counter create hit Things We Didn't Say - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Things We Didn't Say

Availability: Ready to download

Headstrong Johanna Berglund, a linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, has very definite plans for her future . . . plans that do not include returning to her hometown and the secrets and heartaches she left behind there. But the US Army wants her to work as a translator at a nearby camp for German POWs. Johanna arrives to find the once-sleepy town exploding wit Headstrong Johanna Berglund, a linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, has very definite plans for her future . . . plans that do not include returning to her hometown and the secrets and heartaches she left behind there. But the US Army wants her to work as a translator at a nearby camp for German POWs. Johanna arrives to find the once-sleepy town exploding with hostility. Most patriotic citizens want nothing to do with German soldiers laboring in their fields, and they're not afraid to criticize those who work at the camp as well. When Johanna describes the trouble to her friend Peter Ito, a language instructor at a school for military intelligence officers, he encourages her to give the town that rejected her a second chance. As Johanna interacts with the men of the camp and censors their letters home, she begins to see the prisoners in a more sympathetic light. But advocating for better treatment makes her enemies in the community, especially when charismatic German spokesman Stefan Werner begins to show interest in Johanna and her work. The longer Johanna wages her home-front battle, the more the lines between compassion and treason become blurred--and it's no longer clear whom she can trust.


Compare

Headstrong Johanna Berglund, a linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, has very definite plans for her future . . . plans that do not include returning to her hometown and the secrets and heartaches she left behind there. But the US Army wants her to work as a translator at a nearby camp for German POWs. Johanna arrives to find the once-sleepy town exploding wit Headstrong Johanna Berglund, a linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, has very definite plans for her future . . . plans that do not include returning to her hometown and the secrets and heartaches she left behind there. But the US Army wants her to work as a translator at a nearby camp for German POWs. Johanna arrives to find the once-sleepy town exploding with hostility. Most patriotic citizens want nothing to do with German soldiers laboring in their fields, and they're not afraid to criticize those who work at the camp as well. When Johanna describes the trouble to her friend Peter Ito, a language instructor at a school for military intelligence officers, he encourages her to give the town that rejected her a second chance. As Johanna interacts with the men of the camp and censors their letters home, she begins to see the prisoners in a more sympathetic light. But advocating for better treatment makes her enemies in the community, especially when charismatic German spokesman Stefan Werner begins to show interest in Johanna and her work. The longer Johanna wages her home-front battle, the more the lines between compassion and treason become blurred--and it's no longer clear whom she can trust.

30 review for Things We Didn't Say

  1. 4 out of 5

    MarilynW

    Things We Didn't Say by Amy Lynn Green Outspoken, goes her own way, headstrong, Johanna Berglund, is a  linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, in I944, when she is asked to come back to her hometown to act as a translator at a camp for German POWs. When Johanna declines the offer several times, her scholarship is revoked, forcing her to go home and take the job.  Johanna had left her home, with plans to rarely return, due to sad memories and a falling out with her best friends, sever Things We Didn't Say by Amy Lynn Green Outspoken, goes her own way, headstrong, Johanna Berglund, is a  linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, in I944, when she is asked to come back to her hometown to act as a translator at a camp for German POWs. When Johanna declines the offer several times, her scholarship is revoked, forcing her to go home and take the job.  Johanna had left her home, with plans to rarely return, due to sad memories and a falling out with her best friends, several years earlier. Now Johanna is a pharah in her hometown, since most citizens are angry to have German POWs there, despite the fact that the POWs are going to help them to plant, raise, and harvest their crops. It doesn't help things when it becomes known that Johanna corresponds regularly with Japanese American, Peter Ito, a language instructor at a school for military intelligence officers. Johanna's attempt to make life better for the German POWs and her friendship with Peter convinces the most critical townsfolk to turn on Johanna and believe the worst of her. And Johanna often makes things worse with her abrasive but honest letters to the editor of the newspaper and other residents of the town. The entire story is told through letters, notes, and documents and we know from the beginning that Johanna has been accused of treason. I enjoyed how the story was told and especially enjoyed the letters between Johanna and Peter. Peter, whose family is in an American concentration camp because of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. They have done nothing wrong except to be Japanese, yet Peter has such a forgiving, compassionate, and positive outlook on life and he is the best thing that could ever happen to Johanna. She cherishes his friendship, knows he is her best friend, but it isn't until something happens to Peter that she realizes just how much she has always held back her most real, deepest feelings, thinking she would lose something of herself if she gave any more of herself to anyone. This is such a touching story and the tension builds as we read the letters, notes, and documents. Johanna is both naive and cynical, not realizing how she is being used, not suspecting what is going on right in front of her. The story shows us the heartache of those who have lost family to the war, have loved ones as POWs, and live separated from their homes and their families, with no end in sight. Published November 3, 2020 Thank you to Bethany House/Bethany House Publishers and NetGalley for this ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    This girl's got gumption! Who would have thought that a WWII Christian historical fiction novel would make me laugh in more than a few places, but the heroine of Things We Didn't Say kept me smiling and you-go-girl cheering due to her "headstrong" nature throughout all 416 pages. Comparisons to The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society are apt, given the structure of storytelling solely through letters, newspaper articles, and speech transcripts. Readers learn early on that these communic This girl's got gumption! Who would have thought that a WWII Christian historical fiction novel would make me laugh in more than a few places, but the heroine of Things We Didn't Say kept me smiling and you-go-girl cheering due to her "headstrong" nature throughout all 416 pages. Comparisons to The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society are apt, given the structure of storytelling solely through letters, newspaper articles, and speech transcripts. Readers learn early on that these communications have been collected as evidence for the treason case against Johanna, the main character, who has been working as a translator at a German POW work camp in Minnesota. What I love about this book is that it highlighted a piece of Midwestern history that I knew nothing about (the POW camps in the US) ... and I live in Iowa. While I've passed on WWII fiction lately due to burnout, this perspective was different enough to catch my interest. And it held my interest, not in small part because the story didn't go in the direction I expected. Kudos to the author for her fresh take on what can be a tired subject. Things We Didn’t Say is now available in print and on audio. My thanks to NetGalley, Bethany House Publishers and Amy Lynn Green for the advanced ebook copy to review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    DeAnn

    3.75 German POW stars This debut novel is written in the epistolary style, which means the whole thing is letters, notes, etc. I’ve read a few books in this style and they usually make for an interesting tale! I would characterize this one as a religious historical fiction book. I was fascinated to read that there were some POW camps in the Midwest that housed German POWs. The Germans went to work on the harvest as many of the local farming men were off fighting in WWII. The book centers around a 3.75 German POW stars This debut novel is written in the epistolary style, which means the whole thing is letters, notes, etc. I’ve read a few books in this style and they usually make for an interesting tale! I would characterize this one as a religious historical fiction book. I was fascinated to read that there were some POW camps in the Midwest that housed German POWs. The Germans went to work on the harvest as many of the local farming men were off fighting in WWII. The book centers around a fascinating character, Johanna, a young woman who had been studying languages at University of Minnesota. She moves back to her small hometown to serve as the POW camp’s translator as one of the languages she knows well is German. Johanna is very bright and not afraid to speak her mind! Soon she’s trying to make the townspeople be more hospitable to the German POWs. As you might imagine, there’s a lot of fear and distrust toward the prisoners and reluctance to have them in the area. There are also lots of letters between Johanna and Peter, a college friend who happens to be a Japanese nisei (a person born in the US or Canada whose parents were immigrants from Japan). His Japanese language skills are highly valued and he’s teaching Japanese to soldiers that will soon be headed to the Pacific theater. From the beginning of the book, we know that there is a trial for treason happening and it takes nearly the whole book to tell the full story. The second half of book got really dramatic and I was worried about what would happen to Johanna. Johanna really grows as a character and I enjoyed this exposure to a part of WWII history that I didn’t really know about at all. There are quite a few religious elements in the story, but it didn’t feel like too much to this reader. Thank you to Bethany House and NetGalley for a copy of this one to read. Now available!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn Green

    Not everyone can pull off an epistolary novel. Amy Lynn Green is one of those who can, and with flying colors. Things We Didn't Say is on par with The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. Johanna Berglund is one of the most vibrant heroines I've ever read, so smart, witty and surprising that I was laughing out loud in places--something I normally don't do during World War 2 novels! Each character's voice is distinct and believable, each one carrying far more than the words they penned ( Not everyone can pull off an epistolary novel. Amy Lynn Green is one of those who can, and with flying colors. Things We Didn't Say is on par with The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. Johanna Berglund is one of the most vibrant heroines I've ever read, so smart, witty and surprising that I was laughing out loud in places--something I normally don't do during World War 2 novels! Each character's voice is distinct and believable, each one carrying far more than the words they penned (hence the novel's title). If you're a fan of Susie Finkbeiner for voice and characterization, you'll love this novel, too. If you enjoyed Guernsey, this is for you. If you are charmed by Louisa May Alcott's Jo March, or by L.M. Montgomery's Valancy in The Blue Castle, you'll fall in love with Johanna Berglund. If you're into World War 2 tales, don't miss this homefront story! MY official endorsement follows: “Things We Didn’t Stay is a stand-out novel as brilliant and brave as its heroine. I was moved to both laughter and tears while tagging along with Johanna Berglund for her emotional and spiritual journey. When I wasn’t pausing to savor a particularly profound passage, I was turning the pages as fast as I could to see what Jo and Peter would say next. An utterly satisfying read you’ll want to share as soon as you reach its conclusion.”

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sundin

    An outstanding debut novel, told entirely through letters and newspaper articles! Much will be said about the unique format of Things We Didn’t Say, but what truly shines in this novel are the characters. Outspoken and delightfully antisocial, Johanna sparkles with wit, but she also comes to see the heart and depth of the people around her—and the flaws within her own soul. With impeccable research, Amy Lynn Green casts a light on the POW camps in America during World War II and on the dangers o An outstanding debut novel, told entirely through letters and newspaper articles! Much will be said about the unique format of Things We Didn’t Say, but what truly shines in this novel are the characters. Outspoken and delightfully antisocial, Johanna sparkles with wit, but she also comes to see the heart and depth of the people around her—and the flaws within her own soul. With impeccable research, Amy Lynn Green casts a light on the POW camps in America during World War II and on the dangers of prejudice. Make space on your bookshelf, because this book is a keeper!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Tagg

    I've waited and waited and waited to review Amy Lynn Green's debut novel, hoping that if I waited long enough I'd find the right words to do it justice. Well, this is me now surrendering, realizing that no amount of reader/reviewer fancy wordiness will ever truly sum up how I feel about Things We Didn't Say. So I'll do my best. Bottom line: I loved it. I was awed by it. As a reader, I was so swept away I couldn't concentrate on my normal daily to-dos. As an author, I couldn't stop thinking about I've waited and waited and waited to review Amy Lynn Green's debut novel, hoping that if I waited long enough I'd find the right words to do it justice. Well, this is me now surrendering, realizing that no amount of reader/reviewer fancy wordiness will ever truly sum up how I feel about Things We Didn't Say. So I'll do my best. Bottom line: I loved it. I was awed by it. As a reader, I was so swept away I couldn't concentrate on my normal daily to-dos. As an author, I couldn't stop thinking about how masterfully Green pulled it off. It's my favorite read of 2020 (and beyond) and I think it should be a must-read for everyone. Things We Didn't Say is written in epistolary form and while I know that could cause some readers to pause, I can promise you that it doesn't impede the story. It makes it all the more impressive! You get to know the characters so wonderfully well. And speaking of the characters, I adore Johanna. She's blunt, not entirely socially savvy, and so relatable. She has a fantastic wit and dry sense of humor. It's amazing to me that a book dealing with such serious events during such a turbulent time could also be so funny! And as to those events, you can read the synopsis to get the details, but I was blown away by how relevant it is to today. I can't tell you the number of times as I read the book that I found myself highlighting lines that felt so significant and so poignant to where we are today...especially in the U.S. What happens in the small Minnesota town in Things We Didn't Say is so indicative of what's happening in our nation...and on a personal note, as someone who has found herself more and more jaded, frustrated and discouraged by both government and faith leaders, I needed this wake-up call and reminder that hope, kindness and compassion begin in our own hearts and in our own corners. I needed this story and I'm grateful for it! And as far as the storyline, it was captivating! The closer I got to the end, the more I could NOT stop reading. (Also, I know I'm in gushing territory here, but seriously, I was so impressed by the plotting! There are so many moments where little details mentioned early in the story suddenly popped out to me later on and I was just awed!) Oh, and of course, I can't help mentioning the romance! It's subtle but touching and oh my goodness, I FELT it! This book is, simply put, brilliant. It's an amazing debut by an author who I've no doubt has even more brilliance in store for us. Can't possibly recommend it enough!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rachel McMillan

    From Endorsement: A fascinating excavation of a little known moment in US history executed with an inimitable voice and extremely clever style. Excessively readable, this winsome epistolary is underscored by a deep look at patriotism, prejudice, unwavering faith, duty and love. I guarantee you will not have a similar reading experience this year. Green's compassionate exploration of the many facets of forgiveness and humanity intersect a Japanese military intelligence instructor, deeply realized From Endorsement: A fascinating excavation of a little known moment in US history executed with an inimitable voice and extremely clever style. Excessively readable, this winsome epistolary is underscored by a deep look at patriotism, prejudice, unwavering faith, duty and love. I guarantee you will not have a similar reading experience this year. Green's compassionate exploration of the many facets of forgiveness and humanity intersect a Japanese military intelligence instructor, deeply realized German POWs and an intelligent woman who must learn the depth of loss beyond the words she so easily finds solace behind. A dazzlingly smart and confident debut, Things We Didn't Say is as moving as it is memorable.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan Snodgrass

    This was the first book I'd ever read that was written in the epistolary style. It was very different, but also very enlightening because the reader is allowed to get inside the characters' heads. I confess I knew next to nothing about the German POW camps in the United States during World War II. I knew they were there and that's about it. My own uncle was a POW for thirteen months in Stalag 17 during the same war and was treated very horribly. Our own family never received any word from or abou This was the first book I'd ever read that was written in the epistolary style. It was very different, but also very enlightening because the reader is allowed to get inside the characters' heads. I confess I knew next to nothing about the German POW camps in the United States during World War II. I knew they were there and that's about it. My own uncle was a POW for thirteen months in Stalag 17 during the same war and was treated very horribly. Our own family never received any word from or about him until after his liberation. So it was good to know that the German prisoners in the United States were treated kindly and allowed to communicate with their families. This book has spurred me to research this situation for myself. I love to learn and Amy Lynn Green's writing has mademe very much interested in learning more. Well written and flowing nicely, this is a debut novel that you'll want to add to your TBR pile. Recommended. *My thanks to Bethany House Publishing for a copy of this book via Net Galley. The opinion is my own and I received no compensation.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kellyn Roth

    This book was simply not for me! And that's okay. Some books aren't. This was a review copy that I didn't exactly know all the details about - now that I do (it's entirely epistolary, the main character has a very different background than I do as far as her faith goes, and I just don't find her amusing - she's sort of annoying to me!), I've decided that it's just not for me. However, this book seems like it deals with some great political stances (approaching things from many different angles), This book was simply not for me! And that's okay. Some books aren't. This was a review copy that I didn't exactly know all the details about - now that I do (it's entirely epistolary, the main character has a very different background than I do as far as her faith goes, and I just don't find her amusing - she's sort of annoying to me!), I've decided that it's just not for me. However, this book seems like it deals with some great political stances (approaching things from many different angles), it appears to have a bit of a mystery/thriller aspect, and there's just a lot going on. I think for people who love in-depth historical but are wanting something a bit different from the normal, well, this might be the book for you! As for me, however, this book simply isn't right for me. :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey (Books for Christian Girls)

    3.5 stars. About this book: “Headstrong Johanna Berglund, a linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, has very definite plans for her future . . . plans that do not include returning to her hometown and the secrets and heartaches she left behind there. But the US Army wants her to work as a translator at a nearby camp for German POWs. Johanna arrives to find the once-sleepy town exploding with hostility. Most patriotic citizens want nothing to do with German soldiers laboring in their 3.5 stars. About this book: “Headstrong Johanna Berglund, a linguistics student at the University of Minnesota, has very definite plans for her future . . . plans that do not include returning to her hometown and the secrets and heartaches she left behind there. But the US Army wants her to work as a translator at a nearby camp for German POWs. Johanna arrives to find the once-sleepy town exploding with hostility. Most patriotic citizens want nothing to do with German soldiers laboring in their fields, and they're not afraid to criticize those who work at the camp as well. When Johanna describes the trouble to her friend Peter Ito, a language instructor at a school for military intelligence officers, he encourages her to give the town that rejected her a second chance. As Johanna interacts with the men of the camp and censors their letters home, she begins to see the prisoners in a more sympathetic light. But advocating for better treatment makes her enemies in the community, especially when charismatic German spokesman Stefan Werner begins to show interest in Johanna and her work. The longer Johanna wages her home-front battle, the more the lines between compassion and treason become blurred--and it's no longer clear whom she can trust.” Series: The author will have another book set in the same time period, but it is not about these characters. Spiritual Content- Scriptures are read, quoted, & mentioned; Talks about God & praying; ‘H’s are not capitalized when referring to God; Jo isn’t sure that God listens to her anymore & continues wondering and trying to pray throughout the story; Many mentions of pastors/priests, churches/chapels, services, sermons, & hymns; Many mentions of different religions (Protestant Christian, Lutheran, Baptist, Catholic, Buddhism, and Native American gods); Mentions of Scriptures & faiths; Mentions of prayers, praying, thanking God, & blessings over food; Mentions of Good Friday, Easter, & Thanksgiving; Mentions of missionaries; Mentions of Bibles and those & events in the Bible; A few mentions of godsends & blessings; *Note: Many mentions of Greek myths & gods/goddesses; Mentions of Martin Luther and his hatred for Jews; Mentions of the devil (making a deal & selling your soul); Mention of damnation, hell, & a hellhole; A few mentions of being (or not being) a Marxist; A couple mentions of godforsaken places; A mention of a Shinto shrine. Negative Content- Minor cussing including: an ‘idiot’, a ‘what the devil’, two ‘damning’s, two ‘dumb’s, two ‘heck’s, three ‘blasted’s, and five ‘stupid’s; Mentions of curses & racial slurs (said, not written); A bit of sarcasm; All about the war (World War II), deaths, prisoner-of-wars, missing-in-actions soldiers, propaganda, prejudices, spies, Nazis, treason, internment camps (semi-detailed); Mentions of murders & murderers; Mentions of bombs; Mentions of fights, injuries, & blood/bleeding; Mentions of the Great War & the Great Depression; Mentions of a fire & arson; Mentions of jails/prisons; Mentions of drinking, alcohol, & drunks; Mentions of smoking, cigarettes/cigars, & tobacco; Mentions of hatred; Mentions of lies & lying; Mentions of gossip & rumors; A few mentions of those willing to taking their lives; A few mentions of thieves & stealing; A few mentions of graffiti; A few mentions of slaughterhouses & animals are destined for glue; A couple mentions of Joan of the Arc being on fire & a costume depicting that; A couple mentions of executions; A couple mentions of being held hostage & at knifepoint; A couple mentions of gunfire; A couple mentions of riots; A couple mentions of blackmail; A mention of a president assassination attempt; A mention of a film showing the Ku Klux Klan rescuing “a town from a mob of murderous, newly freed slaves”; A mention of death threats; A mention of a lynch mob; A mention of train robbers; A mention of horse droppings; *Note: Many mentions of singers, songs, actors/actresses, movies, authors, & books; A mention of Al Capone; A mention of a car brand. Sexual Content- A few mentions of kisses & kissing; A few mentions of affairs & adultery; A few mentions of flirting & winking; A few mentions of girls mooning over a guy & a guy “making eyes” at a girl; A few mentions of blushes; A couple mentions of a “mattress that had seen considerable use”; A mention of men boasting about women; A mention of couple in dark corners at a dance; A mention of a man mentioning the gentler sex; A mention of a saloon girl; A mention of jealousy; Very, very light love, falling in love, & the emotions (since this book is completely in letters (not letters sent from a couple) it is all very light in the romance regard); *Note: A couple mentions of shirtless men (one asks Jo if she likes what she sees); A mention of an actress wearing nothing but a towel and a wig in a movie; A mention of a bathing suit model. -Johanna Berglund, age 22 Told in the format of Letters Set in 1944-1945 416 pages ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* Pre Teens- One Star New Teens- Two Stars Early High School Teens- Three Stars Older High School Teens- Four Stars My personal Rating- Three Stars (and a half) {{ Not for those sensitive to World War II. }} I don’t know where to begin with this novel. I was expecting a book featuring many languages and a heroine you spoke another language. As someone who enjoys learning new languages and seeing that represented in fiction, I was very curious about this one. I think I would have to read this book a couple more times to fully grasp my thoughts on this book. There were many parts that felt related to the last year. (Some readers are checking the date of this review at this moment, I’m sure.) I didn’t know this was a book of a collection of letters—in all honesty, I think I might have been a bit hesitate over that had I known—but it was a unique format for this book and the plot. Because of this style, the physical side to a romance that is typically shown was not there (a positive) and there wasn’t much dialogue (a negative, in my eyes). There were a few parts were the story slowed and I do wish the faith content had been stronger, but for a book set in World War II, it was pretty clean. Now, I’m off to go research different bunny trails about different things mentioned in the plot. Link to review: Coming soon. *BFCG may (Read the review to see) recommend this book by this author. It does not mean I recommend all the books by this author.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Johnson

    It’s not often that a debut novel really blows me away, but Things We Didn’t Say was absolutely amazing. I grabbed a digital copy of this book on a whim. It’s not my typical genre, but I’m always looking to try new authors. I was completely captivated by the writing style and characters. The story itself was completely engrossing and I was totally sucked in by the plot. This book has so many layers to it that I feel like it’s one I will be pondering for days. One thing that I was surprised by is It’s not often that a debut novel really blows me away, but Things We Didn’t Say was absolutely amazing. I grabbed a digital copy of this book on a whim. It’s not my typical genre, but I’m always looking to try new authors. I was completely captivated by the writing style and characters. The story itself was completely engrossing and I was totally sucked in by the plot. This book has so many layers to it that I feel like it’s one I will be pondering for days. One thing that I was surprised by is that although the subject matter is serious, and the time period is during a war, this book flowed effortlessly without being heavy. Amy Green was able to capture the heart and emotions of a strenuous and controversial time in history, but offer it in a way that was diplomatic and showed various perspectives. The live story in this novel was subtle, however it was perfectly crafted and naturally occurring and I wouldn’t have changed a bit of it! I have a serious book hangover from this fabulous read and cannot wait to see more from this Author!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Walters

    A fascinating historical read that taught me something I never knew. Author, Amy Lynn Green, creatively weaves a captivating story through letters giving readers the unique perspective of spying on a piece of American history. I think the best part of this story is learning about the role Nazi POW's had in our nation's history as well as what was happening on the Pacific front with Japanese sentiment after Pearl Harbor. The author does a great job creating page-turning tension with strong charac A fascinating historical read that taught me something I never knew. Author, Amy Lynn Green, creatively weaves a captivating story through letters giving readers the unique perspective of spying on a piece of American history. I think the best part of this story is learning about the role Nazi POW's had in our nation's history as well as what was happening on the Pacific front with Japanese sentiment after Pearl Harbor. The author does a great job creating page-turning tension with strong characters and her unique plot. I'll say that her main character, Jo, was an enigma to me in that I enjoyed her wit very much but also found myself struggling to empathize with her completely in her abrasive tact towards others. It wasn't enough that I wouldn't give this story the stars it deserves or keep me highly recommending this book to others. **I received a copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to give a positive review, all opinions expressed are my own.**

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    I am not sure what I expected when I picked up this book, but a literary collection of letters in the tradition of "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society" was unexpected. A book written in this manner can either fall flat or be wildly successful, and I believe this one to be the latter. The story, woven in letters, of a strong heroine without romantic interests, but longing for an education, to stand for what she believes in, come across very well. the German POW's along with the Jap I am not sure what I expected when I picked up this book, but a literary collection of letters in the tradition of "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society" was unexpected. A book written in this manner can either fall flat or be wildly successful, and I believe this one to be the latter. The story, woven in letters, of a strong heroine without romantic interests, but longing for an education, to stand for what she believes in, come across very well. the German POW's along with the Japanese unrest, is told in a new way when I thought it could not be done. My only wish would be that we had just a bit more to the story. Well done. I obtained this book from the publishers. All opinions contained herein are my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kailey

    This is Amy Lynn Green’s debut book, but you would never be able to tell. I’m now a fan! I loved that this is an epistolary novel. I also liked that each letter started out saying who it was to and who it was from. It made it easier to hear each person’s voice through their writing. I would recommend this book for fans of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julie Carpenter

    I've talked about my love of letter writing before in reviews, as well as growing up with a dear grandmother (and others) who were my pen pals. I love stories that bring back those memories as well as inspire me to continue writing letters (or emails) to friends and family. I was also pretty obsessed with learning everything I could about WWII when I was younger, having had several family members serve in the military during the war. I felt such a great connection to them as I did so. I loved the I've talked about my love of letter writing before in reviews, as well as growing up with a dear grandmother (and others) who were my pen pals. I love stories that bring back those memories as well as inspire me to continue writing letters (or emails) to friends and family. I was also pretty obsessed with learning everything I could about WWII when I was younger, having had several family members serve in the military during the war. I felt such a great connection to them as I did so. I loved the letters in the book and the way that they showed a greater depth and created a connection with the characters in the book. When done well, I really enjoy reading/listening to books that are written all through letters or have several letters throughout the story. I love the personalization of characters that creates. Johanna was a strong character whom I enjoyed watching grow and learn, especially as she stepped out of her comfort zone. I followed an author chat about writing and letters that was really fun. Amy Lynn Green and several other authors whom I have read their books participated. It was fun to read more about the process of writing this book as well as some of the reasons why. It was also fun to ask questions about the book during the chat. If you have a love of history, letters, well developed characters this is a book for you! Content: Clean I received a copy from the publisher, Bethany House, via NetGalley. All thoughts and opinions in the review are my own. Happy Reading!!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kate Breslin

    I was charmed from the first page! This epistolary novel, told through letters, flowed seamlessly for me, with plenty of wit to keep me laughing and also a poignancy that at times took my breath away. Author Amy Lynn Green’s delightful characters will resonate with readers in this tale set in rural Minnesota during WWII. Quirky linguistics student Johanna Berglund is certainly a gem, and her life is never the same once she’s coerced into coming home to act as translator to the town’s new camp fo I was charmed from the first page! This epistolary novel, told through letters, flowed seamlessly for me, with plenty of wit to keep me laughing and also a poignancy that at times took my breath away. Author Amy Lynn Green’s delightful characters will resonate with readers in this tale set in rural Minnesota during WWII. Quirky linguistics student Johanna Berglund is certainly a gem, and her life is never the same once she’s coerced into coming home to act as translator to the town’s new camp for German POWs. There were some lovely twists that kept me up late turning the pages, and I found Ironside Lake a world both memorable and entertaining. Things We Didn’t Say is a wonderful story and a must-read for fans of historical fiction!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    Things We Didn't Say was a refreshing book for me because of its epistolary style. It didn't detract from my enjoyment of this novel at all. I thoroughly enjoyed all the letters and learning about all the characters, though I will admit that it was a challenge because I'm not used to getting to know people through letters. (at least not anymore!) Johanna was a strong character and I really liked that she wasn't afraid of being real and upfront. I didn't know what to expect of this novel but I do Things We Didn't Say was a refreshing book for me because of its epistolary style. It didn't detract from my enjoyment of this novel at all. I thoroughly enjoyed all the letters and learning about all the characters, though I will admit that it was a challenge because I'm not used to getting to know people through letters. (at least not anymore!) Johanna was a strong character and I really liked that she wasn't afraid of being real and upfront. I didn't know what to expect of this novel but I do know if there is a chance of going back to Ironside Lake, I would not hesitate to go back and spend more time with everyone. My gratitude to Bethany House Publishers and Net Galley. All opinions are my own

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    What an AMAZING debut novel by Any Lynn Green! Honestly, I was a little skeptical, but this quickly became one of my favorite books of 2020! I have never read a book quite like this - It is written entirely in letters, telegrams, etc amongst the characters. It takes a couple of chapters to get used to this type of writing, but just keep reading - It is so unique and wonderful! In this novel, you will get set down into the little town of Ironside Lake, Wisconsin during WWII. You will experience wha What an AMAZING debut novel by Any Lynn Green! Honestly, I was a little skeptical, but this quickly became one of my favorite books of 2020! I have never read a book quite like this - It is written entirely in letters, telegrams, etc amongst the characters. It takes a couple of chapters to get used to this type of writing, but just keep reading - It is so unique and wonderful! In this novel, you will get set down into the little town of Ironside Lake, Wisconsin during WWII. You will experience what it was like to live in a small, close-knit town hosting a POW camp. Wow! That was not something I had thought about! The characters are so fun and I absolutely fell in love with them! Johanna (age 22) is one of my all-time favorite characters of 2020! She is spunky, candid, and mostly unconcerned with the cares of society. Such a refreshing character who is somewhat reminiscent of Anne Shirley. Overall, this was a lighthearted, easy to read & follow, well-written novel full of surprises and laughs! I definitely can't wait to see what else Amy Lynn Green has in store! :) Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    Having grown up in NW Iowa, I have heard of the German POW camps there, but never visited. I heard more of the Japanese internment camps because my aunt was born in a camp in California. But looking into the German POW camps, I did not know there were so many, and one that held some of the high officers was right here where I live now. I think it would be an interesting stop on a trip back home to see this museum. My son loves history, so I think he would love it just as much. This is the story Having grown up in NW Iowa, I have heard of the German POW camps there, but never visited. I heard more of the Japanese internment camps because my aunt was born in a camp in California. But looking into the German POW camps, I did not know there were so many, and one that held some of the high officers was right here where I live now. I think it would be an interesting stop on a trip back home to see this museum. My son loves history, so I think he would love it just as much. This is the story of Johanna Berglund an interpreter at the German POW camp in Ironside Lake, Minnesota. She was to interpret the letters in to the soldiers and the ones soldiers wrote out of the camp. A very interesting story, especially when you bring in her friend Peter Ito, who was a Japanese American who taught intelligence at Fort Snelling in Minneapolis. It was also about the hurt that happened between families when a loved one is killed. Forgiveness, hatred, prejudice, and understanding are just a few of the feelings throughout the book. The book is written entirely in letters between friends, people of the town, and the local newspaper. It was an interesting way, and one that I likes as a change of pace. I liked the book for a majority, I did not really connect with Johanna, I felt she was a bit harsh and not very personable. I am not sure I really liked her and Peter together either. In all it was an interesting read into the life, happenings, and the way of a German POW camp here in the states. Would recommend to my fellow readers and look forward to future works by Ms. Green. Thank you to Netgalley, Bethany House/Bethany House Publishers, and Amy Lynn Green for this advanced copy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Wow! Not only has Amy Lynn Green written a very memorable debut, I will say that this is one of my favorite reads of the year. I have only read a couple of epistolary novels and I can already imagine what a great audiobook this will make(my favorite way to experience epistolary novels). With a fresh voice to fiction, the author pens an eclectic cast of characters through the various letters that surround a POW camp and the young woman who was at first unwillingly serving as translator. Ms. Green Wow! Not only has Amy Lynn Green written a very memorable debut, I will say that this is one of my favorite reads of the year. I have only read a couple of epistolary novels and I can already imagine what a great audiobook this will make(my favorite way to experience epistolary novels). With a fresh voice to fiction, the author pens an eclectic cast of characters through the various letters that surround a POW camp and the young woman who was at first unwillingly serving as translator. Ms. Green gives the readers a heroine who is outwardly brusque and obstinate, but taps an unexpected inner strength as a crusader for justice. The many letters in this novel hold a magnifying glass that reveals the individual flaws and prejudices that can taint a community and how one strong voice can speak for justice....and grace for all. This book is for the keeper shelf and I hope to read many more books by this author in the future. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author/publisher and was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Fantastic novel. Amy is a talented author and I am excited to read more from her.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Staci

    Unique debut! Johanna Berglund is an opinionated linguistic student at The University of Minnesota. She is pressured into returning to her small hometown and serving as a translator at the German POW camp. Through this epistolary novel, readers learn about Johanna, her friends and family and happenings in the town. Johanna's snarky humor comes through loud and clear in her communications. A bit more subtly readers see her heart. Alleged crimes and POW mishaps keep the pages turning with this novel Unique debut! Johanna Berglund is an opinionated linguistic student at The University of Minnesota. She is pressured into returning to her small hometown and serving as a translator at the German POW camp. Through this epistolary novel, readers learn about Johanna, her friends and family and happenings in the town. Johanna's snarky humor comes through loud and clear in her communications. A bit more subtly readers see her heart. Alleged crimes and POW mishaps keep the pages turning with this novel. One thought that stood out to me is how would a mom feel with a son in a POW camp overseas that may not be getting treated humanely while the German POWs in her town were given descent meals, entertainment and opportunities to learn. It's a tough question to ponder. The cover is lovely! I look forward to what the author will pen next. My gratitude to publisher Bethany House for a complimentary NetGalley copy of the novel. I was not required to post a review and all opinions expressed are my own

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Amy Lynn Green, you have a new fan. I hadn’t read anything of yours before this, and after searching for other books, I had a hard time believing this could be a debut novel. Things We Didn’t Say is truly an excellent, well written story. While I am no author, I would imagine that writing an entire novel as an amalgamation of letters would be challenging. But the level of creativity here exceeds most books I’ve read lately. The characters are well thought out, and the plot carefully planned. The Amy Lynn Green, you have a new fan. I hadn’t read anything of yours before this, and after searching for other books, I had a hard time believing this could be a debut novel. Things We Didn’t Say is truly an excellent, well written story. While I am no author, I would imagine that writing an entire novel as an amalgamation of letters would be challenging. But the level of creativity here exceeds most books I’ve read lately. The characters are well thought out, and the plot carefully planned. The conclusion was perfection. I’m sure a great deal of research went into this book. There was also thoughtful consideration of POW treatment in the United States and a proper balance was achieved here. I can’t wait to read your next book!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    Small Town America during WWII becomes a hot bed of unease, intrigue and accusations when a POW camp is placed there and one of their own- a fiery, independent prodigal- returns to work at the camp as a translator. A debut epistolary novel captivated and I will feel the effects for some time to come. Johanna Berglund is a brilliant linguistic student at the University of Minnesota with dreams of going to Oxford for further language studies. She is impulsive, outspoken, and can be abrasive with he Small Town America during WWII becomes a hot bed of unease, intrigue and accusations when a POW camp is placed there and one of their own- a fiery, independent prodigal- returns to work at the camp as a translator. A debut epistolary novel captivated and I will feel the effects for some time to come. Johanna Berglund is a brilliant linguistic student at the University of Minnesota with dreams of going to Oxford for further language studies. She is impulsive, outspoken, and can be abrasive with her abrupt social skills, but no one can doubt her abilities. This is why her professor is approached by the army and he easily recommends Johanna as does her great Japanese American friend, Peter Ito from over at the Ft. Snelling Language School. Johanna is being recruited to act as translator at the new POW camp of German prisoners being put up outside her home town for the purpose of the POWs put to work in the fields to replace the young men who went to war leaving farmers in a bad place for food production. The commander hopes that the fervor against the camp will die down if a home town girl is brought in to act as sensor for the POW mail, liaison with the POW rep, and as translator who can also keep an eye on what the prisoners are saying. Johanna does agree easily and has her private reasons for never wanting to go back home again. Too bad her parents, her friends, and even her anonymous scholarship sponsor are all set on her doing this. In the end, things go very wrong and lives are at stake. Things We Didn't Say opens with a startling reason for why the heroine is gathering and reading through all her correspondence. Though, it's at the beginning, I'm not going to reveal what is going on so if others choose to read the book they get the full effect like I did. The reader gleans the story from these various pieces of correspondence- letters, memos, newspaper articles, reports, and notes. There is a reason this epistolary form is not the most popular writing style for stories. It is tough for all the usual story elements to shine through to the reader without distraction, detachment, or under-development being issues. A few writers, however, shine in this format and this one just dazzles. Johanna is the main character, but her closest friends, Peter and Olive, her parents, and others back home, and the people at the camp are brought to vivid life as is the historical background and the setting. The big conflict gives an urgency to the story from the opening page and the reader knows to what all that is being written is leading to, but in the meantime, the story leading up to this takes over and the reader is plunged into Johanna's world. I've read several WWII homefront stories and even a few set in and around internment camps, but this was my first that dealt with a POW camp that was there to work the local farms. I was fascinated by that part alone, but then this was paired with the linguistics side of the war effort and how Japanese Americans from the American mainland and those from the Hawaiian Islands studied and trained to be used in the Pacific Theater of the war. The author didn't pull punches on how it was for those who looked and sounded like the enemy, but were as loyally American as anyone else. Johanna might be all sorts of prickly, but she had the generous gift to see past that stuff and embrace Peter Ito as dearest friend just as she saw those German prisoners as people and not monsters. This advocacy gift gets her into trouble really quickly when she begins working at the camp. So that editorials in the newspapers and whispers in town follow her. At the beginning, I felt there was something of a mystery about the way Johanna was acting toward the Lutheran preacher and his daughter and I was curious what was behind it. It seems that the past with this family was at the crux of why she wanted nothing to do with her home. Johanna was spunky and impulsive and lord did she get up a head of steam, but she's likeable and even when I wanted to snag her before she could go off half-cocked, I thought she was a game gal. I also felt her pain and what was holding her back. I loved seeing her private journey to peace and understanding herself happen along the way. And, yes, this is an inspirational fiction so forgiveness, understanding, compassion, and relying on God as comfort and strength is woven into Johanna story. Peter was such a well of wisdom for her and the kind of friend who said the hard things in a gracious way. Johanna might have been far from God, but she could respect the advice and truths Peter shared particularly since he of all people couldn't be doubted when he talked of forgiveness and being understanding of others. As the reader, I could see the train wreck coming for Johanna when she was blithely in ignorance and ignored warnings from others because she thought she knew best. And, to be fair to her, she was often the only one championing certain people so it was easy to see why she went on instinct and got a few pivotal people very wrong in their motives and actions. I had no idea how she was going to get out of her tight spot, but loved how it happened- what got her into the mess was also what got her out of it. All in all, a brilliant, sparkling story full of all the good things including a subtle romance, a journey of the heart, and an intrigue during the WWII years. Those who enjoy historical fiction, light inspirational fiction, light historical romance, and suspense should give this one a try. I rec'd this book through Net Galley to read in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    "Don't hold on so tightly to one idea of what you want that you don't let God push you in another direction." Linguistics student Johanna Berglund is brilliant, determined, a bit cynical and overly headstrong; in other words, she clutches her dreams for the future very tightly, dreams which include post graduate work at Oxford University in England, among other things. So when she is forced (according to her) to choose between changing directions (serving her country) or losing her coveted colle "Don't hold on so tightly to one idea of what you want that you don't let God push you in another direction." Linguistics student Johanna Berglund is brilliant, determined, a bit cynical and overly headstrong; in other words, she clutches her dreams for the future very tightly, dreams which include post graduate work at Oxford University in England, among other things. So when she is forced (according to her) to choose between changing directions (serving her country) or losing her coveted college scholarship money (the worst possible thing that could happen to her), Johanna reluctantly returns to her small hometown of Ironside Lake, Minnesota to serve as an Army translator in a German prisoner of war camp, censoring their letters home and providing a means of communication between the guards and inmates. Leaving behind a best friend, a Japanese American language teacher at a school for military intelligence officers, the two comrades resort to letters filled with spirited conversations and timely advice (mostly Peter to Johanna). Things get a little dicey when Johanna's kindnesses towards the occupants of the German camp land her in a bit of trouble (a lot of trouble, actually) and Peter's war time assignment takes a turn into a dangerous direction(his life just might be at stake). Caught between two conflicts, while painfully watching her future disappear before her very eyes, Johanna learns the value of silence; "it's where God is most likely to be heard", a valuable lesson for one's head and heart. Granted, it may take awhile to rest comfortably within the pages of this epistolary novel, nonetheless, the author skillfully moves the story line along with her brightly contrasting characters and their conversant natures, some of whom hide their charlatan motives quite well. When the last page turns, you will realize exactly what you have just read, for even Jo herself states, "I've found that every letter has two messages; the one written on the lines and the ones written between them". Quite an impressive debut novel! I received a copy of this book from the publisher. I also purchased a copy. The opinions stated above are entirely my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Tero

    I am not a huge fan of epistolary novels and was not aware that this was one when I requested it to review. However, that preference aside, I really did enjoy this story. I know that it is a challenge to tell a complete story through letters alone, yet I feel like it was really well done. There were a few parts where the story dragged, but then there were parts where I totally did not want to put it down. It was fascinating to emerge into the world of POW camps and letter censoring of WWII. I enj I am not a huge fan of epistolary novels and was not aware that this was one when I requested it to review. However, that preference aside, I really did enjoy this story. I know that it is a challenge to tell a complete story through letters alone, yet I feel like it was really well done. There were a few parts where the story dragged, but then there were parts where I totally did not want to put it down. It was fascinating to emerge into the world of POW camps and letter censoring of WWII. I enjoyed the various points of views featured through letters and newspaper clippings. Being that it was all letters, the romance in this is what I consider very appropriate for all audiences. It was a romance of denial, for lack of better terms. Toward the end, I was just waiting for that one letter that absolutely had to come. The Christian content was not a super strong point in the story, in my opinion. Johanna questioned God and His involvement in people’s lives, wondering why He was silent and while it did get semi-resolved in the end, it just was not quite as strong a thread. Also, because the denomination was Lutheran, there were a couple of more Calvinistic comments regarding the sovereignty of God. Apart from that doctrinal difference I have with this book, it is one that I would hand to almost any teen, as it presents a fascinating side of World War II. *I received this book from NetGalley and happily provided an honest review*

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    I really enjoyed this debut novel from author Amy Green. Things We Didn't Say is an epistolary novel made up of letters, newspaper clippings, and correspondence between friends and neighbors. I was intrigued by the strong voices each character has in the letters they write as a small town grapples with a German POW camp coming to their home. Of those strong voices, our main character, Joanna, has the most distinctive voice of all. She writes with conviction and isn't afraid to say what she thinks I really enjoyed this debut novel from author Amy Green. Things We Didn't Say is an epistolary novel made up of letters, newspaper clippings, and correspondence between friends and neighbors. I was intrigued by the strong voices each character has in the letters they write as a small town grapples with a German POW camp coming to their home. Of those strong voices, our main character, Joanna, has the most distinctive voice of all. She writes with conviction and isn't afraid to say what she thinks, even if it's the unpopular opinion. I loved her spunk and fire. I was especially hooked towards the end, and was reading nonstop around the last 100 pages. I had to see how the tangled mess Joanna was in would get resolved! I'm really looking forward to seeing what Amy writes next!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erin Laramore

    This book was utterly fantastic! I will start by saying that it is an epistolary novel (told in the form of letters, telegrams, and notes, etc.). Some people don't like that style because it generally is difficult to tell a story well in that manner, but Ms. Green overcame that obstacle beautifully. The story was told well in that format, without taking the reader out of the method or making the letters sound un-letter-like. That this was set in the 1940s when letter writing was the best way to This book was utterly fantastic! I will start by saying that it is an epistolary novel (told in the form of letters, telegrams, and notes, etc.). Some people don't like that style because it generally is difficult to tell a story well in that manner, but Ms. Green overcame that obstacle beautifully. The story was told well in that format, without taking the reader out of the method or making the letters sound un-letter-like. That this was set in the 1940s when letter writing was the best way to communicate long distance helped to set the stage smartly. One thing I did not know before reading this book is that there were POW camps here in the US during WWII. This book brought in unique facets of the War and how it impacted the US in the POW camps, the language training schools (to train soldiers to speak Japanese), and the internment camps. In addition to being educational in that regard, and having an enjoyable story-line, I absolutely adored the characters. Johanna is no doubt the type of person my child would be if I had one. With my no-nonsense attitude and my husband's wit and sarcasm, Johanna was the perfect combination of us and I found myself relating well to her on those grounds. I loved her spirit and her way of going about things and I loved how Peter grounded her and kept her focused on the right things. I adored Pastor Sorenson and his steady faithfulness, and Cornelia Knutson gets an award for best supporting character - I just adored her - and her collection of hats! Because the letter writing happens over time and there's a natural time of progression, the character growth happens fluidly and naturally. I loved to watch Johanna grow and blossom in her circumstances and struggles as she wrote to Peter, Olive, Annika, Pastor Sorenson, Cornelia, and even the POWs. The faith thread is solid in this one as Johanna struggles with the concept of unanswered prayers and those around her encourage her in her faith. This book took me through all of the emotions. I would be laughing one moment at something that Johanna or Peter said and then all of a sudden, I've been punched in the gut with a truism brought abut by that same anecdote. There were thoughts on race relations (Peter, as a Japanese American dealt with a good deal of racism, and the German POWs noted that the American treatment of Blacks wasn't so different than their treatment of Jews), faith struggles, lost friendships, and regrets. The story-line was redemptive and moving, though, as these things were all worked through. This was one that definitely makes you think and is entertaining as well. That this is the author's debut novel makes this even more impressive. Ms. Green is now on my "watch list" of authors and I plan to read whatever she releases next! Special thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for an advance e-copy of this book. I was not obligated to write a review and the thoughts contained herein are my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kav

    Highly anticipated. Unexpected. Riveting. Completely different. And so much more it's going to be hard to do justice to this book in a review. First, you must be a fan of epistolary fiction -- or at least dive in with an open mind -- because the entire novel is made up of letters with the exception of a few newspaper articles. I've been a fan of this genre since reading Daddy-Long-Legs by Jean Webster in fifth grade. But these books are few and far between and the only other one that stands out f Highly anticipated. Unexpected. Riveting. Completely different. And so much more it's going to be hard to do justice to this book in a review. First, you must be a fan of epistolary fiction -- or at least dive in with an open mind -- because the entire novel is made up of letters with the exception of a few newspaper articles. I've been a fan of this genre since reading Daddy-Long-Legs by Jean Webster in fifth grade. But these books are few and far between and the only other one that stands out for me right now is The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows. Loved both those books and the way their stories unfold through letters so if you are also a fan then Things We Didn't Say is a book I think you will enjoy. In a way, this letter writing approach keeps a reader at arms length since our scope is limited to the letters. We don't have 'real time' scenes with characters interacting or are allowed into the inner thoughts of a protagonist like a traditionally written novel. But there's something deliciously tantalizing about reading a treasure trove of correspondence while fitting the pieces of disparate lives together in order to make a cohesive whole. I kinda felt like part detective and part genealogist. And the pacing is impeccable. It took me just a few letters to get into the rhythm and then I was compulsively reading all the way. Johanna's on a journey of self-discovery. She isn't always lovable but she grows on you as her world and her choices open up and she comes to terms with some hard truths. And untruths. She's blunt and funny and so very real! One of my favourite quotes: "Real life is dreadfully tedious, the way it interrupts reading." :-) And there are so many layers to this novel -- addressing all kinds of war issues that I never even thought about. I'm always amazed and appreciative when authors open new aspects of a historical topic I thought I was well-versed in! An engrossing inspirational historical fiction debut!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andi

    A beautiful and engrossing debut novel. I've been anxiously waiting Amy Green's debut novel and I absolutely loved it. Johanna Berglund is a favorite heroine. She is smart, witty, having heart and depth. Using the technique of letters, telegrams, notes; known as epistolary storytelling, Amy Green tells a beautiful story of what happened in the German POW camps. Ms. Green packs so much in this 416 page novel; race relations, faith, lost friendships, and regrets. To think this is her debut novel m A beautiful and engrossing debut novel. I've been anxiously waiting Amy Green's debut novel and I absolutely loved it. Johanna Berglund is a favorite heroine. She is smart, witty, having heart and depth. Using the technique of letters, telegrams, notes; known as epistolary storytelling, Amy Green tells a beautiful story of what happened in the German POW camps. Ms. Green packs so much in this 416 page novel; race relations, faith, lost friendships, and regrets. To think this is her debut novel makes the read even more stunning as well as inspiring. If you're still adding books to your Christmas wish-list; you need to add this one! I highly recommend it! Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book via the publisher. I was not required to write a review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.