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Eisner-winning writer Jeff Lemire joins forces with the legendary art team of Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz to resurrect Vic Sage, only to destroy him all over again...and again... For years, Vic Sage has worn the faceless mask of the Question to clean up the streets of Hub City by sheer force of will. He knows right from wrong. He knows black from white. But what happen Eisner-winning writer Jeff Lemire joins forces with the legendary art team of Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz to resurrect Vic Sage, only to destroy him all over again...and again... For years, Vic Sage has worn the faceless mask of the Question to clean up the streets of Hub City by sheer force of will. He knows right from wrong. He knows black from white. But what happens when he is drawn into a conspiracy that reaches from the heights of Hub City power to the depths of its underground tunnels? What happens when things stop being black-and-white and start getting a little gray? And what happens when, in a secret chamber deep beneath the city, Vic Sage meets his own end...and his new beginning? Collects issues #1-4.


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Eisner-winning writer Jeff Lemire joins forces with the legendary art team of Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz to resurrect Vic Sage, only to destroy him all over again...and again... For years, Vic Sage has worn the faceless mask of the Question to clean up the streets of Hub City by sheer force of will. He knows right from wrong. He knows black from white. But what happen Eisner-winning writer Jeff Lemire joins forces with the legendary art team of Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz to resurrect Vic Sage, only to destroy him all over again...and again... For years, Vic Sage has worn the faceless mask of the Question to clean up the streets of Hub City by sheer force of will. He knows right from wrong. He knows black from white. But what happens when he is drawn into a conspiracy that reaches from the heights of Hub City power to the depths of its underground tunnels? What happens when things stop being black-and-white and start getting a little gray? And what happens when, in a secret chamber deep beneath the city, Vic Sage meets his own end...and his new beginning? Collects issues #1-4.

30 review for The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This was pretty great. Each issue dealing with one of the Question's past lives. My only complaint would be the underdeveloped villain. We never got any answers why this was happening to Vic Sage or why this villain was menacing Hub City. It probably could have used another issue. The real star here is the art. Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz bring out the best in one another playing to each other's strengths. This was pretty great. Each issue dealing with one of the Question's past lives. My only complaint would be the underdeveloped villain. We never got any answers why this was happening to Vic Sage or why this villain was menacing Hub City. It probably could have used another issue. The real star here is the art. Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz bring out the best in one another playing to each other's strengths.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I don’t read a lot of DC superhero stuff, mainly because I cut my teeth on Marvel books and have only occasionally found DC’s superheroes as appealing. I’m a huge fan of Bill Sienkiewicz and also like Denys Cowan’s stuff, though, so I made one of my rare exceptions for this book and I’m glad I did. This book was excellent. I don’t think I’ve ever read a Question book before; I’m mainly aware of him from guest appearances in other characters’ books but have always thought he had a cool visual. You I don’t read a lot of DC superhero stuff, mainly because I cut my teeth on Marvel books and have only occasionally found DC’s superheroes as appealing. I’m a huge fan of Bill Sienkiewicz and also like Denys Cowan’s stuff, though, so I made one of my rare exceptions for this book and I’m glad I did. This book was excellent. I don’t think I’ve ever read a Question book before; I’m mainly aware of him from guest appearances in other characters’ books but have always thought he had a cool visual. You really don’t need to know much about him to enjoy this book, though, as it’s pretty self-contained. There may be stuff in here that only long-term fans will appreciate but as a relative newcomer to the character I didn’t feel like I was missing anything. The artwork is stunning. The ‘Every-comicbook-artist-should-draw-like-Jim-Lee’ crowd will probably hate it but those of us who appreciate a more expressionist/impressionist art style will find a lot to love here. I’m getting it a bit foggy (probably a migraine coming on) so I’ll leave it there but, overall, I loved this one.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. The two opposing and eternal forces of good and evil have rarely been understood without a divide among mortals. There are many ways for one to determine if they are prone towards one or another but there is no guarantee that they will not tilt into the other domain at a moment’s notice. Sometimes you look at the means, sometimes you look at the ends, but always is the intention crucial to grasp one’s tendency towards good or evil. The Question You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. The two opposing and eternal forces of good and evil have rarely been understood without a divide among mortals. There are many ways for one to determine if they are prone towards one or another but there is no guarantee that they will not tilt into the other domain at a moment’s notice. Sometimes you look at the means, sometimes you look at the ends, but always is the intention crucial to grasp one’s tendency towards good or evil. The Question is one hero who is convinced that he knows the distinction between both, that he champions the way towards good, that is, until he’s sent down a rabbit hole. Collecting all four issues, Eisner-winning writer Jeff Lemire teams up with the legendary artistic powerhouse Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz to deliver a mystery surrounding the identity of Vic Sage and his alter-ego The Question. What is The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage about? In the hopelessly corrupt Hub City, one faceless hero roams the streets looking to dish out justice and order to anyone embracing crime. When a conspiracy leads him to the depths of the city’s underbelly, he is suddenly pulled into an adventure beyond his understanding, sending him back in time to unravel past lives he might have had despite having no memory of them. Waging his war against evil, his journey brings him to delve into the complexity of good and evil, as well as to demystify the blurry line distinguishing one from the other. However, this sequence of tragic reincarnation has left him with more questions than answers but the real query lies in his ability to break free from this vicious cycle or not. Writer Jeff Lemire achieves a truly unique and authentic take on the hero The Question through this four-part story. At its foundation, it is a heavily-focused noir mystery centered around politics and crime with a protagonist juggling two completely opposite personas, one completely public and transparent to the world and the other hidden in the shadows of the people. As the story progresses, the narrative drifts into a conscious-expanding quest gravitating around Vic Sage’s identity and history. It is especially during these later acts of the story that writer Jeff Lemire melds together various historical periods and explores adjacent genres, e.g. western. Although the narrative structure is flimsy towards the end, having trouble to properly take shape, it is the premise and the promise of resolution that makes this story engrossing. Artist Denys Cowan brings to the table a rough and sketch-like artistic vision that works tremendously with this storyline. The unsure and undefined quality of his style stunningly reflects the hazy and blurred line between good and evil, subconsciously inviting readers to understand the difficulty of individuals to adopt a purely dichotomic view of the world. Inker Bill Sienkiewicz and colourist Chris Sotomayor also tap into this story’s tone to deliver the grim, dimmed, and shadow-heavy artwork. The use of black borders also easily engulfs the story in a darker atmosphere without much more effort than necessary, reminding readers of the darkness within and outside of The Question. Unfortunately, the final act rushes into a philosophical frenzy that strips the protagonist from getting the answers to the questions he craved so profoundly. In the end, this psychological odyssey leads to his ultimate transformation, a transformation that simply broadens the protagonist’s vision rather than destroy his perception of the world. The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage is a riveting yet puzzling genre-blending mystery centered around one man’s tale of self-discovery through conspiracy and moral uncertainty. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This is...something. I won't lie and say I read much Question before, and I usually love Lemire, but this did almost nothing for me. Jumping through different time periods, touching on political issues but not doing much with it, and the plot itself not having much to say...this ended up being a dud. A 2 out of 5. This is...something. I won't lie and say I read much Question before, and I usually love Lemire, but this did almost nothing for me. Jumping through different time periods, touching on political issues but not doing much with it, and the plot itself not having much to say...this ended up being a dud. A 2 out of 5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    DC's Black Label is quickly becoming a warning label to stay away -- not because of adult content, mind you, but because they are mostly below-average to bad books like this misdirected attempt to turn the Question into a generational legacy character. (Except is it all a dream, delusion, or supernatural mind game? Who knows, who cares?) Or maybe I'm just over Jeff Lemire as a writer? Maybe I should re-read the Essex County books to remind myself why I thought he was someone to watch. DC's Black Label is quickly becoming a warning label to stay away -- not because of adult content, mind you, but because they are mostly below-average to bad books like this misdirected attempt to turn the Question into a generational legacy character. (Except is it all a dream, delusion, or supernatural mind game? Who knows, who cares?) Or maybe I'm just over Jeff Lemire as a writer? Maybe I should re-read the Essex County books to remind myself why I thought he was someone to watch.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    3.5/5 This is coming from someone who knows nothing about this character before this read so keep that in mind with this review: Overall, it’s a fun noir story. It plays with time and the idea of someone reliving aspects of their life over and over again. I got a lot of similar vibes between The Question and Batman—I don’t know if that’s on purpose but they seem very similar in characteristics. The ending is a bit ambiguous, might need a second reading to fully understand it. If you’ve read Lemire 3.5/5 This is coming from someone who knows nothing about this character before this read so keep that in mind with this review: Overall, it’s a fun noir story. It plays with time and the idea of someone reliving aspects of their life over and over again. I got a lot of similar vibes between The Question and Batman—I don’t know if that’s on purpose but they seem very similar in characteristics. The ending is a bit ambiguous, might need a second reading to fully understand it. If you’ve read Lemire’s Old Man Logan run then this will definitely feel familiar.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    I am shocked by how little I cared about a Jeff Lemire Question comic. I mean kudos for really replicating the feel of the O'Neil series, by returning to characters, locales, and themes. But. The whole theme of good and evil was as subtle as a brick in the face, particularly in the fairly horrible Old West issue, which was just ruined by its captioning. The whole idea of The Question being reincarnated, maybe, might have been interesting if it weren't totally apart from anything ever written about T I am shocked by how little I cared about a Jeff Lemire Question comic. I mean kudos for really replicating the feel of the O'Neil series, by returning to characters, locales, and themes. But. The whole theme of good and evil was as subtle as a brick in the face, particularly in the fairly horrible Old West issue, which was just ruined by its captioning. The whole idea of The Question being reincarnated, maybe, might have been interesting if it weren't totally apart from anything ever written about The Question before. And Lemire's storytelling is so muddy that he never really commits to it anyway. In fact, I'm really not sure what he committed to, because so much of the story is a muddy mess. Yes, yes, that's clearly some of the point, given the final dialogues in the story. But Lemire doesn't tell the whole unreliable-narrator story in a way that actually leaves you with a very fulfilling story. I think this comic also came up short because it was being released at the same time as Greg Rucka's Lois Lane: Enemy of the People, which also focused on the Question, but in a way that respected his continuity and tried to rebuild it after the disaster that was the Nu52. This instead just throws a whole bunch of new stuff at the wall while ignoring questions from Lois Lane like Vic's death pre-Flashpoint. Also, really, did you have to make the comic an annoying shape just to prove how cool you were?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    2,5/5. It's a rare thing for me the write bad review bout a Jeff Lemire comic book, but here I am. I would have love to enjoy it but I didn't, there is a lot happening but it's the glue between it all that didn't seem to work. It reminds me a lot of the recent Watchmen TV show in the overall way it was done, nothing that similar, but some similarities and just an overall feeling about it. And it was also a very popular show even if I didn't really enjoy it, so maybe it might be the same for you 2,5/5. It's a rare thing for me the write bad review bout a Jeff Lemire comic book, but here I am. I would have love to enjoy it but I didn't, there is a lot happening but it's the glue between it all that didn't seem to work. It reminds me a lot of the recent Watchmen TV show in the overall way it was done, nothing that similar, but some similarities and just an overall feeling about it. And it was also a very popular show even if I didn't really enjoy it, so maybe it might be the same for you and this book... Wasn't for me, it happens!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Muteeb

    "I told you, boy. There is no 'Devil.' Just us. Just people." This was ultimately a love letter to Denny O'Neil's Question. It succeeds on all fronts to be quite possibly the best DC Black Label book out there. "I told you, boy. There is no 'Devil.' Just us. Just people." This was ultimately a love letter to Denny O'Neil's Question. It succeeds on all fronts to be quite possibly the best DC Black Label book out there.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rodolfo Santullo

    Question. Que cosa. Yo no leía historietas de superhéroes. Había leído de niño, sí, cosas de Novaro, cosas sueltas, pero para mis 15 años leía mucha historieta europea (Asterix, Tintín, Lucky Luke pero también cosas cómo La Feria de los Inmortales o a Jacques Tardi) y obviamente la Fierro, pero nada de superhéroes. Entonces conocí a mi amigo Diego, que tenía su cuarto lleno -llenísimo- de historietas de los encapotados y pasó un día entero hablándome de Watchmen, Superman y quién sabe cuántas co Question. Que cosa. Yo no leía historietas de superhéroes. Había leído de niño, sí, cosas de Novaro, cosas sueltas, pero para mis 15 años leía mucha historieta europea (Asterix, Tintín, Lucky Luke pero también cosas cómo La Feria de los Inmortales o a Jacques Tardi) y obviamente la Fierro, pero nada de superhéroes. Entonces conocí a mi amigo Diego, que tenía su cuarto lleno -llenísimo- de historietas de los encapotados y pasó un día entero hablándome de Watchmen, Superman y quién sabe cuántas cosas más. Así que un par de domingos después de eso fui a la Feria de Tristán Narvaja y en la librería Ruben paré por primera vez ante esa mesa con pilas y pilas de revistas de superhéroes. Me llevé dos. Una de Batman de Peter Milligan y Jim Aparo (titulada “La hierba hambrienta”) y el número 3 de Question. Que lo tiró. No había imaginado que los superhéroes también podían ser eso. Así inició este romance -que, cómo todo romance, ha tenido altibajos- con los amigos de las máscaras y las mallas, pero en particular con Question fue amor a primera vista. Lo que me costó completar esa serie, rastreando en quioscos, librerías de usados, tacos de Zinco que aparecían de repente y había que ser más rápido que el Correcaminos para no perderlos. Pero la completé. Y sigue estando entre mis historietas favoritas de toda mi vida. Y el personaje, siempre ha estado entre mis más queridos. Pero lo cierto es que más allá de la mentada serie de Denny O’Neill y Denys Cowan no pasó gran cosa luego. Sí tuvo una reinterpretación muy divertida en su variante animada, cómo parte de la Liga de la Justicia Ilimitada, pero en historietas medio que le perdí el rastro. Por eso, esta miniserie que recuperaba nada menos que Cowan cómo dibujante (con tintas de Bill Sienkievicz, cómo en las tapas de la serie original) era cuanto menos llamativa. Que el encumbrado Jeff Lemire la escribiera la hacía también muy interesante. Así que la rastreé y allá fui. El resultado es bastante grato pero curioso. Primero que nada, en esta miniserie de cuatro entregas, en el inicio Lemire rinde homenaje a la serie original y prácticamente reinterpreta su origen: Vic Sage es un periodista que combate la corrupción en la oscurísima Hub City y al mismo tiempo el enmascarado Question. Lo ayuda Aristotle Rodor, que le da elementos para esa batalla. Está Myra y su (ahora) hermano, el alcalde Fermin. Hay malos, mafia, peleas, trios y tramoya, tal cual la escribía Denny. Y la verdad, queda un retrogusto algo amargo, a historia ya conocida. Pero Lemire luego pega el volantazo y, sorpresivamente, la historia se vuelve mística: con Question cuál encarnación de algo elemental que se repite en distintas épocas -el Lejano Oeste, los 20s, ahora- siempre combatiendo la injusticia. Hay una suerte de Logia cómo villanos y un clima pesado, denso, de conspiración onda Masones o Illuminati. ¿Cierra todo esto con Question? Y… más o menos. Por momento es cómo ver a Hawkman reinventado como detective sin cara, pero lo cierto es que Lemire escribe con onda y en los dibujos de Cowan y Sienkevicz hay todo el amor del mundo por el personaje y su universo, así que el resultado -aunque algo agridulce- es bastante recomendable, así sea para reencontrar a un amigo, uno que hace mucho tiempo que no veías.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage collects issues 1-4 of the DC Black Label series by comic legends Jeff Lemire, Denys Cowan, and Bill Sienkiewicz. Vic Sage leads two lives: a TV news reporter by day and vigilante by night. As The Question, he fights crime in Hub Cuty with a strict idea of right and wrong, black and white. But when Sage stumbles upon a conspiracy that wil test not only his belief in justice but also his own mortality. I have deeply loved everything I have read to date from Je The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage collects issues 1-4 of the DC Black Label series by comic legends Jeff Lemire, Denys Cowan, and Bill Sienkiewicz. Vic Sage leads two lives: a TV news reporter by day and vigilante by night. As The Question, he fights crime in Hub Cuty with a strict idea of right and wrong, black and white. But when Sage stumbles upon a conspiracy that wil test not only his belief in justice but also his own mortality. I have deeply loved everything I have read to date from Jeff Lemire and was really looking forward to this book. This is his first book that I haven't cared for. I didn't dislike it but the book feels incomplete. No explanation is given to the villain or why he has been messing Sage. There are some great ideas being played with, but I don't feel like they are ever wrapped up. The art has a sketchy haunting look to it that plays well with Sage's psychology. As always, DC Comics does a great job with the hardcover edition to their Black Label series. It is beautifully bound and the paper stock showcases the art well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I was a little torn on this one. It's got great art. The story spans a few genres, including westerns and noir, two genres that I really enjoy. And I've always been a fan of The Question. Also, the story had some really cool moments. Overall, I enjoyed every second of this one. However, when it ended, I was left with many questions, no pun intended. I'm not sure exactly what was going on, as this was the type of existential story that always seems to be beyond me. But considering that even if I w I was a little torn on this one. It's got great art. The story spans a few genres, including westerns and noir, two genres that I really enjoy. And I've always been a fan of The Question. Also, the story had some really cool moments. Overall, I enjoyed every second of this one. However, when it ended, I was left with many questions, no pun intended. I'm not sure exactly what was going on, as this was the type of existential story that always seems to be beyond me. But considering that even if I was left confused at points, I still enjoyed both the story and art. . In summary, I don't know exactly what was going on in this story at all times, but I know I liked it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I’m a huge fan of Lemire, so I was really looking forward to this. It starts off pretty strong, but by issue 3 things just begin to fall apart. The ending just felt so rushed and poor, no finality to it, which could mean a sequel is on the way but with such a bad ending it’s put me off picking it up if there ever is one. The story if vic sage finding out about his past, who is he? That’s indeed the question. And it was an interesting story to follow for the most part, I just feel the final issue I’m a huge fan of Lemire, so I was really looking forward to this. It starts off pretty strong, but by issue 3 things just begin to fall apart. The ending just felt so rushed and poor, no finality to it, which could mean a sequel is on the way but with such a bad ending it’s put me off picking it up if there ever is one. The story if vic sage finding out about his past, who is he? That’s indeed the question. And it was an interesting story to follow for the most part, I just feel the final issue lost an entire star for this review which was a real shame

  14. 5 out of 5

    Saugata Mukherjee

    The story was very boring. Jeff Lemire tried to do too much in 4 issues. The concept of many Questions over the years is an intriguing idea, but the story did not do justice to it. The villain is too convoluted (allegory to human sins may be). Lemire tried to incorporate the current US situation also in the story, but it happens very drastically without any real build up. The end is similarly quite abrupt and unsatisfying. The art is good and is the only saving grace of this graphic novel. It felt The story was very boring. Jeff Lemire tried to do too much in 4 issues. The concept of many Questions over the years is an intriguing idea, but the story did not do justice to it. The villain is too convoluted (allegory to human sins may be). Lemire tried to incorporate the current US situation also in the story, but it happens very drastically without any real build up. The end is similarly quite abrupt and unsatisfying. The art is good and is the only saving grace of this graphic novel. It felt like a chore, reading 4 issues, and I thought of skipping pages every now and then. That is never a good sign, especially when the story is so short.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    Back in the 80's DC comics produced a Question comic book that was amazing. The 36 issue run plus two annuals and an additional five issues in a quarterly are all part of a run by the late great Denny O'Neil and Denys Cowan. They brought out the best in this character that was pretty paper thin at best up to that point. Vic Sage was a reporter in Hub City by day and The Question at night. The Question while he is portrayed as a hero is more than a little gray. He borders on making many questiona Back in the 80's DC comics produced a Question comic book that was amazing. The 36 issue run plus two annuals and an additional five issues in a quarterly are all part of a run by the late great Denny O'Neil and Denys Cowan. They brought out the best in this character that was pretty paper thin at best up to that point. Vic Sage was a reporter in Hub City by day and The Question at night. The Question while he is portrayed as a hero is more than a little gray. He borders on making many questionable decisions all in the name of truth and justice. He is a little like Marvel's Punisher without the Deathwish like element that the Punisher conveys. With the ending in the early 90's of this run The Question fades away for a good while in the DC universe. He returns a couple of times before meeting his fate and being replaced but then returning again to life after DC restarted their universe again. Then DC started the Black Label line and produced an excellent mini series by writer Jeff Lemire and Denys Cowan again bring The Question to life, The Deaths of Vic Sage. Lemire picks up on many of the O'Neil runs characters and nails the personality of Vic Sage. He takes us on a zen-like journey of Sage reliving past lives against a common foe and then returns him to the real world to resolve the case. It is a well told story and it is highlighted by an excellent art job by Cowan and inker and artist extraordinaire Bill Seinkiewicz. This was both a quality job and I think a labor of love. The only thing missing for me was a tribute to O'Neil in the book. One of my favorite books of the year. Would love to see more from this team and character.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    The Question was created by Steve Ditko at Charlton Comics, and Ditko had several other similar characters over the years at other publishers. The Question reflected Ditko's black-and-white view of life. The Question was the inspiration for Rorschach in Alan Moore's Watchmen. What does a modern writer like Jeff Lemire do with a character like that? Here we get a fascinating look at the character, finding out that he has essentially been reincarnated at least a couple of times, first in the Old W The Question was created by Steve Ditko at Charlton Comics, and Ditko had several other similar characters over the years at other publishers. The Question reflected Ditko's black-and-white view of life. The Question was the inspiration for Rorschach in Alan Moore's Watchmen. What does a modern writer like Jeff Lemire do with a character like that? Here we get a fascinating look at the character, finding out that he has essentially been reincarnated at least a couple of times, first in the Old West, and again at the height of organized crime in the 1940s. Every time we see him fighting the Devil, first for a black man's life, then for union organizers being harassed by a city government in the pockets of big business, and finally reaching a head in the present with civil unrest against another corrupt city government whose police are free to shoot unarmed black men. That these injustices go around in cycles and will probably never end seems to be the moral of this particular tale. It was a fun surprise to see the character Richard Dragon make a small but important appearance in the story; Dragon is a DC character created during the 1970's kung-fu craze. The artwork by Denys Cowan and Bill Sienkiewicz creates an off balance tone that complements the writing. I read this book as individual comic book issues.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    I still have a lot of questions after finishing Jeff Lemire’s The Question. I’m not exactly sure who the Question is or what he can do. Does he have powers, or just really good Kung-fu moves? And by the end you might wonder what it is he accomplishes. And yet, this was a very enjoyable read. It’s a story of Vic Sage discovering his identity. By day he is a news reporter tackling political corruption, and by night he is a masked crusader seeking all of the information he will use for his reportin I still have a lot of questions after finishing Jeff Lemire’s The Question. I’m not exactly sure who the Question is or what he can do. Does he have powers, or just really good Kung-fu moves? And by the end you might wonder what it is he accomplishes. And yet, this was a very enjoyable read. It’s a story of Vic Sage discovering his identity. By day he is a news reporter tackling political corruption, and by night he is a masked crusader seeking all of the information he will use for his reporting. But when he discovers a ring with a strange symbol on it (another unanswered question, btw), he knows there is a deeper question that needs answering. To do so, he goes on a spirit journey of sorts, discovering his past lives and some enemy with a thousand faces. These stories of his past lives are enjoyable, and Lemire does a great job establishing a gritty, noirish tone, which is aided with the excellent artwork.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eastham Erik

    As a huge Lemire fan, it’s sad to say that Sienkiewicz’s art barely saves this unorganized, direction lacking, misguided story. The story is set up to be a confusing mystery, but the final conclusion barely provides any answers resulting in a giant build up to a complete let down. Lemire’s hero Vic Sage is anything but. Trying to literally fight evil, Vic Sage beats up cops as the question and as a news anchor, slings allegations and is begged repeatedly to “get back on the air” as he is the only As a huge Lemire fan, it’s sad to say that Sienkiewicz’s art barely saves this unorganized, direction lacking, misguided story. The story is set up to be a confusing mystery, but the final conclusion barely provides any answers resulting in a giant build up to a complete let down. Lemire’s hero Vic Sage is anything but. Trying to literally fight evil, Vic Sage beats up cops as the question and as a news anchor, slings allegations and is begged repeatedly to “get back on the air” as he is the only voice of reason who can speak wisdom to the citizens of Hub city. In short, a love letter to the main stream media of 2020 and an over simplification of race issues. The art is incredible though.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    The Question is back! While memory may have elevated the quality of the previous incarnations Lemire’s version of the question touches elements that have always been in Vic Sage and Hub City and presents them for our reconsideration.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Jeff Lemire does a great job of capturing the spirt of the 80’s Denny O’Neil series. Of course it dosnt hurt to have the art team from that great run return also. The book is excellent, and with the events of the last week here in the states it feels very timely. Good read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    The real highlight of this book is the glorious art from Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz and Chris Sotomayor. The story from Jeff Lemire does some really entertaining genre hybrid stuff and ends on an incredibly timely note, but it doesn’t quite stick the landing.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David

    I don't know. It's okay I guess. It just seems like so many comics I've read before. I think I'm just over this general tone in books. It's a little edgelord-ish. 2 1/2 stars. I don't know. It's okay I guess. It just seems like so many comics I've read before. I think I'm just over this general tone in books. It's a little edgelord-ish. 2 1/2 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    I'm not sure if it's just that this book was published so sporadically, but I had a hard time following what was happening. The story was decent, but the real star was the artwork. I'm not sure if it's just that this book was published so sporadically, but I had a hard time following what was happening. The story was decent, but the real star was the artwork.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Excellent artwork, and I loved the noir tone of the story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Went into this blind and really enjoyed it

  26. 5 out of 5

    Am Gill

    3.5 Stars

  27. 4 out of 5

    Borja

    3,5. Un buen reencuentro con The Question.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andres Pasten

    Destaco más el arte de Cowan, más que la historia de Lemire. Ni buena ni mala.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    Not lemires best but it’s nice to see him branch out. Still a good read though. Would normally rate this 3 stars but lemire doesn’t write measly 3 star books. 4 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aether Ghoul

    A true return to form for the only Question that matters.

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