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On the Horizon

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From Lois Lowry comes an account of the lives lost in two of WWII’s most infamous events: Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. With black-and-white illustrations by Kenard Pak. Lois Lowry looks back at history through a personal lens as she draws from her own memories as a child in Hawaii and Japan, as well as from historical research, in this work in verse for young readers. On From Lois Lowry comes an account of the lives lost in two of WWII’s most infamous events: Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. With black-and-white illustrations by Kenard Pak. Lois Lowry looks back at history through a personal lens as she draws from her own memories as a child in Hawaii and Japan, as well as from historical research, in this work in verse for young readers. On the Horizon tells the story of people whose lives were lost or forever altered by the twin tragedies of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima.  Composed of poems about individual sailors who lost their lives on the Arizona and about the citizens of Hiroshima who experienced unfathomable horror.


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From Lois Lowry comes an account of the lives lost in two of WWII’s most infamous events: Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. With black-and-white illustrations by Kenard Pak. Lois Lowry looks back at history through a personal lens as she draws from her own memories as a child in Hawaii and Japan, as well as from historical research, in this work in verse for young readers. On From Lois Lowry comes an account of the lives lost in two of WWII’s most infamous events: Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. With black-and-white illustrations by Kenard Pak. Lois Lowry looks back at history through a personal lens as she draws from her own memories as a child in Hawaii and Japan, as well as from historical research, in this work in verse for young readers. On the Horizon tells the story of people whose lives were lost or forever altered by the twin tragedies of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima.  Composed of poems about individual sailors who lost their lives on the Arizona and about the citizens of Hiroshima who experienced unfathomable horror.

30 review for On the Horizon

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Wow. Is there anything she can’t write? This was interesting, informative, and a lovely tribute. Writing this difficult subject in verse makes it approachable and incredibly unique. I slowly savored each section and ruminated over each one. This will be a fantastic tool for teachers as they teach this subject, or for a poetry unit. I absolutely loved this and found it fascinating. My thanks to the publisher for the advance reader in exchange for my honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I'm grateful to the publisher and Libro.fm for allowing me the opportunity to listen to Lois Lowry read her newest memoir in verse. I am also looking forward to seeing the illustrations soon. Please, whenever possible, support local bookstores. Libro.fm allows one to do just that digitally for audiobooks. If you haven't seen their website, please check it out at libro.fm Lowry's poems here are beautiful, absolutely beautiful. They are snapshots from World War Two that honor those we have lost in I'm grateful to the publisher and Libro.fm for allowing me the opportunity to listen to Lois Lowry read her newest memoir in verse. I am also looking forward to seeing the illustrations soon. Please, whenever possible, support local bookstores. Libro.fm allows one to do just that digitally for audiobooks. If you haven't seen their website, please check it out at libro.fm Lowry's poems here are beautiful, absolutely beautiful. They are snapshots from World War Two that honor those we have lost in this world, both in America and Japan. They are moments Lois experienced living in Shibuya in Tokyo after the war, including an encounter with illustrator Allen Say, whom she would officially meet many years later. Language, connection, and history are layered here in ways that are simply inspiring. Her afterword may have said it best when she said, "and to honor the past by making silent promises, to our fellow humans, that we will work for a better and more peaceful future." As someone who called Japan home for four years of my life and who often returns to visit family in the summer, this book now has a special place in my heart.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katiria

    *** Full Review To Come Up Soon! ***

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristy Miller

    In the 1980’s Lois Lowry was watching home movies of her young childhood on Honolulu with friends. During a video of a very young Lois playing on the beach they saw a ship in the background. It was the USS Arizona, on its way to its final berth. Shortly after the video was taken Pearl Harbor was bombed, and the Arizona was at the bottom of the harbor, taking some 1,700 sailors with it. This was the first event over the next decade that inspired reflections on history, memory, and connectivity, a In the 1980’s Lois Lowry was watching home movies of her young childhood on Honolulu with friends. During a video of a very young Lois playing on the beach they saw a ship in the background. It was the USS Arizona, on its way to its final berth. Shortly after the video was taken Pearl Harbor was bombed, and the Arizona was at the bottom of the harbor, taking some 1,700 sailors with it. This was the first event over the next decade that inspired reflections on history, memory, and connectivity, and ultimately resulted in this beautiful book. On the Horizon is a collection of poems about loss, and grief, and healing, and remembering. It is a very quick read, but so moving. It makes the huge, tragic, historic events of the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the dropping of the atomic bomb approachable to young people. The incredible Ms. Lowry shows us that no matter who we are, a sailor on the Arizona, a boy whose family fled the destruction of Hiroshima, or a girl playing on a beach, these large world events connect us all through love, loss, and healing. In these days of pandemic and social unrest I don’t think she could have written a more beautiful of healing book. Highly recommend for all ages.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Selah Pike

    I am always astonished by Lowry’s talent.

  6. 4 out of 5

    KC

    Perfect for poetry month, this short but powerful book is an autobiographical tale of Lowry’s youngest years in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii right before the bombing. Intense, yet sensitive prose describing both the US and Japanese points of view.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anny

    Absolutely incredible. If you're looking for a very short and brief book that won't leave your mind and will also rip your heart apart, look no further. Lois Lowry's writing is phenomenal. I wish it were a little longer since I completely lost myself in each of these stories. But there was something magical in the brevity as well. It hinted at the brevity of their passing as well, the brevity of time and life. They were gone before you got too attached, but you got attached anyway. The emotions Absolutely incredible. If you're looking for a very short and brief book that won't leave your mind and will also rip your heart apart, look no further. Lois Lowry's writing is phenomenal. I wish it were a little longer since I completely lost myself in each of these stories. But there was something magical in the brevity as well. It hinted at the brevity of their passing as well, the brevity of time and life. They were gone before you got too attached, but you got attached anyway. The emotions matched the rhyming schemes as well. I feel like this is the book I will be gifting to a special someone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Lowry, people. An absolutely poignant novel in verse (an exemplar for sure) that includes multiple illustrations (I'm reading a galley copy from Netgalley) incorporated into a story of herself as a child, a Japanese boy, and a third story woven in to connect it all that she shares about in her author's note. It's emotional and informative, sentimental and reverent. She has video of her playing on the beach in Hawaii and in the background, the USS Arizona. Then she meets a boy who was in a town r Lowry, people. An absolutely poignant novel in verse (an exemplar for sure) that includes multiple illustrations (I'm reading a galley copy from Netgalley) incorporated into a story of herself as a child, a Japanese boy, and a third story woven in to connect it all that she shares about in her author's note. It's emotional and informative, sentimental and reverent. She has video of her playing on the beach in Hawaii and in the background, the USS Arizona. Then she meets a boy who was in a town riding a bike as the bomb was being dropped on Hiroshima-- they meet as adults. And then when Lowry brings her grandson to the Pearl Harbor memorial, a note from a grandson having never met his grandfather who died at Pearl Harbor. The verse is sparing and heartfelt, introducing real people and real events which is why it's a strong nonfiction verse for a middle grade audience and up. (A quick read for older teens) but it's the years that Lowry has lived that lends itself to a reverential book like this. Stories like this won't age. And I'm here for more memoirs and biographies of the authors we love.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    “I think back to that sunlit day When I was young, and so were they. If I had noticed? If I’d known? Would each of us be less alone? I’ve traveled many miles since then- around the world, and back again; I’ve learned that there will always be things we miss, that we don’t see on the horizon. Things beyond. And yet there is a lasting bond between us, linking each to each: Boys on a ship. Child on a beach.” This was extremely poignant and beautiful. I cried almost from start to finish. I really liked The Gi “I think back to that sunlit day When I was young, and so were they. If I had noticed? If I’d known? Would each of us be less alone? I’ve traveled many miles since then- around the world, and back again; I’ve learned that there will always be things we miss, that we don’t see on the horizon. Things beyond. And yet there is a lasting bond between us, linking each to each: Boys on a ship. Child on a beach.” This was extremely poignant and beautiful. I cried almost from start to finish. I really liked The Giver and other books by Lois Lowry and when I saw she had written something else, I immediately ordered it. I didn’t really know what to expect or what I was going to get and what I found is a beautiful collection of poems about the attack on Pearl Harbor and the bombs being dropped in Japan. She has amazing personal connections to both places. There are so few words and yet a powerful message about the connection of our lives to others. In her own words in the authors note, “to honor the past by making silent promises to our fellow humans that we will work for a better and more peaceful future.” I most definitely recommend this one to anyone and everyone!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    Imagine looking at old family home movies and discovering something in the background that suddenly jolts memory and reflection. Well, that is exactly what happened to Lois Lowry when she had some of her family's old home movies restored and realized as a young child playing on Waikiki beach with her grandmother in 1940, her father's camera had also captured the USS Arizona in the distance heading to its berth in Pearl Harbor: She Was There We never saw the ship. But she was there. She was moving sl Imagine looking at old family home movies and discovering something in the background that suddenly jolts memory and reflection. Well, that is exactly what happened to Lois Lowry when she had some of her family's old home movies restored and realized as a young child playing on Waikiki beach with her grandmother in 1940, her father's camera had also captured the USS Arizona in the distance heading to its berth in Pearl Harbor: She Was There We never saw the ship. But she was there. She was moving slowly on the horizon, shrouded in the mist that separated skies from seas while we laughed, unknowing, in the breeze. She carried more than twelve hundred men on deck, or working down below. We didn't look up. We didn't know. It is only as an adult, Lowry says in her Author's Note, while showing the restored films to friends, that the USS Arizona is finally seen. As you probably already know, it sank when Pearl Harbor was attacked on December 7, 1941, and most of the sailors onboard were killed - among them, twin brothers, members of the ship's band, two brothers, one a survivor, one not but reunited years later in death. From 1941, Lowry jumps to August 6, 1945 and the bombing of Hiroshima, and again highlighting individuals who were there - among them, a young boy named Koichi Seii, who would later become known as Allen Say, a child pulled from the rubble and reunited with his father, teenage girls running the trams, and a little boy on a red tricycle. Hiroshima: The cloud appeared over the distant hill, blossoming like strange new flowers in spring, opening, growing. But the world was still. When the cloud appeared over the distant hill, silence has fallen. There were no sounds until rain came. Not true rain, but black drops falling from the cloud that appeared over a distant hill, blossoming like strange new flowers in spring. On the Horizon is written in three parts- the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the bombing of Hiroshima, and the Lowry family's life in post-war Japan - and uses a variety of poetic forms. One of the things that she has accomplished is to show the randomness of war - especially who lives and who dies (a randomness we are witnessing again as the Coronavirus chooses its victims). It is perhaps one of the most affecting books I have read about WWII, and I found often myself tearing up as I read. I believe it is because of the way Lowry has brought the distant near. In this slender book of poems, she shows us that sometimes history can feel like one is looking at something far away on a misty horizon, but by giving face and voice to those who were there she brings it to the forefront, and history becomes closer, people become individual human beings. This is a book of poems I believe I will be returning to again and again. Kenard Pak's black and while pencil and digital illustrations are a perfect compliment to each one of the poems. You can find a useful Teacher's Guide HERE This book is recommended for readers age 10+ This book was a EARC gratefully received from NetGalley This is one of my favorite poems from On the Horizon. It is called Solace The hospital ships had names that spoke of need: Comfort Hope Solace Mercy Refuge The carried the wounded and ill. That morning, Solace was moored near the Arizona. She sent her launches and stretchers across. The harbor has a film of burning oil. Scorched men were pulled one by one from the flames and taken to Solace.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joey T

    /3.5 stars/ Really liked it! Highly recommend for all ages. Clean.

  12. 4 out of 5

    vanessa

    A book in verse about WWII memories. Lowry wrote this book after seeing the USS Arizona (before the attack on Pearl Harbor) in the background of a family home movie. It's got other stories from WWII from American and Japanese perspectives. I really liked her author's more. I kind of wish I was able to see the illustrations along with the audio. Thanks to Libro FM for an ALC. I recommend to middle grade readers who like historical / WWII stories.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Czechgirl

    They say great things come in small packages and this is one of them. Such an interesting true story. I love that author chose to write this book in verse.

  14. 4 out of 5

    TJ

    This was such a nice tribute to the lives lost during WWII, and it showed how lives intersect beautifully. A few of the poems were a bit too minimalistic for my taste, but most of them were really powerful. It’s great to see Lowry still publishing impactful stories today. 4.5/5 stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    I was so lucky to pick up an ARC of this book at a meeting. Promoted for ages 10-12, this is a tragic and emotional read about the lives lost in the attack of Pearl Harbor and reciprocal bombing of Hiroshima. Told in 3 parts through magnificent poems about the young and old lives lost and effected during the events, it is heartbreaking for any age. Lowry is able to interweave her childhood and personal connections into the events, making it even more impactful. It is a short read, but one that c I was so lucky to pick up an ARC of this book at a meeting. Promoted for ages 10-12, this is a tragic and emotional read about the lives lost in the attack of Pearl Harbor and reciprocal bombing of Hiroshima. Told in 3 parts through magnificent poems about the young and old lives lost and effected during the events, it is heartbreaking for any age. Lowry is able to interweave her childhood and personal connections into the events, making it even more impactful. It is a short read, but one that can be read slow or over again, picked up and grazed to remember a life and think on the world. Final copy will be illustrated. Highly recommended for anyone ages 10+ to pick-up.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jess Cruz (tingly.spines)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I saw this ARC on the HMH table at ALA and had to pick up a copy, mainly because Lois Lowry was one of my favorite authors throughout my childhood. And I knew by the way that she handled the issues and topics in Number the Stars with great care, that she would also craft this poetry collection about Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima in a delicate but provocative way. I’m happy to report that my initial instinct was correct. After so many years, Lois Lowry still manages to write about tragedy in a way th I saw this ARC on the HMH table at ALA and had to pick up a copy, mainly because Lois Lowry was one of my favorite authors throughout my childhood. And I knew by the way that she handled the issues and topics in Number the Stars with great care, that she would also craft this poetry collection about Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima in a delicate but provocative way. I’m happy to report that my initial instinct was correct. After so many years, Lois Lowry still manages to write about tragedy in a way that is accessible and reverent while still holding your attention captive until the very end. Certain poems made me stop and google “the red tricycle”, “Japanese tram girls”, and “what is Hiroshima like today?” Also, I can’t overstate how touching and deeply personal this collection was. Lois Lowry shares the events of both days, Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima, but also how those events shaped her girlhood growing up in Honolulu and then Shibuya. Like many of us who grew up in New York during 9/11, Lowry perfectly captures that moment where a child is woken up from dreamlike innocence into the wakefulness of a large-scale disaster. (I’m only now realizing that I needed this book desperately in 2001 when I was 11 years old, but I’m still so grateful to have read it at 29.) She then talks about feeling gaijin in Japan. She was an outsider and it was too soon to reach out across the divide to make friends with the children in her neighborhood because of what happened in Hiroshima. I’m so fascinated by this series of events that I wish she would write an entire memoir about this time in her life. Until then, I’m giving this collection 5 stars and buying a finished copy for my shelves (and so that I can see Kenard Pak’s final artwork). If anyone tells you that middle grade poetry isn’t insightful, deep, or captivating, push this book into their hands along with a box of Kleenex and have them report back in a couple of hours.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Judi

    I got this audiobook on libro.fm because I noticed that is was new from Lois Lowry. I didn't even check to see what it was about since I loved reading Number the Stars and The Giver with my kids when they were younger and expected I'd enjoy this one too. I'm glad I did. Lowry writes of her childhood experiences in Hawaii and Tokyo during WWII interspersing personal details of the young men who perished on the USS Arizona and the people who suffered in Hiroshima. She shares how she felt about livi I got this audiobook on libro.fm because I noticed that is was new from Lois Lowry. I didn't even check to see what it was about since I loved reading Number the Stars and The Giver with my kids when they were younger and expected I'd enjoy this one too. I'm glad I did. Lowry writes of her childhood experiences in Hawaii and Tokyo during WWII interspersing personal details of the young men who perished on the USS Arizona and the people who suffered in Hiroshima. She shares how she felt about living in post-war Tokyo in a way that gently relates to children yet resonates with adults. How serendipitous for me read this book on the 75th anniversary of VE Day. I was reminded of how much our world has changed that countries that were once enemies are now allies and how we can now look beyond the way a person looks into their hearts to determine if they can be a friend. Lowry's words remind us of this fact in a way that recognizes the past as it was to a young child and the present as it is to an adult. Lowry reads the audiobook and her voice adds so much to her remembrances. I hope to find the physical book and see the illustrations as I'm sure they'll add to the reading experience as well.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    Because of COVID-19, I have overcome my longtime aversion to ebooks, and I borrowed a digital copy of this from my library. I read it while walking on the treadmill this evening, and despite this utilitarian set-up, I cried through the entire thing. It is so reverent, moving, and meaningful, honoring fatalities and survivors from both Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima without hijacking either of these events to make a specific political or social message. This is a moving testament to lost humanity, an Because of COVID-19, I have overcome my longtime aversion to ebooks, and I borrowed a digital copy of this from my library. I read it while walking on the treadmill this evening, and despite this utilitarian set-up, I cried through the entire thing. It is so reverent, moving, and meaningful, honoring fatalities and survivors from both Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima without hijacking either of these events to make a specific political or social message. This is a moving testament to lost humanity, and I wept and wept and wept over the specific details. Given the emotionally intense and tragic material that this book covers, I would not recommend it for young children. It is a quick read, and there is nothing graphic about the writing, but just because the free verse poetry is within a child's reading level does not mean that they are ready to delve into the specific, ordinary, excruciatingly real details of lives lost under such horrible conditions. I know that I could never have handled this when I was in elementary school, and even though less sensitive children might be okay with it, I would primarily recommend this book for middle school and up.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bernadette Kearns

    Thank you to Libro.fm for the free audio version of this book for educators. I LOVED listening to Lois Lowry read this book because it added a personal, emotional connection from her to the listeners. The poems in this book are stunningly beautiful. In the first two parts, Lowry uses the poems to tell the stories of the men aboard the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor and people from the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima on the days the bombs were dropped. Part 3 contains poems that are mainly short me Thank you to Libro.fm for the free audio version of this book for educators. I LOVED listening to Lois Lowry read this book because it added a personal, emotional connection from her to the listeners. The poems in this book are stunningly beautiful. In the first two parts, Lowry uses the poems to tell the stories of the men aboard the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor and people from the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima on the days the bombs were dropped. Part 3 contains poems that are mainly short memoirs of Lowry’s experiences living in Japan after the war. The writing in every poem is gorgeous and both adult and student writers could learn so much from them as mentor texts individually and the book as a whole. There is strong storytelling, vivid word choices, and raw emotions in every poem. I found myself tearing up after listening to many parts. This is a stunning achievement from an author I have long admired. It would be an excellent text for middle/high school Social Studies classes studying WW2, English classes investigating poetry or for anyone who simply enjoys gorgeous writing. Highly recommend!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tamsyn

    Thanks to NetGalley, I was able to read this poignant look back at Lois Lowry’s childhood. Born in Hawaii, she was a 3-year-old living in Pearl Harbor when the Japanese bombed it. Through research, she puts a human face to some of the men who served on the USS Arizona. After the war ends, her father, stationed in Japan, is able to have his family join him. We get snapshots of other young people living in or near Hiroshima as well. Told in verse, this unique experience in her life is capped with Thanks to NetGalley, I was able to read this poignant look back at Lois Lowry’s childhood. Born in Hawaii, she was a 3-year-old living in Pearl Harbor when the Japanese bombed it. Through research, she puts a human face to some of the men who served on the USS Arizona. After the war ends, her father, stationed in Japan, is able to have his family join him. We get snapshots of other young people living in or near Hiroshima as well. Told in verse, this unique experience in her life is capped with an author’s note reflecting on her proximity to these events and her unexpected meeting with a man (Allen Say) who had lived in the adjacent community to hers in Japan when they both received the top awards from ALA in 1994. A book from Lois Lowry is a gift.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Linda Wolfe

    I give very few books a rating of 10 (highest rating in my personal system), but this one would be an 11. You can’t read this book and not feel the horror and waste of war. A fitting tribute to those who died on the Arizona at Pearl Harbor and those who perished in Hiroshima. The red bicycle and the American brothers will tear at my heart forever. Author, Lois Lowry and Allen Say have visual contact as children in Japan after WWII, but do not actually meet or become friends until they are adults I give very few books a rating of 10 (highest rating in my personal system), but this one would be an 11. You can’t read this book and not feel the horror and waste of war. A fitting tribute to those who died on the Arizona at Pearl Harbor and those who perished in Hiroshima. The red bicycle and the American brothers will tear at my heart forever. Author, Lois Lowry and Allen Say have visual contact as children in Japan after WWII, but do not actually meet or become friends until they are adults. Spring releases seldom win the gold, but right now, this is my Newbery pick! Pair this book with GRANDFATHER’S JOURNEY by Allen Say.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    I received a digital ARC from Netgalley. On the Horizon is a look at the tragedies of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima, told through the personal lens of Lois Lowry who was born in Hawaii and lived in Japan as a child. Through verse she puts names and faces to a few of the victims of both terrible events. I am awed by Lowry's ability to evoke such a emotion with simple rhythms and phrases. The poetry is beautiful and I can't wait to get a finished copy to see the illustrations.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Park

    I was fortunate to read an ARC of this book. It was missing some of the final art but the story was very moving and poignant. It had additional meaning for me as my mother’s family lived in Honolulu at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The war affected so many people in so many different ways.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    ARC #PLA2020 This book is lovely and brings forth the stories of individuals that died or survived the attack on Pearl Harbor and the bombing of Hiroshima. It would be a great story to share that goes beyond the data and statistics of Hiroshima and Pearl Harbor. Very accessible for younger audiences. I look forward to seeing the final art of the published version.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I didn’t know anything about this book before I started listening to it from Libro.fm (side note: educators, you can get free audiobooks from them every month!), except that it was by Lois Lowry, and she’s wonderful. This is a heartbreaking mix of history and personal memoir about Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. It’s lovely and quick, told in short poems, read by the author.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan Morris

    What a hauntingly beautiful book. Lowry’s poems telling the story of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima, and her connections with them are amazing. I will definitely use this in the future with 5th graders, when we read The Secret Project and Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. I think I’ll be buying my own copy of this book. (Library)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jody

    Dear Lois Lowry, I have read several of your books (thank you), but this one has gone through me and is in me and I cried. I too have lived in Hawai'i and Japan. I too have visited Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima (and 4/10 Japanese internment camps). I too have wept in front of the blackened tricycle. Jody

  28. 4 out of 5

    Josephine

    This book in verse portrays in moving account the lives lost in two of WWII’s most infamous events: Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. Lois Lowry draws upon her personal account and her own memories as a child in Hawaii and Japan. It is obvious there has been a great deal of historical research, in this stunning book for young readers. The text combines humanity and war filled with pain, truth, and the importance of bridging cultural differences. The story is haunting, heartbreaking, as well as uplifti This book in verse portrays in moving account the lives lost in two of WWII’s most infamous events: Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. Lois Lowry draws upon her personal account and her own memories as a child in Hawaii and Japan. It is obvious there has been a great deal of historical research, in this stunning book for young readers. The text combines humanity and war filled with pain, truth, and the importance of bridging cultural differences. The story is haunting, heartbreaking, as well as uplifting, On the Horizon will remind listeners of the horrors and heroism in our past, as well as offer hope for our future.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kate Schwarz

    After reading a review of this short audiobook by Newbery winner Lois Lowry in the New York Times book review last week (May 2020), I was intrigued. It is only 40 minutes long, very much worth giving it a try. I wasn't sure of the scheme of poems that Lowry wrote and reads, but I trusted her... What I was sure of was how remarkable her childhood was--she was born in Honolulu before Pearl Harbor and realizes, when she's middle-aged, that she played on the beaches while the U.S.S. Arizona was prep After reading a review of this short audiobook by Newbery winner Lois Lowry in the New York Times book review last week (May 2020), I was intrigued. It is only 40 minutes long, very much worth giving it a try. I wasn't sure of the scheme of poems that Lowry wrote and reads, but I trusted her... What I was sure of was how remarkable her childhood was--she was born in Honolulu before Pearl Harbor and realizes, when she's middle-aged, that she played on the beaches while the U.S.S. Arizona was preparing for war. When she was 11, her family moved to Japan, just a few years after the atomic bombs were dropped. What a crazy, coincidental childhood--Lowry says in the afterward that it's taken her many scores to try to figure out how to make sense of it. In this book, in addition to paying homage to many of the soldiers who died in Pearl Harbor, she does.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Written mostly in verse, this nonfiction account of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima is excellent for middle grade social studies. It is also a cultural look at America, Hawaii, and Japan during World War II, and there is a brief look at battleships from the war. But mostly it is an examination and contemplation of lives lost in the war.

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