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Women Make Horror: Filmmaking, Feminism, Genre

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Winner of the the 2021 Best Edited Collection Award from BAFTSS Shortlisted for the 2021 British Fantasy Awards - Best Non-Fiction​ ​Finalist for the 2020 Bram Stoker Award® for Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction Runner-Up for Book of the Year in the 19th Annual Rondo Halton Classic Horror Awards​ “But women were never out there making horror films, that’s why they are not w Winner of the the 2021 Best Edited Collection Award from BAFTSS Shortlisted for the 2021 British Fantasy Awards - Best Non-Fiction​ ​Finalist for the 2020 Bram Stoker Award® for Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction Runner-Up for Book of the Year in the 19th Annual Rondo Halton Classic Horror Awards​ “But women were never out there making horror films, that’s why they are not written about – you can’t include what doesn’t exist.” “Women are just not that interested in making horror films.”   This is what you get when you are a woman working in horror, whether as a writer, academic, festival programmer, or filmmaker. These assumptions are based on decades of flawed scholarly, critical, and industrial thinking about the genre. Women Make Horror sets right these misconceptions. Women have always made horror. They have always been an audience for the genre, and today, as this book reveals, women academics, critics, and filmmakers alike remain committed to a film genre that offers almost unlimited opportunities for exploring and deconstructing social and cultural constructions of gender, femininity, sexuality, and the body. Women Make Horror explores narrative and experimental cinema; short, anthology, and feature filmmaking; and offers case studies of North American, Latin American, European, East Asian, and Australian filmmakers, films, and festivals. With this book we can transform how we think about women filmmakers and genre.


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Winner of the the 2021 Best Edited Collection Award from BAFTSS Shortlisted for the 2021 British Fantasy Awards - Best Non-Fiction​ ​Finalist for the 2020 Bram Stoker Award® for Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction Runner-Up for Book of the Year in the 19th Annual Rondo Halton Classic Horror Awards​ “But women were never out there making horror films, that’s why they are not w Winner of the the 2021 Best Edited Collection Award from BAFTSS Shortlisted for the 2021 British Fantasy Awards - Best Non-Fiction​ ​Finalist for the 2020 Bram Stoker Award® for Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction Runner-Up for Book of the Year in the 19th Annual Rondo Halton Classic Horror Awards​ “But women were never out there making horror films, that’s why they are not written about – you can’t include what doesn’t exist.” “Women are just not that interested in making horror films.”   This is what you get when you are a woman working in horror, whether as a writer, academic, festival programmer, or filmmaker. These assumptions are based on decades of flawed scholarly, critical, and industrial thinking about the genre. Women Make Horror sets right these misconceptions. Women have always made horror. They have always been an audience for the genre, and today, as this book reveals, women academics, critics, and filmmakers alike remain committed to a film genre that offers almost unlimited opportunities for exploring and deconstructing social and cultural constructions of gender, femininity, sexuality, and the body. Women Make Horror explores narrative and experimental cinema; short, anthology, and feature filmmaking; and offers case studies of North American, Latin American, European, East Asian, and Australian filmmakers, films, and festivals. With this book we can transform how we think about women filmmakers and genre.

53 review for Women Make Horror: Filmmaking, Feminism, Genre

  1. 4 out of 5

    Audra (ouija.reads)

    It isn't any surprise that I love horror and that I love horror by women. But I haven't turned as much of a critical eye on horror films as I have on horror fiction, so I was really interested to learn more. This is a fabulous and much-needed collection of film criticism. Both by women and about women, these essays explore the horror genre and women's often overlooked contributions. With essays on directors and writers, mainstream and experimental cinema, and movies all over the world, this work It isn't any surprise that I love horror and that I love horror by women. But I haven't turned as much of a critical eye on horror films as I have on horror fiction, so I was really interested to learn more. This is a fabulous and much-needed collection of film criticism. Both by women and about women, these essays explore the horror genre and women's often overlooked contributions. With essays on directors and writers, mainstream and experimental cinema, and movies all over the world, this work offers a historical corrective, and I can only hope we'll see more criticism in this vein. Some of the essays came off as more academic than others, and while that isn't necessarily my cup of tea, I do appreciate any challenge to read outside of my comfort zone. I think there could be a good market for a more trade-friendly version of this book. I learned a lot from all the essays and know there are pieces that I will return to again. I also have a pretty good list of movies to find now too! My thanks to the publisher for my copy of this one to read and review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    A great collection of scholarly insight on women in horror writing and filmmaking. Definitely plan to add this to my shelves at home!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Timpanaro

    An excellent collection of current scholarly articles on women in horror. Highly recommend as a bookend with Dread of Difference. Covers many topics and sheds new light on previous areas of discussion as well as introducing new areas of thought.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Pittman

    Don’t go in expecting this to be a list of important women in horror. Well, it is kinda that. But this is written more like an essay.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Collins

    -Clearly, this one is very on-brand -Would recommend!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bel Riddle

    I feel: perturbed.

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    Francesca

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    Rebeccah

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