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A Tropical Frontier: The Indian Fighter

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BEST FICTION: FLORIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, PATRICK D. SMITH AWARD, 2018. The Second Seminole War would be the longest and most costly of all Indian conflicts in the United States in both lives and national treasure. In 1842, Colonel William J. Worth, commander of the Florida Campaign, declared hostilities at an end. Although as many as 3,000 Seminole and Miccosukee had been BEST FICTION: FLORIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, PATRICK D. SMITH AWARD, 2018. The Second Seminole War would be the longest and most costly of all Indian conflicts in the United States in both lives and national treasure. In 1842, Colonel William J. Worth, commander of the Florida Campaign, declared hostilities at an end. Although as many as 3,000 Seminole and Miccosukee had been relocated to the Oklahoma Territory, several enclaves remained in the extreme southern portions of the peninsula at Big Cypress, Fisheating Creek, Catfish Lake, and New River. A census taken three years later accounted for 120 warriors, (70 Seminoles, 30 Miccosukee, 12 Creek, 4 Uchee, and 4 Choctaw), 100 women, and 140 children - a total of 360 souls. The Florida Indians had prevailed, and old Sam Jones would fulfill his vow to die in the land of his birth.


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BEST FICTION: FLORIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, PATRICK D. SMITH AWARD, 2018. The Second Seminole War would be the longest and most costly of all Indian conflicts in the United States in both lives and national treasure. In 1842, Colonel William J. Worth, commander of the Florida Campaign, declared hostilities at an end. Although as many as 3,000 Seminole and Miccosukee had been BEST FICTION: FLORIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, PATRICK D. SMITH AWARD, 2018. The Second Seminole War would be the longest and most costly of all Indian conflicts in the United States in both lives and national treasure. In 1842, Colonel William J. Worth, commander of the Florida Campaign, declared hostilities at an end. Although as many as 3,000 Seminole and Miccosukee had been relocated to the Oklahoma Territory, several enclaves remained in the extreme southern portions of the peninsula at Big Cypress, Fisheating Creek, Catfish Lake, and New River. A census taken three years later accounted for 120 warriors, (70 Seminoles, 30 Miccosukee, 12 Creek, 4 Uchee, and 4 Choctaw), 100 women, and 140 children - a total of 360 souls. The Florida Indians had prevailed, and old Sam Jones would fulfill his vow to die in the land of his birth.

30 review for A Tropical Frontier: The Indian Fighter

  1. 5 out of 5

    June Saunders

    This is a monumental work. It's a huge slice of historical fiction, with characters based on real personages, others fictionalized, and some composite. The storytelling is great--the pace is just right. It is full of twists and turns and converging currents of conflict. Tim Robinson's style is that of a classic yarn-spinner, yet he is firmly grounded in Florida's geography and history. The descriptions of Biscayne Bay and the Everglades take the reader there, feeling the saw blade foliage, heari This is a monumental work. It's a huge slice of historical fiction, with characters based on real personages, others fictionalized, and some composite. The storytelling is great--the pace is just right. It is full of twists and turns and converging currents of conflict. Tim Robinson's style is that of a classic yarn-spinner, yet he is firmly grounded in Florida's geography and history. The descriptions of Biscayne Bay and the Everglades take the reader there, feeling the saw blade foliage, hearing the cries of exotic birds. There are scenes so vivid and well-described, the reader carries the imagery in mind for a long time afterward. The characters are great--some are priceless in their foibles (there's a lot of humor in the book). Others--like Jubal Prescott, the protagonist--are many-faceted and complex mixtures of light and darkness. Jubal's grief (which motivates him to become the Indian Fighter of the title) is described to perfection in a way that cannot help but resonate with anyone who has ever known loss. All of the characters have an essential humanity that comes through. For example, the vengeful Indians who engage in savage acts against the settlers are depicted as loving family men too, deeply attached to children and grandchildren, full of natural and human wisdom.We are taken right into the action of the Second Seminole War, and we feel the impact of that cultural clash as Seminole mothers escape into the waters of the Everglades with their children and are defeated, pitiably, by both nature and soldiers; the taking of Indian Key by Indians and the vengeance wreaked upon the (mostly) innocent inhabitants there is imprinted on the reader's mind and heart. This is really great writing. I would urge every serious reader to give themselves the treat of reading Tim Robinson. He shows how great storytelling is done.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Page Turner

    Interesting and detailed with historical information and a story filled with memorable characters. I have learned a lot about how Florida was settled and the conflicts that developed through this series. A good read for each book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

    I enjoyed this book very much. It was a little slow in the beginning but I'm glad I continued to read. I live in the area that this story took place and it was fascinating how the true history was incorporated with the fiction. I have swum with the wild dolphins off Key Biscayne, visited the historical homes in Key West, watched the video's of Indian life in the 1800's, fished, crabbed, netted shrimp and dove for lobster. I've been to Shark Valley and Shark River, taken airboat rides out into th I enjoyed this book very much. It was a little slow in the beginning but I'm glad I continued to read. I live in the area that this story took place and it was fascinating how the true history was incorporated with the fiction. I have swum with the wild dolphins off Key Biscayne, visited the historical homes in Key West, watched the video's of Indian life in the 1800's, fished, crabbed, netted shrimp and dove for lobster. I've been to Shark Valley and Shark River, taken airboat rides out into the everglades, seen snakes, alligators and many birds, not to mention lizards. Mr. Robinson places you so deep in the story you can taste the salt water, feel the crunch of sand under your feet, feel the warm breezes on your face. Don't miss this great read!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Lloyd

    This book was like reading a combination of two texts: one historical fiction and the other nonfiction. It had an intriguing story but was in constant competition with the facts and details of Florida during the 1800's. Robinson does a good job of connecting the reader to the emotional struggle of some of the soldiers and the Indians as they fight for what they believe is right.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maggies Daisy

    Wow, why do we still wage wars when we all know that no one actually ever wins? So much death over pieces of land. This books raw accounts of such savagery committed against another human being will give you nightmares. This historical fiction touches on one of the many wars against the indigenous Indians that lived in southern Florida region.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sandee

    Story of the Florida Indians A great read. Really love the way this author writes. It really transports me back to old Florida and helps me understand the Florida of today, the one out which I live.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I love the stories of old Florida. Tim Robinson has taken them and put them into a very readable format. I won an e-book copy of The Indian Fighter in a Goodreads giveaway, and having read it, I will definitely dive into the others in the series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve Bender

    I received this ebook in a Goodreads Giveaway. Good gritty historical novel. You can't predict the twists and turns. Reads much like a Jeff Shaara novel. Recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    Enjoyable read. This is my first Tropical Frontier book. Well developed characters and great story line. Interesting history of Florida. I plan to read more of this series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    Well researched and holds one's attention. Good characters as well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hudson

    Great Book These Florida books are amazing and I can’t put them down I have read 3-4 of them from front to back in one day

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    would love to see this book series as a mini-series! well researched and full of details!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Blankenship

    Thanks to good read for a free copy. It was terribly slow. Could not finish it. Sorry

  14. 4 out of 5

    Frances Slaughter

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Geib

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Picado

  18. 5 out of 5

    phoebe birchfield

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Lee

  20. 4 out of 5

    Judy Compton

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen M Triplett

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  24. 5 out of 5

    R Will Sera

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maurice J. Bates

  27. 4 out of 5

    David Riddle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Khajeh-noori

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erik Johannsen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

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