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An eerie horror debut about a little boy who recovers from a mysterious pandemic and inherits an imaginary friend who makes him do violent things... Kids have imaginary friends. Rachel knows this. So when her young son, Billy, miraculously recovers from a horrible flu that has proven fatal for many, she thinks nothing of Delfy, his new invisible friend. After all, her famil An eerie horror debut about a little boy who recovers from a mysterious pandemic and inherits an imaginary friend who makes him do violent things... Kids have imaginary friends. Rachel knows this. So when her young son, Billy, miraculously recovers from a horrible flu that has proven fatal for many, she thinks nothing of Delfy, his new invisible friend. After all, her family is healthy and that's all that matters. But soon Delfy is telling Billy what to do, and the boy is acting up and lashing out in ways he never has before. As Delfy's influence is growing stranger and more sinister by the day, and rising tensions threaten to tear Rachel's family apart, she clings to one purpose: to protect her children at any cost--even from themselves. We Hear Voices is a mischievously gripping near-future horror novel that tests the fragility of family and the terrifying gray area between fear and love.


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An eerie horror debut about a little boy who recovers from a mysterious pandemic and inherits an imaginary friend who makes him do violent things... Kids have imaginary friends. Rachel knows this. So when her young son, Billy, miraculously recovers from a horrible flu that has proven fatal for many, she thinks nothing of Delfy, his new invisible friend. After all, her famil An eerie horror debut about a little boy who recovers from a mysterious pandemic and inherits an imaginary friend who makes him do violent things... Kids have imaginary friends. Rachel knows this. So when her young son, Billy, miraculously recovers from a horrible flu that has proven fatal for many, she thinks nothing of Delfy, his new invisible friend. After all, her family is healthy and that's all that matters. But soon Delfy is telling Billy what to do, and the boy is acting up and lashing out in ways he never has before. As Delfy's influence is growing stranger and more sinister by the day, and rising tensions threaten to tear Rachel's family apart, she clings to one purpose: to protect her children at any cost--even from themselves. We Hear Voices is a mischievously gripping near-future horror novel that tests the fragility of family and the terrifying gray area between fear and love.

30 review for We Hear Voices

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    This book truly terrified me because even though it takes place in the future world telling a breath taking story about contagious pandemic crisis: there are so many similarities with our new normal world where we try to adjust its new rules right now! Probably the author wrote this book before Covid-19 but this means this book is great proof that human mind may imagine the worst and those scary scenarios appear on our minds may truly happen😱😱 In this book: mostly the little kids are affected by This book truly terrified me because even though it takes place in the future world telling a breath taking story about contagious pandemic crisis: there are so many similarities with our new normal world where we try to adjust its new rules right now! Probably the author wrote this book before Covid-19 but this means this book is great proof that human mind may imagine the worst and those scary scenarios appear on our minds may truly happen😱😱 In this book: mostly the little kids are affected by Pandemic. (So we have pessimistic clairvoyant author) And the kids who don’t die, returning back to their new lives with an uninvited host: they create IMAGINARY FRIENDS and they turn into those evil friends’ vessels to ask inappropriate questions about the organisms, sex etc. and become addicted to the spiders, finally they turn into blood thirsty, violent, little Chucky babies to kill the elders! Let’s talk about our main characters to have a better understand how the story goes on: Rachel, ex-lawyer, divorced, living with her gold hearted, supportive boyfriend Al who works for homeless shelters. She was so close to lose her 6 years old Billy to pandemic. But her prayers were answered and he came back with his imaginary friend bitchy Delfy who forces him to heal faster and start researching more about science. In the beginning, having an imaginary friend seemed like harmless thing for him. At least he was alive and physically he gets better. But mentally he sleepwalks, gets more agitated and disturbing at each day, watching you when you sleep, reorganizing everything in the house, making spider bouquet to scare his mom. Rachel still thinks they are so lucky because her third child (she’s from Al) Beth who is little toddler gets also sick for one night but miraculously she gets better at the next day. She also seems blessed to have a lovely relationship with her smart 16 years old daughter Nina who is selected for space program for creating a better future for next generations. She also dates with a charming, lovely, wealthy young man. But the changes with Billy’s behaviors get out of control. He gets more volatile, unpredictable. His own grandmother wants to call a priest to perform exorcism to him. And things get more vicious, dark which results his captivation in a special asylum. Nina secretly starts to a blog which goes viral, trying to reach the other families who suffer from same imaginary friend syndrome. She teams up with Graham: Billy’s doctor who observes little children in a special and secret hospital complex showing same symptoms with Billy. Those little children hear voices who control their bodies for their great scheme. Who are they? What do they want? Why are they so violent and hostile? The conclusion is satisfying enough for me but the process of secrets’ coming out was a little too easy and of course the jaw dropping ending was a little weird, absurd and batshit crazy. Did I like it? Of course I did. This is kind of my favorite craziness served so well with this riveting page turner. Overall: the character portraits were drawn meticulously and especially Nina and Imogen ( even though she was a ghost) are my favorites. The pacing was intriguing. The story telling is witty, sarcastic and captivating. The conclusion has some plot holes but it was the best explanation for the source of voices. I’m giving well-deserved four stars and congratulating brilliant Evie Green for her promising debut. Special thanks to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for sharing this captivating ARC with me in exchange my honest opinions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    Y'all know, I love a solid creepy kid trope. But when said kid has an imaginary friend telling him to do evil things, EVEN BETTER!!! Thank you for the ARC, Berkley!! You are too good to me! Y'all know, I love a solid creepy kid trope. But when said kid has an imaginary friend telling him to do evil things, EVEN BETTER!!! Thank you for the ARC, Berkley!! You are too good to me!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lyn❤Loves❤Listening #AUDIOBOOKADDICT

    Audio 4 Stars Story 4 Stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sheena

    Happy pub day! A creepy debut novel with an assortment of genres such as horror, sci-fi, and thriller. We Hear Voices takes place in an apocalyptic setting of Earth facing the brink of collapsing. Technology took over a fair bit with virtual reality and artificial intelligence being prominent in this dystopian society. The answer to saving humanity is to train a new generation to launch into space to create a new life. On top of the plan for colonizing space there is a pandemic going on that is Happy pub day! A creepy debut novel with an assortment of genres such as horror, sci-fi, and thriller. We Hear Voices takes place in an apocalyptic setting of Earth facing the brink of collapsing. Technology took over a fair bit with virtual reality and artificial intelligence being prominent in this dystopian society. The answer to saving humanity is to train a new generation to launch into space to create a new life. On top of the plan for colonizing space there is a pandemic going on that is similar to the flu, called JX5 that is untreatable and killing people all over the world. Sound familiar? Billy recovers from the mysterious pandemic but with the recovery comes a new imaginary friend named Delfy. His mother Rachel thinks Delfy is a blessing and believes that this is how Billy will be able to deal with the traumatic experience he just went through. At first what seems like harmless pranks by a six year old boy, quickly takes a dark turn for the worst. Billy claims that Delfy is the cause of these bad actions and is controlling him to do things he doesn’t want to do. Is it really Billy or is something far more sinister at play here? Meanwhile, Billy’s older sister Nina is training to become one of the pioneers to start over in space. Nina does her own investigation in trying to figure out what is happening with Billy and finding other children who are in the same position as him. At first, it seems like the multiple plot lines are arbitrary and may be part of two entirely different books. As you read on, these plot lines come together seamlessly and everything is actually far more interconnected than you realize. The characters are well developed and strong, as well as linked together in ways they may not even expect. The book also explores economic equality and the concept of corporations taking control of people’s families, jobs, homes, and more. We Hear Voices kept me up well into the night, quickly flipping the pages in anticipation of what Billy will do next. Everything comes together full circle with a surprising yet satisfactory ending. I definitely will be on the lookout for Evie Green’s future novels! Thank you so much to Netgalley and Berkley Publishing for providing an ARC in exchange for review. Originally posted at mysteryandsuspense.com

  5. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. WOW. This book was really hard to put down. I love the format - short chapters, scenes that are constantly building to an ending that was a teensy bit predictable but also oh so twisty. The book had lots of good reveals, and it really built and built. It wasn't really horror, though it had quite a bit of horror-element to it. It was more like a sci-fi techno thriller with some horror thr Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. WOW. This book was really hard to put down. I love the format - short chapters, scenes that are constantly building to an ending that was a teensy bit predictable but also oh so twisty. The book had lots of good reveals, and it really built and built. It wasn't really horror, though it had quite a bit of horror-element to it. It was more like a sci-fi techno thriller with some horror thrown in. There were so many possibilities as to what could be going on that it left you wondering, and the reveals over time were fantastic. I also cared for most of the characters, which is a big feat for an author to do. So many times I love the story and feel the characters fall flat. Definitely recommend this one as a fun read, especially if you're looking to escape the pandemic into, well, a different pandemic. ;)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    Have you ever been frustrated by a book, but then loved how it wrapped up? This review will be short and confusing, because quite honestly, I don't know how to review We Hear Voices at all. The synopsis of this book is so relatable—a global pandemic, quarantining, flu-like symptoms... Evie Green wrote this book before COVID-19 began rampaging against our global community, but it's wild how similar the book is to reality. However, I found the book a bit too dry for my liking. I got bored very Have you ever been frustrated by a book, but then loved how it wrapped up? This review will be short and confusing, because quite honestly, I don't know how to review We Hear Voices at all. The synopsis of this book is so relatable—a global pandemic, quarantining, flu-like symptoms... Evie Green wrote this book before COVID-19 began rampaging against our global community, but it's wild how similar the book is to reality. However, I found the book a bit too dry for my liking. I got bored very quickly and almost gave up many times. I absolutely loved the final chapter and how the story wrapped up, and I'm frustrated that this wasn't a bigger part of the novel. I can't speak more about it without ruining the story so take this review for face value.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    I liked this a lot more than I expected to, even though it dragged in the middle and the ending didn't quite hold together. Rachel is mum to teen Nina, 6yo Billy and 8mo Beth. A horrible fever has reached all corners of the earth, killing millions and now it's sickened Billy. He pulls through, and his mother thinks his recovery is a miracle. When his behavior becomes naughty then dangerous, and he's blaming it on imaginary friend Delfy, Rachel takes him to a child psychologist. She has no idea Dr. I liked this a lot more than I expected to, even though it dragged in the middle and the ending didn't quite hold together. Rachel is mum to teen Nina, 6yo Billy and 8mo Beth. A horrible fever has reached all corners of the earth, killing millions and now it's sickened Billy. He pulls through, and his mother thinks his recovery is a miracle. When his behavior becomes naughty then dangerous, and he's blaming it on imaginary friend Delfy, Rachel takes him to a child psychologist. She has no idea Dr. Graham has a group of deadly, post-fever children hospitalized in the basement. And the group is growing. This story seems inspired by that movie The Astronaut's Wife. In a reads-like sense, it made me think of Riley Sager. There are lots of clues and misdirections as to what's really going on and who (or what) is behind the illness. A few B-movie developments occur in addition to the gripes I mentioned at the top, but overall I enjoyed this.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maximilian Birner

    Imaginary friends will never not be spooky. But, it's just a question of if they're done right... and I can say with confidence that We Hear Voices had a new and great take on them! I am definitely predicting a big hit release for this book, especially nearby Halloween. But, for all of the people reading this who may think they're not into "scary" books, I wouldn't worry. It's not that We Hear Voices isn't scary, but I think that almost all readers will be able to take this on even if they're jus Imaginary friends will never not be spooky. But, it's just a question of if they're done right... and I can say with confidence that We Hear Voices had a new and great take on them! I am definitely predicting a big hit release for this book, especially nearby Halloween. But, for all of the people reading this who may think they're not into "scary" books, I wouldn't worry. It's not that We Hear Voices isn't scary, but I think that almost all readers will be able to take this on even if they're just semi-interested. It's one of those half thriller half horror books, in which I can't really separate into one genre. Anyways, this was a super fun read. There was always a rising level of suspense whilst reading, and the characters were very interesting. There were probably three subplots, which all revolve around this mysterious flu that comes with some sinister (real or not) best friends. The only thing taking this away from a five-star review is the atmosphere. Not as much as a criticism, but I think there was a lot of missed potential. There was supposed to be an apocalyptic setting, and I didn't see the author leaning into it very much. Would've really amped things up, but if I were to be reading a random chapter there is no way I would be able to tell they were in the middle of a virus. Definitely check We Hear Voices out, even though I didn't receive a hard copy I still gotta respect the great cover.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

    In a world that eerily parallels the pandemic currently faced, one small boy recovers from near death only to have found an imaginary friend who seems to control his very actions, actions that are often terrifying and unexplainable. What could be happening to this innocent child? Is the voice in his head real? How will his mother deal with the horrors she must face? Is she prepared to admit something is not right? What of the others who have recovered? Do they hear voices, too? WE HEAR VOICES by In a world that eerily parallels the pandemic currently faced, one small boy recovers from near death only to have found an imaginary friend who seems to control his very actions, actions that are often terrifying and unexplainable. What could be happening to this innocent child? Is the voice in his head real? How will his mother deal with the horrors she must face? Is she prepared to admit something is not right? What of the others who have recovered? Do they hear voices, too? WE HEAR VOICES by Evie Green is a dark tale of family relationships, paranormal events and questions the unknown and the unexpected and the unbelievable. Well written, Billy is a typical small child who begins doing horrific things. His mother seemed too caught up in having a perfect family, almost seeming to deny a problem until further into the story. The addition of a doctor “studying” pandemic-recovered children adds a brilliant element as all is slowly revealed. A perfectly evil read for the upcoming Halloween season. I received a complimentary ARC edition from Berkley Publishing Group! This is my honest and voluntary review. Publisher : Berkley (December 1, 2020) Genre: Dark Fantasy Print Length : 384 pages Available from: Amazon | Barnes & Noble For Reviews, Giveaways, Fabulous Book News, follow: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  10. 4 out of 5

    ☕️Kimberly

    Narrated by Elizabeth Knowelden, the premise of We Hear Voices by Evie Green drew me in with its eerie offerings. A gripping tale about imaginary friends in a near future reality. Fans of science fiction, horror and thrillers will be drawn into this world. Green’s debut novel begins with a pandemic/flu that kills most, but Rachel’s son Billy survives. She is so grateful that she thinks nothing of Billy’s new imaginary friend Delfy. That is, until Delfy convinces her son to do unspeakable things. T Narrated by Elizabeth Knowelden, the premise of We Hear Voices by Evie Green drew me in with its eerie offerings. A gripping tale about imaginary friends in a near future reality. Fans of science fiction, horror and thrillers will be drawn into this world. Green’s debut novel begins with a pandemic/flu that kills most, but Rachel’s son Billy survives. She is so grateful that she thinks nothing of Billy’s new imaginary friend Delfy. That is, until Delfy convinces her son to do unspeakable things. This was a twisted tale that weaved science fiction into an eerily plausible concept that gave me the chills. From the world Rachel and her family live in, to the startling discovers and children, I became immersed in what was happening. I connect with the characters and was invested in the outcome. This is classified as horror, but it’s more of a science fiction suspense thriller. Things that happen are scary and had a supernatural vibe but you won’t be sleeping with the lights on… then again, maybe you will. The pacing and world building made listening a pleasure. Elizabeth Knowelden did a splendid job with the voice of Rachel, our protagonist, and the POVs of Nina, and the Doctor. I worried that the pandemic element would overwhelm me thanks to the current reality of COVID-19, but the dystopian type world and brilliant fleshed out characters soon had me hooked. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Reviewer

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: An ambitious genre mash-up that tackles such diverse topics as poverty, imaginary friends, space exploration and family bonds. We Hear Voices caught me off guard, but in a good way. I don’t know what I was expecting, but I didn’t realize this was science fiction/dystopian when I started reading it. It looks like horror, ri I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: An ambitious genre mash-up that tackles such diverse topics as poverty, imaginary friends, space exploration and family bonds. We Hear Voices caught me off guard, but in a good way. I don’t know what I was expecting, but I didn’t realize this was science fiction/dystopian when I started reading it. It looks like horror, right? There are horrific elements for sure, but I was surprised by all the SF tropes as well.  The story takes place in a future London in the middle of a deadly pandemic and revolves around several connected families. Rachel is divorced with two children, sixteen year old Nina and six year old Billy, and she currently lives with her boyfriend Al. She and Al have recently had a baby girl together named Beth, so their small, dingy apartment is feeling cramped at the moment. The family is in dire straits since Rachel has been on maternity leave for eight months with no income. In addition to that, she had to leave her job at a law firm due to anxiety, and now she’s not sure how she will be able to work again. Even worse, Billy has caught the J5X virus and is dying when the story opens. The family has gathered to say their goodbyes, but the next day, Billy appears to be better and quickly recovers. Rachel is elated, until Billy starts talking about his new imaginary friend, a girl named Delfy. At first, Delfy seems to be a coping mechanism for Billy’s recovery, but soon disturbing things start to happen and Billy insists that Delfy made him do them. After a terrible tragedy occurs, Rachel knows she can no longer handle Billy on her own, and so she turns to Dr. Graham Watson for help. Graham runs a secret underground facility where he’s gathered a handful of children who, like Billy, have recovered from the virus and claim they have imaginary friends “living in their heads.” All of the children have committed heinous crimes, and Graham’s facility is the only place to keep them safely out of society. Meanwhile, Nina is convinced that something or someone is controlling Billy and that it might be connected to a mysterious plane crash that happened in London a year ago. With the help of a couple of friends, she starts a blog called We Hear Voices and asks anyone with similar experiences to contact her. Something big is going on, and Nina wants to get some answers. As you can see from my awkward attempt to describe the plot of We Hear Voices , there are a lot of moving pieces to this story. Luckily they mostly make sense and work together, but Evie Green really has her work cut out for her. This is a tough story to classify, since it has elements of science fiction, dystopian, horror, mystery/thriller, paranormal and even contemporary family drama. I really enjoyed the mystery of the “imaginary friends,” which the author stretches out for most of the book, only revealing her hand near the end. She kept me guessing, and although I sort of figured out what was going on, Green still managed to surprise me. Tucked in among the mystery are several competing events. First, we have the story line about the space program, where a group of gifted teens are being groomed to be the first generation on a ship that will take over a hundred years to reach a new planet. Nina and her boyfriend Louis are both in the program, and it’s Nina’s dream to help create a better life for humans by helping colonize another planet. I liked these sections because the space program is run by the conglomerate Starcom, a shady organization that is literally taking over everything. Starcom plays a big part in the reveal at the end, and they also act as one of the villains of the story. Then you have Graham’s story, which revolves around the disturbed children in his care. Graham’s dead wife Imogen appears to him in ghostly form, popping up just when he needs her. Imogen is another mystery in this story. Is she really a ghost? Or is Graham just imagining her? And what is her connection with some of the other characters in the story? Imogen’s resolution was one that I wasn’t completely satisfied with, although I was surprised by those connections I mentioned. Is it bad to admit I would have loved a story just about Graham and Imogen? But the most heartbreaking part of the story was the depiction of Rachel’s family and their desperate attempts to claw their way out of poverty. These are good, hard working people who obviously deserve more, but the terrible divide between classes has ensured that they live in a hovel of an apartment and barely have enough to eat. Rachel’s ex husband Henry refuses to help her, although he’s very kind to Nina and Billy. Rachel is also dealing with her conflicting thoughts about Billy. She loves him beyond reason, but he has also shattered her heart in a way that can never be repaired. Rachel suffers blow after blow in this story, and it was almost painful to read her chapters. As far as the horrific elements go, you have the pandemic, which everyone reading this review will be able to relate to. I read somewhere that Evie Green wrote We Hear Voices way before 2020, but it’s eerie how close to reality her vision of a pandemic turned out to be. The creepy imaginary friends were also pretty frightening at times, although because there are so many different things going on in this story, the impact is almost buried under everything else. There’s also a weird side story dealing with spiders, of all things, which I couldn’t figure out for the longest time. We finally learn more about the spiders at the end, but for me, the reveal was too little too late, and I almost would have preferred the story without them. Ultimately, I enjoyed the human connections and emotional moments the most, since I was caught up in Rachel’s struggles with Billy, Nina’s dilemma about the space program, and Graham’s interactions with Imogen. I haven’t even mentioned half the characters in this story, but Rachel’s boyfriend Al was one of my favorites. It turns out there are so many unexpected connections among all the characters, and it was fun connecting the dots and figuring out how each one fit into the overall story. There were some negatives for me, however. Not everything is explained, particularly when it came to the imaginary friends, and certain elements just didn’t make sense to me. I suspect this might be because the story really is a bit overcrowded with so many characters and separate story lines. I also didn’t like the surprise ending—and by ending I mean the very last sentence. It felt more like a cheap way to end a horror novel and I don’t think it was necessary. But overall, I really did enjoy this, hence my four star rating. I loved Evie Green’s writing style, and I will definitely be reading more of her work. Big thanks to the publisher for providing a review copy.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (WhereTheReaderGrows)

    Imagine you're in a pandemic... I know, I know... it's a stretch, but just try. Now imagine you're a kid that caught whatever "flu" (J5X) is going around, gets REALLY sick but then starts to recover. But he's also brought with him a new imaginary friend named Delfy. Imaginary friends are harmless right? 😉 Spider bouquet anyone? 🕷♥ As an only child you would've thought I would've had an imaginary friend but I never did. I would make up scenarios in my head all the time and hold conversations where Imagine you're in a pandemic... I know, I know... it's a stretch, but just try. Now imagine you're a kid that caught whatever "flu" (J5X) is going around, gets REALLY sick but then starts to recover. But he's also brought with him a new imaginary friend named Delfy. Imaginary friends are harmless right? 😉 Spider bouquet anyone? 🕷♥ As an only child you would've thought I would've had an imaginary friend but I never did. I would make up scenarios in my head all the time and hold conversations where I was the voice of everyone that wasn't there... but they were people I knew and never someone that didn't actually exist. I have ALWAYS been fascinated with imaginary friends and then couple that with kids turned creepy AND add a pandemic to the mix? I'm in! Yes, I'm that person who watched all the pandemic movies when all of *this* occurred but anywayssssssssssss...... I'm SUPER torn in how I feel about this novel. The concept it fantastic and the synopsis hooked me straight away. I do feel that some parts of the book felt like we were being told, rather than shown, what was happening. And this was usually in a cluster of sentences that basically told the reader what happened over a short period of time. It just seemed off compared to the feel of the rest of the read. (cluster of sentences... paragraph, whatever 🤣) I had fun with how the characters ended up intersecting but that ending.... Ok, let me say that I love when books get wonky. And this absolutely gets wonky. I'm undecided if I'm LOVING on it or just kinda MEH about it. Either way, I swiped to the left one last time on my e-copy with a head shake and a smile. There's certainly some plots holes but as a debut, I'm pretty excited for the whole concept of this story. I'm gonna keep an eye on Green... I'm excited to see what else she has for us in the future.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    You don't have to go far to imagine a pandemic sweeping across the world but you may have to stretch the mind to imagine this flu like ailment that seems to effect the kids. To what do we owe the great pleasure of having an entire basement full of 'mentally ill' kids suffering from the same element of feeling controlled to the point of hearing voices that force them to 'act out.' Lets just transport them to a far off planet via spaceship or perhaps 'colonize' them. You see folks while we are busy You don't have to go far to imagine a pandemic sweeping across the world but you may have to stretch the mind to imagine this flu like ailment that seems to effect the kids. To what do we owe the great pleasure of having an entire basement full of 'mentally ill' kids suffering from the same element of feeling controlled to the point of hearing voices that force them to 'act out.' Lets just transport them to a far off planet via spaceship or perhaps 'colonize' them. You see folks while we are busy admiring from afar they are coming down to Earth to infect us much like 'aliens' but don't tell---oK? Is there a doctor in the house... Oh by God -there is! Besides this virus known as J5x nearly killed Billy but luckily for everyone he survived to terrorize them all?! Wait-what? Brainwashing 101 but here comes gaslighting 102... Billy's sis Nina is now missing and for the love of god someone get the darn files. STAT! Nina is rained to set off the colony. Ship to new planet that would take many generations. She'd die on the ship colonized by space scientists under communism rule via the STARDOM. Oh where's the damn love? This virus stems from the ROCK but the imaginary people are more of a colonization just not in body form. This virus was ultimately used to talk to kids but now lets not get carried away here. As we uncover it's not just with kids but with SPIDERS! Ok, now you got my attention-I'm not a fan of creepy-crawling-long legged things. Virus in Beth-WARNING- Virus In BETH.. I'm out....till we meet again! Get this one it's wild with sci-fi, dystopian, paranormal, and more.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2020/12/24/... A mysterious pandemic. Social unrest and widespread poverty. A new initiative to send gifted youth into space in the hopes of building a new world while the old one burns. All these are catastrophes and events unfolding in We Hear Voices. As the story begins, a woman named Rachel watches over her gravely ill son Billy in their tiny apartment in London, praying for him to survive the night. The boy had contracted the J5X vi 3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2020/12/24/... A mysterious pandemic. Social unrest and widespread poverty. A new initiative to send gifted youth into space in the hopes of building a new world while the old one burns. All these are catastrophes and events unfolding in We Hear Voices. As the story begins, a woman named Rachel watches over her gravely ill son Billy in their tiny apartment in London, praying for him to survive the night. The boy had contracted the J5X virus, a strain of deadly flu which has already claimed the lives of many children. The family, which includes Rachel’s other two children, her mother, and her boyfriend Al have already gathered to say their last goodbyes. But then miraculously, Billy recovers. Before long, he is back to being the average six-year-old boy he used to be—except for one major difference. Now he has an imaginary friend he calls Delfy, whom he claims to have pulled him back from the brink of death by encouraging him to get better. At first, Rachel is unconcerned, believing it to be a phase. She also feels blessed that her son was spared when so many others have succumbed to the virus. However, it isn’t long before Delfy starts becoming a problem, telling Billy inappropriate things and instructing him to act up and behave badly at school—or so the boy says. Rachel takes her son to see a professional, but the situation only gets worse. Soon, it’s clear that Delfy is more than a child’s coping mechanism; she has become Rachel and her family’s worst nightmare. You’d think I should have known better, picking up a book about an outbreak of a mysterious deadly virus during a pandemic. Fortunately, J5X only plays a small part in this story, mostly just serving as its backdrop. Much of the plot is actually about…well, everything else. Lots of things are happening here, and while most of it’s good, some of it not so much. First, what I liked: there’s a good mix of genres for everyone, and I especially enjoyed the strong horror vibes. There’s just something so creepy about unnatural children that make them the perfect staple for a scary story. The imaginary friend angle was also very clever, particularly in the way the author relates it back to the pandemic. I also loved how the author wrote Delfy, and that initial uncertainty over whether she is just a figment of a child’s imagination or something more sinister. The things she makes Billy do are pretty atrocious, and the wickedness of them only escalates as the story progresses. I also liked the setting. It’s unmistakably dystopian, as even as the pandemic rages, it’s clear there are many other problems ravaging this world. In fact, it’s gotten so bad that the government has actually started a space exploration initiative to develop a generation ship and recruit young people for a centuries-long journey to a new planet where humanity can start anew. Rachel’s oldest daughter, Nina, is a bright young teen who has been chosen to be a part of the ship’s crew along with her boyfriend, and through her eyes we get to see the unfolding of space program storyline. Unfortunately, this was also where the book started to lose me. Here’s what I didn’t care for: there was so much going on, but not really enough time or attention to sufficiently explore all the different subplots. I was mostly interested in Rachel’s plight and her struggles with Billy, and I wanted to know what was going on with Delfy. Nina’s sections were distracting and became more and more an annoyance to the point I started to resent every moment the story took me away from what I really wanted to read. For this reason, I had a rough time of getting through the second half of the book which branched into even more subplots, following Dr. Graham who was the specialist in charge of Billy’s case. As you might have guessed, Rachel’s son is not the only patient of Dr. Graham, whose research has led him to track down many other children with imaginary friends that only manifested after recovery from the virus. It’s a mystery that eventually comes together at the end, but I can’t say I was a fan of the way the resolution was handled. The answers came too quickly and too tidily for my tastes, not to mention the ending felt more gimmicky than satisfying. At the end of the day, I had a good time with the horror elements of We Hear Voices, but there was also a lot of “noise” in the book that unfortunately took away from the enjoyment. Things started out strong, but the story lost some of its focus towards the end and probably would have worked better if it had been more fleshed out or streamlined.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Monnie

    Back in my younger days, I ripped through sci-fi books with a passion - I think it was largely because technology, and all the possibilities it brings, has always been a fascination (probably because my formative years were spent using a crank telephone on a party line and getting news and music from a floor-model radio, so Sony's Walkman was enough to blow my mind). But my tastes these days lean more toward mysteries and thrillers, so when I was offered a pre-release copy of this book, I was a Back in my younger days, I ripped through sci-fi books with a passion - I think it was largely because technology, and all the possibilities it brings, has always been a fascination (probably because my formative years were spent using a crank telephone on a party line and getting news and music from a floor-model radio, so Sony's Walkman was enough to blow my mind). But my tastes these days lean more toward mysteries and thrillers, so when I was offered a pre-release copy of this book, I was a bit hesitant. I needn't have been. It was, literally, hard to put down. And while I won't describe it as anywhere near terrifying or horrifying, it was totally engaging - and eerily familiar because it takes place amid a pandemic, climate change devastation and people hopeful of a new beginning on a different far-away planet. Elsewhere, a mega-developer has created a highly regimented, communal living/working utopia with Big Brother overtones and a doctor is secretly trying to rehabilitate children who recovered from illness and suddenly began hearing "voices" in their heads. The pandemic has taken the lives of thousands of earthlings, and many, many more have contracted and recovered from the J5X virus. One of those is Rachel's young son Billy, and although her life is far from perfect, she's grateful that his life was spared. She's even willing to overlook his newfound imaginary friend Delfy, who appeared in Billy's head shortly after his recovery. But her acceptance doesn't last long; soon, Delfy seems to have taken control - telling Billy to say and do ever more frightening things. Billy realizes what's going on, but he claims he's powerless to stop Delfy or ignore her commands. Meanwhile, Rachel has two daughters - Nina, who is in school and hoping to be on one of the rockets that will take people to start a new world - and Beth, who, amid all the chaos, is almost the perfect baby. Rachel and her partner Al have been barely able to make ends meet since she stopped working to care for Beth, but both are resolute in their refusal to sign up for the communal work/housing program. But then Delfy starts commanding Billy to do decidedly unchild-like things. As readers will suspect early on, these seemingly separate things - the space program, the work-life community and the doctor's hideaway - may be intertwined, and finding out how and why is what keeps the book a mind-grabber. The ending, while not a total surprise, wraps things up yet leaves future possibilities up to the reader's imagination. All told, very enjoyable and thought-provoking.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Asheley

    I took a chance on something different and I really liked it! We Hear Voices by Evie Green is largely the story of a young boy named Billy and his mother. As the story begins, Billy is near death from the flu, which has been raging as a deadly pandemic. Billy ends up surviving. As he gains his strength after recovering, it becomes clear that Billy now has an imaginary friend named Delfy. Whether or not this imaginary friend came to Billy during his illness or immediately after is not really that I took a chance on something different and I really liked it! We Hear Voices by Evie Green is largely the story of a young boy named Billy and his mother. As the story begins, Billy is near death from the flu, which has been raging as a deadly pandemic. Billy ends up surviving. As he gains his strength after recovering, it becomes clear that Billy now has an imaginary friend named Delfy. Whether or not this imaginary friend came to Billy during his illness or immediately after is not really that important to his mother, because all she cares about is that he survived. At first, everyone passes Delfy off as a harmless way to cope with near-death, but it soon becomes clear that Delfy may be a bigger deal than anyone anticipated. In choosing to read We Hear Voices, I took a chance on something a little different and it ended up paying off. Yes, the pandemic in the story has some eerie similarities to the one we are currently experiencing and I wondered how it would feel to read something like that during this time. But the details of the pandemic aren’t the big part of the story here, and I was easily able to separate the story-pandemic from the real life one we have going on. Billy is essentially a “creepy kid” in this story, and the addition of the imaginary friend really amps that up. Some of the things Billy says and does are darn right horrifying, but it is when he begins to blame Delfy for these big, bad actions and words that the tension and suspense begins to build. I loved the sense of foreboding that I felt the entire way through the story, like something dreadful was about to happen on the next page. My favorite part of the story was Billy’s mother, Rachel. Rachel has a lot of hard stuff going on in her life while Billy is sick and then recovering. The family has been hit hard economically by the pandemic, and there are three kids in the family in total-not just Billy. When Billy’s issues begin, Rachel throws herself headfirst into caring for him, during his sickness and during all of the craziness that happens after. Her stress is palpable on the pages. She cannot think of anything besides making sure that her child (children, really) are okay. She is desperate for most of the story, and I love the way that really came through to me as I was reading. Her desperation was a living, breathing thing, and I feel like it may have been the most real and true thing about this story. I connected with her emotionally as a mother, caretaker, and provider. I could almost put myself in her situation, trying to juggle everything while also being willing to get into some trouble to protect her child. The tension and suspense were already there in the story, but Rachel made it great. So, yeah, this was a fun read. Definitely a distraction when the real world outside seems to be more and more stressful by the day. The world in We Hear Voices doesn’t exist, but it is close enough that we can almost imagine it. You almost have the ability to forget that this is a sci-fi/dystopian story sometimes with the way the world is written, and I think that made the story quite good. The way the big reveals come out in the end may be a little quick for some readers, but I enjoyed them and I couldn’t have predicted that ending! We Hear Voices will be released in the US on December 1, 2020.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    From the description I was expecting a horror, but what I got was more of a dystopian sci fi. Maybe that's why I was declined when I first requested an advance copy. The reason I gave for wanting to read this was that I love horror that features creepy kids. Maybe I should have taken the hint that this book was not for me, instead of requesting an advance copy elsewhere. When young Billy recovers from the mysterious pandemic it's like the miracle that Rachel has prayed for. So many have died from From the description I was expecting a horror, but what I got was more of a dystopian sci fi. Maybe that's why I was declined when I first requested an advance copy. The reason I gave for wanting to read this was that I love horror that features creepy kids. Maybe I should have taken the hint that this book was not for me, instead of requesting an advance copy elsewhere. When young Billy recovers from the mysterious pandemic it's like the miracle that Rachel has prayed for. So many have died from this new virus that she is, at first, willing to overlook the strange behavior that has come with this recovery. The way that Billy seems so obsessed with gaining knowledge can't really be a bad thing can it? Yet soon the voice in Billy's head has moved him from doing inappropriate things to downright aggression and threatening behavior. Rachel seeks help but being poverty stricken leaves her with few options. Enter the doctor who knows more than he is telling, and is willing to treat Billy for free. Meanwhile Rachel's daughter has a new boyfriend who she has met in space skills while preparing to colonize a new planet. They boyfriend has a half sister who also suffered this voice in her head. While Billy and his strange affliction did hold my interest and Rachel trying to make do while living in poverty is quite relatable I did find myself skimming the bits about space skills. It was just an OK read for me, but others will probably enjoy it more, especially those who enjoy dystopian sci fi. I received an advance copy for review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    How could you not want to read this book? Set in near future London, we're plopped down in the middle of a global pandemic in which young children survivors develop post-flu imaginary friends. The voices, which first appear to be a cute side-effect of recovery, quickly push the children they've infected to do horrific and sinister things. As if that wasn't terrifying enough, the world itself is gasping its last breaths and Green's written a secondary storyline that deals with the state of the pl How could you not want to read this book? Set in near future London, we're plopped down in the middle of a global pandemic in which young children survivors develop post-flu imaginary friends. The voices, which first appear to be a cute side-effect of recovery, quickly push the children they've infected to do horrific and sinister things. As if that wasn't terrifying enough, the world itself is gasping its last breaths and Green's written a secondary storyline that deals with the state of the planet in general and London's efforts to provide promising teenagers free training to become astronauts, because humanity has gotten really good at fucking up everything it touches and now we need to get our youth prepared to evacuate Earth in search of a new planet to populate. And within THAT subplot are tentacles of an even deeper sub-story that begin to weave their way through the main "we hear voices" storyline, connecting the two together in ways that are sometimes predictable, and sometimes in ways that Green felt compelled to spell out in case it went flying by us. While it's got all the right elements on the surface- creepy possessed kids, space travel, swarms of icky spiders, yup there are spiders - something just wasn't working for me. And I couldn't seem to put my finger on it as I progressed through the book. And for a much of the novel, I also couldn't stop thinking of the Dead Milkman's "Little Man in My Head". Google the song if you don't know it, and you'll understand why. But oh my gawd... that ending. If I was on the fence at all about where I stood with this book...that ending just completely blew it for me. There is nothing more frustrating than when an author takes the book just one chapter too far. I purposely didn't add this to one of my goodreads shelves because if I had, I'd spoil the twist ending and I just. can't. do. that. to. you. I was kind of cool with things until that damn epilogue. PS: I listened to this on audio, so I'm not sure if the author's note was also included in the print version, but I kind of chuckled that the publisher felt compelled to preface the novel with a disclaimer that it was written well before Covid was a thing, and that any similarities to our current pandemic was pure coincidence. If you end up picking this one up, which I'm not sure I necessarily recommend doing, you'll see why I thought it was funny.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rajiv

    [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] Many thanks to Berkley Publishing Group and Netgalley for providing me an ARC of this book! Wow! Reading this book was a trip! It was unique and unlike anything I had read ever. It is part dystopian, part futuristic, part science fiction, part space travel, part horror and part YA, which made the story unpredictable. I had no idea where the story was going, and I loved that aspect! Also, I loved the main characters. Nina is sma [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] Many thanks to Berkley Publishing Group and Netgalley for providing me an ARC of this book! Wow! Reading this book was a trip! It was unique and unlike anything I had read ever. It is part dystopian, part futuristic, part science fiction, part space travel, part horror and part YA, which made the story unpredictable. I had no idea where the story was going, and I loved that aspect! Also, I loved the main characters. Nina is smart and amazing and wants to get to the bottom of what’s happening. Rachel is a mess and wants a normal life, but her luck keeps running out. Also, I loved Graham and his love for Imogen and his commitment towards helping others. And of course, Billy and his imaginary friend Delfy are creepy and make the entire story extremely memorable. Moreover, the setting of the story is very eerier as well. The story takes place in a near futuristic landscape that seems gloomy yet relatable. Not to mention the pandemic flu that spreads with the children, similar to what our world is facing now. I hope our future does not go in the same direction as what Ben Alford had in mind. However, the only reason I did not give this book 5 stars is because I felt like the story shifted focus in the second half. The first half mainly focused on Billy’s condition, and his family (and Graham) trying to figure out what is happening. However, the second half shifted the focus to Nina and her quest. Although all the story-lines are interconnected towards the end, I wished the story had revolved around Billy throughout. Overall, “We Hear Voices” is definitely worth reading because it is just so different and wonderfully weird!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Permanently_Booked

    The synopsis had me utterly intrigued and I honestly can't say no to creepy kid-based horror books. There is a strong start to this read that has you quickly sucked in but as things unravel and more POVs start to come in the plot seems to overstretch itself into different directions. Mind you there is a reason for it, and it ties together epically in the end. Getting there was a slight sluggish battle for me though. There was a decent number of extra scenarios occurring that took away from the o The synopsis had me utterly intrigued and I honestly can't say no to creepy kid-based horror books. There is a strong start to this read that has you quickly sucked in but as things unravel and more POVs start to come in the plot seems to overstretch itself into different directions. Mind you there is a reason for it, and it ties together epically in the end. Getting there was a slight sluggish battle for me though. There was a decent number of extra scenarios occurring that took away from the overall plot for me. The inner monologues were repetitive for the mom and daughter even though I could understand the weight on their shoulders. I also debated the necessity of the doctor's POV outside of the institution he ran. I liked the inclusion of the pandemic and the tie in to looking to settle on another planet. Very time appropriate for our current era and it really makes you sit back and think. Overall, I was hoping for more horror but even though that aspect was minimal I still found myself flipping Kindle pages pretty fast. The characters are easy to root for and the plot is unique from others I have read. I look forward to finding more by this author in this genre.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Creepy sci fi horror tale I loved this book. It hit all the high points for me from the first page until the last. This sci fi dystopian horror tale takes place in the not-far-off future in London, England. Earth is in a downward spiral, with ever increasing numbers of animals going extinct and environmental issues negatively impacting quality of life all over the world. A new terrifying pandemic has struck worldwide, mainly hitting children and seniors and some of those surviving the J5X virus, esp Creepy sci fi horror tale I loved this book. It hit all the high points for me from the first page until the last. This sci fi dystopian horror tale takes place in the not-far-off future in London, England. Earth is in a downward spiral, with ever increasing numbers of animals going extinct and environmental issues negatively impacting quality of life all over the world. A new terrifying pandemic has struck worldwide, mainly hitting children and seniors and some of those surviving the J5X virus, especially the children, find that when they recover, they have a voice in their heads that tells them what to do - some terrible things. The story centers around one family especially whose young son hears the voice in his head. They are a low income loving family that is just trying to get by when the young boy does something terrible and is isolated with some other similar children. His older sister, who is in an outer space training program, starts asking questions and trying to find out the "whys" of current happenings. The character development was super in the story. I loved the whole premise. The story was timely (as the world is in the middle of dealing with the COVID-19 virus at this moment). I highly recommend this book to readers who love horror, science fiction, thrillers, and medical thrillers. I received this book from Berkley Publishing through Net Galley in the hopes that I would read it and leave an unbiased review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    C.J. Cooke

    Absolutely chilling to think this was written BEFORE coronavirus. Beautifully written and deftly plotted, this is a MUST read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Thank you, Berkley Publishing Group, for an uncorrected proof of "We Hear Voices" in exchange for an honest review, which I've provided for the author's perusal via NetGalley. Since I don't know exactly how "uncorrected" it is, I'm not sure how fair a detailed discussion would be, so I'll just say it's a very promising novel which combines elements of YA, dystopia and domestic thrillers, but needs some serious editing before it's published in November. Thank you, Berkley Publishing Group, for an uncorrected proof of "We Hear Voices" in exchange for an honest review, which I've provided for the author's perusal via NetGalley. Since I don't know exactly how "uncorrected" it is, I'm not sure how fair a detailed discussion would be, so I'll just say it's a very promising novel which combines elements of YA, dystopia and domestic thrillers, but needs some serious editing before it's published in November.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Interesting premise. Dumb execution. Ending fell flat for me

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacy40pages

    This was a great read! It was creepy throughout the book, with a huge bang at the end. You really don't know that's going on, but you have suspicions. There is a bit of a mystery unraveling throughout.. what are these voices; are they demonic possessions or psychotic after effects from the flu? There are some sub plots going on that tie in well to the story; teenage romance, commericalism, and space colonization. While the time period is never revealed, it's implied that it's sometime in the nea This was a great read! It was creepy throughout the book, with a huge bang at the end. You really don't know that's going on, but you have suspicions. There is a bit of a mystery unraveling throughout.. what are these voices; are they demonic possessions or psychotic after effects from the flu? There are some sub plots going on that tie in well to the story; teenage romance, commericalism, and space colonization. While the time period is never revealed, it's implied that it's sometime in the near future and has some interesting ideas on technology. The ending really did it for me and made it a five star read. I was shocked by the reveals and twists and definitely ended this one with a gasp. TW: Spiders. if you don't like spiders, you may have to skip some parts.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Evie

    I'm really not sure how to rate this one, or even how I really feel about it. I picked it up thinking that this was a horror story or a speculative fiction with horror themes. The synopsis had me thinking: evil children, possession, demons etc. But in an odd twist, the book turned out to be something entirely different. The ending left me dumb founded. I asked myself: what did I just read? Did I like it? I didn't dislike it, but I am not entirely sure if I'm sold on the idea behind this book. It I'm really not sure how to rate this one, or even how I really feel about it. I picked it up thinking that this was a horror story or a speculative fiction with horror themes. The synopsis had me thinking: evil children, possession, demons etc. But in an odd twist, the book turned out to be something entirely different. The ending left me dumb founded. I asked myself: what did I just read? Did I like it? I didn't dislike it, but I am not entirely sure if I'm sold on the idea behind this book. It was all very odd and convoluted, and - in the end - almost borderline ridiculous. I honestly don't know. I'm utterly baffled by this one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Nothing is worse than seeing your child sick. Especially a child near death in the midst of a pandemic. When Rachel’s son Billy miraculously recovers, she doesn’t question it, she rejoices. Things take a strange turn when Billy develops an imaginary friend named Delfy. Rachel doesn’t think much of this until Billy starts doing dangerous things on Delfy’s orders. Everything gets worse and Rachel’s family is in serious danger. Rachel will do anything to keep Billy and her family safe. I wasn’t sur Nothing is worse than seeing your child sick. Especially a child near death in the midst of a pandemic. When Rachel’s son Billy miraculously recovers, she doesn’t question it, she rejoices. Things take a strange turn when Billy develops an imaginary friend named Delfy. Rachel doesn’t think much of this until Billy starts doing dangerous things on Delfy’s orders. Everything gets worse and Rachel’s family is in serious danger. Rachel will do anything to keep Billy and her family safe. I wasn’t sure I’d be up to reading about a pandemic, considering what we are going through right now, but this was quite addicting. It’s a mix of science fiction and drama. The characters are all well developed, even the imaginary one. The situations are a bit far-fetched, but not that much considering what we are going through now. Although, in this story, the people mostly effected are children. We Hear Voices is very difficult for me to summarize. I don't want to give anything away. It is an edge-of-your seat reading. A tense story I couldn’t stop reading until I got to the end of the book. The author does a great job of keeping the reader wanting to know what would happen next. This would make a good movie. I can see a sequel in the air. I’d definitely read it. FTC Disclosure: I voluntarily reviewed a free Advance Reader Copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Nicola

    3.5 stars. This book was really creepy at times and had a great twist at the end but (and I'm trying to avoid a spoiler here) I felt one crucial part of the story line was underdeveloped and I haven't yet decided if that was on purpose or not. Enjoyed it!! 3.5 stars. This book was really creepy at times and had a great twist at the end but (and I'm trying to avoid a spoiler here) I felt one crucial part of the story line was underdeveloped and I haven't yet decided if that was on purpose or not. Enjoyed it!!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Athanasios Pappas

    Solid entertainment. Good plot and the end makes you crave for a sequel!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laura Medicus

    Dystopian sci-fi / not what I normally would read but I absolutely loved it. Well done!! Loved the female characters also.

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