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The follow-up to the critically acclaimed autobiographical comics collection Super Late Bloomer, documenting transgender artist Julia Kaye’s life post-transition. My Life in Transition is a story that’s not often told about trans lives: what happens beyond the early days of transition. Both deeply personal and widely relatable, this collection illustrates six months of Juli The follow-up to the critically acclaimed autobiographical comics collection Super Late Bloomer, documenting transgender artist Julia Kaye’s life post-transition. My Life in Transition is a story that’s not often told about trans lives: what happens beyond the early days of transition. Both deeply personal and widely relatable, this collection illustrates six months of Julia's life as an out trans woman—about the beauty and pain of love and heartbreak, struggling to find support from bio family and the importance of chosen family, moments of dysphoria and misgendering, learning to lean on friends in times of need, and finding peace in the fact that life keeps moving forward. After the nerve-wracking, anxiety-ridden early transition period has ended and the hormones have done their thing, this book shows how you can be trans and simply exist in society. You can be trans and have a successful future. You can be trans and have a normal life full of ups and downs. In our current political and social climate, this hopeful, accessible narrative about trans lives is both entertaining and vital.


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The follow-up to the critically acclaimed autobiographical comics collection Super Late Bloomer, documenting transgender artist Julia Kaye’s life post-transition. My Life in Transition is a story that’s not often told about trans lives: what happens beyond the early days of transition. Both deeply personal and widely relatable, this collection illustrates six months of Juli The follow-up to the critically acclaimed autobiographical comics collection Super Late Bloomer, documenting transgender artist Julia Kaye’s life post-transition. My Life in Transition is a story that’s not often told about trans lives: what happens beyond the early days of transition. Both deeply personal and widely relatable, this collection illustrates six months of Julia's life as an out trans woman—about the beauty and pain of love and heartbreak, struggling to find support from bio family and the importance of chosen family, moments of dysphoria and misgendering, learning to lean on friends in times of need, and finding peace in the fact that life keeps moving forward. After the nerve-wracking, anxiety-ridden early transition period has ended and the hormones have done their thing, this book shows how you can be trans and simply exist in society. You can be trans and have a successful future. You can be trans and have a normal life full of ups and downs. In our current political and social climate, this hopeful, accessible narrative about trans lives is both entertaining and vital.

30 review for My Life in Transition: A Super Late Bloomer Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carol Flores

    Have you ever been so lucky to find yourself a new favorite author? I feel like 2020 is just filled with amazing gems that I’m utterly grateful. This is the second graphic novel I read by the author and I totally love the way she draws her daily life, since I think we all can relate to funny, wholehearted moments with friends, as well as the loss and grief of someone loved, perhaps you don’t know what are you doing with your life, but that’s OK. The beauty of life is that nobody really knows wha Have you ever been so lucky to find yourself a new favorite author? I feel like 2020 is just filled with amazing gems that I’m utterly grateful. This is the second graphic novel I read by the author and I totally love the way she draws her daily life, since I think we all can relate to funny, wholehearted moments with friends, as well as the loss and grief of someone loved, perhaps you don’t know what are you doing with your life, but that’s OK. The beauty of life is that nobody really knows what the future would hold and pretending to have it all figured it all is more painful than not. We have both good and bad moments, and we should cherish them all. Life should not be taken for granted and we all should make the effort to live the way we really want to. Anyway, Julia takes us into her private life and she show us her doubts and struggles with dating, or the exciting feeling of meeting new people. She lets us know she has the best friends as well as the important moments of solitude: those we need to heal from past relationships and maybe, even learn how to take care and forgive oneself. I seriously loved every single page and it made me chuckle the same way it made me realize that perhaps we don’t see big changes from day to day life, but after six months, a year or more, we surely change –hopefully into someone better, kinder. I received a copy in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley. PREVIOUS REVIEWS: Super late bloomer: my early days in transition

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This is a wonderful and honest comic strip depicting 6 months in the life of the author/artist, a trans woman. It will be relatable for those who have transitioned or are thinking of it, but it's also relatable just as a human dealing with insecurities, breakups, grief, toxic family members, friendships, etc. It is not a funny comic strip but it's an ultimately hopeful, poignant, interesting and impactful one. Highly recommended. I read a temporary digital ARC of this book via Net Galley for revi This is a wonderful and honest comic strip depicting 6 months in the life of the author/artist, a trans woman. It will be relatable for those who have transitioned or are thinking of it, but it's also relatable just as a human dealing with insecurities, breakups, grief, toxic family members, friendships, etc. It is not a funny comic strip but it's an ultimately hopeful, poignant, interesting and impactful one. Highly recommended. I read a temporary digital ARC of this book via Net Galley for review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anniek

    I haven't read Super Late Bloomer, so this was my first time reading Julia Kaye's comics. But this book can be easily read as a standalone, and I really enjoyed it. One of my favourite comics in this collection was the one where a little kid completely accepts and validates Julia as a woman. It just radiated joy. Overall, I liked how balanced this collection was - there's so much trans joy, but also difficult issues, like the comic about her grandmother who she's not out to. As someone who's not I haven't read Super Late Bloomer, so this was my first time reading Julia Kaye's comics. But this book can be easily read as a standalone, and I really enjoyed it. One of my favourite comics in this collection was the one where a little kid completely accepts and validates Julia as a woman. It just radiated joy. Overall, I liked how balanced this collection was - there's so much trans joy, but also difficult issues, like the comic about her grandmother who she's not out to. As someone who's not out to their grandparents either, that one really hit home. Another comic that really spoke to me was about how after coming out as trans, you start to change as a person because you can finally be honest about who you are. Overall, I think it's so impressive how Julia Kaye was able to convey so many of the joys and complexities of being trans in three-panel comics. CWs: sexual assault (groping in a club), gender dysphoria, mentions of misgendering, estrangement from parents/family

  4. 5 out of 5

    iam

    My Life in Transition is a collection of short biographical comics strips, with three panels covering each day over the course of roughly half a year. Julia Kaye chronicles the way she feels each day, mostly in relation to her experiences as a trans woman who started transition three years ago. Topics feature dating and relationships, family, transition, dysphoria, as well as healing, grief and forgiveness. The art style is simple and effective. I have not read any of the author's other works, and My Life in Transition is a collection of short biographical comics strips, with three panels covering each day over the course of roughly half a year. Julia Kaye chronicles the way she feels each day, mostly in relation to her experiences as a trans woman who started transition three years ago. Topics feature dating and relationships, family, transition, dysphoria, as well as healing, grief and forgiveness. The art style is simple and effective. I have not read any of the author's other works, and I sometimes struggled with the context of the comics and who was who, as characters generally weren't really introduced (which makes sense, as these seem to have sprung from a sort of diary in comic form.) Since the style was so simple, a lot of the characters also looked very similar, which additionally made me mix them up. This was however not detrimental to getting the point each comic was trying to get across. I received an ARC and reviewed honestly and voluntarily.

  5. 5 out of 5

    ashes ➷

    (Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC.) Julia Kaye is such a gift. For those who wondered where she went after Super Late Bloomer, Kaye has returned to show us! There is something so refreshing and so joyful about a trans woman documenting the real ups-and-downs of her life when she has already begun to pass. Kaye writes about strangers generally recognizing her as a woman, and her LGBT friends, and tons of romance; and also about the aspects of her transition she still hopes to complete, her strugg (Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC.) Julia Kaye is such a gift. For those who wondered where she went after Super Late Bloomer, Kaye has returned to show us! There is something so refreshing and so joyful about a trans woman documenting the real ups-and-downs of her life when she has already begun to pass. Kaye writes about strangers generally recognizing her as a woman, and her LGBT friends, and tons of romance; and also about the aspects of her transition she still hopes to complete, her struggles with transphobic family, and days that seem impossible to get through. For many trans people, it's hard to imagine what it will be like to live happily as yourself. I have a vision of who I want to be, but they often seem completely out of reach. Kaye happily proves that, while you may change during your transition, the other side isn't so mysterious after all. You're still you, and you still have your good and bad days. A lot of your trans-related problems dissolve just slightly with transitioning. It could not possibly be overstated how important an accessible, good-hearted, honest autobiographical comic from a trans woman can be, and this one delivers on every front. In terms of the comic medium, this book pleases me every time I look at it-- cute style, skilled flexibility, cohesive tone, easy to read, so so so difficult to put down. I happily took an hour out of my day just to sit down and enjoy Kaye's work. There wasn't a strip I disliked seeing, and there wasn't a moment I wanted to step away, which is not just surprising but incredibly impressive for daily comics. I hadn't even considered a second collection after SLB, but here it is, and it's just as good as the first. In general, I really can't overstate how happy I am with this book. And the chance to read it and review it early! Fantastic. Highly recommend if any of the above-- autobiographical comics, trans memoirs, etc-- appeal to you. I'm confident both cis and trans people will enjoy it (though perhaps trans people will laugh a little harder at some very relatable moments.) Already excited to see Kaye's next collection, and going to bed smiling thinking about this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mehsi

    I received this comic collection from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. The second A Super Late Bloomer collection and I was hyped to see Julia's comics combined into a book once again. I will definitely be adding this book to my physical collection when it is out! I am writing a short review for this book as I feel I have addressed most of the big things in the review for the first book (which I also ABSOLUTELY loved). We continue reading about Julia's transition, heartbreak, relationsh I received this comic collection from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. The second A Super Late Bloomer collection and I was hyped to see Julia's comics combined into a book once again. I will definitely be adding this book to my physical collection when it is out! I am writing a short review for this book as I feel I have addressed most of the big things in the review for the first book (which I also ABSOLUTELY loved). We continue reading about Julia's transition, heartbreak, relationships, struggles with how people address her, daily life, and more. It details the years late-2018 to mid 2019. Most of the comics I already know as I try to keep an eye on Julia's twitter. But since I am following so many people and twitter only shows a couple, it hasn't be easy. But I don't mind. That way I get some new things to read. I really loved reading this one. I love seeing Julia's art get even prettier! I loved the written parts at the beginning/the end. All in all, recommended to everyone!

  7. 5 out of 5

    SaraCat

    First, I want to thank NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for giving me early access to this book in exchange for an honest review. In many ways, this was a quick read because each page is a 3 panel comic, but this is a book that feels like it's one the reader can return to again and again. While there are some everyday parts of her life that she depicts, there is also a huge range of deep emotions that readers are taken on as well: joy, pain, recovery, uncertainty, healing. While there are First, I want to thank NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishing for giving me early access to this book in exchange for an honest review. In many ways, this was a quick read because each page is a 3 panel comic, but this is a book that feels like it's one the reader can return to again and again. While there are some everyday parts of her life that she depicts, there is also a huge range of deep emotions that readers are taken on as well: joy, pain, recovery, uncertainty, healing. While there are parts of her story that I cannot fully relate to because I'm cis gendered, there were also many emotions that I could relate to in my own way. And that reminder that even though our experiences are different, we are all still so human and all feel many similar emotions throughout our lives is beautiful and powerful. I would highly recommend this book for anyone would enjoys stories about real people going through life, but especially for anyone who is transgender to be reaffirmed that you aren't alone on your path to expressing who you are more authentically to the world.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Syd

    Read Early via NetGalley I was so happy to pick up a copy of Super Late Bloomer at FlameCon 2018 and My Life in Transition is an excellent follow-up. It's a very well done slice of life that makes the most of a 3 panel structure, while showing the ups and downs of not only queer life, but of coming into one's own self. There's a wonderful balance of humor and deeply touching personal moments that really resonate for me as a trans person, but also express it in a way that most readers could unders Read Early via NetGalley I was so happy to pick up a copy of Super Late Bloomer at FlameCon 2018 and My Life in Transition is an excellent follow-up. It's a very well done slice of life that makes the most of a 3 panel structure, while showing the ups and downs of not only queer life, but of coming into one's own self. There's a wonderful balance of humor and deeply touching personal moments that really resonate for me as a trans person, but also express it in a way that most readers could understand. It's very rewarding to read Julia's work because it always feels like she is challenging herself to be vulnerable, and you feel like you are getting to know the author.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Julie Kaye is doing something very hard, baring her soul for all to see, as she goes through transitioning to a new life, losing a love, trying to date new people. Like all sequential art memoirs, there are a lot of sad things, things that one wouldn't want to talk about, and yet she bares all. It is hard to bare your soul every time you draw a comic strip. This continues her story, past the coming out, and getting estrogen To being misgendered, and standing up to people to let them know that. Tha Julie Kaye is doing something very hard, baring her soul for all to see, as she goes through transitioning to a new life, losing a love, trying to date new people. Like all sequential art memoirs, there are a lot of sad things, things that one wouldn't want to talk about, and yet she bares all. It is hard to bare your soul every time you draw a comic strip. This continues her story, past the coming out, and getting estrogen To being misgendered, and standing up to people to let them know that. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anwen Hayward

    Graphic novels and comics aren't usually my cup of tea, but I couldn't resist this one, and I'm glad I didn't. I love everything about it. Julia Kaye has a really impressive way of showing nuance in a series of 3-panel cartoon strips; she doesn't even need words to make you feel things. I've not read the first one, but even without that context I really appreciated how this book covered her life after she was already several years into her transition; it showed a different side to the transition Graphic novels and comics aren't usually my cup of tea, but I couldn't resist this one, and I'm glad I didn't. I love everything about it. Julia Kaye has a really impressive way of showing nuance in a series of 3-panel cartoon strips; she doesn't even need words to make you feel things. I've not read the first one, but even without that context I really appreciated how this book covered her life after she was already several years into her transition; it showed a different side to the transition narrative we usually get, in which an individual's transition is often portrayed as the natural conclusion to their life's greatest journey, and so on and so forth. Even though her gender is a huge part of her identity, Julia's life isn't magically perfect just because she's overcome that initial hurdle and has reached a point at which she's living happily as a trans woman and is almost always gendered as female. She still has to get through breakups, men being men, work pressures, friendships, the works. It made her feel a lot more authentic and three-dimensional as a protagonist and author. That said, she also very clearly shows how her transition will always be a tangible part of her life through the hardship of misgendering, the trauma of her own family rejecting her, the constant worries about whether she's performing femininity 'enough' or 'correctly'. I think these were my favourite panels, when Julia writes (?) about how, as a trans woman, the pressure to perform a certain type of femininity in order to almost justify being trans can be a roadblock to authenticity. She feels a constant guilt over not doing enough (her phrase, not mine) to avoid misgendering, whilst being objectively aware that it's absolutely not her fault at all, and that the general gendered aspects of the society she lives in are to blame. It was an interesting aspect that, as a cis woman, I've never had to consider; I can wear trousers or a baggy jumper without getting misgendered, for example, and it was illuminating to be forced to confront the inherent privilege of that. Literally the only thing I would nitpick over is that it only covered 6 months of her life and I would have liked to live alongside her longer. That's it. Oh, and sometimes the art style made people difficult to differentiate, particular her first girlfriend and her therapist. They looked very similar and it could be jarring. Still, there are limits to black and white cartoons, so that's really more of an issue of medium for me than anything else. Now I have to pick up the first one...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brooke Stouffer

    Thank you to Andrew McMeel Publishing and NetGalley for the eARC copy of “My Life in Transition” in exchange for an honest review. I first found Julia Kaye’s diary comics through her instagram @ upandoutcomic a few years ago and appreciated getting a glimpse into her life in the middle of transitioning. The graphic novel “My Life in Transition” is a beautiful update on her life now, and it’s so wonderful to see Julia’s growth into a more confident woman. Her honesty with the discrimination she fa Thank you to Andrew McMeel Publishing and NetGalley for the eARC copy of “My Life in Transition” in exchange for an honest review. I first found Julia Kaye’s diary comics through her instagram @ upandoutcomic a few years ago and appreciated getting a glimpse into her life in the middle of transitioning. The graphic novel “My Life in Transition” is a beautiful update on her life now, and it’s so wonderful to see Julia’s growth into a more confident woman. Her honesty with the discrimination she faces is balenced with her gratitude for her circle of strong friendships around her. It warmed me reading these comics after reading the ones on her instagram page. I highly recommend diving into the comics that she has on there before you read this book, as well as reading her previous graphic novel “Super Late Bloomer”. All in all, Julia’s story fills you with hope as you read. It makes you grateful for the people that you have in your life that are always there to lean into when you need it, and are there to make you smile at the end of a hard day. I am not a transgendered person, but while I couldn’t relate to Julia’s struggles it was a reminder to be there for the people in my life that are, and to be an active ally for them in a time of need. I highly recommend Julia Kayes work for all older readers (there’s mentions of sex and dating which is the only reason I wouldn’t recommend to younger readers). However, be aware that there are triggers of: transphobia, gender dysphoria, unsupportive family, discrimination.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Der-shing

    Thanks to Andrews McMeel Publishing and Julia for sending me an early copy of the book. Reading Julia's work is like being invited on a hike. You take part in the uphills and downhills, the plodding slogs, survey the terrain, manage fears of losing your way, weather storms. Most of all you expand your world, and take in the beauty of a new landscape with Julia as your guide. It's not often that you are invited into a stranger's life so intimately, from the daily work grind to the foibles of dati Thanks to Andrews McMeel Publishing and Julia for sending me an early copy of the book. Reading Julia's work is like being invited on a hike. You take part in the uphills and downhills, the plodding slogs, survey the terrain, manage fears of losing your way, weather storms. Most of all you expand your world, and take in the beauty of a new landscape with Julia as your guide. It's not often that you are invited into a stranger's life so intimately, from the daily work grind to the foibles of dating to struggles with ignorant family members, and the digestible 3-panel format is a big plus for readers of all ages. In her first book and now her second, Julia chooses not to shy away from either the mundane or the devastating, and importantly takes time to breathe and remind herself to appreciate the journey as well. This second volume also does a great job of continuing the work begun in volume one, showing readers (especially trans readers) the value of continuing to put one foot in front of the other. There's something important to be learned from every human experience, and it is a particular joy to share in the author's personal queer and trans experiences. Thanks for letting us come on this journey with you Julia!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    Thanks to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishingm for the digital galley of this book. My Life in Transition is the follow up to Kaye’s earlier collection, Super Late Bloomer, and though the art-style and tone is the same, Kaye is further along in her journey, and it’s really cool to see her grow and change. She mentions in the afterword that though she felt super out of sorts and like she didn’t know what she was doing, by drawing a comic each day, her life follows a pretty clear arc, and that Thanks to NetGalley and Andrews McMeel Publishingm for the digital galley of this book. My Life in Transition is the follow up to Kaye’s earlier collection, Super Late Bloomer, and though the art-style and tone is the same, Kaye is further along in her journey, and it’s really cool to see her grow and change. She mentions in the afterword that though she felt super out of sorts and like she didn’t know what she was doing, by drawing a comic each day, her life follows a pretty clear arc, and that is great for self-discovery, but also it makes for compelling storytelling. This book isn’t about the transition so much as the existence of being trans in society once the hormones have done their thing. I really enjoyed being along for the ride of Kaye’s journey. It was like catching up with an old friend I hadn’t seen in a year or so, and in these wild times, that is even more comforting. This collection is out in February, and if you enjoy good things with a bit of humor and a lot of heart, check it out!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    My Life in Transition is the follow-up to Super Late Bloomer: My Early Days in Transition, which documented the author's decision to transition genders. Both pictures are a sort of diary in comics, with one comic per day, showing glimpses into Kaye's life and experiences. In My Life in Transition we get a look at 6 months in Kaye's life as she lives as a female and anxiously awaits getting bottom surgery. She stresses about being misgendered, deals with her own feelings of depression and dysmorp My Life in Transition is the follow-up to Super Late Bloomer: My Early Days in Transition, which documented the author's decision to transition genders. Both pictures are a sort of diary in comics, with one comic per day, showing glimpses into Kaye's life and experiences. In My Life in Transition we get a look at 6 months in Kaye's life as she lives as a female and anxiously awaits getting bottom surgery. She stresses about being misgendered, deals with her own feelings of depression and dysmorphia, and also the everyday dilemmas of interpersonal relationships. Thank you to the publisher for the review copy!

  15. 5 out of 5

    ✮Octjillery✮

    While I am maybe not the main target audience for this collection, as I am not a member of the LGBTQ+ community, I found it to be utterly relatable in so many ways. I think anyone could (and should) read this and find some aspect of Julia's life to relate to or maybe take solace in. Julia deals with a lot in the sixth months that this collection covers: the loss of a relationship, figuring out what exactly she wants in a relationship/partner in the future, trying out different types of relations While I am maybe not the main target audience for this collection, as I am not a member of the LGBTQ+ community, I found it to be utterly relatable in so many ways. I think anyone could (and should) read this and find some aspect of Julia's life to relate to or maybe take solace in. Julia deals with a lot in the sixth months that this collection covers: the loss of a relationship, figuring out what exactly she wants in a relationship/partner in the future, trying out different types of relationships, dealing with a lack of support or acceptance from her family, realizing how much support she does have in her life to somewhat offset that, etc. Most of her struggles are simply "people" struggles--things that many people across all walks of life face, which is what makes her a relatable person. While the dysphoria that she faced is not something I have experienced, I did appreciate seeing such a raw and honest portrayal of it and how it came up in her everyday life. I can't presume to have a true understanding of what Julia has gone through in her life, especially during the early stages of her transition, but I'm thankful for the chance to read her story. One of my favorite strips was on...I think page 122. Julia visits a friend's family for Passover instead of her own family, and this granny says something along the lines of, "Julie should sit by me. She's so cute!" (I don't have the book at hand.) I just felt like that was one of the most validating strips in the whole collection, and it was really cute.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kt

    This is the first thing by Kaye that I have read and I loved it! As someone who is only out to a couple family members (and barely out to myself) this gave me immense hope that I will one day love and care for myself, I will grow into myself just as Julia has done. These short comics are able to portray these raw emotions so wonderfully and fully, this really is a fantastic book Julia was able to show her story so well covering transness, heartbreak, family trouble and grief. i honestly applaud J This is the first thing by Kaye that I have read and I loved it! As someone who is only out to a couple family members (and barely out to myself) this gave me immense hope that I will one day love and care for myself, I will grow into myself just as Julia has done. These short comics are able to portray these raw emotions so wonderfully and fully, this really is a fantastic book Julia was able to show her story so well covering transness, heartbreak, family trouble and grief. i honestly applaud Julia for releasing this and telling her story. (Thank you NetGalley for the ARC. This is my honest review)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dallas

    Since reading Super Late Bloomer, I have come out as genderqueer. While I don't really use trans as a label for myself, I do very much identify with the struggles and the processes that come with maneuvering gender after realizing that maybe you don't identify with what you were assigned. I so appreciate artists like Julia Kaye who put their stories out there for the rest of us so we know we aren't alone in our experiences and feelings. Since reading Super Late Bloomer, I have come out as genderqueer. While I don't really use trans as a label for myself, I do very much identify with the struggles and the processes that come with maneuvering gender after realizing that maybe you don't identify with what you were assigned. I so appreciate artists like Julia Kaye who put their stories out there for the rest of us so we know we aren't alone in our experiences and feelings.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Ann

    ARC courtesy of NetGalley. I was so happy to see more of Julia Kaye's autobiographical comics were being published in book form. She has such a way with getting so much across in three panels. This latest collection covers 6 months of her life; we see her her growth over those months in such a poignant, heartfelt way. Highly recommended. (And I hope there's more coming!) ARC courtesy of NetGalley. I was so happy to see more of Julia Kaye's autobiographical comics were being published in book form. She has such a way with getting so much across in three panels. This latest collection covers 6 months of her life; we see her her growth over those months in such a poignant, heartfelt way. Highly recommended. (And I hope there's more coming!)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura Sackton

    I really enjoyed this. Kaye captures so many ordinary moments so effortlessly! Really loved the blend of moments of trans and queer joy as well as the moments of struggle and heartache. Felt very real.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    I read this in one sitting. Very enjoyable daily comics about Julia's life and relationships, including her relationship with herself. Content notes: one depiction of a needle. Discussion of dysphoria and transphobia. I read this in one sitting. Very enjoyable daily comics about Julia's life and relationships, including her relationship with herself. Content notes: one depiction of a needle. Discussion of dysphoria and transphobia.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I enjoyed the original Super Late Bloomer book by Julia Kaye about her life when she first came out as trans, so I already knew I would like this one too. I ended up enjoying it even more than the first book. The comic strips work as a diary with snapshots of her life, both ups and downs. It's a very personal and honest look at her life through new relationships, break-ups, friendships, gender dysphoria and gender euphoria. I highly recommend reading anything by Kaye, but especially this book. [F I enjoyed the original Super Late Bloomer book by Julia Kaye about her life when she first came out as trans, so I already knew I would like this one too. I ended up enjoying it even more than the first book. The comic strips work as a diary with snapshots of her life, both ups and downs. It's a very personal and honest look at her life through new relationships, break-ups, friendships, gender dysphoria and gender euphoria. I highly recommend reading anything by Kaye, but especially this book. [Free ARC from NetGalley]

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lyzz

    My Life in Transition Author/Cartoonist: Julia Kaye Genre: Collection of webtoons Pages: 167 Publication Date: 2/16/2021 This collection is written and drawn by Julia Kaye and describes Julia’s experiences after she transitioned. It focuses on her life after the early days of her transition and covers topics such as break-ups, mental health, dating, and friendship. The collection covers a six-month period from December 2018 to June 2019. What I liked: *I love that this collection focuses on life af My Life in Transition Author/Cartoonist: Julia Kaye Genre: Collection of webtoons Pages: 167 Publication Date: 2/16/2021 This collection is written and drawn by Julia Kaye and describes Julia’s experiences after she transitioned. It focuses on her life after the early days of her transition and covers topics such as break-ups, mental health, dating, and friendship. The collection covers a six-month period from December 2018 to June 2019. What I liked: *I love that this collection focuses on life after the transition. When trans people are depicted in media, the focus is often on their transition and the early days. This collection allows us to see some of Julia’s authentic experiences of what her “new normal” is going to be. *The art style reminds me of the Sunday funnies. It is easy to read and very cute. *I really enjoyed the chronological nature of this collection showing us small victories and setbacks for Julia. *I liked that this comic depicted the complexity of gender after the transition. The societal influences do not disappear after someone transitions but continue to impact how they see themselves, how others see them and who they attracted to. *The afterword was *powerful* talking about regret. As someone who came to her queerness later in life, I have grabbled with this. I really hope the author explores this theme in future comics as it is powerful! What I didn’t like: *The cover was very hard to read due to the lack of contrast. I had to enlarge the cover to be able to read the title and see the art. The cover also did not draw me in as I scrolled by it several times before reading the description. *At times, I felt like the narrative did not fit the three-panel cartoon. Subsequently, some of the third panels were filler or platitudes that did not feel authentic. *The story arc about Julia’s relationship with Liv felt abrupt. In several comics, we are shown how happy they are and then they break-up with little explanation. As the reader, I was unclear why they broke-up. Julia talks about how they just were not a good fit, but it would have been better to see that lack of a fit depicted in comics before their break-up or in flashbacks. I would highly recommend this collection of webtoons. The artwork is cute and will remind you of the warm feelings you had reading the Sunday funnies as a kid while the narrative is powerful depiction of life after transition. It is a quick and thoughtful read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frida

    I received an eARC copy in exchange for an honest review from Andrews McMeel Publishing via NetGalley. After reading this comics collection, I somehow regret not having read Super Late Bloomer first. However, with the emotional foreword Julia Kaye included, I feel I managed to create the bigger and more complete picture of the story and the daily struggles and situations Julia faced and is still facing. I've been trying to be better about vocally setting my personal boundaries lately. To addre I received an eARC copy in exchange for an honest review from Andrews McMeel Publishing via NetGalley. After reading this comics collection, I somehow regret not having read Super Late Bloomer first. However, with the emotional foreword Julia Kaye included, I feel I managed to create the bigger and more complete picture of the story and the daily struggles and situations Julia faced and is still facing. I've been trying to be better about vocally setting my personal boundaries lately. To address what is unacceptable behaviour and advocate for myself. To have more self-respect than to let other people walk all over me. I've been taking time to look inward to the core of my being. I'm asking questions and starting to better understand myself. I'm so much stronger than I give myself credit for. Just keep putting one foot in front of the other. One day you'll look back and it'll all make sense. But for now, just keep moving. This is growth done right. Honesty is a trait I value in people the most, and this collection is, by far, the most honest one I came across recently. It is very relatable with everyone going through a rough time in life, dealing with grief, loss, break up, anxiety, misunderstanding of the world, misunderstanding of themselves, acceptance or a lack of it. And above all, every time people addressed Julia wrong hit my nerve, just as it may have hit hers. Why? Why people give themselves the right to make choices and "correct the wrongs" on behalf of other adults, fully physically and mentally developed people? Live and let live! We should be able to make our own choices and decisions, and we should all be supportive of them, without any judging. Show some support and love; the world has already become an ugly place, and we don't have to add more to it. I truly enjoyed the three-panel comic concept; it sets the daily atmosphere right and gives us a good overview of the daily happenings. Seeing Julia blossoming into an emotional young woman, experiencing happiness and sadness, joy and pain, hurting and healing, all wrapped up in one, made my heart full of same emotions. This collection reminds us that we all go through many similar feelings and struggles in life, but we fight back, and we stand tall. We are brave! We are powerful! This comics collection is a real gem, a book that could help many young trans people, to let them know we are in this together. It radiates warmth, love, support, and understanding.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vera Lazzaro

    "Feeling gross and dysphoric, like "how could anyone possibly read me as a woman" dyshporic. I haven't shaved in days in preparation for electolysis. It's like I can feel the tiny hairs poking up out of my face. Is that all it is?? Could something so slight make such a huge impact?" The thing about reading autobiographic books (or graphic novels) is that there is no romanticization. Kaye is not scared of telling the reader about the ups and downs, and this is expecially true when you see the diar "Feeling gross and dysphoric, like "how could anyone possibly read me as a woman" dyshporic. I haven't shaved in days in preparation for electolysis. It's like I can feel the tiny hairs poking up out of my face. Is that all it is?? Could something so slight make such a huge impact?" The thing about reading autobiographic books (or graphic novels) is that there is no romanticization. Kaye is not scared of telling the reader about the ups and downs, and this is expecially true when you see the diary-like setting of the opera. "Nobody wants to rock the boat, I get that. Confronting people is uncomfortable at best. But inaction isn't neutrality. Being a supportive ally sometimes requires taking an active role" People often try and be allies without really knowing what it means to be one. Without knowing you can't be a real ally if you stand by the side of the road and never help with the crossing. We have been seeing more transexual people on the media, but still not enough. We have been accepting them more, but they don't only need to be accepted. They need to be supported, understood and helped in their struggle. "The concept of chosen family keeps coming up in my life. I love it so much. Why shouldn't those closest to us in life be considered family??" I also loved seeing how Kaye didn't try and sugarcoat her experience with dating, and breaking up, and living a normal life alongside being in pain or feeling dysphoric. This is important because it makes readers feel understood by Kaye despite having nothing in common with her: the constant changes and insicurities about life are known by everyone, not only by trans folks. This is an important meeting point when it comes to mutual understanding. Thanks to NetGalley for the EARC version of this graphic novel.

  25. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    I'm not familiar with Kaye's previous work, but this volume will work as a stand alone read, and you'll likely want to seek out her earlier work, as I did. This was written in Kaye's third year after starting her transition, making this a helpful, important, and inspiring read for trans folx at any stage, but especially in the earlier stages of their transitions, because seeing Julia's story will help them get through their own journey. It's an important read for other folx too- as a cis female, I'm not familiar with Kaye's previous work, but this volume will work as a stand alone read, and you'll likely want to seek out her earlier work, as I did. This was written in Kaye's third year after starting her transition, making this a helpful, important, and inspiring read for trans folx at any stage, but especially in the earlier stages of their transitions, because seeing Julia's story will help them get through their own journey. It's an important read for other folx too- as a cis female, I have no real idea of what it's like to transition, and while I know Julia's experience isn't every trans person's experience, it gives me something to hold onto, y'know what I mean? The whole "put yourself in someone else's shoes" thing, more people need to to do that. Julia makes her story so relatable, you can't help but feel everything along with her- there's all the emotions going on here, confusion, doubt, joy, love, fear, sadness, freedom, you name it. She starts this volume in a relationship, seemingly happy but doomed to breakup, then there's the stages of grief and recovering from the breakup, awkward dating, then meeting the just right person. We experience her body becoming more feminine with her, and the traumas of not feeling female enough, of being misgendered, of not being accepted by some of her close family as who she is. I cheered for her strong support system of friends and found family, for her triumphs big and small, and especially the ending-that's-not-really-an-ending, more of a happy, hopeful life's pretty good now that I am who I've always been kind of thing. The author's notes at the beginning and end add a lot to the whole thing, and Kaye's artwork is charming and dear. Just read this, it's good . #MyLifeinTransition #NetGalley

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Read more graphic novel reviews at The Graphic Library. My Life in Transition is a second anthology of Kaye’s web comic, Up and Out, chronicling her life as a transgender woman. Kaye publishes nearly one three-panel comic a day, and this collection is roughly six months of her life. In it, Kaye explores dating as a trans woman, both men and women, and healing after a long-term relationship ends. Kaye also shows instances of people misgendering her, and the anxiety and dysmorphia that often follo Read more graphic novel reviews at The Graphic Library. My Life in Transition is a second anthology of Kaye’s web comic, Up and Out, chronicling her life as a transgender woman. Kaye publishes nearly one three-panel comic a day, and this collection is roughly six months of her life. In it, Kaye explores dating as a trans woman, both men and women, and healing after a long-term relationship ends. Kaye also shows instances of people misgendering her, and the anxiety and dysmorphia that often follows. Kaye also navigates friendships and builds personal boundaries with friends, romantic partners, and work. Kaye also struggles with her bio family who is not supportive and exhibits transphobia. A friend suggests a chosen family - building a family of people who are supportive and positive influences. Kaye builds a chosen family of other trans individuals and friends who see Kate for who she is. Kaye’s comics are honest and authentic. This collection is a stark look into the journey of a trans person, especially after surgeries and hormones have had a chance to work, and often a time we don’t see very often portrayed or discussed in media. Usually, trans stories end with the decision to have surgery or start hormone therapy, but Kaye demonstrates that the daily struggles and journey of personal growth is far from over at that point. The three-panel stories are easy to digest but can pack a punch depending on the type of day Kaye had. They are loosely connected, so this format might be jarring for readers who are used to comics as a longer format, but this style harks back to comic strips and their collection into books. There is one strip that includes nakedness, but the portrayal is that of rebirth, not anything sexual. Sara’s Rating: 9/10 Suitability Level: Grades 10-Adult This review was made possible with an advanced reader copy from the publisher through Net Galley. This graphic novel will be on sale February 16, 2021.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I received a digital ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of Julia Kaye's other book, Super Late Bloomer, so I absolutely had to grab this one when it became available on NetGalley. I really enjoy the way Kaye speaks about her life and how she portrays very real emotion through seemingly-simple drawings. It's a tough thing to talk about your truest and most raw emotions and put it out there for everyone to see, but I'm glad she has done it. This coll I received a digital ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm a big fan of Julia Kaye's other book, Super Late Bloomer, so I absolutely had to grab this one when it became available on NetGalley. I really enjoy the way Kaye speaks about her life and how she portrays very real emotion through seemingly-simple drawings. It's a tough thing to talk about your truest and most raw emotions and put it out there for everyone to see, but I'm glad she has done it. This collection spans six months and highlights a time in her life where she's becoming more comfortable with herself. Kaye experiences dysphoria, heartbreak, and loss, but sees eventually that she is finally able to really love life more than she ever has before. The exploration of both good and negative emotions I think is really great here- it makes her story so much more realistic and relatable. I think my favorite part of this book though is the afterward. Kaye talks about coming to terms with her former self pre-transition, and how she has come to love and appreciate her, even through the intense hardship she faced in the past. It's so honest and heartwrenching. Books like this are incredibly important for many reasons, the most important being that they can hopefully help bring peace and solace to other people struggling with similar battles. As a cis person I cannot speak for trans people, but I hope that they would be able to read this book and think, "it does get better, I'm not alone."

  28. 5 out of 5

    James Gwinn

    I should preface by saying I simply do not think this book was meant for me. I picked this book up and read it in an afternoon because I liked the art and because I was genuinely interested in reading a trans narrative so I could understand the experience a little better. That's not really what the book is, however. The only thing really presented here is the author's personal experience, and it is far from interesting. It is a vapid book in which the author displays a radical self-absorption, a I should preface by saying I simply do not think this book was meant for me. I picked this book up and read it in an afternoon because I liked the art and because I was genuinely interested in reading a trans narrative so I could understand the experience a little better. That's not really what the book is, however. The only thing really presented here is the author's personal experience, and it is far from interesting. It is a vapid book in which the author displays a radical self-absorption, a naive craving for acceptance, and a submission to emotions that one normally expects of children, not 30-year old women. "Dysphoria" here seems to be a catch-all term for any sort of uneasiness or discomfort the author experiences - which is fine. After all, this is a diary, and in reading it, I am signing up to hear the author's innermost thoughts, dysphoria being one of them. But the constant blaming of everything on dysphoria and the need for that dysphoria to be incessantly validated gets boring after a while. I can sympathize with someone struggling with a mental condition, but someone who uses that mental condition as an excuse to not visit her own family members, including a dying grandmother simply because they might have trouble understanding the "real" her? Not so much. Worst of all, the aimlessness and inanity of the words eventually caused me to resent the art as well. Although I enjoyed the drawings at first, after 100 pages or so, the whole venture just started to come across as twee and pointless.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe E

    I've always enjoyed seeing Julia's cartoons on the internet, so it was super cool to see them all condensed here, covering a year of her life. This collection of comics captures so many things at once. It captures a piece of Julia's life and the mundane day-to-day joys and frustrations she faces, it captures her experience as a trans woman, it captures heartbreak and the chaos of the dating scene, and it also documents her year in a way that unfurls each day upon the next. I really enjoyed getti I've always enjoyed seeing Julia's cartoons on the internet, so it was super cool to see them all condensed here, covering a year of her life. This collection of comics captures so many things at once. It captures a piece of Julia's life and the mundane day-to-day joys and frustrations she faces, it captures her experience as a trans woman, it captures heartbreak and the chaos of the dating scene, and it also documents her year in a way that unfurls each day upon the next. I really enjoyed getting to watch Julia evolve literally page by page, dealing with breakups and moving and so many different changes. This is a life in transition, not just regarding Julia's trans identity, but it's also quite literally capturing a year in motion for the life of a woman caught between new loves and old loves, new and old places, new and old relationships, and so on. It's a testament to queer and trans joy and a testament to change, in every way. **Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid Stephens

    My Life in Transition is not just about the life of a woman in transition, but a story of what her life has been after she made the hard choice to come out, to herself, her friends, her family and be her true self. This story is about all the changes her life has begun t go through above and beyond the physical. She boldly shows the struggles to fit in and try to adopt society's version of feminine beauty as she fights bouts of dysphoria and misgendering. I hadn’t read the 1st part of her story, My Life in Transition is not just about the life of a woman in transition, but a story of what her life has been after she made the hard choice to come out, to herself, her friends, her family and be her true self. This story is about all the changes her life has begun t go through above and beyond the physical. She boldly shows the struggles to fit in and try to adopt society's version of feminine beauty as she fights bouts of dysphoria and misgendering. I hadn’t read the 1st part of her story, but this volume stands up well on its own. I may not have a 100% understanding of her struggle but as a Lesbian, I can understand the alienation from family and friends. I have been called sir, because of the way I dress, and yes it pisses me off every time. Regardless of how you identify, which pronouns you prefer, you can recognize yourself in Julia’s growth as a woman. I received this uncorrected proof free from Andrew McNeil’s Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion

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