I hope it comes out in audio soon as I would love to go on this adventure again. I do have to mention that Finally! The epic fantasy book I have been searching all year for. I love fantasy and there is nothing I would rather read then some sapphic fantasy. While I have read some okay and even some good fantasy books this year, there has not been anything I thought was great… well that is until now. I had high expectations for this book and it was exactly the type of fantasy that I want to read. I hope it comes out in audio soon as I would love to go on this adventure again. I do have to mention that it takes a little bit to get into this book. There are a lot of names and places and the book starts a little slow. This is very common for epic fantasy books and by the 15% mark I was completely hooked anyway. This is a long book, almost three times as long as say an average romance book, but I easily finished it in two nights. I was so immersed into the story that once it had its hooks in me, the pages just flew by. Suri writes so well and she took her time to really build up the characters, and then really launched the story. The first half is very character driven, where the second half is much more about the plot. This just clicked so well for the type of reader I am and is a big reason why this was such a winner for me. This book has multiple POV’s, although there are two obvious mains, but it was a pleasant surprise about how much I enjoyed all the POV’s. I’m not normally a fan of more than two POV’s but they all worked here for me. Even if I didn’t like a character, I wanted to know what was going on with them. All the characters were really well written and they easily stuck with me. I’m not one to always remember names but in this book I got this whole large cast remembered quickly. Of course the heart of the book is really about the two main, morally grey, sapphic ladies. I was so happy with these two mains. I hate when characters in fantasy are passive and things just happened to them. Not these ladies who are willing to do, what they think is right, no matter what it takes. I enjoyed both characters so much that I was extra happy when they started to catch feels. There is not a lot of romance in this book, and what is there is very slow burn, but it completely worked for me. At one point, I just knew that they were truly meant to be together. In life or death, we will have to see, but I loved their connection. I have so much else I would love to talk about but I don’t want to accidentally spoil anything for new readers. This is a book I absolutely recommend. If you are a fantasy fan and a fan of strong, kickass women, get this book. This is adult fantasy at its best and I could not be happier. This is the first book in the series, but the book ends on a good stopping point. It feels like the first part is complete and doesn’t end on a crappy cliffhanger feeling. I still cannot wait to see what happens to the characters next and I hope Suri writes fast. An ARC was given to me for a review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Talia Hibbert

    I… just… wow. I long ago accepted the fact that no book would ever make me feel precisely the way Empire of Sand or Realm of Ash did, which is fine, so WHY did The Jasmine Throne have to knock me off my chair with the exact same feels magnified by like 10,000? What is that about????? Reading The Jasmine Throne was like hovering, ghostlike, in another world, feeling the heat of the flames and watching the drip of spilled wine and hearing my own heart pound with rage or fear or love or some unnervi I… just… wow. I long ago accepted the fact that no book would ever make me feel precisely the way Empire of Sand or Realm of Ash did, which is fine, so WHY did The Jasmine Throne have to knock me off my chair with the exact same feels magnified by like 10,000? What is that about????? Reading The Jasmine Throne was like hovering, ghostlike, in another world, feeling the heat of the flames and watching the drip of spilled wine and hearing my own heart pound with rage or fear or love or some unnerving combination of all three. I was utterly transported and fascinated and thrilled to core, god dammit. And to top it all off, I am literally IN LOVE with Priya and Malini. They are my precious monster wives and I just??? They??? Murdered me??? Which is not at all out of character for them but still. The next book cannot come soon enough.

  6. 5 out of 5

    may ➹

    — find this review and others on my blog! I had a feeling that I would love The Jasmine Throne from the very first time I’d heard about it. Promising a morally grey lesbian romance and a focus on empire and family, I thought this would hit on some of my favorite things to see in fantasy, and though it wasn’t quite the new favorite I was hoping it would be, I was still utterly enchanted by it. If you’re looking for a fantasy burning with intensity, from its vengeful characters to its feminist them — find this review and others on my blog! I had a feeling that I would love The Jasmine Throne from the very first time I’d heard about it. Promising a morally grey lesbian romance and a focus on empire and family, I thought this would hit on some of my favorite things to see in fantasy, and though it wasn’t quite the new favorite I was hoping it would be, I was still utterly enchanted by it. If you’re looking for a fantasy burning with intensity, from its vengeful characters to its feminist themes, you should absolutely pick this up. The Jasmine Throne follows many perspectives, but mainly those of Priya and Malini, two women who come from vastly different backgrounds but can benefit from working with each other. Malini grows weaker every day in the magical prison her brother forced her into, but when Priya’s forbidden power comes to light, they realize how they can use each other to achieve their own goals of rebellion and freedom. Some men dream of times long dead, and times that never existed, and they’re willing to tear the present apart entirely to get it. The Jasmine Throne delves into several themes, influenced by its India-inspired world where imperialism and misogyny thrive. I especially loved its exploration of empire as a tool for oppression and how it stands for an all-consuming force that seeks to stamp out “impurities,” of how extremists can twist religion and faith to justify oppression, and of what monstrosity truly means in a world that demonizes women who don’t conform. These are all active influences in the characters’ arcs and daily lives, a display of the intricate connections between the characters and their environment. Priya is a maidservant whose veins sing with both magic and tragedy, one of the few survivors of a fire that stole her temple family. She seeks the power that she was denied, the power that the empire vilifies her for, and the power her brother wants to use and weaponize. Malini is the princess of Parijat, sister to the emperor who exiled and imprisoned her for refusing to die for the sake of “purification.” She is vengeful and cunning, unafraid to manipulate others for her own gains, and I loved her for it. While both characters are morally grey, Malini was more so in my opinion (which is why she’s my favorite). I’ll be honest, I wasn’t quite invested in Priya and Malini’s relationship in the beginning, but as more time passed, I found myself absolutely obsessed with their dynamic. It is fierce and tender at once, burning with passion for not only each other but for themselves and their own values: They hold their love for each other gently and carefully, especially because of what it means for two women to love each other in a misogynistic homophobic world, but they are also cautious in the sense that their loyalty to themselves and their motives never wavers in the face of their relationship. (And yes, that waterfall scene is as good as everyone says.) There was no void in her any longer. Whatever she was—weapon, monster, cursed or gifted—she was whole. Along with Priya and Malini are other side characters who get their own POVs, most notably Bhumika and Ashok, Priya’s temple siblings, and Rao, a prince allied with Malini. Suri handles these with skill, using their perspectives to provide more intrigue and insight into the plot but keeping them balanced so as not to drown out Priya and Malini’s main storylines. What I loved the most about these added POVs was the glimpse into the complicated relationship Priya has with her temple siblings. They are united in their trauma of being the only survivors of a disaster that killed the rest of their family, but they are also a source of pain for each other as well, particularly Priya and Ashok. This complex dynamic made my heart ache, for where they found destruction in each other they also found healing, tinging each of their interactions with bittersweetness. While all of these relationships, romantic and familial, were entrancing, I would argue that The Jasmine Throne is truly first and foremost a book about women and their strengths. In all of the female characters’ arcs, the idea of monstrosity as it applies to women in a patriarchal society is explored. Priya, Malini, and Bhumika all carve spaces for themselves where their power can thrive, in a world that would rather see such power crushed, and they are deemed monstrous, weak. But what makes them “monstrous,” when their desire for agency is seen as a threat? When they are hated for refusing to bow to the demands of men and instead forging their own paths? When their very existence is demonized? She could make herself into something monstrous. She could be a creature born of poison and pyre, flame and blood. Though the book is quite lengthy, I flew through it and was thoroughly engrossed from the first page. Suri’s writing is laced with a certain loveliness and deadliness that complements the world of the novel, and though it was slow-moving in the beginning, Suri’s masterful way of building up tension kept me engaged. However, there was something that prevented me from fully loving this book—I think as the first book of the series, there was a lot of buildup (and I didn’t get all the exciting payoff I was hoping for) that resulted in a lack of some spark that would’ve allowed me to become wholly obsessed with this. But while I didn’t love it as much as I’d hoped to, it is undeniable that The Jasmine Throne is a gorgeously written book, its characters intense and its writing gripping. The world Suri creates is somewhat terrifying, especially in how it mirrors our own world at times, and it is thus thrilling to see the characters at the heart of it react and move through it. I suspect the rest of the series will be even more of a delight to read, and I can’t wait to see what Suri manages to weave together in the next book. —★— :: representation :: Indian-coded cast, lesbian MCs :: content warnings :: murder, death, violence, homophobia (including internalized), suicidal ideation, immolation, self-mutilation, familial abuse, body horror, drug use, fire [more details] Thank you to Orbit for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This did not affect my opinion in any way. All quotes are taken from an advance copy and may differ in final publication. // buddy read with kate and krisha!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Gong

    The Jasmine Throne raises the bar for what epic fantasy should be. Tasha Suri has created a beautiful, ferocious world alongside an intimate study of the characters who will burn it all down.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    My thanks to Tasha Suri, Orbit books and Netgalley. What can I say? I loved this book so much! I've recently found that I love Sapphic Fantasy. As an extremely boring, hetero white gal? I love the thought of females coming together against a very Patriarchal culture, and messing it all up! Watching Priya and Malini find each other was lovely. I loved watching them slowly build up trust! I've lately read alot of fantasy books, but this story was lush! The plant's, flowers, waters, colors.. I can' My thanks to Tasha Suri, Orbit books and Netgalley. What can I say? I loved this book so much! I've recently found that I love Sapphic Fantasy. As an extremely boring, hetero white gal? I love the thought of females coming together against a very Patriarchal culture, and messing it all up! Watching Priya and Malini find each other was lovely. I loved watching them slowly build up trust! I've lately read alot of fantasy books, but this story was lush! The plant's, flowers, waters, colors.. I can't wait to read more!

  9. 5 out of 5

    anna (½ of readsrainbow)

    rep: Indian inspired characters and setting, lesbian mcs tw: homophobia, gore, violence, execution by burning, forced drug use, torture, death, body horror Review also on Reads Rainbow. ARC provided by the publisher. The Jasmine Throne is one of those books where even weeks and months after you’ve read it, you don’t stop thinking about it. But all that time also doesn’t make it easier to put into words all the reasons why the book leaves such an impression, why you’re so full of wonder over it. I c rep: Indian inspired characters and setting, lesbian mcs tw: homophobia, gore, violence, execution by burning, forced drug use, torture, death, body horror Review also on Reads Rainbow. ARC provided by the publisher. The Jasmine Throne is one of those books where even weeks and months after you’ve read it, you don’t stop thinking about it. But all that time also doesn’t make it easier to put into words all the reasons why the book leaves such an impression, why you’re so full of wonder over it. I can try, but alas. Despite me recommending this book to everyone as lesbian fantasy, the best part about it is probably the worldbuilding. It’s inspired by Indian cultures, and you can clearly feel all the love the author put into creating the world, into research. It’s in the main plot arcs and it’s in the tiniest details; it’s in how one part of the empire is made to be homophobic after an invasion and in every description of the food the characters eat. Most importantly, though, none of it is a crude info-dumping. Suri is a very talented author, knows where and when, and how to let the reader glimpse the world she created, so that the reader is fascinated and hungry for more, but never, ever bored. All the bits she puts forth create a rich world, a real world, with power dynamics that make sense, with problems but also miracles, with layers upon layers of details which add up to create something great, something monumental. And the characters move through that world effortlessly, which is to say all of them seem an integral part of it but they also fight for their place in it. Especially the women. It’s not a black-and-white scenario where women are good and men are bad, but something is to be said about the men being power-hungry for the sake of wielding said power, and about women trying to find a path to more than the men allow them to have. Again, it’s a very real situation, even with all the magic and the plants growing out of people’s bodies. Yes, it’s a lesbian fantasy romance, but before that it’s a novel about women. All of them beautiful, all of them starving for what the world denies them, be it power, choices, independence. And they fight for it. Openly or in secret, physically or with words, the exact way they think will work best to achieve their goals, not how someone else advises them to do it. They know better. And they’re willing to reshape the empire to get what they want. Then finally, there’s the romance. The intensity of it is unlike anything else. It’s central to the story in a way that it at times it pushes the plot forward, without ever making it seem as if either Priya or Malini make decisions solely based on their love for the other. That love is undeniable and it shines through everything that happens, but it’s not the only propelling force of those women. It’s treated as something precious, both by Priya & Malini, and by the novel itself. The Jasmine Throne is the kind of book that grips you from the start and doesn’t let go until the very last page. And even then, when you’re left alone with no more words, you’re still thinking about it all, about the pain, the hunger, the love. It’s the kind of book that carves out a piece of your heart it can live in forever, just like its characters strive to carve out a piece of the world for themselves.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lucie V.

    I received a copy of this book via NetGalley (thank you Orbit Books). All thoughts and opinions are my own. ✅ Gorgeous cover ✅ Indian-inspired ✅ World-building ✅ Writing ✅🆗 Characters ✅🆗 Plot ✅🆗 Multiple POVs 🆗 Pace 🆗 Romance 3.5 stars There is no meaning in the universe: no fate, no high blood, no rights of kings over land. Everything is emptiness. The world only had meaning when we give it meaning. This story starts with a religious sacrificial burning. Three young women have been destined I received a copy of this book via NetGalley (thank you Orbit Books). All thoughts and opinions are my own. ✅ Gorgeous cover ✅ Indian-inspired ✅ World-building ✅ Writing ✅🆗 Characters ✅🆗 Plot ✅🆗 Multiple POVs 🆗 Pace 🆗 Romance 3.5 stars There is no meaning in the universe: no fate, no high blood, no rights of kings over land. Everything is emptiness. The world only had meaning when we give it meaning. This story starts with a religious sacrificial burning. Three young women have been destined to burn alive in honor of the Mothers of flame, except that one of them, the Emperor’s sister refuses to willingly climb onto the pyre to burn. The Jasmine Throne tells the story of Priya, a servant girl who ends up taking care of Malini, the princess who refused to sacrifice herself on the pyre. The storyline is filled with politics, violence (nothing too explicit), rebellious groups, magic and religious beliefs. There are also other POVs from rebel leaders and ruling lords of Ahiranyi. Malini is full of conflicting emotions and internal turmoils, which was interesting to read, but the rest of her felt ordinary and I did not connect with her that much. Priya has mysterious magical abilities, and she was definitely more intriguing than Malani. I enjoyed getting to know her and her dark past. Priya and Malini’s chapters were interesting to read, but the other characters had minimal development, and I think I would have preferred this book to have only two POVs because I have to say that I was not particularly interested in the other characters. It’s hard to further explain the plot of The Jasmine Throne because it honestly feels more like a long prequel. The majority of the book revolves around Malini escaping her prison, Priya’s brother trying to get her to work for him because he needs her magic abilities, and growing discontent and revolutionary ideas among the population. The author is very skilled and writes beautifully, but even so, I have to say that I am overall underwhelmed by this book. There are many great ideas, but I feel that there is still something missing and it prevented me from really getting into this story. Part of it is probably because I had trouble connecting with many characters who had their own chapters, but I think it’s also because of the slow pace and the whole plot that feels more like a setup for the second book than an adventure in itself. The point of this book is to get you ready for the main conflict that is to come in the second book. The world-building is great and steady. There is a strong Indian influence, and the author does a great job of weaving the Indian culture into her fantasy world. There is no info-dump, but I have to say that since my electronic ARC didn’t have a map yet, it was hard to get a clear picture of the geography and to understand well the politics and tensions at first, but once you’re immersed in the story it all starts to make sense eventually. The relationship between Priya and Malini is well written and developed enough to be realistic, but still, I did not like their dynamic or romance that much. I thought the whole romance part was lacking and even felt forced sometimes... Honestly, I wish they had just been friends instead. It is a medium burn, so at least there is no insta-love or insta-lust. I would still recommend this book if you are a fan of Indian-inspired high fantasy with great world-building, a mix of politics and religion, and a medium burn sapphic romance.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    My thanks to Tasha Suri, Orbit books and Netgalley. What can I say? I loved this book so much! I've recently found that I love Sapphic Fantasy. As an extremely boring, hetero white gal? I love the thought of females coming together against a very Patriarchal culture, and messing it all up! Watching Priya and Malini find each other was lovely. I loved watching them slowly build up trust! I've lately read alot of fantasy books, but this story was lush! The plant's, flowers, waters, colors.. I can't wa My thanks to Tasha Suri, Orbit books and Netgalley. What can I say? I loved this book so much! I've recently found that I love Sapphic Fantasy. As an extremely boring, hetero white gal? I love the thought of females coming together against a very Patriarchal culture, and messing it all up! Watching Priya and Malini find each other was lovely. I loved watching them slowly build up trust! I've lately read alot of fantasy books, but this story was lush! The plant's, flowers, waters, colors.. I can't wait to read more!

  12. 4 out of 5

    charlotte,

    i am wrecked & so grateful for it read my review on reads rainbow Rep: Indian inspired characters and setting, lesbian mcs CWs: homophobia, gore, violence, execution by burning, forced drug use i am wrecked & so grateful for it read my review on reads rainbow Rep: Indian inspired characters and setting, lesbian mcs CWs: homophobia, gore, violence, execution by burning, forced drug use

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bhavya {on temporary hiatus}

    Buddy reading in August with Nashita ❤️ …………………………………………………… I AM SO EXCITED FOR THIS …………………………………………………… THIS IS RELEASING IN 2 DAYS 🥳 …………………………………………………… I NEED this book now

  14. 5 out of 5

    luce

    / / / Read more reviews on my blog / / “Trust me, her face said. That was the problem with making allies. At some point, inevitably, there came a moment when a decision had to be made: Could this one be trusted? Had their loyalty been won? Was their generosity a façade for a hidden knife?” I more or less inhaled this 500+ page novel in two days. Tasha Suri's The Jasmine Throne may be one of the best high fantasy novels I've ever read. Superbly written The Jasmine Throne presents its readers with a / / / Read more reviews on my blog / / “Trust me, her face said. That was the problem with making allies. At some point, inevitably, there came a moment when a decision had to be made: Could this one be trusted? Had their loyalty been won? Was their generosity a façade for a hidden knife?” I more or less inhaled this 500+ page novel in two days. Tasha Suri's The Jasmine Throne may be one of the best high fantasy novels I've ever read. Superbly written The Jasmine Throne presents its readers with an evoking Indian inspire setting, A+ world-building, a cast of compelling and morally ambiguous characters, a sapphic romance (think Fingersmith by way of Marie Rutkoski), and plenty of intriguing storylines that will keep you on the edge-of-your-seat. In other words, The Jasmine Throne is high fantasy at its best. It is exceedingly original and utterly captivating. “But some men dream of times long dead, and times that never existed, and they're willing to tear the present apart entirely to get them.” The Jasmine Throne transports us to Ahiranya a nation plagued by a peculiar disease known as the rot. Ahiranya was conquered by Paraijatdvipa which is ruled by the fanatical Emperor Chandra. Between the 'rot-riven' and the growing discontentment towards the harsh Paraijatdvipan rule, Ahiranya is a nation on the verge. Priya who works in the household of the regent of Ahiranya tries to help 'rot-riven' children. Although she does her best to hide her true identity and past the arrival of Malini, Emperor Chandra's disgraced sister, complicates things, especially when Malini witnesses her powers. After refusing to be burned at a pyre, in order to be 'purified', Malini is sent by her zealot brother to Hirana, a treacherous temple that was left abandoned after the deaths of its 'children'. Once Malini sees Priya in action she requests her as her maidservant. The two feel pulled to each other but both are aware that their desires may not align. The Jasmine Throne provides its readers with a fantastic cast of characters. First, Priya and Malini. These two young women have been through a lot (and when I say a lot, I mean it). They have every reason not to trust one another but they cannot deny the nature of their feelings. To call it 'love' doesn't feel quite right given the positions they are in. Malini's brother is responsible for many horrific things, many of them which have left their mark on Priya and her homeland. Also, both at one point or another end up using the other. Yet, their relationship is *chef's kiss*. There is yearning, lust, hate, understanding... Of course, I found each of their character arcs to be just as captivating as the relationship that develops between them. They face many impossible situations and we may not always agree with their choices. The characters around them are just engaging. From Bhumika, the regent's wife, to Rao, Prem, and even Ashok. I loved the tension between all of them, as well as the betrayals and revelations we get along the way. The world-building is top tier stuff. From the religions (we have the nameless god, the yaksa, the mothers of flame, each one is truly intriguing) and tales that shape each empire (the nameless to the magical elements. I found Suri's storytelling to be truly immersive. There are many beautiful and haunting passages (“Family don't have a duty to be kind to you. They have a duty to make you better. Stronger.” and “The first time Malini learned how to hold a knife was also the day she learned how to weep.”), as well as insightful discussions on power, revenge, and forgiveness. It had been a while since I'd read something that gave me the so-called 'feels' but The Jasmine Throne sure did. Suri has crafted an engrossing tale that made me feel as if I was riding a rollercoaster. And that finale...wow. I have yet to recover from it. Suffice to say, I am anxious about the sequel (please Suri, be gentle on us!). ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    I went into this book with high expectations and it did not disappoint!!! Lovers of epic fantasy, do yourselves a favor and get a copy of The Jasmine Throne. It is an intricate, feminist, political fantasy with a large cast of characters, sapphic representation, and really interesting world-building inspired by the history and epics of India. Thus far, easily the best fantasy of 2021 for me. Malini is a princess imprisoned by her brother for refusing to willingly burn on a pyre. Kept isolated in I went into this book with high expectations and it did not disappoint!!! Lovers of epic fantasy, do yourselves a favor and get a copy of The Jasmine Throne. It is an intricate, feminist, political fantasy with a large cast of characters, sapphic representation, and really interesting world-building inspired by the history and epics of India. Thus far, easily the best fantasy of 2021 for me. Malini is a princess imprisoned by her brother for refusing to willingly burn on a pyre. Kept isolated in an ancient, magical temple and drugged, one of the only people she has contact with is her maidservant Priya. But Priya is more than she seems and carries a dangerous secret from her past. This is a story of kingdoms rising and falling, rebel factions, dangerous magic, and competing religious beliefs. I don't want to say too much because you should just experience it for yourself but I loved the nuanced characters, the unique magic, and the way she plays on competing loyalties. Oh and the powerful women who refuse to stay in the corners meant for them. This book was everything I wanted it to be. I received a copy of this book for review from the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nomadic Reader (Baba Yaga)

    Love how this adult fantasy book, which isn't even out yet, has already been shelved as YA by several people on Goodreads. What exactly does a female author have to do in order for her books to be considered adult fantasy, apart from writing under a male or gender-neutral pseudonym? If you find out, let me know. Love how this adult fantasy book, which isn't even out yet, has already been shelved as YA by several people on Goodreads. What exactly does a female author have to do in order for her books to be considered adult fantasy, apart from writing under a male or gender-neutral pseudonym? If you find out, let me know.

  17. 4 out of 5

    fang

    5/5 stars. aches. hurts. in love. rep: indian coded lesbian main characters, indian coded cast do you like reluctant allies to lovers, yearning is in the almost kisses, tenderly washing your lovers hair, accidental hand holding in a dark forest night? The Jasmine Throne is the first book in the burning kingdoms duology, an engrossing tale of two women, survivors who become unlikely allies to save the empire, with a slow burn romance in the make set in Ahiranya, a colonized nation on the verge of 5/5 stars. aches. hurts. in love. rep: indian coded lesbian main characters, indian coded cast do you like reluctant allies to lovers, yearning is in the almost kisses, tenderly washing your lovers hair, accidental hand holding in a dark forest night? The Jasmine Throne is the first book in the burning kingdoms duology, an engrossing tale of two women, survivors who become unlikely allies to save the empire, with a slow burn romance in the make set in Ahiranya, a colonized nation on the verge of war. Reading this book was an amazing experience, I kept wanting to savor it sweetly yet anxiously turned pages, wanting to know more. Tasha writes an imaginative and wonderful tale of survival and taking control that’s been stolen from you with characters that are so flawed and so human that you can’t help but root for. It’s also the queer south asian fantasy of my dreams, I felt an aching tenderness like this was everything I could’ve wanted and more. I love how the romantic aspects are so well balanced with the plot, how every side character is so well fleshed out, how the narrative never condemns Bhumika for making the best of her options. I ended up caring about all of them, especially Rukh and even Ashok. I also love how despite everything, Priya’s kindness and her love for her homeland never diminishes. She’s allowed to be soft, without it being portrayed as a weakness. The tension between her and Malini is delirious and frantic and lovely to behold. The worldbuilding is wonderful and I loved how Tasha put a spin on some of the folklore and stories about the yaksha content warnings: (from the author’s website) explicit violence including immolation and self-immolation, gender-based violence (no sexual assault), homophobia and internalised homophobia(minor), suicidal ideation, self-mutilation, abusive family dynamics, child murder, body horror (plant-based, cosmic), forced drug use and depictions of addiction/withdrawal Thank you to the publisher and netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This did not affect my opinion in any way.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    "There is power that is showy and fierce. And there is power that is grown slowly, and stronger for the time spent braiding its ancient strength.” So What’s It About? Imprisoned by her dictator brother, Malini spends her days in isolation in the Hirana: an ancient temple that was once the source of the powerful, magical deathless waters — but is now little more than a decaying ruin. Priya is a maidservant, one among several who make the treacherous journey to the top of the Hirana every night to cl "There is power that is showy and fierce. And there is power that is grown slowly, and stronger for the time spent braiding its ancient strength.” So What’s It About? Imprisoned by her dictator brother, Malini spends her days in isolation in the Hirana: an ancient temple that was once the source of the powerful, magical deathless waters — but is now little more than a decaying ruin. Priya is a maidservant, one among several who make the treacherous journey to the top of the Hirana every night to clean Malini’s chambers. She is happy to be an anonymous drudge, so long as it keeps anyone from guessing the dangerous secret she hides. But when Malini accidentally bears witness to Priya’s true nature, their destinies become irrevocably tangled. One is a vengeful princess seeking to depose her brother from his throne. The other is a priestess seeking to find her family. Together, they will change the fate of an empire. What I Thought If you’re looking for fantasy books about morally complex lesbians and colonialism you now have a few series to choose from - off the top of my head there’s Seth Dickinson’s Masquerade series and C.L. Clark’s The Unbroken, as well as The Jasmine Throne. I think this one is really, really good, guys. I think this book’s shining strength is how complex the relationships between all of the characters are. Everywhere you look there’s another nuanced dynamic: Pramila hates Malini because she survived the burning when Pramila’s daughter didn’t, while part of her genuinely believes that they both should have burned, while Priya and Bhumika resent each other and struggle to get along despite -or perhaps because of -being two of the only temple children left. Ashok genuinely thinks he is justified in hurting Priya for the greater good; Bhumika almost loves the husband who sees her as nothing more than an ornament and a vessel for children. The most interesting relationship is of course the fraught dynamic between Malini and Priya, and it is a very juicy one indeed. Malini manipulates and seduces to survive and she does this to Priya, using her out of desperation and necessity. Priya resents how much she is attracted to her and abhors her manipulation when she discovers it, struggling to trust her and know what is real. At the same time Malini is, in fact, real with Priya in a way she isn’t with anyone else, and when she fears her own capacity for cruelty Priya insists to her that she is one person who will not be hurt by her - who sees her at her worst and still cares. It’s a really fascinating dynamic and I am so looking forward to seeing how their relationship develops from here. There are a few minor weaknesses to some of the aspects of characterization, although I clearly feel that the characterization is a strength by and large. I think Malini’s grief over her maids’ death could have been a little more at the forefront, but she’s also drugged and struggling to escape her prison for most of the book so maybe that’s not super practical. I’m also not totally convinced by the explanation given by the book for Bhumika’s marriage to Vikram - it says that her family’s political clout was used to erase her past as a temple child, but I don’t know if I buy that. I wasn’t sure about Ashok’s decision not to drink the deathless water while on the brink of death and speaking of death, Prem’s demise was not deeply emotionally resonant to me. My final nitpicks are that all of the characters speak in a very similar elegant style and I wish their voices had been a bit more distinct, and that a few of the one-off POV characters felt a little bit cumbersome. As far as the book’s take on empire, one of my favorite things is that there are so many differences of opinion among the different rebels. Ashok wants complete freedom for Ahiranya and will achieve it through any kind of brutality, while Bhumika initially views resistance through the preservation of culture and scholarship to be the most important thing and abhors Ashok’s methods. Meanwhile Rao and his cohort simply want Chandra off the throne and Aditya on it without caring for the people or fate of Ahiranya at all, looking down upon them and seeing no fundamental problem with the empire. When Ashok leads a bloody attack, Priya only sees the retribution that will occur while Ashok believes that he has to prove his point by any means necessary. The book also reflects on different kinds of power, concluding that oppression and hierarchy are not the only kind of power that exist - community and protection and safety are their own kind of power. There is the power of direct force pitted against the power of manipulation and the strength of playing at weakness and showing different faces to different people. Finally, there is the terrible cost of attaining power and how its attainment measures up against the good you can do with it once you have it and the things that you have to do to keep it. The magic and world-building are intriguing, with the deathless waters and the yaksa possession, the mysterious emergence of the rot at the same time as the new generation of temple children, the mothers burning themselves to stop the Age of Flowers and whatever the heck is happening with Chandra at the end. My one quibble here is that an explanation of the deathless waters and why only Priya can find them comes about halfway through the book, and I think it could have come earlier. It works well to have the flashback to the night of the burning followed directly by Priya finding the deathless waters again, but I think that the book could have explained that the waters are hidden/constantly moving and Priya has a special connection with the temple much earlier to spare readers some wondering. As far as pacing goes, it’s definitely true that the first half is much, much slower than the second half, which ramps up in intensity and features an onslaught of very exciting scenes one after the other (in addition to lots and lots of travel that gets skimmed over). If you can’t tell from what I’ve said already I found so much to enjoy here. This is an intelligent, thoughtful and absorbing epic fantasy and I am truly eager for the next book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maëlys

    ☆ 5 / 5 ☆ “She could make herself into something monstrous. She could be a creature born of poison and pyre, flame and blood.” This book starts out with fire and it does not die down throughout the story. Princess Malini, traitorous sister to the Parijati emperor refuses to burn and is sent instead to be imprisoned in the conquered nation of Ahiranya where unrest and tensions are rising. Masked rebels are taking more and more violent action to free themselves from Parijatdvipa’s control, aspir ☆ 5 / 5 ☆ “She could make herself into something monstrous. She could be a creature born of poison and pyre, flame and blood.” This book starts out with fire and it does not die down throughout the story. Princess Malini, traitorous sister to the Parijati emperor refuses to burn and is sent instead to be imprisoned in the conquered nation of Ahiranya where unrest and tensions are rising. Masked rebels are taking more and more violent action to free themselves from Parijatdvipa’s control, aspiring to revive the legendary powers of the temple children of the Hinara. Priya is a simple servant working at the Regent’s mahal with a gentle heart, or so it seems. As appearances are shattered and secrets unveiled, Malini and Priya cross paths and find an ally in each other. Their relationship is a complex one where they’re not beyond using each other but are slowly learning to trust. Both of them are strong and ruthless in very different ways and it shows in their progressing dynamic too. Ultimately they find comfort in understanding each other’s harsher nature and actions perfectly and without judgement and find softness together. “We didn’t deserve what was done to us. I want to believe that. I want to know that. I want that to be true, and if it isn’t, I want to make it true. But you, Malini, you want to remake the world.” Priya and Malini also share their trauma with each other and find solace in understanding that too. They’ve both been abused by their families and have deeply painful experiences linked to fire but their coping mechanisms are very different. Priya has shut her childhood trauma out by refusing to remember her own memories of the temple burning which also blocks her connection to the Hirana and her powers. Malini is still reeling from recently seeing her heart sisters burn while she refused to go to the pyre, having drugged induced hallucinations where she feels she deserves their hatred. This book explores how these two girls have had their humanity ripped away by circumstances and how their brothers have shaped them into weapons, whether it be intentional or not. Both are longing for something greater than survival and meeting each other might be the first step in embracing every part of themselves. “There was no void in her any longer. Whatever she was- weapon, monster, cursed or gifted- she was whole.” The author does not shy away from exploring the dynamics of toxic and abusive families and the different shapes they present themselves in. Both Malini’s blood brother and Priya’s temple brother (and just temple siblings in general) are two sides of the same coin but the feelings Malini and Priya still feel towards them are very different. It is handled in a careful and layered way that explores this abuse but also discusses what family can be. We slowly discover what this temple family means to Priya, who they were, and why their love was found in pain and pain found in love. While misogyny has a fierce grip on this world, Priya, Malini and Bhumika all know their own power. They understand the power of being underestimated and how to use that, manipulating the circumstances for themselves in their own ways.They’ve all made sacrifices for power and know its price maybe better than anyone else. Their strengths lie somewhat in their pain and the things they’ve endured, but Priya’s might be her unfailable kindness. The author will never let you forget that despite the circumstances she has not turned her back on others and has managed to build meaningful relationships, even with all the lies. Seeing her relationship with her friend Sima and Rukh warmed my heart so much and those were never presented as weaknesses, but a core part of Priya’s character. “Some men dream of times long dead, and times that never existed, and they’re willing to tear the present apart entirely to get it.” While on opposing sides of this building conflict, Chandra, Emperor of Parijatdvipa, and Ashok, the rebels’ leader, both aim to restore older powers and recall a past long dead. Chandra abuses the faith of his people in the mother of flames to see women and countries burn, being purified by fire and so-called raised to “immortality”. He plays a ruthless game of conquest, seeking to eradicate other religions and cults to impose his own. The Ahiranyi used to worship the yaksa (tree-like entities that hold power over nature) and the temple children and elders used to be conduits for this power. However this always came at the cost of surviving the deathless waters. Their temple was burned and their faith squashed down by the Parijati but Ashok aches to restore their once great powers to free Ahiranya. Other faiths are also explored in very interesting ways in this book. For example, Alorans worship the nameless god and their names are a prophecy given at birth that isn’t to be spoken to anyone else until it feels like the right tile. Although this latter religion was not discussed as extensively as the other two, it still plays a pivotal part in the plot of this book and brings in a third, seemingly more balanced, perspective. “Even when we try to explain a vision of ourselves to one another - in our poetry, our song, our theater masks- we do so in opposition to you, or by looking to the past. As if we have no future.” The waning of Yaksa power brings not only a layer of magic to this fantasy world but a tangible and easy to grasp effect of Parijati imperialism in Ahiranya. It truly shows what it means to crush not only a country but its people and their culture. It is felt in the loss of their powers and traditions, in a new religion being imposed on them. It can be seen with the loss of their language to the point where only a few words cling to the edges of their daily conversations. A conquered nation is not only conquered territory, it’s a whole history being rewritten and a people losing every piece of their nation. There is no arguing that Chandra is an awful and terrible person at heart and that his ways are extreme, but it’s also shown that imperialism is deep-rooted and a bloody heritage passed down through generations. Others have come before him and conquered nations for him to rule, he is not an exception but the heir to a long line of oppressors. The Ahiranyi hold on to the last of the powers that they have: words and art. While Ashok’s group takes decisive and bloody action, others are rebelling through poetry and dance, telling the stories of these rebels, and keeping spirits of the people up, trying to instill some hope into them. “Parts of me are broken and I stand in the middle of all those pieces and don’t go anywhere. I’m stuck. In all this time, I’ve just been quiet. I’ve just survived.” The multi point of views truly brought this multilayered story to life and presents a very solid start for an epic series. I can’t wait to read more about these characters and I’m especially excited to see Malini navigate the upcoming political games with cunning and ruthlessness. Youtube ☆ Twitter

  20. 5 out of 5

    Silvia

    I was sent this book as an advance copy by the publisher for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. 4.5 stars This was my first Tasha Suri book and I was drawn in by the promise of morally grey lesbians in an India-inspired epic fantasy (and also the fact that the author's bunnies are named Wei Ying and Lan Zhan. but mostly it was the lesbians) and all I can say is Suri definitely delivered on all fronts! It's really hard to decide where to begin with in this review, because the books I was sent this book as an advance copy by the publisher for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. 4.5 stars This was my first Tasha Suri book and I was drawn in by the promise of morally grey lesbians in an India-inspired epic fantasy (and also the fact that the author's bunnies are named Wei Ying and Lan Zhan. but mostly it was the lesbians) and all I can say is Suri definitely delivered on all fronts! It's really hard to decide where to begin with in this review, because the books has so many themes and they all seamlessly blend into a story that's as much character driven as it is dense with events that move the plot forward. I am someone who absolutely adores multiple POV in fantasy and I really enjoyed seeing all the different point of views and how by the end they spiraled into a bigger focus on the three women that are the main protagonists. And this really sums up the heart of the beginning of this series: a focus on women who could not be more different from each other in their strengths, but they all have learned to move in a heavily patriarchal society to get what they want, be it sometimes something as simple as surviving. The romance between Priya and Malini had a lot of nice moments and I can't wait to see how things develop in the rest of the series. I admit I didn't have many strong feelings about the romance, I didn't have a really big gasping-out-loud moment (or if I did it didn't have to do with the romance), but that isn't to say I didn't enjoy it. I certainly root for them and am looking forward to see how they'll have to navigate yet another unfortunate facet of a patriarchal society -homophobia- and I know this will be handled with care and grace, even if it should become a more relevant theme than in this first book. Something else I really liked was the writing, and actually one of the reasons I was so slow reading this book (other than the fact that I'm not used to reading physical books and that I'm generally speaking a slow reader) is the fact that I really wanted to take my time reading each sentence without skipping words, it's hard to explain but usually when it takes me a long time to read a book it's because I'm enjoying it a lot and not skipping sentences or skimming to the next dialogue. So that's definitely one more sign I liked this. So all I can do is recommend this gorgeous book which is filled with characters you won't easily forget, really beautiful writing and a critical look at so many themes like empire, colonialism, religion, sexism and so much more. TWs (from the author's site): Explicit violence including immolation and self-immolation, Gender-based violence (this does not include sexual assault), Homophobia and internalised homophobia, Suicidal ideation, Self-mutilation, Abusive family dynamics, Child murder, Body horror (plant-based, cosmic), Forced drug use and depictions of addiction/withdrawal

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mads

    YES READ IT YES I CANT BE COHERENT BUT READ IT

  22. 5 out of 5

    gauri

    check out the full review along with an aesthetic on my blog! "There are other versions of you that I don't know. But this one..." Her fingers were against Malini's lips. "This one is mine." Tasha Suri has done it again. I am so grateful to her for that. There isn't a single thing that I didn't like in the book: the complex plot, the sapphic yearning, the magic system, the influential side characters, the scheming, the Indian rep and the beautiful descriptions. I'm so eager to see how the seri check out the full review along with an aesthetic on my blog! "There are other versions of you that I don't know. But this one..." Her fingers were against Malini's lips. "This one is mine." Tasha Suri has done it again. I am so grateful to her for that. There isn't a single thing that I didn't like in the book: the complex plot, the sapphic yearning, the magic system, the influential side characters, the scheming, the Indian rep and the beautiful descriptions. I'm so eager to see how the series progresses. If you're looking for a fantasy with a cleanly woven plot and interesting characters, I highly highly recommend The Jasmine Throne! Need for book 2 is intolerable. Thank you Netgalley and Orbit Books for the ARC!

  23. 5 out of 5

    mishi

    The Jasmine Throne by Tasha Suri is a feminist tale with a main cast of captivating yet flawed women. The strength of the book is in the characterization. The characters are enchanting, complex and messy. These characters will steal your heart and then try to stab you through it but you will love them anyway(pointedly looking at Malini). I found the writing to be spellbindingly beautiful. The world building was fantastic and vivid. The plot while very intriguing was extremely slow moving, so it The Jasmine Throne by Tasha Suri is a feminist tale with a main cast of captivating yet flawed women. The strength of the book is in the characterization. The characters are enchanting, complex and messy. These characters will steal your heart and then try to stab you through it but you will love them anyway(pointedly looking at Malini). I found the writing to be spellbindingly beautiful. The world building was fantastic and vivid. The plot while very intriguing was extremely slow moving, so it took me a little while to get interested in the book. There are two main characters in the book. Priya, a maidservant with secrets up to the height of Hirana. She is soft hearted but extremely courageous and strong. The other MC Malini is a multifaceted princess and the reason I liked this book so much. I can't find words to describe how amazing her character is. She is tactful, tantalizing, tenacious and sometimes a little twisted. I dare you to read this and not completely fall in love with her. From the side characters Bhomika was the most interesting to me and I found her relationship with Priya to be one of the highlights of the book. The men of the story didn't impress me much except Rukh, the cutest little boy. I was excited for this book because the blurb gave me a bit of Crier x Ayla vibe and while the characters do face a few similar situations, the romance couldn't be more different from Crier's war. I liked Malini and Priya together a lot but for some reason I did not connect with their romance as much as I hoped to, even though they had the best tropes i.e. (view spoiler)[being unable to kill the other, going feral when the other is about to be hurt et cetera. (hide spoiler)] This is a gorgeous and powerful story and I definitely recommend it if you are a fan of complicated female characters, F/F romance or you know, feminism. I will definitely be picking book #2, if only to watch Malini straddle the fine line between good and evil. Copy provided by the publisher, via NetGalley.

  24. 4 out of 5

    literarylesbian

    I fell so hard for this entire book. I loved the relationship and the intricacies of the world and it’s magic. This book really makes the reader question who they’re rooting for in the best way possible. First off, the world and magic. The world building was super well done and was rather simple to understand despite its complexities. I thought it was really creative and included nods to Indian mythology and culture, which is always super cool to see in any book. I think fantasy books with refere I fell so hard for this entire book. I loved the relationship and the intricacies of the world and it’s magic. This book really makes the reader question who they’re rooting for in the best way possible. First off, the world and magic. The world building was super well done and was rather simple to understand despite its complexities. I thought it was really creative and included nods to Indian mythology and culture, which is always super cool to see in any book. I think fantasy books with references to underrepresented mythology is super cool to see, especially when so many of the retellings are dominated by the same white washed stories. The characters and romance were equally as intriguing. I thought that the characters unique perspectives was enhanced by the changing point of views. Despite the amount of POVs, it was still easy to understand. The morally grey lesbians were just *chefs kiss*. This romance is slow burn, and I mean SLOW burn. But it has you on the edge of your seat regardless just yelling at the book “KISS ALREADY”. This buildup makes it all the more satisfying when they finally do. Definitely recommend you preorder this book (I already have as well!) It comes out on June 8th and is own voices. I recommend supporting own voices reviewers and their opinions regarding this book as opposed to me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fanna

    ↦ 01.06.2021 starting a buddy read with the every so wonderful cath. 💛 ↦ 18.05.2021 who has an early copy? ME. Now lemme go and fall in love with these desi heroines, okay bye. ↦ 02.07.2020 yes. I'm sad I discovered this so late but now that I'm here I can't stop imagining how sapphic this is gonna be and I'm all here for it. ↦ 01.06.2021 starting a buddy read with the every so wonderful cath. 💛 ↦ 18.05.2021 who has an early copy? ME. Now lemme go and fall in love with these desi heroines, okay bye. ↦ 02.07.2020 yes. I'm sad I discovered this so late but now that I'm here I can't stop imagining how sapphic this is gonna be and I'm all here for it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    ~ a foray in fantasy ~

    Lesbians being soft for each other (especially if they have a tough facade) >>>> I absolutely adored this book. Priya, despite seeming a lot tougher than Malini, is actually quite the softie. She’s still morally grey, but a little more on the good side. Malini, on the other hand, is a perfect antiheroine- she doesn’t have nearly the moral compass that most quasi-antiheroes have. She’s ruthless and power-hungry, but still cares deeply for Priya. I enjoyed the plot as well- the world is rich and wel Lesbians being soft for each other (especially if they have a tough facade) >>>> I absolutely adored this book. Priya, despite seeming a lot tougher than Malini, is actually quite the softie. She’s still morally grey, but a little more on the good side. Malini, on the other hand, is a perfect antiheroine- she doesn’t have nearly the moral compass that most quasi-antiheroes have. She’s ruthless and power-hungry, but still cares deeply for Priya. I enjoyed the plot as well- the world is rich and well-described. I felt as though I could picture every setting perfectly. Bottom line: Read this book! The writing is beautiful, the setting is gorgeous, and the romance is fantastic.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sana

    What's better than a queer, desi woman in a sari on the cover of an #ownvoices fantasy anyway 💁🏽 ---------------------------------------- HERE FOR THE MORALLY GREY LESBIANS (IN LOVE) Honestly, though a captive princess and her maidservant coming for the princess's traitor brother (and in love). Love to see it What's better than a queer, desi woman in a sari on the cover of an #ownvoices fantasy anyway 💁🏽 ---------------------------------------- HERE FOR THE MORALLY GREY LESBIANS (IN LOVE) Honestly, though a captive princess and her maidservant coming for the princess's traitor brother (and in love). Love to see it

  28. 5 out of 5

    Landice (Manic Femme)

    HOLY SHIT????? The Jasmine Throne was my most anticipated Summer release and it did NOT disappoint. I adored basically everything about it: gorgeous prose, lush world building, a unique magic system, political intrigue - but the true standouts for me were the compelling characters & complex relationships. I fully expected to love the f/f romance (and I did), but I loved the friendships, alliances, and messy found family dynamics just as much. All in all, The Jasmine Throne was a true standout - HOLY SHIT????? The Jasmine Throne was my most anticipated Summer release and it did NOT disappoint. I adored basically everything about it: gorgeous prose, lush world building, a unique magic system, political intrigue - but the true standouts for me were the compelling characters & complex relationships. I fully expected to love the f/f romance (and I did), but I loved the friendships, alliances, and messy found family dynamics just as much. All in all, The Jasmine Throne was a true standout - easily one of my favorite books I’ve read this year. I highly recommend it and cannot wait to see where Suri takes us in the remaining two books of the trilogy! Disclosure Note: I was gifted an early finished copy of The Jasmine Throne by the publisher, but I ended up reading this as an audiobook that I purchased myself. Love sapphic books, too? Let's be friends! Bookstagram | Booktube | Booktok | Book Blog | Twitter

  29. 5 out of 5

    julianna ➹

    update: it's time to stop pretending i've been reading this when i haven't even gotten past the one page prologue 🙏 thank you everyone for watching the illusionist's (me) show, come again this is a lesbian princess/priestess pairing everyone say thank you tasha suri for feeding us update: it's time to stop pretending i've been reading this when i haven't even gotten past the one page prologue 🙏 thank you everyone for watching the illusionist's (me) show, come again this is a lesbian princess/priestess pairing everyone say thank you tasha suri for feeding us

  30. 5 out of 5

    Candie

    I really enjoyed this book! This is a great first book in a new fantasy series with strong, brave, and well developed female lead characters, a fun new world and an easy to follow yet still very interesting plot line. I thought the world building was done exceptionally well. Some fantasy books can be very hard to follow for the first half of the book where everything is being built and explained, but this was done slowly and naturally throughout the book so the fantasy elements just seemed natur I really enjoyed this book! This is a great first book in a new fantasy series with strong, brave, and well developed female lead characters, a fun new world and an easy to follow yet still very interesting plot line. I thought the world building was done exceptionally well. Some fantasy books can be very hard to follow for the first half of the book where everything is being built and explained, but this was done slowly and naturally throughout the book so the fantasy elements just seemed natural and real; not confusing at all. I was very immersed in this new world. I loved the romance; it was a slow burn; I always enjoy that. I'm over the insta love or the strong enemies to lovers trope where they treat each other awful and then fall madly in love. So weird. The romance in this book developed naturally and beautifully over time and I really enjoyed the lesbian romance representation. I personally enjoyed the first half of the book better than the second, but I feel like it could go either way for most people. The first half is more character based and I really enjoyed getting to know all of the characters and their stories. The second half is more plot based and is where a lot of the action happens, the writing style in this half got more descriptive, dreamy and poetic which was less my style but I still really enjoyed it. The book has strong messages about the love and bonds between family, what makes up family, accepting the ones we love no matter their faults and how far we can allow the ones we love to push us before we finally break. It discusses how we often can't help but love some people even though they have wronged us, because of the history you have been through. Love unfortunately doesn't always work like that; you can't just shut it off. It deals with a lot of political issues and the systemic removal of an entire nation of people and their fight to regain control over their lives and it also has a lot of women rising above the patriarchy and fighting for what they believe in and deserve. Overall, I think this is an awesome first book in a new series and I absolutely recommend picking it up when it comes out on June 8th! I will definitely be reading book two when it comes out! I received a copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion.

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