counter create hit The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food: A Cookbook - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food: A Cookbook

Availability: Ready to download

In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor of dozens of top chefs, writers, and activists—with stories exploring their creativity and influence.   Black cooking has always been more than “soul food,” with flavors tracing to the African continent, to the Caribbean, all over the United States, and beyond.


Compare

In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor of dozens of top chefs, writers, and activists—with stories exploring their creativity and influence.   Black cooking has always been more than “soul food,” with flavors tracing to the African continent, to the Caribbean, all over the United States, and beyond.

30 review for The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine from How Useful It Is

    The Rise cookbook is unlike any other cookbooks I have been recently exploring. It's a compilation of different recipes from different Black chefs across America. This book celebrates Black foods and recognizes Black cooks. I enjoyed reading the author's note and learning about Black foods. The Rise "stands on 3 pillars: authorship, memory, and aspiration." Definitely interesting to read mini biographies of different chefs and to have the chance to cook their specialties. 
Not all recipes in this The Rise cookbook is unlike any other cookbooks I have been recently exploring. It's a compilation of different recipes from different Black chefs across America. This book celebrates Black foods and recognizes Black cooks. I enjoyed reading the author's note and learning about Black foods. The Rise "stands on 3 pillars: authorship, memory, and aspiration." Definitely interesting to read mini biographies of different chefs and to have the chance to cook their specialties. 
Not all recipes in this cookbook have pictures unfortunately because pictures played a big role in determining what I want to eat. I like pictures of arts in places where the chefs reside like the murals on the walls of buildings in Detroit downtown and the Harriet Tubman Memorial statue in Harlem. 
I loved learning about different foods at the end of this cookbook! Interesting to know the origin of plantains and okra, among others. I have eaten plantains but not the same way as shown in this cookbook's recipes. My mom utilized banana leaves to wrap some desserts before baking so it's definitely on point in its description of the usage.
 There are many dishes to try and so far, I have learned how to cook two dishes from two different chefs: Fish Cakes and Hand Pies. Do visit my blog for pictures! xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details Many thanks to Little Brown for the opportunity to cook and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Denver Public Library

    This is a fantastic compendium of food culture, lore, recipes and culinary history, all focused on contributions made by Black chefs, food producers, writers and more on what is considered "American food." Samuelsson's voice and passion comes through in each and every chapter, and recipes are well-written and easy to follow. Substitutions are suggested for hard to source items, such as tigernuts. I especially appreciated the spotlight bios of up and coming chefs and influencers, in particular De This is a fantastic compendium of food culture, lore, recipes and culinary history, all focused on contributions made by Black chefs, food producers, writers and more on what is considered "American food." Samuelsson's voice and passion comes through in each and every chapter, and recipes are well-written and easy to follow. Substitutions are suggested for hard to source items, such as tigernuts. I especially appreciated the spotlight bios of up and coming chefs and influencers, in particular Denver's own Adrian Miller, aka The Soul Food Scholar! Design and photography is outstanding. A few recipe highlights—Pork Griot with Roasted Pineapple and Pikliz, Steak Afrique with Sauce Yassa, and Spicy Grilled Garden Egg Salad (that egg being an eggplant!). Back matter includes an ingredient resource list, social media info for Featured Chefs and Experts, Upcoming Chefs to Watch, Source list, and full index.

  3. 4 out of 5

    sssnoo reads

    I have extremely mixed opinions about this book. Let me try and list them. - This book highlights black cooks, and that’s part of the title. In that regard it’s vast and detailed and I now have a long list of restaurants across the country I want to try. Well done. - As a cook book (which it is)it’s pretty inaccessible to most cooks, even experienced ones. I consider myself adventurous and willing to hunt out ingredients for a special dish. But even so, there are so many ingredients (almost one i I have extremely mixed opinions about this book. Let me try and list them. - This book highlights black cooks, and that’s part of the title. In that regard it’s vast and detailed and I now have a long list of restaurants across the country I want to try. Well done. - As a cook book (which it is)it’s pretty inaccessible to most cooks, even experienced ones. I consider myself adventurous and willing to hunt out ingredients for a special dish. But even so, there are so many ingredients (almost one in every recipe) that are either not accessible without a long look (in a big city) or through mail order. I looked up prices, and many of these recipes would cost an arm and a leg and leave you with unused ingredients you would likely through out. - I tagged about half a dozen recipes I thought I might try. Thats not a lot from a pricy book like this. - Many of the recipes look tasty, but the time, effort and ingredients made me wave bye-bye. If you want to learn about some of the history of black cooking in America, and are interested in established and up and coming chefs, or if you are a serious foodie then this book may be worth the purchase. While I read it from cover to cover and may make a small number of the recipes, I rather wish I had my money back. I’m glad I bought the kindle version otherwise I’d be donating the hard cover. Sorry Marcus. I love your passion, but this book is for a very small niche audience.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    When picking up a book by Marcus Samuelsson, the reader should prepare themselves for a treat on so many levels. More than a cookbook (although that is the section of the store where you'll find it), this is a history, set of biographies, social study, and yes, mouthwatering recipe collection, lavishly illustrated not only with the dishes whose inspiration and history he provides, but of Samuelsson himself and his endless array of colorful garments and scarves. Up to the minute, the book opens w When picking up a book by Marcus Samuelsson, the reader should prepare themselves for a treat on so many levels. More than a cookbook (although that is the section of the store where you'll find it), this is a history, set of biographies, social study, and yes, mouthwatering recipe collection, lavishly illustrated not only with the dishes whose inspiration and history he provides, but of Samuelsson himself and his endless array of colorful garments and scarves. Up to the minute, the book opens with a chapter on current life under the pandemic and its devastating effect on the restaurant community and his transformation of his Harlem institution, Red Rooster.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Cintron

    As a book about the diversity and richness of the food coming from black chefs in America- this book was fantastic. I loved reading the background stories of the widely diverse group of chefs that were highlighted. However, I found that the recipes themselves were largely inaccessible to your average home chef. Many of these ingredients are hard to hunt down even in a metropolitan area. I did, however, feel that the vegetable recipes were doable and I look forward to trying a few out!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Kramer

    A celebration of Black cooking over the years, accompanied by beautiful photography and profiles of Black chefs and food experts. The recipes are inspired by the various people profiled, which is such a neat touch. Many of the recipes are aspirational for me—either more complicated than I want to try at home or with ingredients that will be trickier to track down. But I still thoroughly enjoyed reading through them and seeing what Samuelsson loves about each one. And there are quite a few recipe A celebration of Black cooking over the years, accompanied by beautiful photography and profiles of Black chefs and food experts. The recipes are inspired by the various people profiled, which is such a neat touch. Many of the recipes are aspirational for me—either more complicated than I want to try at home or with ingredients that will be trickier to track down. But I still thoroughly enjoyed reading through them and seeing what Samuelsson loves about each one. And there are quite a few recipes I do plan on trying! I’ve grown very tired of cooking for myself this past year but I feel renewed after reading this and getting new ideas.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Talea

    I learned so much in this cookbook! There were ingredients I’d never heard of before and a culinary history that has been by and large ignored in the US. It was an eye opening read and the recipes all look amazing. As someone who has strong southern roots I recognized many ingredients but not nearly as many as I believed I would when I borrowed this book from the library. This is one I will have to get for my personal collection also.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sonia

    I may try a few of these dishes. I wish I lived closer to where these chefs are! This book is a visual feast recognizing Black cooking tracing flavors from around the world.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Silverberg

    A Learning Experience. Where to begin....I enjoyed reading the short bios of each chef. They all had a rich background and won multiple awards for their cooking. The historical and cultural significance of food is not something that I have given much thought. I see now that so many people of color from all over the world have contributed massively, and have largely been dismissed and marginalized.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This is a beautiful and provocative book, though I don't know that I will try the recipes. Samuelsson examine the contributions Black chefs and cooks have made to what we think of as American cuisine. As in so many other fields, these contributions have been ignored, overlooked, erased or diminished. A timely and powerful look at food as culture. Worth a read even if you won't use the recipes. This is a beautiful and provocative book, though I don't know that I will try the recipes. Samuelsson examine the contributions Black chefs and cooks have made to what we think of as American cuisine. As in so many other fields, these contributions have been ignored, overlooked, erased or diminished. A timely and powerful look at food as culture. Worth a read even if you won't use the recipes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I jumped at the chance to get this book from my library. I've been interested in books by Marcus Samuelsson since I read his memoir, Yes, Chef. (If you aren't familiar with his story, he was born in Kenya and adopted by a Swedish family. He became a chef and now lives in the United States.) This is more than just a cookbook. It is the story of many Black chefs. Each person has their story told over a few pages with wonderful photographs and then lists 2 or 3 recipes of theirs. This makes the I jumped at the chance to get this book from my library. I've been interested in books by Marcus Samuelsson since I read his memoir, Yes, Chef. (If you aren't familiar with his story, he was born in Kenya and adopted by a Swedish family. He became a chef and now lives in the United States.) This is more than just a cookbook. It is the story of many Black chefs. Each person has their story told over a few pages with wonderful photographs and then lists 2 or 3 recipes of theirs. This makes the format of this book a bit different than other cookbooks. The recipes aren't arranged by topics. There is a recipe guide that lists the dishes by main ingredient or course so you can find what you are looking for. These aren't recipes that I think will be made routinely by home cooks. Many of them have preparation and cook times of several hours or the recipe refers you to other recipes that need to be made before you can assemble the dish you picked. These chefs do introduce some ingredients that I wasn't familiar with. It would require ordering in these ingredients if I wanted to make these recipes because they aren't available at my local stores. Sea moss smoothies, anyone? I found myself doing more googling of ingredients than I usually have to do. It like the innovation but probably won't be making those dishes. The recipes here are overwhelmingly meat-based. Even the recipes in the guide under Grains or Vegetables are heavily into meat. I did find one recipe that I wanted to try. It is a Couscous Salad with Roasted Figs. https://flic.kr/p/2kgAVVV Even this recipe has three sub-recipes as written. It is recommended to make a fresh Ethiopian cheese, a spiced butter, and a carmelized honey vinaigrette. I skipped the cheese. The butter recipe added an additional spice to another spiced butter recipe that already had 11 ingredients. It makes a pound. I needed a tablespoon. I did some melted butter with dashes of whatever of the listed spices I had close. I'm sure the original recipe is amazing but it added a whole other layer of complicated on top of this "simple" salad. I'm not even sure that the extra steps helped a lot. Maybe I just have really simple tastes but I think this would have been just as good with fresh figs and nuts instead. The people whose stories are told in this book are fascinating. I would pick up this book in order to learn about them and to learn about some ingredients that you may not be familiar with but I don't think this will be a cookbook that many people will use regularly. This review was originally posted on Based On A True Story

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I enjoyed learning about the featured chefs and the rich histories included, but this is not a cookbook I could take many notes from. The dishes are just too inaccessible for me (and I feel like they would be inaccessible to the average person tbh). And this is more of a personal issue rather than an issue with the book: I felt disconnected from this particular Black culture, despite being Black, because most (if not all) of the stories and recipes had a sense of knowing in regards to the histor I enjoyed learning about the featured chefs and the rich histories included, but this is not a cookbook I could take many notes from. The dishes are just too inaccessible for me (and I feel like they would be inaccessible to the average person tbh). And this is more of a personal issue rather than an issue with the book: I felt disconnected from this particular Black culture, despite being Black, because most (if not all) of the stories and recipes had a sense of knowing in regards to the history and connection to specific cultures. I grew up with some of these foods (with much less ingredients used, so very likely it tasted wildly different) so it's not completely foreign to me. But it definitely felt like I was missing important context via life experience, which I undoubtedly am. I still enjoyed reading through it, but almost none of these recipes would be something brought to (or eaten at) my grandmother's house when everyone decides to get together. Everything just sounds too intricate and like it belongs on the menu of a Michelin star rated restaurant.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This isn't really a cookbook, it's a food history book. It is a really wonderful book in terms of the history of black cooks and the cuisine that has resulted from so many different cultures coming together over generations. It offers up a plethora of restaurants to try, the photography is beautiful. And I do like that Samuelsson has always profiled and elevated so many cooks and chefs that you might otherwise never hear of. But as a home cookbook, it's just not. The dishes themselves, while fas This isn't really a cookbook, it's a food history book. It is a really wonderful book in terms of the history of black cooks and the cuisine that has resulted from so many different cultures coming together over generations. It offers up a plethora of restaurants to try, the photography is beautiful. And I do like that Samuelsson has always profiled and elevated so many cooks and chefs that you might otherwise never hear of. But as a home cookbook, it's just not. The dishes themselves, while fascinating, all require very unusual ingredients that could be largely inaccessible for most home cooks. And where I live, even in a country with a strong history of South American and Caribbean dishes, I cannot find a single one. So by all means, do check it out from the library and read through it, it's got some amazing information, but don't expect to be able to cook anything from it unless you're fortunate enough to have access to some of the ingredients.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    This is such as interesting book to read. It is time for more diversity in restaurants. When I was young, we had one kind of rice, two kinds of potatoes and Italian food was becoming popular. Now there are Thai restaurants, Moroccan restaurants and many kinds of Chinese restaurants. Now I have spices like harissa, six types of dried beans and three types of rice in my pantry. We see all kind of tomatoes and potatoes in the Farmer’s Market. Soon, it may be possible to find canned callaloo greens, This is such as interesting book to read. It is time for more diversity in restaurants. When I was young, we had one kind of rice, two kinds of potatoes and Italian food was becoming popular. Now there are Thai restaurants, Moroccan restaurants and many kinds of Chinese restaurants. Now I have spices like harissa, six types of dried beans and three types of rice in my pantry. We see all kind of tomatoes and potatoes in the Farmer’s Market. Soon, it may be possible to find canned callaloo greens, fermented shrimp paste, cow peas, locust bean powder, baobab powder, fonio, and other ingredients which are now unfamiliar. I plan to try some of the recipes as many spices and ingredients from the Northern regions of Africa can be found nearby without resorting to mail order. It was great to see how Marcus Samuelson has brought together cooks from so many different countries and cultures to make such an interesting and mouth watering collection of recipes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tory

    A beautifully illustrated book with great descriptions of the contributions of Black cooks and soul food to American cuisine. The organization is unusual for cookbooks (the chapters are: Rise - Where Black Food is Headed; Remix - Black Food Integrates Many Cultures; Migration - The Influence of the American South; Legacy - Old and New Journeys from Africa to the Americas; and Origins - a Pantry of Ingredients, Techniques, and Recipes), rather than the usual organization by ingredient. There is a A beautifully illustrated book with great descriptions of the contributions of Black cooks and soul food to American cuisine. The organization is unusual for cookbooks (the chapters are: Rise - Where Black Food is Headed; Remix - Black Food Integrates Many Cultures; Migration - The Influence of the American South; Legacy - Old and New Journeys from Africa to the Americas; and Origins - a Pantry of Ingredients, Techniques, and Recipes), rather than the usual organization by ingredient. There is a "Recipe Guide" that can help the reader find recipes for specific ingredients. Though most of the recipes look delicious, and I would love to try them in a restaurant, many call for hard to find ingredients or complicated cooking methods, which is why I took away one star in my rating. Worth a look for the historical/future aspects and for the recipes that are less complicated.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a great resource for the history of Black food in America, and how different African cooking styles have influenced American food. There are bios of some incredible chefs, and I now have a long list of restaurants to try and know what some dishes are that I've always wondered about. As a cookbook, it's not incredibly useful to me because most of the recipes are pretty involved and some require ingredients that aren't that easy to find (though the author does give resources at the end of t This is a great resource for the history of Black food in America, and how different African cooking styles have influenced American food. There are bios of some incredible chefs, and I now have a long list of restaurants to try and know what some dishes are that I've always wondered about. As a cookbook, it's not incredibly useful to me because most of the recipes are pretty involved and some require ingredients that aren't that easy to find (though the author does give resources at the end of the book). There are some promising seafood and veggie recipes (and one very good smoothie) that I could see fitting into our routine. And for a book like this, there really should be a picture for every recipe. There were a few dishes that I really wanted to see and had to google. This is a really interesting book and a good read if you like to learn about food and influential chefs.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aisha

    4 stars for an excellent book highlighting the importance of black food and all the community that works towards discovering, recording, cherishing, and uplifting. Loved the features, seeing familiar faces, and discovering new folx! This book is intensely colorful in the best way! Most of the recipes were meat-based, but I'm sure the flavors would work just as well with non-meat proteins. I didn't cook out of this book because I'm only making simple food for myself these days, but I think the fl 4 stars for an excellent book highlighting the importance of black food and all the community that works towards discovering, recording, cherishing, and uplifting. Loved the features, seeing familiar faces, and discovering new folx! This book is intensely colorful in the best way! Most of the recipes were meat-based, but I'm sure the flavors would work just as well with non-meat proteins. I didn't cook out of this book because I'm only making simple food for myself these days, but I think the flavor combinations sounded interesting for another day.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda Camerer

    5 stars for the stories about each highlighted chef and their backgrounds and lives. Also 5 stars for the way Marcus highlighted the Black Lives Matter movement, his reaction and response to the Covid pandemic in NYC, and the descriptions and index of the unusual ingredients. Gorgeous photography too! Only 4 Stars for the recipes because of those same unusual ingredients I could only (and only wanted to) tab seven of the recipes to try. Recommend for serious cookbook readers. It was a joy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessi

    An absolutely fantastic cookbook showcasing Black talent from all around the country. As the dust jacket says, it's past time to start recognizing Black excellence in the culinary world (particularly since so much of "American" cuisine owes so much to Black chefs and home cooks!) as we have in other realms such as music and sports. I really loved this and plan on buying it. An absolutely fantastic cookbook showcasing Black talent from all around the country. As the dust jacket says, it's past time to start recognizing Black excellence in the culinary world (particularly since so much of "American" cuisine owes so much to Black chefs and home cooks!) as we have in other realms such as music and sports. I really loved this and plan on buying it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashani

    This cookbook is unlike any other cookbooks . It's a collection of different recipes from different Black chefs across America raised under different conditions. What's best about this book is, this recognizes whats unique about black cooks and what they are doing in the world and their community. This often is not in the spotlight and Marcus has doe the justice. Its only the beginning. This cookbook is unlike any other cookbooks . It's a collection of different recipes from different Black chefs across America raised under different conditions. What's best about this book is, this recognizes whats unique about black cooks and what they are doing in the world and their community. This often is not in the spotlight and Marcus has doe the justice. Its only the beginning.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This cookbook is a must read for people who love cooking and who want to learn more about Black cooks and American cooking. This book focused on so many good recipes for dishes that are new to me but a staple for so many other Americans. Ever since I read #TheCookingGene I realized how little I knew about The history of American food culture and how important it is to learn more.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paula Forest

    Marcus : Samuelson is an acclaimed chef in Harlem. His restaurant, Red Rooster, was an instant hit and President and Michelle Obama’s favorite. The book highlights up and coming chefs and their recipes, plus gives us a better idea of what food means and it’s importance in black culture and how America is embracing it

  23. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    Beautifully designed and produced. Very interesting info. about a great many chefs working in US and producing recipes with a variety of indigenous/to us exotic ingredients or flavorings. I read with interest but don't think I will actually cook from it. Beautifully designed and produced. Very interesting info. about a great many chefs working in US and producing recipes with a variety of indigenous/to us exotic ingredients or flavorings. I read with interest but don't think I will actually cook from it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Molly Engle

    Too many animal recipes. I like the idea that he has to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks. The stories were worth the read. It would be nice if there were a vegetarian version.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Casseroll

    I love the layout of multiple black cooks and their recipes.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

    Another excellent cookbook by Marcus Samuelsson! Lots of interesting recipes chronicling the rise of Black chefs in America! Beautiful photos, too.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Not only does this cookbook have great recipes, it’s a fascinating read. Samuelsson elevates Black chefs and kitchen staff that have long been marginalized and/or erased from food history. Each recipe is in homage to a Black chef, staff and/or food writer that is both accessible and delicious. But more importantly, it opens up discussions about change and representation in food. In Marcus’ words, Black Food is American Food and Black Food Matters. ETA: December 2020 staff pick

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cynde

    A wonderful look at culture and food of Black chefs around the world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aly K

    I would have enjoyed it more had it contained more information about the people and maybe recipes created by them rather than the author.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Heller

    I like this cookbook because it is more than a cookbook. It gives a good history of African-American chefs and the inspirations behind their favorite recipes. Also, I will be making some of the recipes in this cookbook. I highly recommend this book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.