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The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics)

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Book Description: The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Power and haunting," and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, unites "The Lottery:" with twenty-four equally unusual stories. To Book Description: The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Power and haunting," and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, unites "The Lottery:" with twenty-four equally unusual stories. Together they demonstrate Jack son's remarkable range--from the hilarious to the truly horrible--and power as a storyteller. Shirley Jackson (1919-65) wrote several books, including Hangsaman, Life Among the Savages, and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. For the last twenty years of her life, she lived in North Bennington, Vermont. One of the most terrifying stories of the twentieth century, "The Lottery" created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Powerful and haunting" and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. Widely anthologized, "The Lottery" is today considered a classic work of short fiction.This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, combines "The Lottery" with twenty-four equally unusual or unsettling tales. Taken together, these writings demonstrate Jackson's remarkable and commanding range—from the commonplace to the chilling, from the hilarious to the truly horrible—as a modern storyteller.This FSG Classics edition also features a new introduction to Jackson's work by A. M. Homes. "Jackson is unparalleled as a leader in the field of beautifully written, quiet, cumulative shudders."—Dorothy Parker, Esquire"[These] stories remind one of the elemental terrors of childhood."—James Hilton, New York Herald Tribune "In her art, as in her life, Shirley Jackson was an absolute original. She listened to her own voice, kept her own counsel, isolated herself from all intellectual and literary currents . . . She was unique."—Newsweek About the Author Shirley Jackson, born in 1919, was the author of numerous books, including Hangsman, Life Among the Savages, and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. For the last twenty years of her life, until her death in 1965, she lived in North Bennington, Vermont.


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Book Description: The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Power and haunting," and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, unites "The Lottery:" with twenty-four equally unusual stories. To Book Description: The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Power and haunting," and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, unites "The Lottery:" with twenty-four equally unusual stories. Together they demonstrate Jack son's remarkable range--from the hilarious to the truly horrible--and power as a storyteller. Shirley Jackson (1919-65) wrote several books, including Hangsaman, Life Among the Savages, and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. For the last twenty years of her life, she lived in North Bennington, Vermont. One of the most terrifying stories of the twentieth century, "The Lottery" created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Powerful and haunting" and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. Widely anthologized, "The Lottery" is today considered a classic work of short fiction.This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, combines "The Lottery" with twenty-four equally unusual or unsettling tales. Taken together, these writings demonstrate Jackson's remarkable and commanding range—from the commonplace to the chilling, from the hilarious to the truly horrible—as a modern storyteller.This FSG Classics edition also features a new introduction to Jackson's work by A. M. Homes. "Jackson is unparalleled as a leader in the field of beautifully written, quiet, cumulative shudders."—Dorothy Parker, Esquire"[These] stories remind one of the elemental terrors of childhood."—James Hilton, New York Herald Tribune "In her art, as in her life, Shirley Jackson was an absolute original. She listened to her own voice, kept her own counsel, isolated herself from all intellectual and literary currents . . . She was unique."—Newsweek About the Author Shirley Jackson, born in 1919, was the author of numerous books, including Hangsman, Life Among the Savages, and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. For the last twenty years of her life, until her death in 1965, she lived in North Bennington, Vermont.

30 review for The Lottery and Other Stories (FSG Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    I really loved these stories and a number of them are still percolating in my brain and of course The Lottery was gobsmackingly good. I know a book is good for me when I’m thinking of it through the day. I know a book is great for me when I start narrating in my head in the author’s style which is exactly what I did with this. While I was reading this my husband and I were painting the kitchen and doing jobs around the house. I was so pleased with the work accomplished I kept trying to keep thin I really loved these stories and a number of them are still percolating in my brain and of course The Lottery was gobsmackingly good. I know a book is good for me when I’m thinking of it through the day. I know a book is great for me when I start narrating in my head in the author’s style which is exactly what I did with this. While I was reading this my husband and I were painting the kitchen and doing jobs around the house. I was so pleased with the work accomplished I kept trying to keep things clean so I could have the pleasure of appreciating what we had accomplished. However I would find by the end of the day the joy of a freshly painted kitchen was beginning to transform to irritation every time I’d come into it finding a dish or cup left on the counter. I wondered what would Ms Jackson make of such a simple but revealing thing about me and I could well imagine the story that could be created. I think, having read many of the stories that described character’s spaces and how they were decorated that perhaps she would discern that my joy in my space was also the source of my suffering ( I use the word lightly) every time I walked into the kitchen to find a dirty dish left on the counter. It was driving me a little nuts to tell the truth. I think it’s a mark of excellent writing to have it resonate so fully as Ms. Jackson’s stories did for me and I loved it so much I downloaded several of her books onto my kindle. I definitely recommend this though keep in mind some of the stories are subtle. On the surface there may not seem to be a lot going on such as in the story about the mother of one boy away at school visiting the family of one of his school friends. It seems like a perfectly polite and friendly visit between the two women and yet there is so much going on underneath the polite veneer. Jackson was an excellent observer of human nature and it shines in her work. Can’t wait to tuck into more by her.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Talya Boerner

    The Lottery is possibly the first piece of literature that affected me. I read it in 7th or 8th grade (Mrs. Ashley's English class at Keiser Jr. High) and never forgot it. All these years later, it is still as powerful, maybe more so, the strength in every commonplace word and dialog that weaves together something macabre. The story seemed much longer back then. Everything seemed longer and larger back then. Shirley Jackson's work is marvelous, mysterious, and stands the test of time. The majori The Lottery is possibly the first piece of literature that affected me. I read it in 7th or 8th grade (Mrs. Ashley's English class at Keiser Jr. High) and never forgot it. All these years later, it is still as powerful, maybe more so, the strength in every commonplace word and dialog that weaves together something macabre. The story seemed much longer back then. Everything seemed longer and larger back then. Shirley Jackson's work is marvelous, mysterious, and stands the test of time. The majority of the short stories in this collection, I'd never read. A sinful treat, each one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ginny

    2 stars feels generous to me. I expected a lot but was very disappointed. I liked maybe 3 out of 25 stories. I found them boring and dated. I’m wondering if this is because I listened to the audio instead of reading it. I’m new to audio books and I’m not sure they are for me. It s a different experience. I love short stories but I didn’t love these. Nothing seemed to happen in the stories although I know they were meant to be more character studies rather than plot driven. And they are good in t 2 stars feels generous to me. I expected a lot but was very disappointed. I liked maybe 3 out of 25 stories. I found them boring and dated. I’m wondering if this is because I listened to the audio instead of reading it. I’m new to audio books and I’m not sure they are for me. It s a different experience. I love short stories but I didn’t love these. Nothing seemed to happen in the stories although I know they were meant to be more character studies rather than plot driven. And they are good in that sense but it wasn’t enough and they all seemed too much alike. I really feel I would have enjoyed these stories far more on the printed page.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Allen Thakur

    The stories were strange or eerie. Jackson's anxiety comes through in many of these stories, some of which have a dream-like feeling. My favorites are Pillar of Salt and The Tooth.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    So many good stories, all from a 50s woman's point of view in some way. Grouped thematically, each story shows some monstrous, shitty behavior that people think is just "keeping up decorum." Somehow I had never been forced to read The Lottery in middle school. I don't know how I managed that, but it seems like I missed out. It's really the only story that could be considered almost sci-fi/horror because it takes place in some sort of dystopian future that feels like the past. I was actually expec So many good stories, all from a 50s woman's point of view in some way. Grouped thematically, each story shows some monstrous, shitty behavior that people think is just "keeping up decorum." Somehow I had never been forced to read The Lottery in middle school. I don't know how I managed that, but it seems like I missed out. It's really the only story that could be considered almost sci-fi/horror because it takes place in some sort of dystopian future that feels like the past. I was actually expecting more horror because that's what I know of Shirley Jackson. But I'm also very happy with what I got, too.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    Shirley Jackson’s work somehow delves into the American psyche in a complicated, quiet, brutally honest way I’ve never experienced in any other writing. The undercurrent of paranoia and fear that runs through us as we follow The Rules of daily life, and what happens when something out of the norm or proscribed behaviors bleeds into our lives. How tenuous the threads between us and others, the normal and the abnormal, and how normal itself is a fantasy we create. Quiet terror in every world she b Shirley Jackson’s work somehow delves into the American psyche in a complicated, quiet, brutally honest way I’ve never experienced in any other writing. The undercurrent of paranoia and fear that runs through us as we follow The Rules of daily life, and what happens when something out of the norm or proscribed behaviors bleeds into our lives. How tenuous the threads between us and others, the normal and the abnormal, and how normal itself is a fantasy we create. Quiet terror in every world she builds.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jon Weidler

    A few don't conclude as well as they should (for all the build-up in "Elizabeth," it just kind of...ends), but overall, Jackson's prose is addictive and mercilessly attuned to the nuances and hidden meanings of everyday gestures, building a subtle paranoia that had me second-guessing the deflected glances of my own neighbors. If a work of fiction can instill such a feeling in the reader, it's more than done its job.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura Waggoner

    A lot of the stories are subtle, it took me a while to get into them and understand what she meant by them. "After You, My Dear Alphonse," probably struck me the most because it's something that could have been written about today's society just as easily. We haven't come as far as we like to think we have, sadly.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I have a confession to make, and that is that I don’t particularly like Shirley Jackson’s James Harris stories. However, I adore basically everything else she wrote, so it’s fine. Nobody gets the like, awfulness of everyday life like her. “Flower Garden” and “The Renegade” were my favourite stories in this collection.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Fucci

    3.5 - This is kind of sold as a horror collection because it includes the Lottery, but I don't think that's accurate. Every story is just sort of about....weird people. Don't get me wrong, SJ is a master and writes really compelling characters, so I enjoyed this collection, but it definitely wasn't what I was expecting. Looking forward to reading more of her ideally creeper shit.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel DeLappe

    Jackson is one of my favorite authors. I’ve read all these stories before and hope to read them all again before I shuffle odd the mortal coil. The Lottery is still impactful and gets creepier every time I read it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura Willis

    I cannot deny that Shirley Jackson is a masterful writer, adeptly capturing moments of life and inner thoughts and dialogue in a sparse but descriptive style. That said, I did not enjoy reading this collection at all.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andre Vrdoljak

  14. 4 out of 5

    Manuel

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie M. Wytovich

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna Wehlin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Dunbar

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carly

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katy Ann

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  22. 4 out of 5

    Luna

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Harrison

  24. 5 out of 5

    Josie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Fabiola M

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  28. 4 out of 5

    Clararuthb328

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sheena Carroll

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

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