counter create hit The Shepherd's Wife - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Shepherd's Wife

Availability: Ready to download

Yeshua of Nazareth has two sisters: Damaris, married to a wealthy merchant's son, and Pheodora, married to a simple shepherd from Bethlehem. When Pheodora's husband suffers an unexpected reversal of fortune and is thrown into debtor's prison, she returns to Nazareth, where she pins her hopes on two she-goats who should give birth to spotless white kids that would be perfec Yeshua of Nazareth has two sisters: Damaris, married to a wealthy merchant's son, and Pheodora, married to a simple shepherd from Bethlehem. When Pheodora's husband suffers an unexpected reversal of fortune and is thrown into debtor's prison, she returns to Nazareth, where she pins her hopes on two she-goats who should give birth to spotless white kids that would be perfect for the upcoming Yom Kippur sacrifice. In the eighteen months between the kids' birth and the opportunity to sell them and redeem her husband from prison, Pheodora must call on her wits, her family, and her God in order to provide for her daughters and survive. But when every prayer and ritual she knows is about God's care for Israel, how can she trust that God will hear and help a lowly shepherd's wife?


Compare

Yeshua of Nazareth has two sisters: Damaris, married to a wealthy merchant's son, and Pheodora, married to a simple shepherd from Bethlehem. When Pheodora's husband suffers an unexpected reversal of fortune and is thrown into debtor's prison, she returns to Nazareth, where she pins her hopes on two she-goats who should give birth to spotless white kids that would be perfec Yeshua of Nazareth has two sisters: Damaris, married to a wealthy merchant's son, and Pheodora, married to a simple shepherd from Bethlehem. When Pheodora's husband suffers an unexpected reversal of fortune and is thrown into debtor's prison, she returns to Nazareth, where she pins her hopes on two she-goats who should give birth to spotless white kids that would be perfect for the upcoming Yom Kippur sacrifice. In the eighteen months between the kids' birth and the opportunity to sell them and redeem her husband from prison, Pheodora must call on her wits, her family, and her God in order to provide for her daughters and survive. But when every prayer and ritual she knows is about God's care for Israel, how can she trust that God will hear and help a lowly shepherd's wife?

30 review for The Shepherd's Wife

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kristi Drillien

    In the Bible, Jesus is said to have at least two sisters, neither of which are named. In The Shepherd’s Wife, author Angela Hunt gives these women names, families, and lives. Pheodora lives in Bethlehem with her shepherd husband, and Damaris is married to a wealthy merchant’s son in Nazareth. While Damaris’s husband takes steps toward becoming a well-respected Pharisee, Pheodora’s husband, Chiram, is thrown in debtor’s prison. It is up to Pheodora to follow through on Chiram’s plan to breed and In the Bible, Jesus is said to have at least two sisters, neither of which are named. In The Shepherd’s Wife, author Angela Hunt gives these women names, families, and lives. Pheodora lives in Bethlehem with her shepherd husband, and Damaris is married to a wealthy merchant’s son in Nazareth. While Damaris’s husband takes steps toward becoming a well-respected Pharisee, Pheodora’s husband, Chiram, is thrown in debtor’s prison. It is up to Pheodora to follow through on Chiram’s plan to breed and raise two pure white goat kids for the Yom Kippur sacrifice, which is their only hope to pay Chiram’s debt. I enjoyed the first book in this series, but absolutely loved this one. By the last third or so, I had a hard time putting it down. All of the brothers and sisters of Jesus (called by his Hebrew name Yeshua in the story) are involved, and I appreciated seeing the family dynamics as they interacted with each other, worked together, and even talked about what their eldest brother was up to. Pheodora, whom the plot revolves around, was determined, loyal, and hard-working, but also had plenty of flaws. The book is probably more character-driven than plot-driven, which is really my cup of tea. The book is written from the sisters’ alternating perspectives, with Pheodora’s being the one shown most often. I wasn’t sure what the point of showing Damaris’s POV was at first, but it really did add to the story. Especially at a point somewhere in the middle when the suspense ramped up because of something we only knew happened due to seeing Damaris’s home life. It started to get really difficult to read as the injustice against Chiram was more fully revealed, and though I assumed all would be made right by the end of the book, it was all just too real. And in real life, things usually aren’t made right, so I wasn’t sure how I’d feel by the end. However, the last quarter of the book brought such surprises, emotions, and lessons learned, that I was not thinking about whether or not the incredible injustice was made right. I have a difficult time giving books 5 stars unless I can see it being a book I’ll re-read at least once in the future. This is a book I definitely will read again someday, at least once. I highly recommend it to fans of Biblical fiction, and I’m really excited about what the author has planned for the next book in this series! Thank you to Netgalley and Bethany House for providing me a copy of this book to review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    This book was, in my opinion, even better than Daughter of Cana (which I also really enjoyed). Hunt has a way of making you care so much about the characters that the fact they are siblings of Jesus isn’t the only pull. This book really delved deep into the Pharisee culture, and it was fascinating, particularly from the perspective of a Pharisee’s wife. Everything Jesus said in the Bible to the Pharisees became even more significant and made so much sense as I was reading this book. Somehow, Hunt This book was, in my opinion, even better than Daughter of Cana (which I also really enjoyed). Hunt has a way of making you care so much about the characters that the fact they are siblings of Jesus isn’t the only pull. This book really delved deep into the Pharisee culture, and it was fascinating, particularly from the perspective of a Pharisee’s wife. Everything Jesus said in the Bible to the Pharisees became even more significant and made so much sense as I was reading this book. Somehow, Hunt manages to move things at a realistic pace without bogging me down: I experience the everyday struggles of the characters in what almost feels like real time, and yet I never want to stop reading. She always keeps things interesting. I can’t wait for the third book! I received a free copy of this book. I wrote the review voluntarily.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    What an incredible story! I was enthralled from the first page and could hardly put this book down. The research Angela Hunt put into writing this flawless book is exemplary. She tells the story of Phaedora, one of Jesus' sisters, and how she works to free her husband from prison. Several parts of the story gave me chills, and I especially loved the Biblical accuracy and the Truth about Jesus. An important part of the story was after Jesus was Crucified and Resurrected, the goats were no longer What an incredible story! I was enthralled from the first page and could hardly put this book down. The research Angela Hunt put into writing this flawless book is exemplary. She tells the story of Phaedora, one of Jesus' sisters, and how she works to free her husband from prison. Several parts of the story gave me chills, and I especially loved the Biblical accuracy and the Truth about Jesus. An important part of the story was after Jesus was Crucified and Resurrected, the goats were no longer necessary as a means of redemption. Only Jesus' Sacrifice.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erin Laramore

    Another great biblical historical novel by Angela Hunt. This is book 2 in the Jerusalem Road series, but can be read as a stand-alone. These first 2 novels actually take place along the same timeline - that of the ministry of Christ. While book 1 was from the perspectives of Jude (Jesus's brother) and Tasmin (Thomas's sister), this one was from the perspective of Jesus's 2 sisters. While His sisters are not named in Scripture, there is mention of "sisters", so we know He had at least 2. Ms. Hunt Another great biblical historical novel by Angela Hunt. This is book 2 in the Jerusalem Road series, but can be read as a stand-alone. These first 2 novels actually take place along the same timeline - that of the ministry of Christ. While book 1 was from the perspectives of Jude (Jesus's brother) and Tasmin (Thomas's sister), this one was from the perspective of Jesus's 2 sisters. While His sisters are not named in Scripture, there is mention of "sisters", so we know He had at least 2. Ms. Hunt has taken this in hand and named His 2 sisters Damaris and Pheodora. Though they were raised in the same household, these 2 sisters are very different from one another. Pheodora (the younger) has married a shepherd and lives in Bethlehem. Damaris has married a wealthy merchant who aspires to becoming a Pharisee. Because of their husbands' professions and stations in life, the 2 sisters live very different lifestyles. When Pheodora's husband is sent to a debtor's prison, and Damaris's husband refuses to bail him out, the fireworks start. As one who prefers plot-driven novels (even in biblical fiction, I look for the Bible stories to play out), this one moved a bit slower for me as it is clearly more character driven. Having read the first book and being familiar with the Scriptures, it was interesting to see the same timeline from the point of views in Nazareth. I enjoyed learning more about the culture of the time and place and speculating a bit about Jesus's earthly family. I appreciated the moment that Pheodora came to believe and how things worked out for her after that point. And the theme of forgiveness was strong throughout. Learning more about how the Pharisees functioned also made me better understand Jesus's teachings against them. Anything that helps me better understand the Scriptures is a worthwhile read! Though I would have enjoyed a bit more "action", this was an overall very enjoyable read. I would recommend to fans of Biblical historical fiction, especially those who yearn to know more about the time of Christ. Special thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an advance e-copy of this book. I was under no obligation to write a review and the thoughts contained herein are my own.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    The first book in the Jerusalem Road series was about Jesus’ brother Jude and the twin sister of Jesus’ disciple Thomas. Both want their brothers to return home so they set out together to persuade them. This book concerns Jesus’ two sisters, Damaris who lives in Nazareth with her husband who is the son of a wealthy merchant and aspires to become a Pharisee. Pheodora is married to a lowly Shepherd and lives in Bethlehem but comes to Nazareth to stay with her brothers when her husband is thrown i The first book in the Jerusalem Road series was about Jesus’ brother Jude and the twin sister of Jesus’ disciple Thomas. Both want their brothers to return home so they set out together to persuade them. This book concerns Jesus’ two sisters, Damaris who lives in Nazareth with her husband who is the son of a wealthy merchant and aspires to become a Pharisee. Pheodora is married to a lowly Shepherd and lives in Bethlehem but comes to Nazareth to stay with her brothers when her husband is thrown in prison by an unscrupulous tax collector. This story runs concurrent with the first story and tells the story of Jesus’ family during this time. Rumor is that the next story may be about Mary, the mother of Jesus, but we will have to wait and see. There are 3 other brothers as well. I love all of Angela Hunt’s stories but this series is so wonderful because it gives you a feel of what was going on during Jesus’ ministry and before and after the crucifixion. She does a lot of research and really fleshes out the Bible account and helps give a feel for the way of life at that time, Jewish traditions, cultural mores and the lay of the land. I have voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from NetGalley. All views expressed are only my honest opinion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gloria Moseley

    Did you ever consider the personal lives of Jesus' earthly siblings? Angela Hunt does just that in her book, "The Shepherd's Wife" where she tells of Jesus' sisters Damaris and Pheodora (we do not know their real names but these serve the purpose nicely). Pheodora faces struggles that are quite similar to those we would expect of others who are not the sister of Messiah. It even shows that she has to grow her faith as she comes to understand that God is just as concerned about her individual nee Did you ever consider the personal lives of Jesus' earthly siblings? Angela Hunt does just that in her book, "The Shepherd's Wife" where she tells of Jesus' sisters Damaris and Pheodora (we do not know their real names but these serve the purpose nicely). Pheodora faces struggles that are quite similar to those we would expect of others who are not the sister of Messiah. It even shows that she has to grow her faith as she comes to understand that God is just as concerned about her individual needs as He is about the entirety of the Jewish people. This book helps the reader to recognize that, if Jesus' earthly sister can experience growth through struggle, then we as His spiritual brothers and sisters should not be surprised when we experience trials in this life. Disclaimer: I received a complimentary e-copy of this book through NetGalley and was not required to write a favorable review. All opinions are my own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Josh Olds

    I’m pretty sure I begin every review of Biblical fiction with this phrase: Biblical fiction is hard to write. If you stray too far from what’s known of the biblical story, readers will shout at you. If you contain yourself to only the biblical story then there’s nothing original about what you’re doing. The best biblical fiction blends a firm grasp of the history and culture of the biblical setting to provide a likely, yet still fictionalized, context for biblical narrative that lies tangential I’m pretty sure I begin every review of Biblical fiction with this phrase: Biblical fiction is hard to write. If you stray too far from what’s known of the biblical story, readers will shout at you. If you contain yourself to only the biblical story then there’s nothing original about what you’re doing. The best biblical fiction blends a firm grasp of the history and culture of the biblical setting to provide a likely, yet still fictionalized, context for biblical narrative that lies tangential to the actual biblical story. And that is what Angela Hunt does unfailingly. The Shepherd’s Wife is the second of the Jerusalem’s Road series and follows the fictional story of the sisters of Jesus. We know that Jesus had siblings and we know that he had more than one sister. We know little else, and that leaves Hunt space to work up a story that is tangential to Scripture, touching it, overlapping with it, sharing space with it. One sister, Damaris, is married to a wealthy Pharisee intent on moving up the social ladder. The other, Pheodora, is married to Chiram, a shepherd from Bethlehem—one with a familial connection to some other shepherds from Bethlehem, although that part of the story is never fully told. When Chiram is thrown into debtor’s prison, Pheodora must make her way through a very patriarchal world, hinging all her hopes on care and eventual sale of their two goats and their foals. Hunt weaves through the complicated layers of the first-century ancient Near East social system with a depth that creates a good story but enough “modern” elements that the reader still feels an air of familiarity. The heart of the conflict stems around the relationship of Pheodora and Damaris. Pheodora had hoped that Damaris’s husband would be able to pay the debt, but Damaris’s husband feels that he can’t because it will cause relational issues with the debt collector, who is an important figure to his social status. Hunt captures the complexity of the patron/client relationship well without forcing readers into a lesson in history or sociology. The Shepherd’s Wife runs adjacent to the storyline of Jesus. He’s their crazy brother, out there preaching and teaching and the sisters aren’t quite sure what to make of it. Damaris is more cautious and reserved. Her relationship to Jesus might make things difficult for her Pharisee husband. Pheodora is often just too busy to think of her brother or make much of his ministry. There are overlaps and connections and let’s just say that it builds to a pretty important and impactful payoff. The Shepherd’s Wife is thoughtful, well-written, and respectful to both Scripture and its culture. Hunt writes with the mind of a scholar and the grace of an artist, drawing readers into a familiar-yet-unfamiliar world. The result is educational, entertaining, and will leave you wanting more. (And if the third volume is going where I think…I can’t wait for what’s in store.)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    What was the debt I owed. I saw my anger, my jealousy, my petty sibling rivalry. I saw every unholy attitude, every moment of irritation, every time I believed God did not care, did not see me, did not answer my prayers...Who had been indifferent? Not God but me. I had never bothered to reach behind the ritual prayers; I never savored the Scriptures or probed the treasures contained with those inspired words. I had been a spoiled child, overstuffed with knowledge of God and yet refusing to pract What was the debt I owed. I saw my anger, my jealousy, my petty sibling rivalry. I saw every unholy attitude, every moment of irritation, every time I believed God did not care, did not see me, did not answer my prayers...Who had been indifferent? Not God but me. I had never bothered to reach behind the ritual prayers; I never savored the Scriptures or probed the treasures contained with those inspired words. I had been a spoiled child, overstuffed with knowledge of God and yet refusing to practice a single iota of the principles I had been privileged to receive. I have enjoyed The Jerusalem Road series tremendously. A series based on the siblings of Jesus. Can you imagine being a sister or brother of the one who was appointed to save the world without sin? How we believe the worst in others instead of the best. This account is the sisters of Christ. The bible indicates that Jesus had sisters though the number was not specified. Not much is mentioned about the sisters of Jesus so my favorite author of Historical biblical fiction was able to take some liberties that were conclusive of that time in Israel. Pheodora is the wife of a shepherd. Her life is simple with four daughters. Damaris is married to an upcoming Pharisee. She and her husband have great ambition. She worries about what others think and feels the path that she and her husband are taking will secure their daughters future. Pheodora's family is hit with tragedy when her husband is imprison The prose goes into fascinating detail about the taxation, borrowing money, and the use of slavery. Jesus uses these very details to share the good news of the gospel. However, faith and reality is never what we can fully understand until we understand who Jesus is. Pheodora goes to sister for help only to be refused. There is so much to learn about faith between the two sisters. You will see yourself in each one if you are honest. Don't let the culture of the times blind you to your own need. We are not much different and seeing Jesus for who he is will settle what troubles our heart! Highly recommend. A Special thank you to Bethany House and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ebos Aifuobhokhan

    The world of Biblical fiction is a world I can never get tired of. This story was so captivating and wonderfully written. I finished it in one sitting. An amazing story of love, redemption and second chances. I enjoyed the characters how they brought the story to life. The myriad of emotions I felt as I read it was exhilaratingand exciting. The story was very touching and alive to me. This is not one to miss at all! I received a copy of this book from Netgalley and this is my honest opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Park

    Beautiful. That is the best way to describe this book. It’s a beautiful story of redemption as it explores the lives of Jesus’s two sisters. What I love best about this book is the historical perspective on every day life we are subtly given. The story of the shepherds means so much more to me now. While reading the first book in the series will give you a better understanding of the story, it also can stand alone.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Doris Wiggins

    Pheodora is one of the sisters of Yeshua. He is preaching to the people about the coming messiah. Meanwhile her husband has been arrested and thrown in prison. He has told her of his plan to raise two white unblemished baby goats. That hopefully they will bring enough money in to pay for his release from prison. Pheodora has a lot to learn and she is extremely busy. She has four children of her own.. with her husband in prison the responsibility of raising the children falls on her and now there Pheodora is one of the sisters of Yeshua. He is preaching to the people about the coming messiah. Meanwhile her husband has been arrested and thrown in prison. He has told her of his plan to raise two white unblemished baby goats. That hopefully they will bring enough money in to pay for his release from prison. Pheodora has a lot to learn and she is extremely busy. She has four children of her own.. with her husband in prison the responsibility of raising the children falls on her and now there isn't any money coming in. She is blessed with a family that will help with her and her children's basic needs, but she still has to earn money somehow to be able to pay for her husband's release. A story of faith, preserverance and courage.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen Troutman

    The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt Bethany House You Like Them You Are Auto-Approved Bethany House Publishers Christian Pub Date 06 Oct 2020 | Archive Date 31 Oct 2020 Angela Hunt does a great job on her books and actually allows you to feel the emotions of the characters. Thanks to Bethany House Publishers and NetGalley for the ARC. I really enjoyed this book. 4 star The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt Bethany House You Like Them You Are Auto-Approved Bethany House Publishers Christian Pub Date 06 Oct 2020 | Archive Date 31 Oct 2020 Angela Hunt does a great job on her books and actually allows you to feel the emotions of the characters. Thanks to Bethany House Publishers and NetGalley for the ARC. I really enjoyed this book. 4 star

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt is a biblical fiction novel about two women who could have been Jesus'/Yeshua's sisters. Pheodora, Yeshua's sister, married a poor shepherd, but she doesn't regret it as Damaris, her older, wealthier sister, thinks she should. But when her husband lands in prison for a debt he can't pay, it is up to Pheodora to raise the funds to pay off his debt as well as keep herself and her daughters clothed. And it doesn't help that Damaris won't assist and her oldest brot The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt is a biblical fiction novel about two women who could have been Jesus'/Yeshua's sisters. Pheodora, Yeshua's sister, married a poor shepherd, but she doesn't regret it as Damaris, her older, wealthier sister, thinks she should. But when her husband lands in prison for a debt he can't pay, it is up to Pheodora to raise the funds to pay off his debt as well as keep herself and her daughters clothed. And it doesn't help that Damaris won't assist and her oldest brother is gallivanting around the country preaching. I truly enjoyed the Shepherd's Wife. The first book in the series, Daughter of Cana, focuses on two characters as they hear story after story about Jesus/Yeshua, His teachings, and His miracles. This book was very different. Yeshua's sister Pheodora is the main character with their sister Damaris as a second POV character. And while they hear stories of Yeshua and have to contemplate whether or not to believe, the novel is mainly about their daily life as Pheodora desperately tries to pay back her husband's loan and Damaris begins learning what is truly right when faced with the laws of the Pharisees. The parts that talked about the Pharisees was very interesting to me. Apparently they were an organized group, where you have to swear loyalty, pass a bunch of tests, wear certain clothes, only purchase from specific vendors, and more. Who knew? The Bible speaks a lot about the hypocrisy of the Pharisees (which was definitely mentioned here), but it doesn't go into their hierarchy and rules. I found it fascinating. I really enjoyed getting to know the two women, learning more about their time period and culture, and watching them struggle and learn to know God more. Of course, we don't actually know how many sisters Jesus had or what their names or their lives were like; we only know that He had sisters, plural. But I enjoyed it, as I have enjoyed all of Angela Hunt's novels so far, and I recommend this book to fans of biblical fiction. I received a complementary copy of this book from NetGalley. All opinions are entirely my own, and I was not required to give a positive review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Terri Gillespie

    In The Shepherd’s Wife (Jerusalem Road—Book 2), Angela Hunt gives such convincing look into life in Nazareth, Bethlehem, and Jerusalem that you can almost taste the dust. The Jerusalem Road series focuses on Yeshua’s (Hebrew for Jesus) family. What is so unique about this book is the dynamic of the two sisters. Pheodora and Damaris. Damaris married a wealthy merchant with aspirations of joining an elite order of the Pharisees. Pheodora married a simple shepherd who only had eyes for his wife, ch In The Shepherd’s Wife (Jerusalem Road—Book 2), Angela Hunt gives such convincing look into life in Nazareth, Bethlehem, and Jerusalem that you can almost taste the dust. The Jerusalem Road series focuses on Yeshua’s (Hebrew for Jesus) family. What is so unique about this book is the dynamic of the two sisters. Pheodora and Damaris. Damaris married a wealthy merchant with aspirations of joining an elite order of the Pharisees. Pheodora married a simple shepherd who only had eyes for his wife, children, and flock, and also who loved the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Pheodora’s husband is unfairly thrown into debtor’s prison and Damaris’ wealthy husband won’t help because there is more going on than a simple shepherd’s debt. Left alone with four children and a seemingly impossible plan involving goats, Pheodora moves back home with her other brothers. Yeshua’s siblings are concerned with the news about their brother. Pheodora misses her mother and wishes she and her older brother were there to help. The imprisonment, the two goats, and Yeshua’s ministry all play a role in what is to come. It took a little while to get into the story, but once it grabbed me, it didn’t let go until the final pages. Exploring those half-siblings Yeshua left behind really brings us a picture of His humanity. Not only was He true God, but also true Man. What of the younger sisters who looked up to their brother? The brother who settle disputes, helped their father, perhaps listened to their secrets? It’s a worthy exploration, and Hunt has done a beautiful job. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves Biblical history. Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book in order to give an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    MaryAnn

    Angela Hunt has written several of my favorite books, so I was glad to be chosen to read a complimentary preview copy of this book through NetGalley.. This is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series. I have not read the first book, but I didn't sense that I had missed something as I read this one. The title character is Pheodora, who is married to a poor shepherd, but really, that is not the main relationship developed in the story. It is also a story of sisters, of neighbors, and most of a Angela Hunt has written several of my favorite books, so I was glad to be chosen to read a complimentary preview copy of this book through NetGalley.. This is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series. I have not read the first book, but I didn't sense that I had missed something as I read this one. The title character is Pheodora, who is married to a poor shepherd, but really, that is not the main relationship developed in the story. It is also a story of sisters, of neighbors, and most of all, a story of how Pheodora and her brothers became believers and followers of their oldest brother, Yeshua of Nazareth after his crucifixion and resurrection. I enjoyed learning about life and customs for Jewish people in the first century. The main plot was interesting, but seemed to stray in places. I think the thing that keeps this from being a wonderful book for me is that it didn't relate to my life in a particular way, and it didn't have that "can't put it down" feel to me. I will plan to go back and read the previous book and the one that will follow.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Beth Butler

    While this book ultimately proved thought provoking it was hard to get into and a little choppy. Some of it may be that I am tired of the style of books having various chapters from different points of view. I liked the setting and characters in this book: the look at what life was like for two of Jesus's sisters. Their personal struggles with jealousy of their mothers continual attention to their brother and their disbelief that their brother could be anyone special. The sisters led very differ While this book ultimately proved thought provoking it was hard to get into and a little choppy. Some of it may be that I am tired of the style of books having various chapters from different points of view. I liked the setting and characters in this book: the look at what life was like for two of Jesus's sisters. Their personal struggles with jealousy of their mothers continual attention to their brother and their disbelief that their brother could be anyone special. The sisters led very different lives, one as a shepherd and one as a Pharisees wife. Looking at those drastically different roles in terms of the time period was very educational. Pheadora selling herself into slavery to redeem her husband made sense in the story. And then instantly she was rescued from this. I felt this could have been dealt with in more than one page because it seemed just too easy and there was no discussion of this major event. So overall definitely thought provoking, but a little uneven in pace.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    I have never read a book by Angela Hunt that I did not savor, and The Shepard’s Wife is no exception. The second installment of the Jerusalem Road series, this book provides insights into the daily life of people during the time of Jesus’ life. A fictional account of Jesus’ sisters, Pheodora, the main point of view character, and her sister Damaris who have married into two very different circumstances. Pheodora is a humble Shepard’s wife who finds herself in a position of trying to pay his way I have never read a book by Angela Hunt that I did not savor, and The Shepard’s Wife is no exception. The second installment of the Jerusalem Road series, this book provides insights into the daily life of people during the time of Jesus’ life. A fictional account of Jesus’ sisters, Pheodora, the main point of view character, and her sister Damaris who have married into two very different circumstances. Pheodora is a humble Shepard’s wife who finds herself in a position of trying to pay his way out of debtor’s prison. An inside look at the way of life for goat farmers is offered. All the descriptions are well researched and provide tremendous insights. Forgiveness is ultimately the theme being explored, but you will experience the full gamut of emotions while reading this book. I thoroughly enjoy the insights into everyday life for these historical characters and loved being transported to their day in and day out activities. I highly recommend this book. I received a complimentary copy from the publisher via NetGalley and all opinions expressed are my own, freely given.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I never really think what life would have been like for Jesus’ brothers and sisters. In The Shepherd’s Wife, Book 2 in The Jerusalem Road Series, Author Angela Hunt has done her research well and helps the reader understand and feel what Jesus’ siblings may have experienced. In this historical Biblical fiction, you will discover a story of hope, inspiration, and determination. One sister, Damaris, married well, the other sister, Pheodora, married a lowly shepherd. The sisters’ daily struggles di I never really think what life would have been like for Jesus’ brothers and sisters. In The Shepherd’s Wife, Book 2 in The Jerusalem Road Series, Author Angela Hunt has done her research well and helps the reader understand and feel what Jesus’ siblings may have experienced. In this historical Biblical fiction, you will discover a story of hope, inspiration, and determination. One sister, Damaris, married well, the other sister, Pheodora, married a lowly shepherd. The sisters’ daily struggles differ greatly as does their faith in God. I found this to be an eye-opening storyline. I look forward to reading other books in this series. I was given a complimentary copy of the book from the publisher. The opinions are my own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pat Sabiston

    Angela Hunt uses the wonderful writer's tool of "What if ..." In The Shepherd's Wife (Jerusalem Road, #2). WHAT IF Jesus had two sisters? WHAT IF one of the sisters valued her husband's ambitions more than her sister's family? Hunt uses her doctorate in Biblical Studies to place us right in the middle of where Jesus walked ... letting us see the villages, smell the odors, and actually get into the mind of a Pharisee. More importantly, she shows us how Yeshua of Nazareth would help mitigate this Angela Hunt uses the wonderful writer's tool of "What if ..." In The Shepherd's Wife (Jerusalem Road, #2). WHAT IF Jesus had two sisters? WHAT IF one of the sisters valued her husband's ambitions more than her sister's family? Hunt uses her doctorate in Biblical Studies to place us right in the middle of where Jesus walked ... letting us see the villages, smell the odors, and actually get into the mind of a Pharisee. More importantly, she shows us how Yeshua of Nazareth would help mitigate this family drama, just as He does for us today.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    Bringing the Bible to life Once again, Angela Hunt has created fiction that reads like a biography. Her attention to historical and cultural details allow the reader to be immersed in Biblical history, helping us see how those around Jesus could have felt during His ministry. She made me want to go and read the Biblical story and mine the nuggets that support her story. Can't wait for the next book! Bringing the Bible to life Once again, Angela Hunt has created fiction that reads like a biography. Her attention to historical and cultural details allow the reader to be immersed in Biblical history, helping us see how those around Jesus could have felt during His ministry. She made me want to go and read the Biblical story and mine the nuggets that support her story. Can't wait for the next book!

  21. 5 out of 5

    ArynTheLibraryan

    As usual, Angela Hunt does an amazing job. Getting to know Jesus's sisters, or one imagining of them, anyway, was fascinating. They could have been anyone's sisters, which is kind of the point. The characters were very real, the story well told, well researched. The weaving of humor and heartache made for an enjoyable read. There was one spot, not too far in, where I actually got so mad I put the book down for a week. I've never done that before. But here's the thing. I was angry at human pride, As usual, Angela Hunt does an amazing job. Getting to know Jesus's sisters, or one imagining of them, anyway, was fascinating. They could have been anyone's sisters, which is kind of the point. The characters were very real, the story well told, well researched. The weaving of humor and heartache made for an enjoyable read. There was one spot, not too far in, where I actually got so mad I put the book down for a week. I've never done that before. But here's the thing. I was angry at human pride, ego, and the preserving of one's position no matter the cost. I was actually expecting what happened to happen, and when it did, it made me feel sick. Because I see similar situations in real life far too often. Maybe not exactly, but the sentiment, for sure. I will treasure this book, because of the beauty of the story, the changed hearts, and the lessons on forgiveness. And yes, I'll read it again. I received an advance copy of this book from @NetGalley, and chose to review it here. All thoughts are my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt Back of the Book: “Yeshua of Nazareth has two sisters: Damaris, married to a wealthy merchant's son, and Pheodora, married to a simple shepherd from Bethlehem. When Pheodora's husband suffers an unexpected reversal of fortune and is thrown into debtor's prison, she returns to Nazareth, where she pins her hopes on two she-goats who should give birth to spotless white kids that would be perfect for the upcoming Yom Kippur sacrifice. In the eighteen months between t The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt Back of the Book: “Yeshua of Nazareth has two sisters: Damaris, married to a wealthy merchant's son, and Pheodora, married to a simple shepherd from Bethlehem. When Pheodora's husband suffers an unexpected reversal of fortune and is thrown into debtor's prison, she returns to Nazareth, where she pins her hopes on two she-goats who should give birth to spotless white kids that would be perfect for the upcoming Yom Kippur sacrifice. In the eighteen months between the kids' birth and the opportunity to sell them and redeem her husband from prison, Pheodora must call on her wits, her family, and her God in order to provide for her daughters and survive. But when every prayer and ritual she knows is about God's care for Israel, how can she trust that God will hear and help a lowly shepherd's wife?” Impressions: What a captivating book! Angela Hunt is an amazingly skilled writer. Liked: I loved this snapshot of what life might have looked like for Jesus’ sister during His ministry and crucifixion. The details were so real and emotional. Learned: You are going to have to read the book to understand these things… I really need to be on the lookout for my “Bethel”. The “Legend of Azazel, the Scapegoat,” from Yom Kippur was fascinating! – He has risen! Quotes: “I would feel like a failure if I had to ask for help. None of the other shepherds’ wives seem to grow weary of lonely.” – Why is asking for help so hard sometimes! “So, my sons, whether you use a hammer or a chisel, when you create something, you are using a gift from HaShem. He is maker of things, and so are we.” – Something to think about next time I start creating something. “I may not be able to feed and shelter and clothe HaShem, whom I love, but I can do those things for you.” “’Worry is worry.’ Jude Shrugged. ‘Worry is taking a burden upon yourself when you are meant to trust HaShem.’” I received a copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review shared here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Larimer

    #The Shepherd's Wife# by Angela Hunt is a Biblical fiction book. Angela Hunt is a Christy award winner. She has over five million of her books sold . This book is a beautiful example of what life was like during the time of Jesus. It is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series. The book is a strong comparison of life with two sisters of Yeshua. One sister is married to a Pharisee who is rich. The other sister is married to a shepherd. The shepherd's wife is very caring and kind. She goes the #The Shepherd's Wife# by Angela Hunt is a Biblical fiction book. Angela Hunt is a Christy award winner. She has over five million of her books sold . This book is a beautiful example of what life was like during the time of Jesus. It is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series. The book is a strong comparison of life with two sisters of Yeshua. One sister is married to a Pharisee who is rich. The other sister is married to a shepherd. The shepherd's wife is very caring and kind. She goes the extra mile for her family to show she cares. The book gives insights into the life of Yeshua. He dealt with so many opinions of others. Thank you to netgalley, the publisher and the author for allowing me to read and review this book. I hope it is very successful.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Denice

    The Shepard's Wife by Angela Hunt This is the second book by Angela Hunt in The Jerusalem Road series. The author is a wonderful story teller. Synopsis - Yeshua of Nazareth has two sister's. One sister Damaris was married to a merchants son and Pheodora was married to a very simple man. Damaris could never understand why her little sister would settle for a simple life. The Lord had plans for both sister's. My Thoughts -You can never go wrong with one of Angela Hunt books. She is so good at letti The Shepard's Wife by Angela Hunt This is the second book by Angela Hunt in The Jerusalem Road series. The author is a wonderful story teller. Synopsis - Yeshua of Nazareth has two sister's. One sister Damaris was married to a merchants son and Pheodora was married to a very simple man. Damaris could never understand why her little sister would settle for a simple life. The Lord had plans for both sister's. My Thoughts -You can never go wrong with one of Angela Hunt books. She is so good at letting you be a part of the book. You feel life your being transform to a different time period in history. This is a great story and a page turner. I would recommend this book to other. I give this book a 5 out of 5 I received this book from the publisher and Netgalley. I was asked to write a honest review. All thought and opinions are mine.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    The tale of two sisters took me on a path I found unexpected, especially when I discovered that they were sisters to Jesus. This series has opened up the life during those times in a outstanding way, and will cause you to dig into scripture as well as seek to see what the life of Jesus would have been like through the eyes of family.. I would say that there is the death of animals discussed in a very tasteful and touching way, but it is in this book. I would highly recommend you not let that sto The tale of two sisters took me on a path I found unexpected, especially when I discovered that they were sisters to Jesus. This series has opened up the life during those times in a outstanding way, and will cause you to dig into scripture as well as seek to see what the life of Jesus would have been like through the eyes of family.. I would say that there is the death of animals discussed in a very tasteful and touching way, but it is in this book. I would highly recommend you not let that stop you from seeking out a copy for yourself. The author does a superb job of creating a story setting you do not want to leave.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Yannick Tricia

    The Shepherd's wife is the second book of the serie Jerusalem Road. I read the first book Daughter of Cana about the first miracle Jesus did and his brother Jude and Tasmin... This one is about Jesus's sisters Pheodora and Damaris. Pheodora married a sheperd named Chiram but he found himself in prison when he is unable to pay a debt to a tax collector. Damaris married a rich merchant Shimon who is about to become a Pharisee. Pheodora is struggling to find a way to pay her husband debts and provide t The Shepherd's wife is the second book of the serie Jerusalem Road. I read the first book Daughter of Cana about the first miracle Jesus did and his brother Jude and Tasmin... This one is about Jesus's sisters Pheodora and Damaris. Pheodora married a sheperd named Chiram but he found himself in prison when he is unable to pay a debt to a tax collector. Damaris married a rich merchant Shimon who is about to become a Pharisee. Pheodora is struggling to find a way to pay her husband debts and provide to her Daughters needs. Pheodora and Damaris lives are taking differents paths and they sometimes struggles to understand each other. It's only when their eyes open to understand that the Messiah Israel have been waiting lived among them, was their own brother that a glimmer of hope appears in their situations bringing restoration and forgiveness. Though the story is interesting I prefered the first book it captivated me more than this one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    This book was so interesting and I feel like it held true to the Bible well. It helped me to see the Book in different light and I love that. It helped me to "see" and understand it a whole lot better. This book was so interesting and I feel like it held true to the Bible well. It helped me to see the Book in different light and I love that. It helped me to "see" and understand it a whole lot better.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series. I feel like I got a peek behind the curtain into Jesus' family. The main character in this book is Jesus' sister Pheodora. Married to a shepherd named Chiram and living in Bethlehem, her world is upended when Chiram is thrown into prison for being unable to pay a toll tax. Her only hope to get him out of prison is to ask her rich sister Damaris and her husband Shimon for money. But Shimon is about to be elevated i The Shepherd's Wife by Angela Hunt is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series. I feel like I got a peek behind the curtain into Jesus' family. The main character in this book is Jesus' sister Pheodora. Married to a shepherd named Chiram and living in Bethlehem, her world is upended when Chiram is thrown into prison for being unable to pay a toll tax. Her only hope to get him out of prison is to ask her rich sister Damaris and her husband Shimon for money. But Shimon is about to be elevated in status as a member of the Pharisees. Helping his brother-in-law is not as simple as it may appear. So Pheodora pins her hopes on a pair of white goats that Chiram bred and would sell for Yom Kippur. But she needs the help of her brothers, so she travels home to Nazareth, and while there, she learns about Jesus and his followers. She doesn't know what to think about her older brother, but she fears for his life as he becomes bolder in denouncing the Pharisees. I learned a great many things in this book. From how to care for goats to the ridiculous rules of the Pharisees, which they believed made them holy. Hunt has done her research, and I feel I have a better understanding now of why Jesus called out the Pharisees so much. While I do enjoy good research, all the details about the goats made the story drag somewhat. At times, I had to force myself to continue reading. I am glad I did because the ending made me cry and helped me to imagine what it was like for Jesus' family when they finally realized his identity. This is a story that will move you to tears and have you asking the question - what debt do I owe to Christ? I highly recommend it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    This is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series by Angela Hunt. I have enjoyed every book she has written and this is no exception BUT, I was a bit disappointed in this one. It was a very slow start for me and I almost gave up. I'm glad I didn't as it turned out to be a good book. It was written from the viewpoint of Jesus' 2 sisters. The narrative switched back and forth between them but not in equal shares. The book, of course, is a Christian book and the main theme was forgiveness. The s This is the second book in the Jerusalem Road series by Angela Hunt. I have enjoyed every book she has written and this is no exception BUT, I was a bit disappointed in this one. It was a very slow start for me and I almost gave up. I'm glad I didn't as it turned out to be a good book. It was written from the viewpoint of Jesus' 2 sisters. The narrative switched back and forth between them but not in equal shares. The book, of course, is a Christian book and the main theme was forgiveness. The shepherd's wife is one of the sisters and the book is mostly from her view. The rest of the family is involved, but only as supporting characters. The plot didn't seem to be as important and the theme and I guess that was one of the things I didn't care for. Overall, I did enjoy the book once I got past the first chapter or so. It is not my favorite, but I did enjoy it. I think anyone that enjoys Biblical fiction will enjoy this book also. I give it a 3 out of 5 star rating.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christian Fiction Addiction

    The question weaving its way through the course of this story about our purpose in life is explored in a beautiful way in Angela Hunt's latest biblical fiction offering. Showcasing her attention to detail and the in-depth research she's carried out, "The Shepherd's Wife" will transport readers back in time to reveal a "what if?" type of story about another of Jesus' siblings, a story that truly engaged me deeply. As Pheodora's tale unfolded before me, I felt such a strong sense of injustice at t The question weaving its way through the course of this story about our purpose in life is explored in a beautiful way in Angela Hunt's latest biblical fiction offering. Showcasing her attention to detail and the in-depth research she's carried out, "The Shepherd's Wife" will transport readers back in time to reveal a "what if?" type of story about another of Jesus' siblings, a story that truly engaged me deeply. As Pheodora's tale unfolded before me, I felt such a strong sense of injustice at the way she and her family are treated when her husband is thrown into prison with little recourse to securing his freedom. Although I know this novel is just fiction, Hunt succeeds at making it all too real, giving me a real and fresh understanding of why people in the New Testament felt so strongly about tax collectors and those who not only cheated them from their wages but could alter the course of their lives with a single - and unfair - decision. The actions of the Pharisees were likewise horrific to behold. Yet watching Pheodora's brothers gather around her to sustain her and her daughters was a beautiful contrast to their actions, as was the neighbour who ends up going from becoming a possible irritant and foe to a gift of God. Isn't that just so in keeping with the mysterious ways God works in our lives? And though this story is not one of suspense per se, I truly was kept on the edge of my seat because I was just so eager to see how things would work out. As with other tales set in Bible times that Hunt writes, the ending is more true to life than happily ever after. But the story points to what really matters in life and to the amazing work that Jesus did for us all, the way God is able to bring good out of the most difficult of circumstances. The Shepherd's Wife is another excellent novel from Angela Hunt's fervent imagination, and she has once again given me a fresh appreciation for the Biblical passages upon which this story sprung forth. I award this novel 4.5 out of 5 stars, and I look forward with anticipation to the third novel in the Jerusalem Road series, "A Woman of Words", coming in May 2021! Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.