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The seventh and final installment of Stephen King's The Dark Tower saga is perhaps the most anticipated book in the author's long career. King began this epic tale about the last gunslinger in the world more than 20 years ago; now he draws its suspenseful story to a close, snapping together the last pieces of his action puzzle and drawing Roland Deschain ever closer to his The seventh and final installment of Stephen King's The Dark Tower saga is perhaps the most anticipated book in the author's long career. King began this epic tale about the last gunslinger in the world more than 20 years ago; now he draws its suspenseful story to a close, snapping together the last pieces of his action puzzle and drawing Roland Deschain ever closer to his ultimate goal. Alternate cover edition for ISBN-10: 1416524525; ISBN-13: 9781416524526


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The seventh and final installment of Stephen King's The Dark Tower saga is perhaps the most anticipated book in the author's long career. King began this epic tale about the last gunslinger in the world more than 20 years ago; now he draws its suspenseful story to a close, snapping together the last pieces of his action puzzle and drawing Roland Deschain ever closer to his The seventh and final installment of Stephen King's The Dark Tower saga is perhaps the most anticipated book in the author's long career. King began this epic tale about the last gunslinger in the world more than 20 years ago; now he draws its suspenseful story to a close, snapping together the last pieces of his action puzzle and drawing Roland Deschain ever closer to his ultimate goal. Alternate cover edition for ISBN-10: 1416524525; ISBN-13: 9781416524526

30 review for The Dark Tower

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    *sniff* Oh, you surprised me. Is it time for the review? Just a second. What? Crying? Me? Don’t be ridiculous. I was just ….uh…chopping some onions…..and I’ve got a cold….then somebody broke into my kitchen and pepper sprayed me….I certainly wouldn’t be shedding a few manly tears over a Stephen King novel, would I? Oh, fine. You spend almost twenty years reading this series and tell me you got through the conclusion without a lump in your throat. Liar. Roland and his posse of gunslingers have to *sniff* Oh, you surprised me. Is it time for the review? Just a second. What? Crying? Me? Don’t be ridiculous. I was just ….uh…chopping some onions…..and I’ve got a cold….then somebody broke into my kitchen and pepper sprayed me….I certainly wouldn’t be shedding a few manly tears over a Stephen King novel, would I? Oh, fine. You spend almost twenty years reading this series and tell me you got through the conclusion without a lump in your throat. Liar. Roland and his posse of gunslingers have to wrap up their business on Earth so they can get back to Mid-World. In our world, they’ll have to safeguard the rose in New York by founding a corporation dedicated to its protection, some of them will have to battle a very nasty nest of vampires and low men, and Susannah has to give birth to something that is supposed to be the end of all of them. The ones who can make it back to Mid-World will have to launch a desperate attack against overwhelming odds to stop the Crimson King’s breakers from destroying one of the last Beams holding the Tower and all of reality in place, and if they survive that, there’s a Very Important Person who still needs saving. The Dark Tower series was written in fits and starts by King from the time he was in college to wrapping up the whole thing in a three book burst following his close encounter with a minivan. He didn’t always know where it was going, he littered many of his other books with DT tie-in stories, and he famously claimed for years not to know how it would end. So the series as whole isn’t the most tightly plotted thing you’ll ever read, and at the end King focused on delivering on the emotional journey rather than trying to wrap up every loose end he had hanging out there. He chose wisely. I consider this King’s flawed masterpiece. Some have focused on the ‘flawed’ part of that. I decided to dwell on the ‘masterpiece’ side of the equation. I’ll go a little more in depth on that in this spoiler section, but for any newbies not reading that, I’ll just say that all the years waiting between books turned out to be worth it. (view spoiler)[ The Flaws The biggest let down to me in this was that the whole Modred thing was so anti-climatic. His birth was a huge focus in the final three books, yet in the end all he managed to do was send poor Oy to a grisly death. In fact, there’s precious little satisfaction to be found in any the endings of the major villains. Modred was dying of food poisoning anyhow. Oy spoils his attack and Roland dispatches him with ease. The Crimson King is just crazy old man on a balcony throwing bombs around, and he gets taken out by a pencil eraser wielded by a kid with no tongue. Maybe worst of all was the ending of Randall Flagg a/k/a Walter a/k/a Martin. This one was especially galling because not only had he been Roland’s nemesis, he’d been a boogeyman in King’s books for years. Yet he gets eaten by Modred the baby. That sucked. I’m still not sure about King writing himself into the story either. I don’t think he did it out of ego because he made himself look pretty awful overall, but at some point after his accident, I think he couldn’t separate what he’d gone through from the story it inspired him to finally finish. It didn’t ruin the series for me, but I kind of wish he’d come up with something else. Having gotten that out of my system, let’s proceed to: The Masterpiece I loved the whole concept of the Tet Corporation, and I continue to hope that someday King will give us a book detailing its war against N. Central Positronics and Sombra. I could have read several more chapters regarding that piece. The character deaths were incredibly well done and still painful the third time through this. We’ve known since Roland let Jake fall into the abyss in The Gunslinger that this quest to find the Dark Tower would cost Roland dearly, but I was not prepared for how high the price turned out to be. Which brings us to my favorite part, the ending. The idea that Roland has been stuck in an endless cycle of climbing the Tower only to find himself back at the beginning of the series seems kind of obvious in retrospect, but caught me completely by surprise. As King noted in the afterword, it’s not a happy ending, but it’s the right ending. I agree with that. Roland’s ultimate damanation wasn’t that he sacrificed his friends to get to the Tower, it’s that he risked the Tower again by pressing on to satisfy his own obsession to see it after it had already been saved that puts him in his own personal hell. I also like how that sneaky bastard King made us all complicit with Roland’s fate. By offering us the chance to opt out and leave the book knowing that Roland reached the Tower and that Susannah was reunited with Eddie and Jake in another version of New York, King made us all Roland by proxy. We couldn’t resist. We had to know what was in the Tower. And when we find out, we all share Roland’s fate of going back to the beginning. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    Ka is a wheel, my friend. So, I loved the Dark Tower series. It's one of the best works of fantasy I've read. If you haven't started it: a) do so b) don't read the spoilers here The Dark Tower series is an incredibly varied set of books, written over the course of more than 30 years - written by a young man starting out on a wholly uncertain writing future - written by an old man looking back on a glittering career - and punctuated by all his experiences, discoveries, epiphanies. King brings all his Ka is a wheel, my friend. So, I loved the Dark Tower series. It's one of the best works of fantasy I've read. If you haven't started it: a) do so b) don't read the spoilers here The Dark Tower series is an incredibly varied set of books, written over the course of more than 30 years - written by a young man starting out on a wholly uncertain writing future - written by an old man looking back on a glittering career - and punctuated by all his experiences, discoveries, epiphanies. King brings all his talents to these pages ... and some of his weaknesses. You should read it, it is (forgive the pun) a towering work of imagination and characterization. *** This last volume is a curious mix for me, containing some great writing, an amazingly good idea for ending what must have been a very difficult tale to end well, and in some places some bewilderingly disappointing execution. This mix of brilliance and weakness has resulted in the 3* up top. Below I venture into the deepest realms of spoiler-land, pontificating on the ending. Don't go there if you've not read the book, really. (view spoiler)[ Really! Don't spoil it for yourself (view spoiler)[ So. Randalf Flag, Susannah's baby, and most of all the Crimson King were all huge anticlimaxes for me. Given the nature of the ending and King's skill I wonder if these weren't perhaps intended to be anticlimaxes with everything turning out to be less impressive, less important, more shabby and spoiled than it had been built up to be in Roland's mind. In book 4/5 we see that anything can be magic, with Dodge gearsticks performing as magic wands. Perhaps here we see that anything can be your arch-nemesis and the undoing of the world - it's us (or Roland) who invests them with that power and at the end of it all he sees them for what they are? Who knows. Either way as a reader finding the Crimson King who has sat at the heart of this epic for decades, and finding him to be an unimpressive grenade-lobbing old man with no special powers, no wisdom or insights ... offering no closure ... well it didn't sit well. Perhaps this was intentional - to give me the same empty feeling Roland gets in the end, but it didn't quite work for this reader. I felt short-changed. The idea for the close of the story, the coup de grace, is brilliant. But it could have been spelled out more clearly perhaps. A tough call since you don't want to over do it. The end message (that I took at least) is that the journey was (and is for all of us) the important thing. Not the ending. And that if we set our sights on the end goal and sacrifice everything to get it, we will lose out on every level. Roland, who we admired for his unflinching commitment to the cause, for the doggedness with which he pursued the tower, is doomed to start at the beginning and repeat the hunt yet again for Ka is a wheel and he is bound to it. The strengths we saw in him, the willingness to sacrifice everything, even friends at the very end, are now shown as his weaknesses. His only chance to leave the wheel and find peace is to see this truth - that the important things are those he sacrifices time and again. His singularity of purpose is his curse, not his strength - the friendships and loves he encounters in the NOW are what matters, not the paper-thin Crimson King trapped in an empty tower. The path he plots toward the tower is the crucial thing - not if he gets there. This is a beautiful, powerful way to conclude such an epic and I applaud King for his vision. I just wish he'd written it in a way that connected better with me when I read it. (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)] Join my 3-emails-a-year newsletter #prizes ......

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B+) 79% | Good Notes: A memorable final hundred pages to a book and series that were highly imaginative but also drawn out and uneven.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mario the lone bookwolf

    It´s not just that one understands the whole inner logic much better after finishing this, it´s a feeling of having experienced something so unique in its special quality that I would call it incomparable to any other series so far. But make sure you reach the end in one piece, (view spoiler)[ as Mordred will be in stalking and backstabbing and keep looking out for not stereotypical, glittering vampires to enhance your chance of survival too. (hide spoiler)] Ah Mordred, what a cool little fello It´s not just that one understands the whole inner logic much better after finishing this, it´s a feeling of having experienced something so unique in its special quality that I would call it incomparable to any other series so far. But make sure you reach the end in one piece, (view spoiler)[ as Mordred will be in stalking and backstabbing and keep looking out for not stereotypical, glittering vampires to enhance your chance of survival too. (hide spoiler)] Ah Mordred, what a cool little fellow, he shows Kings´ talent for introspections, thoughts, monologues, and dialogues, something I can´t get enough of. Dialogues and these inner voices in cursive or something are extremely tricky to write, because of the inherent danger of losing the attention and grip around the readers' mind, but this can´t happen with the King. No matter how evil, sick, and demented the mentality of whatever beast may be, one can understand her/his/its/altogether mixed up motivations. You will always remember him when you wake up from the noise of your panicky screams. Runnin gag pun intended. Many criticized King for, against his habit of writing like haunted by the demons he creates, needing decades for finishing his series, but I think that constructing something interconnected with his other works, himself, and many symbols and hidden treasures, just takes its time. It´s instead pure luck for all readers that it took him so long, that he invested the time, and that we are privileged to see how he grew and changed as a writer, evolving newer and different Kings than the one that wrote the first novel. King could instead be criticized for producing some of his other, loveless, one could even say unmotivated novels written without lifeblood, but certainly not for the work he himself things is crucial and of the highest priority to himself. Imagine how it must be to construct a fantasy world over the course of adult life, reminiscing about yourself, integrating parts of yourself and your other works, reflecting what you´ve done, just watching it grow. Something like this, on top of that by one of the greatest writers of all time, is much more precious than a disposable fantasy-, horror-, or sci-fi series without any unique characteristics. It may be well written, but just a clone among many. I am so looking forward to rereading the whole series after hopefully forgetting all I´ve remembered while writing this reviews that hooked me on, I should probably get wasted to delete my memory, but I don´t like brain damage so much. Hm, memory deleting tech is still not there yet and I don´t really trust the pharmaceutical option or self psychotherapy and hypnosis because of the monsters hiding in my mind, so I fear I will have to read it with all the foreknowledge. And it will be great, bombastic, epic, so much to rediscover, the only disadvantage is that I fear that I could enter a both wonderful and horrible rereading phase of many of my favorite authors, leading to a stagnation in exploring new genres and authors, but heck, that´s totally worth it and at least better as degeneration. (view spoiler)[Someone is getting reincarnated, you may, of course, guess who. (hide spoiler)] Tropes show how literature is conceptualized and created and which mixture of elements makes works and genres unique: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.ph...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Greene

    Finishing this book is like ending a relationship you don't want to be over, but is was certainly a relationship that needed ending. You will be frustrated, angry, and WANTING MORE LIKE A DAMN DRUG! Stephen King is the master of mind f*cking his readers. Rarely has he done it so well as here. Full Review Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fP_0q... Finishing this book is like ending a relationship you don't want to be over, but is was certainly a relationship that needed ending. You will be frustrated, angry, and WANTING MORE LIKE A DAMN DRUG! Stephen King is the master of mind f*cking his readers. Rarely has he done it so well as here. Full Review Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fP_0q...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    WARNING! THIS REVIEW IS FULL OF SPOILERS, ONCE YOU GET PAST THE PART "THE ENDING:". DO NOT READ ON UNLESS YOU WANT IT SPOILED FOR YOU! YOU WERE WARNED! I finished the Dark Tower last night. I hadn't plannet to, I really needed to get to bed, but once I got so close, I had to continue. Wow ... hard to find the words, really. (This email will likely be longish) THE SERIES: I think the Dark Tower series is King's crowning achievement as a writer. He has created a world as rich as any other fantasy/Sc WARNING! THIS REVIEW IS FULL OF SPOILERS, ONCE YOU GET PAST THE PART "THE ENDING:". DO NOT READ ON UNLESS YOU WANT IT SPOILED FOR YOU! YOU WERE WARNED! I finished the Dark Tower last night. I hadn't plannet to, I really needed to get to bed, but once I got so close, I had to continue. Wow ... hard to find the words, really. (This email will likely be longish) THE SERIES: I think the Dark Tower series is King's crowning achievement as a writer. He has created a world as rich as any other fantasy/Sci-Fi/Horror epic, replete with a fasincating history and characters that make you aching for more. In Roland Deschain, he's created I think his greatest and most dynamic character. He is dark, brooding, yet classicly heroic all at once, full of, like all real people, many contradictions and inner turmoils. His quest for the Dark Tower I feel is not only a holy one, not just his destiny, but something of his own personal validation, an obsession, the only way he could justify the deaths of so many loved ones and companions over the years. The series clearly has taken on a different life from the one it started with, as most series probably do. I think King switched gears a number of times which makes for slightly shaking continuity, but I think he did his best at finding ways to weave it together. A lesser writer wouldn't have been able to do so. He has said he plans or at least would like to rewrite them, and I think that is interesting and would love to read them again. I probably will whether he does so or not. THE ENDING: The part you're waiting for. The part we all read seven big books for. I realized at least two or three books ago that there would be no way he could end it that would please everybody. And as I read on, I had no idea how he'd end it and decided to have no preconceived notions or hopes. But boy, I sure didn't expect that! I have to say, that upon reading the intro to the final chapter from the Storyteller himself, the warning to not read on and leave the story as it is, I was tempted to do so. I know many wouldn't agree with me, but I think Roland entering the Dark Tower and the doors shutting behind him wouldn't be a bad way to end the book. It would leave it to your imagination, what he would find there. I really almost put it down to sleep on it. But then I thought no, I have to go on. I've come this far! Yes, in a way, the ending is tragic, sad, and extremely unfair. We have read now thousands of pages worth of Roland Deschain's torments and struggles he's gone through to get this far, and then only to have been blasted back to the beginning? It's horrible. It makes you angry. Or at least shocked. A knee jerk reaction might be to say that it was a cop out, that King didn't know how to end the book at went this route at the last minute. I don't really believe that. In a way, yes, I find the ending bittering. My heart really is broken for Roland. I don't think I've ever read a book with an ending that has left me so effected. I even reread the very end of it again this morning over breakfast. Yes, the ending is bittering, and yet, I love it in a lot of ways too. Not love it as in this is the way I think it should have ended, but love it because it knocked me on my backside, love it in the way that you can love a bad thing at times. In a way, to me at least, the ending just might make a little sense. It you really think about it ... what did you expect to happen to Roland once he reached the top of the Tower? Would he pass into a sort of Heaven, rejoined with his love Susan and his former Ka mates? That is probably the ending some people wanted. And if that's what happened, I would have been fine with that too. Would he have confronted God himself? And if so, what would Roland have done before such a God? Roland, one of the things that makes him so wonderful, is kind of a jerk. After all that trouble, all that sacrifice, if said God said something Roland didn't like, I think, much like Conan, he'd tell his Maker to take a flying leap, maybe even draw his gun on him and get blasted into nothingness. But why this? Why the torture? I think the answer is in Roland himself. I think it's a sort of punishment for Roland's arrogance and pride. I think Roland's destiny was to save the Beam, save the Dark Tower. He did that. But he insisted on moving on. He insisted on going to the top of the Dark Tower, something that is perhaps forbidden by Gan or the Powers That Be. He saved the Dark Tower, saved the Beam, and yet it was not enough. As always (and as echoed by the voices he hears at the end of the book) he has to have it His way. And for that, I think, like something out of Greek myth, he has to pay a price. And as King himself says in the Afterword, there is a bit of hope. In the next incarnation, he has the Horn of Eld. Something he didn't have in the previous. Perhaps, just perhaps, with some more trial and error, once the Beam and the Tower saved (perhaps stilling getting all the way, so as to kill the Crimson King), Roland may just turn around and go back to the Callas, and live out the rest of his days quiet and peacefully, maybe as a sort of Sheriff, then going to the Clearing at the End of the Path, and THEN be united withi Susan, Cuthbert, Alain, and the rest. Maybe I'm just grateful that King didn't end it the way I feared. The more I read on, and the more sai King appeared, I was terrified and more and more certain that once Roland met face to face with the Crimson King, that it would be Stephen King himself. I even started to fear that the name, the Crimson KING was a clue. Thankfully, I was wrong. And then, I feared even worse, that once he got to the top of the tower, that there he'd find Stephen King, sitting in a pseudo office of sorts, surrounded by old books and manuscripts, as mad as the Hatter, banging away at an old typewriter and tossing the crumpled up pages over his shoulder making a big pile. That's what I feared, and compared to that, I like this ending just fine.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    The 2011 re-read The quest for the Dark Tower comes to a brutal conclusion. Can Roland and his friends stop the Breakers of Algul Siento, safeguard the Beam, protect the Rose, stop Stephen King from being run down and killed, and reach the Dark Tower? This is the end of my favorite epic of all time. I'm just going to mark the rest of the review as spoilers. Read at your own risk. (view spoiler)[ Here we are again. Has it really been seven years since the last time I read this? When the last Dark Towe The 2011 re-read The quest for the Dark Tower comes to a brutal conclusion. Can Roland and his friends stop the Breakers of Algul Siento, safeguard the Beam, protect the Rose, stop Stephen King from being run down and killed, and reach the Dark Tower? This is the end of my favorite epic of all time. I'm just going to mark the rest of the review as spoilers. Read at your own risk. (view spoiler)[ Here we are again. Has it really been seven years since the last time I read this? When the last Dark Tower book was finally published in 2004, I took a Friday off work to make sure I'd have plenty of time to read that first weekend. I don't remember how many days it took to read through the 800+ pages but I know I tore through it. The re-read has almost been like a completely new book. Except... ...Well, there's no real way to sugar coat this. The first time through, I shed silent man tears at the deaths of Eddie, Jake, and even Oy the billy-bumbler. Since I knew what was coming, you'd think I'd be able to brace myself during the re-read. Nope. There were silent man tears shed once again. I think it was actually worse this time since I knew what was going to happen. So much has changed since 2004 when I last finished this book. People have passed through my life and some have passed on altogether. To the clearing at the end of the path, as Roland would say. A lot happens in seven years. When Roland calls out the names of his ka-tet and the others outside the tower, I'd be lying if I said I hadn't thought of doing something similar. There's a feeling of suspense throughout most of the 800 pages, from the battle at Algul Siento to the saving of Stephen King to the final fight at the end. Roland's feeling of loss was a very real thing. I know because I felt it too. I think it was actually Roland's feeling of loss that pushed my buttons rather than the actual deaths and the breaking of the ka-tet. When the toughest son of a bitch in all the worlds cries, it's some serious shit. By the time this book rolls around, Roland is a vastly different person from the ruthless Man with No Name he was in The Gunslinger. Even before the Dark Tower was completed, it was one of the books against which I measured all others. Since re-reading the entire saga a second time, I'm happy to say that it still is. That's not to say I don't have any complaints about the saga. For one thing, I felt like Eddie and Walter both went out like chumps. Walter's portrayed as a big bad throughout the series and didn't really do much. It made Mordred seem like a capable threat but I would have preferred Walter dying by Roland's hand. Speaking of Mordred, his storyline almost felt tacked on and I felt the whole Susannah-Mia thing was overly complex. The Crimson King was a little bit of a letdown as well. The final battle felt like something out of a video game and I couldn't help but picture The Crimson King looking like Dr. Robotnik from Sonic the Hedgehog. The ending seems to be a big problem for a lot of people. I didn't have a problem with the ending during the first read, nor do I have a problem with it now. The underlying theme of the series is that Ka is a wheel. Roland going back to the beginning reinforces that fact. King also let himself an opportunity to redo the series if he is so inclined in Roland having the Horn of Eld in his possession at the resumption of his quest. (hide spoiler)] I don't really have much else to say. It was my favorite epic when I was 19 and will probably be my favorite epic when I'm 99. It's not for everyone but few really good books are. I'll be reading it again in the future. Hopefully sooner than another seven years. The 2019 re-read Well, it took eight years, not seven, and a baby on the way to get me to re-read The Dark Tower. Since the last time, I've gotten married and both my grandmother and my dog went to the Clearing at the end of the Path. I still love the Dark Tower as a whole but some of the shine has worn off this penny in the last eight years. Part of the difference is that I was gung ho to read it the last two times. This time felt more like an obligation to get to the Tower before my son was born so I put a more critical eye to it. Stephen King never met a long ass sentence he didn't like. There is so much rambling and unnecessary stuff in this. For a book when the universe could be destroyed at any moment, there's a lot of sitting around and talking in it. Too many things hinge on coincidences. Some things happening because of fate is cool. Too many and it just feels lazy. (view spoiler)[ It still bugs me that Walter, Eddie, and Mordred all go out like chumps. The final fight with the Crimson King is almost embarrassing after all the hell we went through to get there. All that aside, I still enjoyed it quite a bit. Jake's death got to me even on the third read. The entire saga could be read as a metaphor for the cost of addiction and/or obsession. Is Roland Captain Ahab and the Dark Tower his Moby Dick? Yes, yes it is. Or if the Dark Tower is God, is Roland Job? Looking back, I think the tonal shifts bothered me the most. The Crimson King killed himself by swallowing a spoon and now he can't die. What kind of horseshit is that? Same with the Wizard of Oz junk in Wizard and Glass. (hide spoiler)] I have arrived at the Dark Tower once again and now it will remain closed for the foreseeable future. I'll read it again once my son is Jake's age.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “It'll be your damnation, boy. You'll wear out a hundred pairs of boots on your way to hell.” How does one even begin to review the conclusion to what I believe is one of the greatest series of all time? I simply cannot put into words what this series means to me and how much of an emotional rollercoaster this final book is. It’s also really freakin’ hard to review any book in a series! If you’re in any way invested in this series, the last book is pretty much 800+ pages of saying goodbye, which i “It'll be your damnation, boy. You'll wear out a hundred pairs of boots on your way to hell.” How does one even begin to review the conclusion to what I believe is one of the greatest series of all time? I simply cannot put into words what this series means to me and how much of an emotional rollercoaster this final book is. It’s also really freakin’ hard to review any book in a series! If you’re in any way invested in this series, the last book is pretty much 800+ pages of saying goodbye, which is incredibly heartbreaking. And King makes a decision in this book which I will honestly never forgive him for. If you’ve read the series, you’ll know. I’m talking in code here, of course, but I just feel it was totally unnecessary. I’m already crushed, why you gotta pummel my heart even more?!! There are so many parts I love in here that I want to fangirl over, but I’m trying to remain as spoiler-free as possible. However, there are also some anti-climactic moments too. And I got a little impatient reading a particular character’s backstory early on in the novel. I feel a little disappointed with those parts, but I still thoroughly love this book. In terms of the ending itself - whether you love it or hate it, I can’t think of a more perfect ending for this series. And for the record I am firmly in the love camp! Even though it depresses the heck outta me. I’m so glad I made another trip to the Dark Tower in 2019. I’ve loved every single page and am already looking forward to my next reread. This little ka-tet feels like family and Mid-World feels like home. Say thank ya. 5 stars. "And will I tell you that these three lived happily ever after? I will not, for no one ever does. But there was happiness. And they did live."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Learned a valuable lesson with this book....never recommend a series to friends until it is finished. I am one of Stephen King's 'constant readers.' Usually I am a big fan, and I've bought enough of his expensive hardcovers over the years that I'm perfectly comfortable throwing in my two cents about the dreadful way he ended The Dark Tower. I'm applying that two stars rating to the last three books of the series, Wolves of the Calla, Song Of Susannah (UGH!) and this, The Dark Tower. They all seem Learned a valuable lesson with this book....never recommend a series to friends until it is finished. I am one of Stephen King's 'constant readers.' Usually I am a big fan, and I've bought enough of his expensive hardcovers over the years that I'm perfectly comfortable throwing in my two cents about the dreadful way he ended The Dark Tower. I'm applying that two stars rating to the last three books of the series, Wolves of the Calla, Song Of Susannah (UGH!) and this, The Dark Tower. They all seem to have been written in a rush after King's brush with mortality when he was hit by that van. What a waste of all the great material he had to work with. If I was rating the first four books, my review would have been five stars. Unfortunately...... Hated the way the vast world of the gunslinger kept getting smaller, with constant trips back to good old New York, to dabble in real estate and investing in Microsoft. Real friggin' epic. Oh, and ANOTHER personality for Susannah. All the metafiction King attempted by writing himself into the story falls flat, and I think breaks the contract he made with readers in earlier books, to play it straight with us and deliver something majestic. All the lame Harry Potter references begs for comparisons between this series and Rowling's, which just wrapped up. I hope King read Deathly Hollows and saw the way a writer can end their story with a satisfying bang, instead of this muddled, poorly plotted disappointment. I could go on and on, but it is getting late. Gotta say, though- I'm surprised by all the five star ratings.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths Reviews The quest for the Dark Tower is ending! All the weary miles, endless deaths, heroic stands, and lost loved ones is finally coming to an end for Roland Deschain of Gilead and his ka-tet. And the weary but dedicated fan can finally savor that ending. An ending that will somehow, someway tie up all the loose plots and cause all their frustration about the years between novels, the endless lore changes, the confusing multiverse, and even Stephen King writ Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths Reviews The quest for the Dark Tower is ending! All the weary miles, endless deaths, heroic stands, and lost loved ones is finally coming to an end for Roland Deschain of Gilead and his ka-tet. And the weary but dedicated fan can finally savor that ending. An ending that will somehow, someway tie up all the loose plots and cause all their frustration about the years between novels, the endless lore changes, the confusing multiverse, and even Stephen King writing himself into the story to disappear from their minds For the end of the Dark Tower Saga will be a wonderful, dramatic, earth-shattering ending. The same kind of ending Tolkien provided fantasy fans with in The Return of the King, where a reader watched breathlessly as Frodo and Sam slunk across the desolate plains of Mordor, striving to reach Mount Doom and destroy the One Ring; only to discover to their sheer wonder and delight that the tale was still not done, but that Tolkien would allow them to follow along behind the hobbits for just a little longer - until the true ending at the Grey Havens. That is the type of finale The Dark Tower must have, because every reader of King’s saga knows that a tale as massive and epic as this deserves that Lord of the Rings type of closure. The kind of ending where a reader closes the novel and sits there, stunned into silent contemplation at the stupendous journey that they have finally COMPLETED! And as a reader begins The Dark Tower Book VII, he/she will begin to see his/her deeply held hope coming to fruition as dangling plots begin to be completed. Immediately, Roland and his friends set forth to stop the Breakers of Algul Siento and save the Beam, protect the Rose (whatever it really is) in New York, and stop Stephen King from being run down by a real life automobile and killed. Everything begins to take shape for the final push to the Dark Tower. So it seems obvious that finally Stephen King is going to reveal the “5 Ws and H” of the grand saga. Who the hell is this Crimson King, who has orchestrated the destruction of world after world in the multiverse, and who the hell is Marten Broadcloak/Randall Flagg really? What caused the Crimson King to go insane and begin to attack the Tower? Why was it so damn important for Roland to get to the tower in the first place? How did Roland’s quest kept the Dark Tower multiverse from continuing to move on? When did the old ones die out and leave their machines, or when did the worlds first start moving on? And finally - after all else has been completed - where is the Dark Tower, and what will happen when Roland finally enters it? But then something unprecedented happens in this grand finale of a sweeping epic. Nothing. That is right. You won’t find any of those questions answered. In fact, you won’t even find a dramatic ending like Lord of the Rings. Nope. It is not going to happen. As Stephen King himself writes at the end of the Quest for the Dark Tower: I’ve told my tale all the way to the end, and am satisfied. It was (I set my watch and warrant on it) the kind only a good God would save for last, full of monsters and marvels and voyaging here and there. I can stop now, put my pen down, and rest my weary hand . . . Yet some of you who have provided the ears without which no tale can survive a single day are likely not so willing. You are the grim, goal-oriented ones who will not believe that the joy is in the journey rather than the destination no matter how many times it has been proven o you. You are the unfortunate ones who still get the lovemaking all confused with the paltry squirt that comes to end the lovemaking . . . You are the cruel ones who deny the Grey Havens, where tired characters go to rest. You say you want to know how it all comes out. You say you want to follow Roland into the Tower; you say that is what you paid your money for, the show you came to see. I hope most of you know better. Want better. I hope you came to hear the tale, and not just munch your way through the pages to the ending. For an ending, you only have to turn to the last page and see what is there writ upon. But endings are heartless. An ending is a closed door no man (or Manni) can open. I’ve written many, but most only for the same reason that I pull on my pants in the morning before leaving the bedroom - because it is the custom of the country. And so, my dear Constant Reader, I tell you this: You can stop here. . . Should you go on, you will surely be disappointed, perhaps even heartbroken . . . There is no such thing as a happy ending. I never met a single one to equal “Once upon a time.” Endings are heartless. Ending is just another word for goodbye. And so after reading 4500 pages about Roland the Gunslinger, a reader is given a choice: stop the book without knowing what happens to Roland once he actually gets to the Dark Tower or read the ending and be disappointed. Who knew Stephen King was writing a Choose Your Own Adventure Book? Or that he was an attorney, because he just put a disclaimer in his book; a disclaimer that basically admits the ending sucks. But in any event, it doesn’t matter which “ending” a reader picks, because they both are horrid in different ways. One is the hollywood “And they all live happily ever after ending,” and the other is the “You wanted an ending, I’ll show you how clever I can be while I’m not giving you what you asked for” ending. And they both leave a reader wondering “Why did I read this series again?” The awful truth about The Dark Tower Book VII is that it is a dud. A clever buildup to a nothing happens. A Dallas “Get out of the shower it’s all been a dream.” Another Matrix sequel were our number today boys and girls is 101, and you are the sixth Chosen One, which means your dramatic victories are not anything new. Not a “flawed masterpiece” at all but a cleverly disguised fake. A huge belly flop into the abyss of bad endings. A book that just stinks. In fact, this “supposed” finale of the Dark Tower series makes such a mess of the story that Roland’s whole quest is rendered meaningless. A useless exercise in futility that is very similar to a hamster running as fast as he can on his exercise wheel. What King does to Roland in this novel is like Tolkien writing that Frodo reached Mount Doom only to discover that Sauron is really Father Christmas on psychotropic medications; the One Ring Frodo has been carrying is really a fake that Sauron allowed Gandalf and the Elves to believe was the real thing; and now - just to be a vindictive bastard (because there doesn’t seem to be any other logical reason) - Frodo and the Fellowship gets to relive the whole bloody quest in an endless loop. Maybe King never knew where Roland’s story was going. Maybe it was just a great idea, which he never really plotted out to guarantee that it ended correctly. I get all that, but if that is true, he should have used this last book to fix all those problems, not tell the reader “I hope you came to hear the tale, and not just munch your way through the pages to the ending.” Who the hell has ever went to a movie and been pleased when it stopped playing before the ending? Or worked all week just to be told “No pay check for you. Try to think back to all the fun you had here.” No one. And no one is going to like this ending. You might love the series or the characters and not want to admit how horrid this last book was, but deep down you realize it. And you cope by telling yourself how great the overall story was or that King focused on Roland’s spiritual journey in this book or whatever, but the fact of the matter is this novel continued the downward spiral of Roland’s story and left all of us scratching our heads thinking “Really, this is the end.” Mr. King, I’ve read epic, fantasy series. I’ve read grand finales with breathtaking endings. J.R.R. Tolkien took me to the Grey Havens once upon a time. Mr. King, you’re no J.R.R. Tolkien, and The Dark Tower was not The Return of the King.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    2.5 stars. This just fizzled out for me. It wasn't so much the ending itself - the wheel of ka seemed quite apt -so much as the let down of so many loose ends of the story. How events and characters had played such a large part in the story, only to come to almost nothing. I didn't like Stephen King's inclusion in the story. In the previous volume I thought it was quite clever, but in this volume it really read like he'd just run out of ideas and was prepared to throw in any old nonsense in order 2.5 stars. This just fizzled out for me. It wasn't so much the ending itself - the wheel of ka seemed quite apt -so much as the let down of so many loose ends of the story. How events and characters had played such a large part in the story, only to come to almost nothing. I didn't like Stephen King's inclusion in the story. In the previous volume I thought it was quite clever, but in this volume it really read like he'd just run out of ideas and was prepared to throw in any old nonsense in order to just get the series finished.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Jones-Goldstein

    It's not just the non-ending. Its the way he spends two books essentially stripping the series of everything good about it and replacing it with trite, poorly done, nudge nudge wink wink garbage. I waited years to find out how this would all end and to get a hastily done, sloppily written, poorly thought out book, capped with a lecture on how endings suck, swiftly followed by a non-ending is in a lot of ways insulting. I understand King didn't have a lot of desire to finish the series and was ti It's not just the non-ending. Its the way he spends two books essentially stripping the series of everything good about it and replacing it with trite, poorly done, nudge nudge wink wink garbage. I waited years to find out how this would all end and to get a hastily done, sloppily written, poorly thought out book, capped with a lecture on how endings suck, swiftly followed by a non-ending is in a lot of ways insulting. I understand King didn't have a lot of desire to finish the series and was tired of people bugging him about it. But this book and the previous one feel very much like King giving his readership the old one finger salute.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    WARNING!! Although it’s a non-review review, it’s still spoiler-y. This spoiler-laden review was brought to you by the number 19! With Special Guest Star: The Eraser Hi kids! I’m the Eraser. Remember stay in school and don’t do drugs! The gunslinger waved to his pal, The Eraser, and thanked him for his help in dispatching the Kooky Krazy King of Krimson. “Thank you, Mr. Eraser! “That’s The Eraser, you twit!” “Sorry, Mr. The Eraserhead.” “Bah. I’ve got the holiday fever. I wonder if there’s an interdim WARNING!! Although it’s a non-review review, it’s still spoiler-y. This spoiler-laden review was brought to you by the number 19! With Special Guest Star: The Eraser Hi kids! I’m the Eraser. Remember stay in school and don’t do drugs! The gunslinger waved to his pal, The Eraser, and thanked him for his help in dispatching the Kooky Krazy King of Krimson. “Thank you, Mr. Eraser! “That’s The Eraser, you twit!” “Sorry, Mr. The Eraserhead.” “Bah. I’ve got the holiday fever. I wonder if there’s an interdimensional door to an alternate universe Festivus celebration or maybe I can return to Batman continuity.” And he was gone. The gunslinger, now alone, turned towards the tower which not coincidentally towered into the clouds. From a loud speaker at the tippy-top of the tower, he heard, faintly, Elton John’s “Someone Saved My Life Tonight”. He hated that song. “Good golly, that tower sure is tall. And dark. Ish” He had to turn the song off, so he lumbered into the doorway of the tower looking for an elevator but only found a winding stair case. On the first floor he encountered Musty, the six-legged smelly mutant cat. “Gee Musty, you’ve grown a pace. Now get along and let me up those stairs.” Musty, now big enough and mean enough to block the stairwell, wouldn’t budge. “I reckon I ain’t goin’ nowhere until I gives ya a tongue bath.” Two hours later as the gun slinger, slipped past a sleeping Musty, he was pulling strands of cat hair from his mouth. The next level of the tower offered a buffet of cheese and mayo sandwiches and a case of Nozz-A-La Cola to wash it down, but all the gunslinger could think of was pound cake. Pulling more even longer threads of cat hair from his mouth, the Gunslinger grew queasy, but strains of that horrible song put him back on track and he climbed upward. The next few floors offered nothing more than a few lobstrosities here and some slow muties there. After he completed the painful climb through those floors the gun slinger reckoned he could get along without a few less fingers and toes. Dad-a-chim. Reaching the twelfth (or was it the eighth floor, it could have been the fourteenth floor) the gunslinger saw the big Gan, Stephen King himself all trussed up, just like the gunslinger left him back in Jeff’s last review of this series. “Oh, Mr. Gan, you got to help me turn this furshlinger song off!” “But I love this song. I wrote into the series and I won’t help you.” “Well then I reckon I’m just gonna have to leave ya tied up.” As Stephen King’s curses echoed in the stairwell and the gunslingers ears, he felt fatigued from his climb but knew instinctively that he was getting closer to the top of the tower. Cackling laughter floated down from the next floor. He knew it was the legendary gunslinger, Quick Draw. “Get up here, graymeat! I got somethin’ for ya.” He was scared, but terror and curiosity compelled him further up the steps. Quick Draw greeted him with a huge grin. Behind her was the door to the off switch. “I’ll let ya through this door, but first ya have to listen to a long-assed tale, I got to tell ya. It’ll only take me a couple a days and it will have little or nothin’ to do with this here adventure, so if ya have to use the can, hold it in.” She cackled. “And ya better listen to this story like ya mean it!!!” He felt himself drift off after a few minutes but a swift kick in the head woke the gunslinger up and he was pointed towards the door. He opened it, only to be greeted by a familiar bright light and a hot desert sun. As the door was slammed behind him and his brain swirled inside his head, he felt something in his pocket. He pulled it out to reveal – curiously - a magic wand… I want to thank my Goodreads Buddy Readers for an incredibly epic journey that spanned years, and especially our din, Sai Stepheny, who always makes buddy reads an enriching and fun experience. Thankee and long days and pleasant nights, ya crazy Mah Fah!!.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    ”The roses of Can'-Ka No Rey opened before him in a path to the Dark Tower, the yellow suns deep in their cups seeming to regard him like eyes.” Journey’s end approaches, and the last gunslinger at last sets his gaze upon the great shadowy column at the end of the road. Yet dangers still lie in the way, and secrets, and the greatest mystery of all: what lies beyond the gate? What can be found at the top of the Tower? Reading Stephen King’s Dark Tower series has now been a journey spanning years. I ”The roses of Can'-Ka No Rey opened before him in a path to the Dark Tower, the yellow suns deep in their cups seeming to regard him like eyes.” Journey’s end approaches, and the last gunslinger at last sets his gaze upon the great shadowy column at the end of the road. Yet dangers still lie in the way, and secrets, and the greatest mystery of all: what lies beyond the gate? What can be found at the top of the Tower? Reading Stephen King’s Dark Tower series has now been a journey spanning years. It had its upsides and downsides. Sometimes it seemed like a pendulum spinning endlessly back and forth between tedious boredom and spectacular amazement. This seventh volume was difficult to get through. Although the beginning kicked off with a continuation of the climactic part of Song of Susannah, this book as a whole was the most boring part of the Dark Tower series since the second book. I was wondering sometimes if it deserved to be simply abandoned. But I convinced myself that I had gotten this far. I had to see the ending. And it turned out to become one of my favourite series of all time. Because the ending is fucking perfect. Contrary to a lot of people, I found the final set of chapters to be an excellently fitting way of ending a Stephen King book, the perfect ending to the Dark Tower series, and one of the best endings I have ever read in speculative fiction. "All right. I go. Long days and pleasant nights. May we meet in the clearing at the end of the path when all worlds end." Yet even then he knew this would not happen, for the worlds would never end, not now, and for him there would be no clearing. For Roland Deschain of Gilead, last of Eld's line, the path ended at the Dark Tower. And that did him fine. Dark Tower reviews: #1 The Gunslinger #2 The Drawing of the Three #3 The Waste Lands #4 Wizard and Glass #5 Wolves of the Calla #6 Song of Susannah #7 The Dark Tower

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    So. I've been sitting here staring at this screen for about 2 hours after finishing The Dark Tower. It was pretty touch-and-go for a bit. I couldn't see much through the tears. But I'm back now. It's not like this is the first time I read the book. I had a book hangover then, also, but I think I'm recovering slightly better than that last time. I'm afraid I can't say ANYTHING about this book without going into spoiler territory. It's brilliant and it's epic, of course, and it keeps blowing my min So. I've been sitting here staring at this screen for about 2 hours after finishing The Dark Tower. It was pretty touch-and-go for a bit. I couldn't see much through the tears. But I'm back now. It's not like this is the first time I read the book. I had a book hangover then, also, but I think I'm recovering slightly better than that last time. I'm afraid I can't say ANYTHING about this book without going into spoiler territory. It's brilliant and it's epic, of course, and it keeps blowing my mind over and over and over again right before it tears out my heart and stamps all over it again and again and again... but by the end, I'm saying to myself, "Go then, there are other worlds than these..." (view spoiler)[I DIED when Eddie and Jake died. When Oy sacrificed himself to fight Mordred, I also died. When Susannah left, finally taking the path AWAY FROM Samsara, I died, because all that was left was an artist, Roland, and Oy. She gave up on him. Of course, there were the dreams and the DT sung to all the Ka-Tet, but still. Roland started his obsession alone and he ended alone, a victim of his own obsession. Or rather, not quite alone. The Crimson King joins him in his obsession. Forever. Time runs backward there, and as we learn later, it repeats. What really freaks me out is the fact that Roland could have relied on the artist to erase the Crimson King entirely, kill evil forever, and yet Roland instead plucks a rose that serves as AN ENTIRE UNIVERSE, sacrificing it, having his blood mix with it, in order to blind the Crimson King before the great erasure. But it was this great evil of Roland's, along with the painting, that lets the Crimson King endure. Just his eyes, of course, but because he got painted with the Blood of Eld and the sacrifice of an entire universe, Roland ensures that his and the Crimson King's obsession endures forever. The climb up the tower, his reliving his past, brought him back 34 years to the darkest point of his hopeless obsession, ever and forever coming back to the Dark Tower. Where do I get the 34 years? Roland and Stephen King are the same man. King wrote this Cycle between 1970 and 2004. It was his grand obsession, and he wrote himself, sometimes humorously and often as a victim of his own hubris, right into the Dark Tower in a very meta and awesomely brilliant way. So. Who is who? Roland? Crimson King? Or Stephen King? They are all victims of their obsession, and their child, either metaphorically or TRULY, is Mordred, the complete body of Stephen King's writing. Which, if you recall, brings in SO MUCH of the Dark Tower mythos. So let's look at the deaths of our great antagonists who all serve the beam. Walter dies, is consumed by SK's bibliography. Mordred grapples with Oy, the last member of Roland's Ka-Tet, which, you should remember, is part dog. And SK has made a point of directing us to the reversibility of Dog as God. Roland and SK take a final parting shot at SK's body of work and kills him (it). The Crimson King, the greatest evil in all universes, across all universes, is left with nothing more than two red eyes that will never die in the hub of all universes. This is SK telling us that as the beams regenerate and the Dark Tower brings magic back into all worlds, the seeds for new evil (And New Stories) will always be waiting in the wings. And Roland? Well, SK's writing obsession will never end. (hide spoiler)] And with that, I beg your pardon. That I do. I needed to say something REAL about this book that affected me soooo damn much. Still affects me. It's one of the most brilliant works I've ever read, together with the rest of the cycle. Sure, there are some things that aren't all that good, but EVERYTHING SERVES THE BEAM. And the beam, the Dark Tower itself, is GOOD. For all the things I could complain about, the really awesome aspects FAR OUTWEIGH the bad... and so much so that I'm left giddy and lost in tears. Say what you will, but these books are something truly memorable. One more thing: (view spoiler)[My edition of The Dark Tower has a picture of Roland carrying an uprooted rose at the base of the Dark Tower. This has got to be one of the most fucked up and nasty covers in history. I mean, it looks rather pretty, right? But what we're looking at is Roland SACRIFICING A WHOLE UNIVERSE, just like he let Jake die, in order to GET to the Dark Tower. This is SIN. Roland's sin. Endlessly repeated. He will never learn his lesson. A universe among so many universes is not so great a price, IS IT? Of course, that universe could have been ours. Or another Keystone Earth. But what does he care? He is deep in the throes of his obsession. Kind of like being a writer. Pouring your soul into your work and yet you always get shat on, and yet you keep writing. And writing. And writing. You may try to balance what you do against the needs of life, and Roland DID try to change, to love his Ka-Tet, to be a wonderfully rounded human being, but in the end, he chose writing over his friends and his family and Gan. And paid the price. *shiver* (hide spoiler)]

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sagan

    My first thought was, he lied in every word... Isn’t it funny? So, you read 7 books (8, if you count The Wind Through The Keyhole), you’re at the end of the last one and you’re wondering how the heck will it end. It’s not about the journey anymore. The journey is over. It’s 110% about the destination. You have no predictions, no clues, no nothing. You can’t even try to guess because your mind is completely empty and all you have are the words you’re reading, page after page after page. It’s like My first thought was, he lied in every word... Isn’t it funny? So, you read 7 books (8, if you count The Wind Through The Keyhole), you’re at the end of the last one and you’re wondering how the heck will it end. It’s not about the journey anymore. The journey is over. It’s 110% about the destination. You have no predictions, no clues, no nothing. You can’t even try to guess because your mind is completely empty and all you have are the words you’re reading, page after page after page. It’s like you held your breath for the last 300 pages or so. And then you’re finally there, standing beside Roland, crying the names of your friends and loved ones and ka-mates; those names carried clear in that strange air, as if they would echo forever. You enter the Dark Tower. You begin to climb the stairs and soon enough you find yourself at the top of the Dark Tower, watching your name carved on the last door. You open it. And you understand... (view spoiler)[...how useless your life can be. How your dreams and hopes mean nothing. They aren’t even really yours. You’re like Sisif, rolling a boulder uphill, without end. But it’s OK. Because you forget. And you start a new cycle. Again. And again. And again. Until the end of time. (hide spoiler)] Oh Discordia! That is the truth.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    “If at his counsel I should turn aside Into that ominous tract which, all agree, Hides the Dark Tower. Yet acquiescingly I did turn as he pointed: neither pride Nor hope rekindling at the end descried, So much as gladness that some end might be.” - Robert Browning And so we come to the clearing at the end of the path. Stephen King’s epic poetic prose inspired by Browning’s poem is a unique and troubling masterpiece of fantasy. Looking back over the seven principle books, from The Gunslinger first publis “If at his counsel I should turn aside Into that ominous tract which, all agree, Hides the Dark Tower. Yet acquiescingly I did turn as he pointed: neither pride Nor hope rekindling at the end descried, So much as gladness that some end might be.” - Robert Browning And so we come to the clearing at the end of the path. Stephen King’s epic poetic prose inspired by Browning’s poem is a unique and troubling masterpiece of fantasy. Looking back over the seven principle books, from The Gunslinger first published in 1982 to this last, first published in 2004, (as well as The Wind Through the Keyhole addendum published in 2012) and comprising well over 4,000 pages. King has woven a tapestry of magical realism and fantasy that blends a lyric quest with modern American cultural references into a whole that stands alone in literature. I can only think of Jack Vance’s The Complete Lyonesse trilogy that comes close to this kind of world building and King far surpasses the Grandmaster in breadth and scope of vision. In this final chapter King ties up the loose ends (for the most part) and draws the story to an end (sort of). Roland is a protagonist drawn from many sources and as a King protagonist he is iconic. No doubt this was an epochal book for Stephen King, who actually thought of writing it years before he actually began the writing process, and who included himself in the narrative as a pseudo deus ex machina writer. King’s description of this multiverse, especially how he has drawn connections with his own work was impressive. His extensive use of symbolism, metaphor and allegory were brilliant.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed. I don't think a sentence has intrigued me more in the literary world. The italicized sentence started the long journey of Roland Deschain of Gilead, line of Eld. And, it finishes King's telling of Roland Deschain's, dan-dinh of the ka-tet, journey. I'm sitting here, thinking, trying to formulate the right words to say what I need to in this review. It's almost 3 a.m., and I have to be quite honest: this journey has worn me out. The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed. I don't think a sentence has intrigued me more in the literary world. The italicized sentence started the long journey of Roland Deschain of Gilead, line of Eld. And, it finishes King's telling of Roland Deschain's, dan-dinh of the ka-tet, journey. I'm sitting here, thinking, trying to formulate the right words to say what I need to in this review. It's almost 3 a.m., and I have to be quite honest: this journey has worn me out. Emotionally, I don't think I could handle another installment. I don't think I could handle another trip in Roland's life. I say this with praise, not disdain. A much lighter read will be taking place after this... I was a little worried King would leave things unfinished in areas. With a story so involved, so many characters, and odds and ends to tie up, I was worried I would be left wondering, "What happened to...??" I wasn't. I know everything King wanted us to know about Roland, Eddie, Jake, Susannah, Oy, and every character in-between. I think that is a small part of what made this story so great. Was this the ending I wanted? To be quite honest, I didn't know what I wanted, well, maybe to some degree. Was it what I expected? Absolutely not. Am I left feeling empty? YES. Am I feeling like I need emotional therapy because of how many times I have cried reading this book? Well, we won't go there...;) Like I said, I didn't really know what kind of ending I wanted for Roland. All I really knew was.....I didn't want him to die. If you've read it, you know what happens. For future readers, I won't spoil it for you, like I had someone keep doing to me. (And it pissed me off beyond belief.) Also, I knew, I wanted him to make it to the Dark Tower, and then....I honestly didn't know what after that. I have read some different reviews, and people wondering why King ended this book the way he did, and I think I get it. I think I understand...maybe.... I will have to think about it, though. Am I disappointed in the ending?...absolutely not. Things really began to make sense for me in this book. Loose ends tied with their other half to close out the importance. And everything fit together so perfectly, so magically, and there were no loose ends for me. I'm going to get into some spoilery junk, so if you haven't read it, do yourself a major solid, and don't cheat...(view spoiler)[ I understand why he did it...I understand why Eddie died. It was ka. When Eddie died, I felt like...the journey really started to be 'over.' When Jake died...I was so damned angry at King. I thought, "Finally, father and son are together...Finally, Roland can stop beating himself up over dropping Jake." But no...King just had to go there. Break my heart. Jake is without a doubt, my favorite character in this series. I don't know if I can fully explain why, but he is. I think its because his parents cast him off to the side, and let someone else raise him without any regard to his feelings....just like my own mother did. There's a wisdom which comes from knowing "the truth", say thank ya, and Jake definitely shows it in this journey. Having Jake die.....hurt. But, I guess in the end, he didn't really die...He just took his life to somewhere where Mid-World can't harm him any longer. Roland, I've definitely loved since he openend the three doors, and formed his ka-tet. (Well, Jake's journey into Mid-World for the second time was different, as we all know). There was never a time when I felt like I didn't like Roland. I always felt like...and this is weird,...but I could trust what he said, his wisdom, knowledge, and just him. When Roland was around, I felt like the ka-tet was safe. Safe from harm. But, I guess even the most powerful of gunslingers can't save everyone, can they? Eddie....ha...Well, he made me laugh quite a bit. He reminds me a bit of my older brother. Always cracking jokes, even when it's inappropriate. I really enjoyed the way his character grew and changed from junkie to a gunslinger who can stand with the best of the best...Roland of Gilead. Eddie really grew on me, and matured over time. I think it is what partially helped him to grow on me. His undying love for Susannah proved he was more than just a recovering junkie wasting his life on drugs. It proved he was human, had a heart, and a will to live. But, being a gunslinger, he also proved his worth. He helped to save the Dark Tower from falling, even if he didn't get to see the Dark Tower itself and touch it. Ka is a real bitch. Oy....who doesn't love Oy? I cried...okay...bawled when Mordred murdered Oy. See? Told you I need Dark Tower therapy. Oy provided a lightness, a reprieve from darkness. He added so much character to the story, or at least I thought so. I think I said this in a previous review of one of the DT books, but I love animals. I have two cats of my own, and one of whom is very, very special to me. I thought, for the longest time, Oy would make it to the Dark Tower. I knew better deep down inside. I knew it was Roland's journey to make alone....and for that...Oy had to die. Did I like it?....Oh hell to the no, I did not. But, at least, it's just a story....No real billy-bumbler died. Say thank ya big-big. Again...ka.. Susannah, has been my least favorite character. She has been since the beginning. In a previous review, I said I thought her character was lacking, and I think King really brought her around in the end. She still isn't my favorite, and I don't 'hate' her character in the slightest. In fact, I thought she was perfect for the series. However, she just wasn't my favorite. I, for some reason was surprised she was the one who made it that long on the journey. I really thought after Eddie died, she would be gone...like dead gone. Actually, I thought she was going to die first. Don't know why I thought that, but I did. I knew someone...didn't know so many though, was going to die. For some reason, I suspected it was her. King definitely proved me wrong. And for that, I say thank ya. (hide spoiler)] I say thank ya because, this whole time, throughout the entire journey, I never knew what to expect. I had someone spoil several things in the story for me before I started to read this journey, and it made me quite angry. Fortunately, I had a few people tell me the story was so much more than those few inklings of spoilers: Blaine the Train, the wolves of Calla Bryn Sturgis, the literary ties to other famous stories, Gasher, Pere Callahan and his story (I also really admired him), etc.... I am glad I took this journey with Roland, Eddie, Susannah, Jake, and Oy, and everyone else they met along the path of the beam. It was definitely a wild ride. It had it's ups and downs, action-packed and dull or down moments, but all in all, the journey was definitely worth it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stepheny

    Original Buddy Read Review:I almost forgot to include my chap Ryder in this epic buddy read! He says: Saddle up, pards! New and Excruciatingly Long-Winded and Passionate Review: Well, here it is, folks. The end. We have travelled long and hard. (That’s what she said.) We have had many ups and downs, backward flips, dips, dives, shucks and even a case of good old-fashioned demon rape, say thankya. Say thankya big-big. We’ve had fallen comrades, we’ve had tagalongs, we’ve had mysterious disappearan Original Buddy Read Review:I almost forgot to include my chap Ryder in this epic buddy read! He says: Saddle up, pards! New and Excruciatingly Long-Winded and Passionate Review: Well, here it is, folks. The end. We have travelled long and hard. (That’s what she said.) We have had many ups and downs, backward flips, dips, dives, shucks and even a case of good old-fashioned demon rape, say thankya. Say thankya big-big. We’ve had fallen comrades, we’ve had tagalongs, we’ve had mysterious disappearances and we’ve had many move on. "The road and the tale have both been long, would you not say so? The trip has been long and the cost has been high... but no great thing was ever attained easily. A long tale, like a tall Tower, must be built a stone at a time.” The world has moved on, so it has. So I’m sad to say. But our quest to reach the Dark Tower did not disappoint. No, I’d say it was one of the best reading experiences of my lifetime(s). I have travelled this path several times. Delah. I’ve picked up accents and speak the language of the people. Aye, hear me well, I beg! But this journey was different; forespecial. Why, you ask? Well, because of my companions. No matter how many were picked up or the ones who dropped off, the few that stuck with me until the very end made this reread unlike all the others. I would like to say thankya. Aye. Say thankya big-big. We are Ka-Tet. We are one from many. We have shared khef. Hear me well, I beg! The fate of the rose must be secured. The fate of Stephen King must be secured. The man in black, Mordred and the Crimson King must be defeated. But most importantly, we must stop the breakers. For if the beam is broken, the tower will collapse and all worlds will fall into nothingness. Endless darkness for all of eternity. Or is it Todash space where things crawl and creep and slither through the blinding darkness? Our enemies are many. The deck is stacked heavily against us. “Our time here is brief, our risk enormous. Don't waste the one or increase the other, if you please.” But we have something on our side. Ka. Ka, like the wind. And when that wind blows, you’d best be ready to sail. It matters not where it wants you to go, you must follow it at all costs. For Ka is a wheel, and it does turn. Does it not? At the risk of sounding cliché, this book will make you laugh, it will make you cry, it will make you happy, it will make you angry, it will make you want to scream. But in this reader’s opinion, it’s what makes a good book a great book. Books that evoke emotions, that make me think, that make me feel what the character is feeling… those are the books that mean the most. They mean everything. Roland is one of the greatest tragic anti-heroes I’ve ever encountered. He’s flawed nearly as much as he is scarred. He has sacrificed everything for the tower- friends, family- even his own mother. Will his current ka-tet be asked to surrender their lives for the sake of his quest? This book may not be perfect- lord knows King does not impress all of his readers all the time. Certain parts are downright cheesy. But as King himself states in the Coda- the fun is in the journey. I don’t think there was a more perfect way to end this series. Ka is a wheel, do you not see? I have a spoiler-filled theory that I’m about to lay out here so if this is a series you haven’t read or plan on reading, I’d stop here if it does ya. **MASSIVE SPOILERS AHEAD, PROCEED WITH CAUTION** I read a blurb once where King said that his version of hell would be reliving the worst moments of your life over and over again for all of eternity. I think this is what is happening to Roland. He goes his quest over and over and over again, never remembering the time before and always slightly different than the time before. The signs are all there within the books! Open thine eyes and see!! “Death, but not for you, gunslinger. Never for you. You darkle. You tinct. May I be brutally frank? You go on.” The man in black tells Roland this very early on. Cort tells him: “It'll be your damnation, boy. You'll wear out a hundred pairs of boots on your way to hell.” Roland himself states that “You needn't die happy when your time comes, but you must die satisfied, for you have lived your life from the beginning to the end and ka is always served.” And has Roland been satisfied? No, he has not. He has been cursed from the beginning. He never learns. He continues to sacrifice all for the tower. I remember when I first saw that last line. It made me shudder. It made me heartbroken for this tragic character. His penance was to continue an endless loop. All his time spent devoted to the same outcome; each time learning just enough to change some small factor of his new journey, but never enough to gain him entrance to something other than the hell he is facing. This series means so much to me. It opened my eyes to a whole new way of thinking and created endless possibilities for what lies beyond the veil of death. It comforts me in times of turmoil. It’s like an old friend. No matter how many times I’ve gone through it I find a new appreciation every time. I would like to thank my ka-mates for going on this journey with me. I hope it did ya fine, so I do. Long days and pleasant nights, friends. I love thee. Aye, say true, say every one of you.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pantelis Andreou

    Contains spoilers: Even though i did not expect this ending chapter of the journey to end the way it did,I can’t deny that over the years i have grown to love Roland and his crew like they are long time friends of mine, making their adventures so unique and i kept reminding myself that is not so much about the ending it’s also about the journey, and it has been a rollercoaster with it’s ups and downs and I’ll give it the five stars it deserves. When I finished this book, I really appreciated the “ Contains spoilers: Even though i did not expect this ending chapter of the journey to end the way it did,I can’t deny that over the years i have grown to love Roland and his crew like they are long time friends of mine, making their adventures so unique and i kept reminding myself that is not so much about the ending it’s also about the journey, and it has been a rollercoaster with it’s ups and downs and I’ll give it the five stars it deserves. When I finished this book, I really appreciated the “epic-ness” of it. I felt satisfied at the end. Like every final volume in a series it had enough tragedy and triumph to have made it worth it even though at times it was lacking a good pace and made it look TOO long. Also some of the characters felt like a missed opportunity as they could have ended up in better fate. (Walter/ Man in black, Mordred and eventually Crimson King) But as for the Crimson King, who initially seemed as a cosmic menace, King previously commented in ‘Danse Macabre’ (a part i read) that unlike Lovecraft, he prefers to “show the monster” even if he fails to live up to readers’ expectations. So the Crimson King, at this very end, seems like a human. Even Roland has moved from the category of myth into humanity. I think there are layers to King’s writing that I didn’t totally appreciate before. That is really neat. SOME MORE SPOILERY NOTES/THOUGHTS : Some found Stephen King’s inclusion here annoying and repetitive, but for me though i though the parts that he was in were some of the best and entertaining aspects of this book (and previous ones). Especially the events leading to the accident. The whole series has a feeling in it’s storytelling of endless possibilities, enigmas and almost every character and sub-plot can create it’s own world and expand it’s story. (Mordred and Dandelo for example) 4,5/5

  21. 4 out of 5

    R.K. Gold

    It took me longer than every other book in the series and I think that’s because I really didn’t want to finish it. It was so nice to have this book to go back to. It was so nice to say I was still working on the dark tower. But it’s over now and I can never again read the dark tower series for the first time, which is fine I suppose since everyone who has read it before knows that once we complete the journey, restarting it is only natural. I loved this series. I really did. If the point of book It took me longer than every other book in the series and I think that’s because I really didn’t want to finish it. It was so nice to have this book to go back to. It was so nice to say I was still working on the dark tower. But it’s over now and I can never again read the dark tower series for the first time, which is fine I suppose since everyone who has read it before knows that once we complete the journey, restarting it is only natural. I loved this series. I really did. If the point of books are to entertain and give readers an escape from reality this series exceeded all requirements. I was lost in all the worlds King strung together and I didn’t want to leave.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul O'Neill

    PFFFTT... What?!? Perfect ending, perfect series (although wizard and glass was a bit of a snooze). One of those endings where you need to go back and read the whole thing all over again. Long days and pleasant nights

  23. 4 out of 5

    colleen the convivial curmudgeon

    So, the first time I read this book I rated it 3 stars, and that was probably a bit high for it, because I hated the ending. I hated it so much, left such a bad taste in my mouth, that it sort of spoiled my thoughts of the whole series. I wanted to reread it, been meaning to for awhile, since there were details that escaped my memory entirely, but I was afraid to - afraid that I would end up still hating it as much, if not more than before. (Allow me to specify. (view spoiler)[When I say ending I So, the first time I read this book I rated it 3 stars, and that was probably a bit high for it, because I hated the ending. I hated it so much, left such a bad taste in my mouth, that it sort of spoiled my thoughts of the whole series. I wanted to reread it, been meaning to for awhile, since there were details that escaped my memory entirely, but I was afraid to - afraid that I would end up still hating it as much, if not more than before. (Allow me to specify. (view spoiler)[When I say ending I don't mean the loop. I was ok with the loop. It made a kind of sense, and it left you with hope that this was the last loop. Roland had the horn. It "felt good, like he never felt it before", and you knew - just knew that this would be the last time. No, it wasn't the loop. It was Patrick fucking Danville being introduced to the story in the last 100 or so pages, and magically erasing out the Crimson King, the ultimate Big Bad of the story who ended up being some asshole on a balcony throwing sneetches! There was no final confrontation between Roland and Mordred (not really), between Roland and the CK, or between Roland and Walter/Flagg (and I won't get started on how lame of a death that was). (hide spoiler)] But this time I went in with a purpose, and I fanwanked. Oh, I wanked like nobody's business to make this thing make sense, and to make me not hate it so much. And I did it with such aplomb that I ended up actually being quite at peace with the ending. And I'm glad that I did because, honestly, it's a good series. Oh, there are some parts that aren't quite as good as others (Waste Lands and Song of Susannah, for instance), and there are parts within individual books which get a bit bogged down, or don't entirely make sense, or have some continuity issues - but, overall, I liked it, and I wanted to like it more. I liked the world(s), and the characters. I loved watching them develop as people and grow as a tet. I love the many sides of Roland. There was just so much to like about the series, that I didn't want it to end on such a bad note. Besides, the start of this book is pretty damn awesome. I was caught up in the whole thing from the get-go, even though I was hesitant to pick it up and start it because of my fears of impending doom. The whole first third of the book is pretty much non-stop action and awesomeness... and we couldn't just let that all go because of King's inability to write an ending some crap at the end. So - here's my wank. (view spoiler)[* Climax: Did you feel that the defeat of CK was a bit anti-climactic? Of course you did - because it's not the climax. The real turning points happen when the Beams are saved - first the taking of Blue Heaven and then the saving of Sai King. Sure, as battles goes, the one at Blue Heaven isn't exactly the most exciting of final, epic showdowns - but that was, in many ways, the final showdown. After that point things are sort of winding down and wrapping up. *Patrick Danville: Deus ex Machine from Hell - or a dan-tete (little savior) put in the path of ka? I mean, sure, there's this person that isn't mentioned before who comes out of nowhere and becomes really important to the story - but haven't we seen this before? Isn't the series full of these people? Some called dan-tete, like John Cullum and Irene Tassenbaum, others random people who later become important, like Calvin Tower and Aaron Deepneau, and some pulled from other stories/worlds, like Pere Callahan and Ted Brautigan. Isn't the entire story about ka pushing them along and helping them out? So why not one final dan-tete to help them on their way? And, hey, at least he is mentioned earlier in the story, and Insomnia is brought to Roland's attention, though he leaves it behind. * Crimson King: I'm still disappointed that there wasn't a big, final battle between the White and the Red - but I wouldn't say that Roland didn't have a hand in defeating him. The entire series is Roland chipping away at him bit by bit, in a way. Afterall, CK, being the embodiement of the Red, gains in power from Chaos - when the world is moving away, and the Beams are breaking, so on and so forth. But Roland's entire quest, as champion of the White, is about working against him. Every battle he wins, such as at the Calla, and saving the Beams, and Sai King, is chipping away at the CK - chipping away at his power and, apparently, his mind. Granted, as hubbie puts it, this is victory "in the most ass way possible" - but, still... it's something. ;) And, anyway, aren't we told, time and time again, that the Crimson King is bugfuck insane? Well, guy on the balcony certain qualifies. (p.s. As a reading tip - it really helps if you mentally skip over the 'EEEEEEEEEEEE's.) (hide spoiler)] There - now isn't everything ever so much better? I'll do you one better. I'll tell you how the final loop could go, and how everyone could live happily ever after: (view spoiler)[So, Roland as the horn. According to 'The Road to the Dark Tower' book, the horn is a talisman, a connection for Roland not just to his old life/world/tet, but to his Self, his humanity. When he left the horn, he lost a piece of himself that matters. This time he has the horn - and, thus, his humanity. Because of this, he doesn't let Jake fall. He still catches Walter because, honestly, he was always going to anyway, but Jake's there to watch his back. When they get to the beach, because there are two, Roland doesn't lose the two fingers on his right hand. Maybe Jake does instead, or maybe neither do, but, however it goes, Roland's hand is saved. Because of this, when Roland shoots Pimli at Blue Heaven, he shoots with his strong, perfect hand, and kills him flat out. No lingering death means he never gets a chance to shoot Eddie, which in turn means that they don't have to delay their trip to 1999 to save King while Eddie has his slow, drawn out death. So they get to 1999, all four of them, and with enough time to get where they need to be to save King, and no one has to sacrifice himself in order to do so. Since Eddie and Jake don't die, Susannah (the bitch) doesn't have the need to leave, and Oy doesn't have to sacrifice/suicide himself to save Roland, since all 5 are there, they can take turns taking watch, and Mordred never ends up being much of a threat at all. Everyone survives, and, hell, they can still come across Patrick Danville on the way, 'cause, like I said, what's one more dan-tete - one more convenient coincidence - in a story full of them? Roland gains the Tower, this time worthy of it - a true champion of the White (which he wasn't before, because he failed by letting Jake fall, by losing his humanity and sacrificing anything for his obsession) - and renews the Tower/Universe, and is thus renewed himself... and they live happily ever after. Maybe they get transported to some where and when where they can live out their days... maybe they even come across another Susan or Cuthbert or Alain. I mean, Susannah got copies of Eddie and Jake - so why not? (Ok, I have an answer for why not, actually, but shush.) (hide spoiler)] So, there you have it. But, really, it's not that much fanwank. Some of it actually makes a lot of sense, all things considered. I still think some of the ending was weak, and I'm not going to say it was perfect - but maybe it wasn't quite as bad as I thought it was the first time. (Sort of like how I liked 'Order of the Phoenix' much more on the second read, and 'Deathly Hallows', too, for that matter. Of course, I rationalized those a bit, too. I have a grand gift for it, it seems. LOL)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn (devours and digests words)

    I feel like I'm broken in 10 different places. It's over. It really is over. Roland Deschain of Gilead has finally completed his quest to reach The Dark Tower - none for the better, none for the worse. There were so much losses, heartbreaks, and blood. SO MUCH BLOOD WAS SHED. And I have suffered through every....damn..... bit .... of......it. Cried my way through too. When I've patched up all 10 broken pieces of myself, I'll be doing a super lengthy review of the entire Dark Tower series. It real I feel like I'm broken in 10 different places. It's over. It really is over. Roland Deschain of Gilead has finally completed his quest to reach The Dark Tower - none for the better, none for the worse. There were so much losses, heartbreaks, and blood. SO MUCH BLOOD WAS SHED. And I have suffered through every....damn..... bit .... of......it. Cried my way through too. When I've patched up all 10 broken pieces of myself, I'll be doing a super lengthy review of the entire Dark Tower series. It really is a true magnum opus . And dare I say it? This is the best series I've ever read in my short life so far. First to Harry Potter even. (and I thought no other series could top The Harry Potter series). Say sorry, sai-Rowling.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    The body was far smaller than the heart it had held. What a journey - for the characters as much as for the readers! In a way, it feels as if we had been on the road to the Dark Tower forever. All the more reason why saying goodbye is so hard. So this is the end. It started where the previous volume left off: Mordred is being born and things ... don't exactly go as Mia had hoped they would. Callahan and Jake are there - as are myriad servants of the Crimson King (including some vampires). Roland The body was far smaller than the heart it had held. What a journey - for the characters as much as for the readers! In a way, it feels as if we had been on the road to the Dark Tower forever. All the more reason why saying goodbye is so hard. So this is the end. It started where the previous volume left off: Mordred is being born and things ... don't exactly go as Mia had hoped they would. Callahan and Jake are there - as are myriad servants of the Crimson King (including some vampires). Roland and Eddie are in our (Keystone) world, meeting none other than (view spoiler)[Stephen King himself (hide spoiler)] and realizing that this is what matters even more than getting back to the others as they are meant to save (view spoiler)[him so he can write the ending (hide spoiler)] . Bonus points definitely have to be awarded to the author for incorporating so many biographical details in this series. It was a mindfuck and a half but it WORKED. Eventually, the Ka-tet is reunited, of course, but only to fight another day. (view spoiler)[That battle to free the Breakers (hide spoiler)] ... I know that it was the "white" choice but personally, I simply would have (view spoiler)[let them die despite some of them not having been assholes (hide spoiler)] . Most tragic that (view spoiler)[Eddie didn't even fall in the actual battle (hide spoiler)] . Yes, I don't think it's much of a spoiler that not everyone is going to make it. What I didn't account for was (view spoiler)[how much I even cared for Father Callahan, let alone Eddie (hide spoiler)] . That HURT. And then (view spoiler)[we race along and Jake sacrifices himself for Stephen King, dying by a van AGAIN (hide spoiler)] . I mean, there ought to be a law against that! Something I hated at first but that I've come to accept and understand was (view spoiler)[Susannah walking away - it felt like a consolation price, maybe even a cop out that there were alternate versions of Eddie and Jake waiting in another world for her; it was like running away and even blaming Roland (partially) for all the bad despite HER having made the choice herself (hide spoiler)] . But considering (view spoiler)[the Mia / birth thing and losing the love of her life and Jake ... SK even had the characters say outright that the Ka-tet was broken after Eddie's death and I guess Susannah was the embodiment of that (hide spoiler)] . And after fighting, tooth and nail, all this way, finally: the Crimson King and the Dark Tower. I was almost feeling cheated what with (view spoiler)[Mordred all but killing himself by eating that spoilt meat after we already got rid of Walter in such an easy (albeit very Schadenfreude-inducing) way. Sure, he was still strong enough to kill poor little Oy, but if he had been at his full strength (hide spoiler)] ... thus, it was also a bit weird that (view spoiler)[a newly introduced character was suddenly the key to vanquishing (almost entirely) the Crimson King (hide spoiler)] . After reading the epilogue though, after seeing the resolution / explanation of it all, it DOES make sense. All serve the Tower and the Beams. Really cool was the incorporation of all the novels that tie into this series. Not sure they all really do (Cujo?), but it was funny. Just like that scene with (view spoiler)[Pennywise's (hide spoiler)] twin! That was actually funny and not just because of the power of stand-up comedy. ;) As a side-note, it was touching that (view spoiler)[Susannah ended much like the "kids" in It, slowly forgetting the traumatic experiences (hide spoiler)] . And not necessarily touching in an entirely positive way. Amazing series with amazing writing that incorporated so many techniques and elements. Most authors don't even dare touch some of these and King simply grabs them all by the scruffs of their necks, throws them all together in one bowl, stirs and bakes them - and gives us the perfect layered cake, decorations and all. At times, it had a bitter taste, at times a sweet one, but it was never tasteless or bland. You can see how deeply I cared about each and every character by how traumatic reading this was. You can also see how rich the worldbuilding was, how deep the mystery, from my other reviews and all the theories I started throwing around there. Some have been confirmed, with others the author went down another lane. The fact that I've been obsessed with it all in such a way, even things in this story's past, is testament to how lively the history and mythology of this multiverse is, how much work the author put into it and what a master he is. There isn't any more I can say other than I'm glad it's over because despite me being a Doctor Who fan and therefore being used to timey wimey stuff, my brain might not have been able to take much more of this. *lol* Endings are heartless. Ain't that the truth! P.S.: About (view spoiler)[Susannah: I wouldn't have written that afterword with her finding an alternate Eddie and Jake and "living happily ever after" - I would have left everyone wondering what had happened to her since there is a reset anyway and they all only served in Roland's quest for redemption or whatever Ka is trying to teach him ultimately (hide spoiler)] . It might have been King's way of preventing (view spoiler)[armies of fans finding and killing him. Bwahahahahahaha (hide spoiler)] !

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Stephen King’s Dark Tower saga comes to a conclusion with the seventh (or eighth if you’re counting “The Wind Through the Keyhole”) and final novel appropriately titled, “The Dark Tower”. In the series’ finale, Roland and his ka-tet draw ever closer to their destiny as the Tower is finally within reach, however, death and destruction lie ahead. Can Roland reach his ultimate destination without paying a heavy price? It took King nearly twenty-two years to finish the series (from the publication of Stephen King’s Dark Tower saga comes to a conclusion with the seventh (or eighth if you’re counting “The Wind Through the Keyhole”) and final novel appropriately titled, “The Dark Tower”. In the series’ finale, Roland and his ka-tet draw ever closer to their destiny as the Tower is finally within reach, however, death and destruction lie ahead. Can Roland reach his ultimate destination without paying a heavy price? It took King nearly twenty-two years to finish the series (from the publication of The Gunslinger) and in the end, he did not disappoint. King ran me through an emotional wringer in deciding to push Roland and his Ka-Tet to their absolute limit both mentally and physically. There’s so much loss in the finale that the weight of the novel cannot be measured in mass alone. That being said, it’s really difficult for me to review this without heading into spoiler territory as all I really want to do is talk about the ending. It is the opinion of many of his fans that King often struggles with endings (he even says as much in the afterword). However, when he does get it right, he nails it - as is the case with The Dark Tower. I couldn’t imagine a more fitting end to the series despite some of the anti-climactic deaths on the antagonist side of things. I also would have likely trimmed some of the fat from the last 200 pages or so - there are points where it feels unnecessarily bloated. Then again, it wouldn’t be a King novel if Uncle Stevie wasn’t a little long-winded at times. King’s magnum opus is not to be taken lightly. In total (including Wind Through The Keyhole), there are a staggering 4,250 pages when all is said and done. It has action, adventure, emotional depth and its own mythology. It connects many of King’s other novels into what many have dubbed “King’s Dominion” - it is what I feel to be the heart and soul of his life’s work. It is most assuredly worth your investment as a constant reader and I look forward to the day that I will once again set upon the journey to the Tower. Here are some spoilerific comments: (view spoiler)[Mordred felt ultimately pointless in the end. While he served a purpose in killing off Flagg, I would have prefered a showdown with the Ka-tet. He was seemingly half-dead from food poisoning when he finally caught up with Roland leading a fairly swift and anti-climactic death at the hands of the Gunslinger - but not before killing Oy (an unforgivable sin). The Crimson King really sucked. Patrick Danville seemed like a weird addition to finish off the novel and having him kill the man responsible for 99% of the shit that happens in the book seemed like an odd choice. Also, why didn’t he draw Roland’s hand giving him his fingers back? I was waiting for that to happen, but I guess it didn’t matter in the end. I.Loved.That.Ending. The absolute horror that Roland would have felt upon realizing he’d already reached the Tower time and time again. Can you imagine? Going through all that just to have to do it again? Jesus Christ. At least he wouldn’t know any different going forward. Is that worse? My heart broke for Roland. (hide spoiler)]

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andre Gonzalez

    Ok, wow. The ending for this series was everything I could have hoped for. Every loose end from the series is tied up by the end, and we get closure with each of the main character's. Getting to finally "see" the Dark Tower was such a relief, after 6.5 books of searching for it, Mr. King will make you feel as if you're standing at Roland's side the rest of the way. I highly recommend this series as a whole, but would suggest reading a few books before going on this journey: Salem's Lot, It, Inso Ok, wow. The ending for this series was everything I could have hoped for. Every loose end from the series is tied up by the end, and we get closure with each of the main character's. Getting to finally "see" the Dark Tower was such a relief, after 6.5 books of searching for it, Mr. King will make you feel as if you're standing at Roland's side the rest of the way. I highly recommend this series as a whole, but would suggest reading a few books before going on this journey: Salem's Lot, It, Insomnia, Hearts in Atlantis, and The Stand. Reading these before The Dark Tower series will make it that much more fulfilling by the end of the journey. I've read all those books except for Insomnia, so there were some references that went over my head! Dark Tower 7 - 5 stars Dark Tower Series - 4.5 stars

  28. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Urges

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am damn disappointed. First off, I liked the final Coda chapter. A lot of readers are unhappy with the cyclical ending and the return to the desert, but that is the only thing I enjoyed about the The Dark Tower. It's a clever idea and I give King credit, but that is where my appreciation ends. I genuinely do not understand how so many readers enjoyed this series. Many of the readers claim that The Gunslinger is the worst in the series, but that is the only book in the series that I actually enj I am damn disappointed. First off, I liked the final Coda chapter. A lot of readers are unhappy with the cyclical ending and the return to the desert, but that is the only thing I enjoyed about the The Dark Tower. It's a clever idea and I give King credit, but that is where my appreciation ends. I genuinely do not understand how so many readers enjoyed this series. Many of the readers claim that The Gunslinger is the worst in the series, but that is the only book in the series that I actually enjoyed. The concepts that arise at the end of the first book seem so great, but as the series progresses it leads to disappointment after disappointment. Stephen King had no idea what to do with The Dark Tower once he finished The Gunslinger. The plot, concepts, and characters are all over the place. Nothing is cohesive. There is so much deus ex machina and outright silliness that it becomes ridiculous. Characters randomly gain new powers, like telepathy in order to communicate between worlds, or characters appear in order to save other characters, e.g. Patrick at the very end of the very last book with his magic eraser. That is bad writing. And when King attempts to be meta and defends his use of deus ex machina within the book—thanks, but no. The only character I care about is Oy and he gets the least airtime. The majority of the time it seems like King forgets Oy is even there until he becomes relevant. Jake and Eddie seem to be King's favorites, but I couldn't bring myself to care about them. I wanted Susannah to become my favorite, because I tend to root for the female underdogs, but her character is such a tool, and I mean that literally. Half the time she doesn't get to be herself. And the rest of the time she is pregnant and being chased around in order to move the plot. She never makes any of her own choices until the very end when she decides to leave Roland. And that happy ending epilogue... Why kill everyone off, only to reunite them in another world? I think King wants to make the readers happy instead of telling a complete story. There are so many holes and anti-climactic endings... What was the point of Maerlyn's Rainbow, Black Thirteen, and Callahan? Black Thirteen was simply a plot device to move things along. In the end, Black Thirteen is left in the World Trade Center and King makes a reference that it is the possible cause for 9/11. That is an interesting idea, but what is the point of including it at all? It is brought in to move the plot and is then left behind. And the inclusion of Callahan is so silly and pointless. King needs a random character to fill a role for a minute and for whatever reason he chooses Callahan and his vampire enemies. The death of Walter Padick/Randall Flagg/Whatever is beyond anti-climactic. Walter is supposed to be the big baddy of the series (and multiple other books) and is taken out nonchalantly by Mordred in the early chapters of the book without a single confrontation with Roland. What is the point of his character? He adds nothing to the story. Mordred barely even adds anything. The Crimson King is supposed to be the true enemy of Roland, but nothing happens except a silly standoff with Harry Potter toys. And Patrick saves the day. The Crimson King is a weak enemy, which makes Roland appear as a weak hero. The whole weird marketing strategy to include Harry Potter elements while that series was making it big at the time makes King seem like a sham. I hope his publisher made him do it. Including Harry Potter font is icing on the cake. The reason I am giving the final book only two stars, while I have given all the other books three, is because ninety percent of this book reads like filler. King writes for word count and not for content. I guess I have done enough complaining. I really wanted to enjoy this series, otherwise I wouldn't have read every single book. But it turned out to be a huge letdown. The concepts are great but it stops there. This should have been a trilogy at the most. The Dark Tower series is for hardcore King fans, not occasional King readers like myself. I have concluded that I am not much of a Stephen King fan. He is a fine writer with interesting ideas, but his style drives me insane and he doesn't know when to stop. Goodbye for now, King. Long days and pleasant nights.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Wow, what a major disappointment. The first 4 DT books were great, and some of King’s best works. It's just too bad that King waited so damn long to finish the last 3, and also too bad that he seemed to be in such a rush to do so. I actually did like #5. It didn't progress Roland's quest to the Tower much, but it was a good story . I quickly went to book 6 and found a fairly boring book, though at least it was shorter. Reluctantly, I picked up book 7. I got halfway through and stopped. Many thin Wow, what a major disappointment. The first 4 DT books were great, and some of King’s best works. It's just too bad that King waited so damn long to finish the last 3, and also too bad that he seemed to be in such a rush to do so. I actually did like #5. It didn't progress Roland's quest to the Tower much, but it was a good story . I quickly went to book 6 and found a fairly boring book, though at least it was shorter. Reluctantly, I picked up book 7. I got halfway through and stopped. Many things were starting to frustrate me with it, and I had other things to read, so I put it on hold. For over two years. After reading the negative reviews I was considering never finishing it, and just leaving the series in my mind with what little sense of wonder and mystery it had left. Of course I picked it up again. I was right the first time. *Spoiler warning. If you don't want to know what happens, please skip this.* I really think that King copped out on this one. First off, Stephen King including himself as a series character was one of the worst things I have ever read. What a bunch of self indulgent crap! I really lost faith after reading that in book 6. The Crimson King was hugely disappointing. Instead of the biggest bad guy in the universe, with the ability to topple the Tower and end all worlds, Roland gets to him and he’s a decrepit old Santa looking man pelting grenades at him and cackling madly. What? Patrick the Artist: The biggest last minute “save my ass” plot device I’ve ever read. With the ability to draw things into and out of existence, this gives King free reign to get himself out of any plot holes he needs to, such as draw the Crimson King and then erase him, allowing Roland to get to the Tower without harm. The Dark Tower: Well, it’s real. Does it hold the answer to all the world’s questions? Is there any explanation as to why it’s there or where it came from? Nothing of the sort. It is a monument to Roland and his life, each level containing a different piece of his life. What happens when he gets to the top? (this isn’t a joke, I promise you) He gets sucked back all the way to the beginning of the first book, forgetting what happens with a hint that this time around, things may be different (he was supposed to blow the Horn of the Eld at the base of the Tower, but lost it as a kid. This time he has it.) Did we really read through seven long books to find out that the next time around, in another seven books that don’t exist, Roland may succeed? In a way, Stephen King reminds me a George Lucas. Lucas got so full of himself after the original Star Wars trilogy that he thought he could tackle another trilogy with no help in writing or directing it. He had complete creative control and there was no one to stand over his shoulder and say, "hey, this is kind of stupid. I don't think people are going to like it." And even if he did, would he listen to them? I think King has gotten to be almost the same way. He's one of the most successful writers on the planet, why should he ultimately care if people won't like this book. He even warns the readers before the last chapter to stop reading, because they will be disappointed, and to simply enjoy the book for the journey getting there. As if he were trying to make you feel bad for not liking his non-ending. As you can see, I didn't like this book, almost solely due to the ending. As usual, King's prose is good, his characters (even Patrick) are well realized and loveable, and Roland's nearly endless journey is page-turning. There was so much potential here. But alas, this is what we have. Would I recommend the Dark Tower books to others? I would say read the first one, which could be a stand alone. If you want to read the whole series, than by all means do so, it's one hell of a journey, but with such an ending, I would almost rather not have made the journey at all.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kandice

    2016 - I just finished my year-long quest to read everything Dark Tower and listen to everything DT I could find on audio. There is a very different feel to the tale when read to you by someone else. I loved it, but sadly, the final CD broke about halfway through. Weird, right? I think it may have been God's way of telling me to read the end, not listen. That brings up a very interesting thing that just occurred to me. I don't want to spoil anything, but for those who have read it (and had their h 2016 - I just finished my year-long quest to read everything Dark Tower and listen to everything DT I could find on audio. There is a very different feel to the tale when read to you by someone else. I loved it, but sadly, the final CD broke about halfway through. Weird, right? I think it may have been God's way of telling me to read the end, not listen. That brings up a very interesting thing that just occurred to me. I don't want to spoil anything, but for those who have read it (and had their hearts broken) does our continuing to read past the warning cause a reset? Is it our, the readers, fault? If I stopped listening after the epilogue (coincidentally, when my CD broke!) would there have been success? My head is spinning and I need to think about this more. 2009 - I finally finished. Let me begin by saying that I think the readers who complain about the ending are...whining! It was perfect. I don't want to post spoilers, but personally, I believe that THIS TIME he will actually complete his quest. That one mistake was made, something left behind, he obviously has it this time around...task completed. It just took a few "drafts," if you will. I realized in this book, that as much as I loved Roland's Ka-Tet, Susannah was important to me only because of her interaction with "the boys." I didn't like her as well without her love of Eddie and Jake to wriggle in my heart. The care she took of Patrick wasn't enough to keep my feelings for her strong. Having said that, I felt she left the tale with a whimper, as opposed to the BANG! I felt her contributions deserved. That's not a complaint, just an observation. A friend has been in love with Eddie Dean since his first appearance. Although my love came late, I love Roland. In this installment especially, I fell head-over-heels in love. No, he isn't the most sensitive, sympathetic sweetheart, but if Roland Deschain loves you, although you may die a tragic death, your life will have been worth the living. He will NOT forget your love and your memory will live forever in the field of roses. Each time he said "My dear" my heart would melt a bit more than I felt was possible. There was never a more faithful, honest, protective man of his true friends. Yes, being important to him probably brings a sad end, but it's a sad end worth the trip. I had no problem with King's insertion of himself into the story. As he explains, and I have always felt, fantasy is so much more believable with a realistic touchstone to anchor my belief. HE was my anchor here. I know he painted himself differently than he really appears, but wouldn't we all? It doesn't make his contribution to the story any less important or central. King IS Gan for Roland's world. He certainly wasn't going to come right out and SAY that, but we, the constant readers, know that. He SHOULD be there. How could the tale be spun without his presence? When Roland speaks the names of his fallen comrades, and loves, at the end of his path, tears ran down my face. Hundreds more died on the journey to his quest, but THESE are the deaths he felt. The deaths that made him the man he has become. The man I have come to love more and more with each installment, but mostly with THIS one. In this one the cost of that walk up the Tower steps was tangible to me, the reader, and I cried FOR him. Not just WITH him, but FOR him. I am completely certain that this go-round, he succeeds, and that's exactly the ending I would choose. As King says, life never ends with a happily ever after, but give the hope of SOME happiness, and I can accept that. Roland deserves SOME happiness, or at lest the feeling of a job well done. I think at the end of this round he will have it.

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