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Imprisoned on the planet Corellia, Han Solo finds himself at the mercy of his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo. Thracken plans to restore the Imperial system and seize total power -- no matter what the cost. Han has one chance to stop him. But to do so he must turn his back on his human cousin and join forces with a female alien. Dracmus was arrested as a ringleader in a plo Imprisoned on the planet Corellia, Han Solo finds himself at the mercy of his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo. Thracken plans to restore the Imperial system and seize total power -- no matter what the cost. Han has one chance to stop him. But to do so he must turn his back on his human cousin and join forces with a female alien. Dracmus was arrested as a ringleader in a plot against the corrupt Human League. Now she and Han will attempt a daring escape to Selonia in time to warn Leia, Luke Skywalker, and Lando of Thracken's plan. But can Han trust the alien to keep her word?Meanwhile other questions threaten the New Republic -- and the lives of millions. Who is behind the deadly Starbuster plot? Why is someone attempting to take possession of Corellia's powerful planetary repulsors? And what is the secret behind the mysterious Centerpoint Station, and ancient, artificial world o unknown origin that has suddenly -- and inexplicably -- come alive?


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Imprisoned on the planet Corellia, Han Solo finds himself at the mercy of his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo. Thracken plans to restore the Imperial system and seize total power -- no matter what the cost. Han has one chance to stop him. But to do so he must turn his back on his human cousin and join forces with a female alien. Dracmus was arrested as a ringleader in a plo Imprisoned on the planet Corellia, Han Solo finds himself at the mercy of his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo. Thracken plans to restore the Imperial system and seize total power -- no matter what the cost. Han has one chance to stop him. But to do so he must turn his back on his human cousin and join forces with a female alien. Dracmus was arrested as a ringleader in a plot against the corrupt Human League. Now she and Han will attempt a daring escape to Selonia in time to warn Leia, Luke Skywalker, and Lando of Thracken's plan. But can Han trust the alien to keep her word?Meanwhile other questions threaten the New Republic -- and the lives of millions. Who is behind the deadly Starbuster plot? Why is someone attempting to take possession of Corellia's powerful planetary repulsors? And what is the secret behind the mysterious Centerpoint Station, and ancient, artificial world o unknown origin that has suddenly -- and inexplicably -- come alive?

30 review for Assault at Selonia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    An engaging story, likable heroes, a despicable villain, interstellar dogfights, multiple plots...this is true Star Wars. I especially enjoyed the appearance by Mara Jade; I've read the later novels more than once, so, I know her future role, but she has always been one of my favorite Expanded Universe characters. It's a shame we'll never see this or any of the other books on the big screen; this is loads better than what Disney saddled us with in The Last Jedi. An engaging story, likable heroes, a despicable villain, interstellar dogfights, multiple plots...this is true Star Wars. I especially enjoyed the appearance by Mara Jade; I've read the later novels more than once, so, I know her future role, but she has always been one of my favorite Expanded Universe characters. It's a shame we'll never see this or any of the other books on the big screen; this is loads better than what Disney saddled us with in The Last Jedi.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    "Assault at Selonia" is the second book in Roger Macbride Allen's Corellian Trilogy, and---as is usual for the second book in most trilogies---the momentum unfortunately slows down in this one. Han has been captured by the terrorist group known as the Human League, led by his long-lost cousin, Thrackan, a former Imperial officer thought to have died years ago. Thrown into a jail cell with an alien named Dracmus, Han plans a daring escape in order to find his wife and children. Leia has teamed up "Assault at Selonia" is the second book in Roger Macbride Allen's Corellian Trilogy, and---as is usual for the second book in most trilogies---the momentum unfortunately slows down in this one. Han has been captured by the terrorist group known as the Human League, led by his long-lost cousin, Thrackan, a former Imperial officer thought to have died years ago. Thrown into a jail cell with an alien named Dracmus, Han plans a daring escape in order to find his wife and children. Leia has teamed up with Mara Jade, reluctantly. Leia suspects that Mara may have been involved in the revolts happening throughout the Corellian Sector. On the planet Drall, the Solo children---Jaina, Jacen, and Annakin---are safely being looked after by Chewbacca, their Drallian tutor, Ebrahim, and Ebrahim's robot Q9-X2. Archaeological digs on several planets in the sector have revealed ancient spacecraft left there by an unknown ancient race. These spacecraft are most likely responsible for the interdiction field that has appeared in the sector, making hyper drive impossible. New Republic Intelligence (NRI) also suspects that this alien intelligence may be what's causing the racial tension and ethnic cleansing revolts on the five planets within the sector. Meanwhile, Luke and Lando, who barely made it out of the sector, has recruited the Bakuran fleet, and Luke is reunited with an old flame (see Kathy Tyers's "Truce at Bakura"). Allen's second book in the series is still enjoyable, despite being mostly exposition. What it lacks in terms of action, though, it more than makes up for in build-up for an exciting third installment.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    The Corellian system is still in an uproar as human, Drall and Selonian all maneuver themselves to secede from the New Republic and attempt to kick out all the other aliens. Han, Leia, Mara, Chewie, and the kids are all stuck in this mess, all in different corners (Han is with his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo, Leia and Mara are held hostage in Coronet house and Chewie and the kids are on Drall with Ebrihim's aunt). Meanwhile, Luke and Lando head off to Bakura to try to gather a fleet. NOTE: I r The Corellian system is still in an uproar as human, Drall and Selonian all maneuver themselves to secede from the New Republic and attempt to kick out all the other aliens. Han, Leia, Mara, Chewie, and the kids are all stuck in this mess, all in different corners (Han is with his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo, Leia and Mara are held hostage in Coronet house and Chewie and the kids are on Drall with Ebrihim's aunt). Meanwhile, Luke and Lando head off to Bakura to try to gather a fleet. NOTE: I read this many years ago and recently listened to it on audiobook. I Liked: Roger Macbride Allen continues to show he is more than an adequate Star Wars author. The second entry into his Corellian trilogy expands upon the idea set forth in book one. Allen introduces new memorable characters and combines them with older ones. Mara Jade has been mostly absent from EU of this time, and Allen makes the good choice to bring her back. As he did in the previous book, he writes her well (I will go out on a limb and say that Zahn would probably approve of the way Allen wrote her). Also, Allen brings back one-time love interest Gaeriel Captison (I will go out on another limb and say that Tyers would be pleased with how he wrote her). This was an excellent, excellent decision. Not only do we get to see that she did move on, have a family (something that most of the cast seems to be avoiding--yes, I am looking at you, Luke!), but we also get some nice tension between her and Luke. Of all the love interests Luke has had (and not married), this one is the one that is most interesting, most alive, and with whom he has the most chemistry. Han is well done, as is his evil cousin, Thracken (always neat to see more of Han's past). Leia is great, Luke is finally not a bumbling moron, Lando is decent (he's a hard one to get right, I've noticed), Chewie is good, the kids are really interesting, and I adore Ebrihim and his aunt (one of the only times I've ever laughed in delight when reading a Star Wars book!). Lando's wife-hunting plot is wrapped up, which I think was a good thing overall, since it distracted from the main story. However, Tendra Risant does continue to play a part and I really like where she is going (I had liked how she and Lando hooked up in the past, and now I remember why!). Chewie is able to take the kids, Ebrihim, and his droid to Drall, where they meet his aunt and try to find a hidden artifact (and determine what the heck it is). I couldn't help but be intrigued by this, not only because I liked Ebrihim, but also because Allen writes the kids superbly and I enjoy a little "Indiana Jones" adventure (and here, unlike with Lando in Black Fleet Crisis, it makes sense and moves the plot). I already mention how Lando and Luke return to Bakura and meet Gaeriel, to win ships to deal with the Corellian issue. Leia and Mara get to escape Coronet House, which is a really intense scene. I also liked how Leia and Han suspected Mara of bringing them into a trap (though it did get old after awhile). I know the system wide jamming and the system wide interdiction fields were kinda hokey, but for me, they worked. Allen didn't try to overexplain or use funky physics to handwave this plot device. Plus, I think it was cool that, in a sense, our team is forced to use "old techniques", i.e. "Morse" code and time-consuming space travel. All too often, our heroes are able to whip from system to system in a blink of an eye. I Didn't Like: I really feel with this second novel that a lot of incidents were put in just so it would fill pages. Some of the unnecessary events include Han fighting Drachmas (yes, I know that's how he meets her, but still, their fight felt tacked on), Luke and Lando fighting their way through Coruscant beasts to meet Mon Mothma (this is just pure filler, there is no reason to include it whatsoever), and all the repetition of the events of last book. I know Allen is trying to bring newcomers up to speed, but honestly, if the book is two in a series, you were already warned. While Thracken Sal-Solo was kinda cool in how he was related to Han, he almost felt too obviously the villain. He was a drunkard, he had been in the Empire, he was power-hungry...all feels like a stereotypical villain to me. Not to mention, it is almost a bit extreme to make him Han's evil twin. I guess what I disliked the most was how the excitement and energy from the first novel almost seemed to disappear. Dialogue/Sexual Situations/Violence: D*** and h***. Gaeriel and Luke experience sexual tension. Han and Drachmas are forced to fight for Thracken. Chewie and the kids get shot at when they first land on Drall. Leia and Mara must elude their captors. Overall: While I enjoyed this and even laughed in a few places, I still found this book a little dull and lackluster. I can't quite pinpoint why, and I'm not sure what was missing, but this book just wasn't as good as the first. However, that doesn't mean this book is bad. It is a solid follow-up to the first book (much better than most EU novels) and definitely leads well into book three, leaving me more than a little interested to see how it ends.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Meggie

    For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the second book in the Corellian trilogy, Assault at Selonia by Roger MacBride Allen. SOME HISTORY: After the release of Children of the Jedi in spring 1995, Bantam jumped back to Allen’s Corellian trilogy with Assault at Selonia. The title, though, is a little perplexing For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the second book in the Corellian trilogy, Assault at Selonia by Roger MacBride Allen. SOME HISTORY: After the release of Children of the Jedi in spring 1995, Bantam jumped back to Allen’s Corellian trilogy with Assault at Selonia. The title, though, is a little perplexing--no one gets to Selonia until the very end, and it’s not much of an assault. I suppose when you want all your titles to feature an action word + a Corellian place, you’re limited in selection. Assault at Selonia made it to number nine on the New York Times paperback bestseller list for the week of July 2, 1995, and was on the NYT list for four weeks. MY RECOLLECTION OF THE BOOK: I didn’t remember a lot of what happened in this book, but to be fair: not a lot does happen here. If the first book was an awful lot of plot setup, this second book continued the trend of being chock full of filler. PRINCESS LEIA COSTUME CHANGE COUNT: Nothing. I presume that Leia’s wearing a jumpsuit or something, but since she spends most of the time locked up or escaping, there’s not really any opportunities for fancy dress or complicated hairstyles. A BRIEF SUMMARY: Princess Leia, Mara Jade, and Han Solo are all trying to escape from imprisonment at the hands of the Human League. Chewbacca and the Solo children head to Drall and make a startling discovery. And Belindi Kalenda meets up with Luke Skywalker and Lando, and they all head to Bakura in hopes of organizing a fleet to send to the Corellian system. THE CHARACTERS: Leia is the most interesting character here, mostly because she has the most exciting plot line. Her escape from Corona House was legitimately thrilling to read--it’s a pity, then, that after Mara Jade and she escape in the Jade’s Fire, they don’t really have anything to do. I appreciate when Leia’s given action scenes, because usually she’s banished to the more boring political plot threads. Han’s a little grumbly here, and his escape is not as thrilling as Leia’s. He’s constantly asking Dracmus questions about where they’re going, and who’s in charge, and complaining about having to crawl in the tunnels. Shut up Han! I had to appreciate that while Han was completely distrustful of Mara Jade, Leia didn’t really have any issues with her. She’s not in league with the bad guys, Han! She hates the Empire now! Lando doesn’t have much to do in this book, so Luke comes into the forefront here. I liked that he met Gaeriel Captison again, and she had moved on--she got married, she had a child, she became Prime Minister, she lost her husband. They behave like grown ups in their encounter, and acknowledge that while he really liked her years ago, it wouldn’t have worked out and they’re at different places in their life. After having loads to do in Ambush at Corellia, Belindi Kalenda is just along for the ride here. Hopefully she’ll have a more prominent role in the third book. Tendra doesn’t have much to do either. She heads out in her ship, trying to alert Lando about the fleet massing on Sacorria. And that’s it. She flies, and sends messages to Lando, and flies, and sends messages to Lando. At the end she finally gets a message back! She just seems stuck in limbo. Chewbacca and the Solo children make it to Drall, and are taken in by Ebrihim’s Aunt Marcha. They discover another underground chamber like on Corellia. And that’s it for them. Wedge has a short POV section in the last chapter, to remind us of the Starbuster threat (I hate that name), and there’s a throwaway line about how he’s so glad to be flying again after doing everything but. I did not understand Wedge’s job(s) in the Jedi Academy trilogy, so that definitely made me laugh. ISSUES: It’s unclear, at this point, who exactly are the true bad guys here. Thrackan is a puppet or a figurehead, making threats that he can’t back up. I’m assuming that the true villains are the Triad from Sacorria, but there’s been no confirmation of that yet. Han told the children in the first book that there was a legend that the Corellian system was created by unknown people, each planet moved into place. That legend is confirmed as fact during the Solo children’s time on Drall, when they discover that the secret underground room is actually a planet-sized repulsor! All the planets of the Corellian system were moved into place! The repulsors can also be used as weapons, and Selonia’s repulsor is used to destroy one of the Bakuran ships! That sounds like something from a Marvel comic, but OK. The Starbuster plot continues to loom over everything, even if I felt like our characters had sort of forgotten about it until the second star blew up. (I thought Star Crusher was a bad name, but Starbuster is far worse.) The back cover blurb is also pretty inaccurate for the story as it’s presented, but that’s a minor issue. Most egregious: like the first book, there’s just not an awful lot going on in Assault at Selonia. Most of the book feels like setup, or Allen maneuvering everyone into the proper position for the conclusion. Han and Leia separately escape from prison, then get off planet, then….slowly start heading for Selonia. Luke and co. travel to Bakura, talk the Bakurans into providing a fleet, and then don’t arrive until the end. The Solo children find the planet-sized repulsor on Drall, then camp out. Having now read Ambush and Assault, I agree that these could have been merged into one book. I mean, if Han is crawling through a tunnel for more than one chapter, that is entirely too many tunnel-crawling chapters. IN CONCLUSION: Is Assault at Selonia exciting? Only in parts. Is it essential? Meh. At this point, I’m hoping that Showdown at Centerpoint is hugely thrilling and action-filled, because I’ve had to wade through a lot of filler in the first two books. Next up: the first of the short story collections, Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina, edited by Kevin J. Anderson. My YouTube review: https://youtu.be/ZmGPTow7Qd0

  5. 5 out of 5

    Colin McEvoy

    Meh. I'm really just not feeling this trilogy. Assault at Selonia wasn't terrible, and I've certainly read worse Star Wars novels, but it mostly failed to keep my interest, and at times I found it difficult to motivate myself to finish it. I felt the first book, Ambush at Corellia, was largely lacking in action and mostly focused on setting the scenes for future books, which, while not great, is at least understandable given that it's the first book in a trilogy. But i found Assault at Selonia t Meh. I'm really just not feeling this trilogy. Assault at Selonia wasn't terrible, and I've certainly read worse Star Wars novels, but it mostly failed to keep my interest, and at times I found it difficult to motivate myself to finish it. I felt the first book, Ambush at Corellia, was largely lacking in action and mostly focused on setting the scenes for future books, which, while not great, is at least understandable given that it's the first book in a trilogy. But i found Assault at Selonia to be more of the same, and, much like the first book, things didn't really pick up until near the end. (In fact, the final chapter might be my favorite.) I suspect if this was a two-book series, rather than a trilogy, it might be tighter and better paced, and therefore more enjoyable. As it stands, I'd say only die-hard Star Wars nerds (like me) and completionists who want to read all the books (again, like me) need to bother with these. But, that being, I'll obviously read the next and final entry, Showdown at Centerpoint, and hope for the best.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    I am going to say a 3 star for now and I guess it depends how the other books turn out if I give it a higher rating... It wasn't bad, but it wasn't great. Basically Han and Leia take their 3 kids to Han's home planet for a "vacation" and then there is this trade show afterwards. Well there might be danger there, but Han is like let's bring the kids, no problem... Right at the end the danger is revealed about a Civil War that is happening. We will see how good that storyline turns out... The other I am going to say a 3 star for now and I guess it depends how the other books turn out if I give it a higher rating... It wasn't bad, but it wasn't great. Basically Han and Leia take their 3 kids to Han's home planet for a "vacation" and then there is this trade show afterwards. Well there might be danger there, but Han is like let's bring the kids, no problem... Right at the end the danger is revealed about a Civil War that is happening. We will see how good that storyline turns out... The other story is with Lando looking for a wife to marry for her money and bring Luke along... Sort of weird that Lando is trying to marry for money. I mean I can see it, but not really. Or at least he should be too old trying to do that. But it comes full circle as they just happen to be going to where Han and Leia are because of the trade show... Sort of a waste of writing about nothing...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    The Corellian system is interdicted and the New Republic struggles to lend assistance in Star Wars: Assault at Selonia. The story begins with Han Solo a prisoner of his demented look-alike cousin, Thrackan Sal-Solo who spends the most of his time acting as a caricature of various villain archetypes with lots of wicked grins and "I'm asking the questions, here" sort of moments. He makes him fight a Selonian by the name of Dracmus for his amusement. Further on he makes a drunken visit to Han's cell The Corellian system is interdicted and the New Republic struggles to lend assistance in Star Wars: Assault at Selonia. The story begins with Han Solo a prisoner of his demented look-alike cousin, Thrackan Sal-Solo who spends the most of his time acting as a caricature of various villain archetypes with lots of wicked grins and "I'm asking the questions, here" sort of moments. He makes him fight a Selonian by the name of Dracmus for his amusement. Further on he makes a drunken visit to Han's cell to spout some exposition and that's the last of his notable scenes in the entire novel. Seems a little limp for someone who headed a human revolt across the entire Corellian system, hmm? Meanwhile, Luke and Lando make it back to Coruscant to inform the New Republic of the interdiction field only to be called into a meeting where they learn that all communication has been lost with the entire Corellian system. It feels slightly irrelevant given we as the reader already know everything we need to know between the Han, Luke & Lando, and Belindi Kalenda plot threads and seems like extra padding in an already stretched book. As an aside, the meeting takes place deep underground on Coruscant with a short scene involving deranged corridor ghouls attacking our heroes on the way to the meeting. The New Republic agent escorting them gives the laughable reason that they're around for security reasons due to their deadliness even though they can't be controlled. It adds some fun lore to Coruscant's planet but it's ridiculously stupid action for the sake of action and continues to serve page count padding. Belindi Kalenda and Tendra Rissant serve a similar existence in this novel - that is: nothing. Tendra spends the entire story wondering where Lando went and Kalenda simply stands around and is present to be present. Luke is sent off to find an old flame - Gariel Captison - who was last seen in Kathy Tyers' Truce at Bakura. The reason is to use her Bakuran fleet to help invade the Corellian system because apparently the New Republic can't scramble enough forces in either enough time or because they simply don't have enough forces to commit, yet they admit to the fact that the Corellian insurrection is serious enough that it could turn over the entire New Republic, even though it's also been shown that they're all general pirates and scum. I'm all for reusing characters past but it's extraordinarily contrived and the way Luke still feels for her after over a decade of not even seeing her feels far too implausible to believe. Luke and Gariel also swoon over each other over her husband's grave, which isn't the least bit awkward, by the way. She agrees and off they go to Corellia with Lando. Dracmus is made Han's cellmate where they put together incredible leaps of logic that Mara Jade must be a secret player in the whole scheme given she was the one who delivered the message in the novel previous and simply vanished there after, even though she's proven herself trustworthy in the past more than once. They assume that since she's ex-Emperor's Hand, she must want to restore the Empire. It's just evidence to the fact that Timonthy Zahn is the really the only one who should be handling his own characters in legends continuity. Selonian rebels arrive soon after to break the two free. Leia and Mara team up to escape Corellia but first they have to retrieve Mara's slave circuit relay to call her ship (what happened to her crew as displayed in the former book?) and do a whole lot of crafty sneaking and hiding as they ascend Corona house to grab it. The author seems to forget, though, that Mara and Leia are both force sensitive and neither employ their powers against the scruffy and overpowerable guards. He DOESN'T forget, however, that Leia can wield a lightsaber in a moment where she lops a man's head off, which is admittedly pretty badass. They board the Jade's Fire and flee. Chewie, the Solo children and Ebrihim meet up with Ebrihim's aunt in bits and pieces across the novel that surmise to them discovering that the archaeological dig was for a massive repulsor device, an item that two Selonian political factions - one who wants to work with the New Republic, the other against - have been after and there are allegedly more across the system. However, the reason behind its threat is very poorly explained and feels empty, much like the breadth of this novel. Leia reunites with Han as Luke uses the Bakuran fleet to do an odd sort of continuous stop-and-start hyperspace maneuver through the interdicted Corellia system - what's the point of the interdiction field, then? It's also shown that Centerpoint Station is larger than the Death Star even though somehow Han had never seen a space station that large as according to A New Hope and given that Corellia is his home system, which he spends the opening of the previous novel boasting about, it's very strange. The trilogy has a large problem so far of taking characters and doing what it wants with them, cherry picking what past history and actions ought to be remembered and that problem is especially apparent here. Assault at Selonia suffers from a common thread connecting all the middle books of the Bantam era trilogies: being bloated, extraneous, and ultimately able to be encapsulated in half the page count. The majority of the trilogies I've read in the past ought to have been duologies and it's no different here. However, it's still not the worst legends novel I've read and despite its painfully droll pace and thin spread plot, I'm still interested in learning how the entire thing wraps up. Two and a half Nannariums out of five

  8. 4 out of 5

    B. Reese

    I recall really liking this series. Probably the last good trilogy I recall reading in the 90's. This book is a good setup for what follows and introduces the mysterious Corellian star system. Adventure. Excitement. A Jedi may not crave these things, but a reader sure does, and this book/trilogy delivers. I recall really liking this series. Probably the last good trilogy I recall reading in the 90's. This book is a good setup for what follows and introduces the mysterious Corellian star system. Adventure. Excitement. A Jedi may not crave these things, but a reader sure does, and this book/trilogy delivers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Lots of action, but little progress--like the middle books of many trilogies. Squeezed twenty pages of plot into 300 pages. Oh, it's well written and all that; it just didn't say much. In fact, a reader could probably skip this book and not miss much. Lots of action, but little progress--like the middle books of many trilogies. Squeezed twenty pages of plot into 300 pages. Oh, it's well written and all that; it just didn't say much. In fact, a reader could probably skip this book and not miss much.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Dillinger

    Still a great story, good intrigue towards the end of how will things unfold. Looking forward to book 3.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dominic

    Like i said, don't mess with han solo. Like i said, don't mess with han solo.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    The Star Wars Expanded Universe books (rebranded as the Legends imprint when Disney bought the franchise) are extremely inconsistent in quality, as is true of most tie-in novels. Some are excellent, and others are pretty mediocre. The Legacy of the Force series of books (nine progressive novels that focus primarily on the Solo and Skywalker children as they become adults) is a wonderful series. Well-written, well-plotted, with power and heartbreak warring with courage and strength. But while rea The Star Wars Expanded Universe books (rebranded as the Legends imprint when Disney bought the franchise) are extremely inconsistent in quality, as is true of most tie-in novels. Some are excellent, and others are pretty mediocre. The Legacy of the Force series of books (nine progressive novels that focus primarily on the Solo and Skywalker children as they become adults) is a wonderful series. Well-written, well-plotted, with power and heartbreak warring with courage and strength. But while reading those novels I discovered that events in the characters’ lives when they were young children were consistently referenced, and I didn’t really understand some of it. So after I finished the series I determined to go back and read the novels with those events. The first one I picked up was Ambush at Corellia, the first book in The Corellian Trilogy. I picked that one because, honestly, I have a soft spot for Corellia, and, well, apparently, men with marginal ethics. More importantly, several events and places in the trilogy were important in Legacy of the Force, and chronologically this series was early in the children’s lives. Remember what I said about some Star Wars novels being excellent and some being mediocre? The Corellian Trilogy (assuming the third volume is consistent with the first two) is, if not mediocre, at the very least inferior. Now, according to the receipt in the book, I bought volume 2 in 2010, which means I read the first volume at least 10 years ago. That said, I really think this volume isn’t as good as the first, and the first wasn’t all that great. The problem is the author just has too many balls in the air, and isn’t a particularly adroit juggler. To his credit, he doesn’t drop any of the balls, plates, knives, or flaming torches--but nonetheless his performance is awkward, inconsistent, and incongruent. I’m going to read the last book because it focuses on events that connect to crucial areas for Legacy of the Force, and I want to understand things (and, frankly, I want to spend time with the three Solo children before their lives go completely to hell in the Yuuzhan Vong stories—which will be the next ones I read). But, honestly, I’m approaching volume 3 sort of like studying geometry—I have to understand it so I can understand the trigonometry I really want to learn. I don’t have to like it—just do it. I guess some books really are only good because of the information they contain--that's certainly the only thing good about this one.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kim Boulware

    Love the escape, and this is by far my favorite post Battle of Endor series. It would make a great movie. Han, Leia and their kids travel to his home world during civil unrest and the adventure begins including all the cast of Star Wars favorites and a planet destroying weapon. (view spoiler)[ Imprisoned on the planet Corellia, Han Solo finds himself at the mercy of his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo. Thracken plans to restore the Imperial system and seize total power -- no matter what the cost. Love the escape, and this is by far my favorite post Battle of Endor series. It would make a great movie. Han, Leia and their kids travel to his home world during civil unrest and the adventure begins including all the cast of Star Wars favorites and a planet destroying weapon. (view spoiler)[ Imprisoned on the planet Corellia, Han Solo finds himself at the mercy of his evil cousin, Thracken Sal-Solo. Thracken plans to restore the Imperial system and seize total power -- no matter what the cost. Han has one chance to stop him. But to do so he must turn his back on his human cousin and join forces with a female alien. Dracmus was arrested as a ringleader in a plot against the corrupt Human League. Now she and Han will attempt a daring escape to Selonia in time to warn Leia, Luke Skywalker, and Lando of Thracken's plan. But can Han trust the alien to keep her word? Who is behind the deadly Starbuster plot, Corellia's powerful planetary repulsors? And what is the secret behind the mysterious Centerpoint Station, and ancient, artificial world of unknown origin that has suddenly -- and inexplicably -- come alive? (hide spoiler)]

  14. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    This one seems to have a bit of middle book syndrome as most of the plot seems to serve to get us to the final book. And things are getting serious so it’s not as funny as the first book. Plus, Han’s (and to a lesser extent, Leia’s) attitude towards Mara/reluctance to trust her was more prominent and more annoying in this book. I mean seriously, they were willing to vouch for her after she saved the twins and Leia straight up told her *she* didn’t want to kill Luke. Which she really didn’t after This one seems to have a bit of middle book syndrome as most of the plot seems to serve to get us to the final book. And things are getting serious so it’s not as funny as the first book. Plus, Han’s (and to a lesser extent, Leia’s) attitude towards Mara/reluctance to trust her was more prominent and more annoying in this book. I mean seriously, they were willing to vouch for her after she saved the twins and Leia straight up told her *she* didn’t want to kill Luke. Which she really didn’t after Myrkr. It was Palpatine’s Force compulsion and she kept coming up with excuse after excuse why it was better to do it later. It’s like Allen didn’t even read The Last Command. That aside, it was an enjoyable book, and I’m looking forward to the conclusion and more time with the Skywalker/Solo family.

  15. 4 out of 5

    rey

    It was...alright? I didn't hate it but I didn't love it THAT much but it was still enjoyable. The curse of second books, this one too had a hard time keeping the hype from the first one and moving it to the next one. Though it was nice, the plot felt flat and I kept waiting "when will the action actually start?". But I'm still excited about the third book since the last books are usually the most fun and action ones. I love the story of the trilogy in general and I hope it won't be a waste. It i It was...alright? I didn't hate it but I didn't love it THAT much but it was still enjoyable. The curse of second books, this one too had a hard time keeping the hype from the first one and moving it to the next one. Though it was nice, the plot felt flat and I kept waiting "when will the action actually start?". But I'm still excited about the third book since the last books are usually the most fun and action ones. I love the story of the trilogy in general and I hope it won't be a waste. It is going good, it just needs to get more alive.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven Strothman

    I found this book more entertaining than the first book in this particular trilogy. It was fast paced with a great plot line that tied together multiple books written in the now no longer current Star Wars universe. I enjoyed the connection among the different and varied characters. This book gave me more desire to finish the this trilogy than I had after reading the first book in this series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Greg Allbee

    Overall, an interesting continuation of the Corellian Trilogy. I did think there was a section in the middle that really dragged and I lost interest. I put the book down for probably a month or more, but finally picked it back up and pushed through. The last third or quarter of the book moves along and things start to happen again. The section with Han going through Selonian tunnels, and other people slowly making their way through space seemed like nothing was happening for too long.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    I don't mean to sound like a broken record, but once again I am not sure why you would need three books to tell this tale. Every major character made very little progress in this story, to the point where I'm not sure what happened on all of these pages. My bright spot... the very last chapter was well written and interesting. Too bad the rest wasn't the same. I don't mean to sound like a broken record, but once again I am not sure why you would need three books to tell this tale. Every major character made very little progress in this story, to the point where I'm not sure what happened on all of these pages. My bright spot... the very last chapter was well written and interesting. Too bad the rest wasn't the same.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jay Wright

    I am actually surprised that I liked the book. We are more than a decade past the Return of the Jedi. Han and Leia have three children. Han, Leia, Luke (with Lando) and the children are in four different locations. Each is on an adventure of their own coming together in the end. I started this i with the middle book and I don't think you need to start at the beginning. Surprisingly enjoyable. I am actually surprised that I liked the book. We are more than a decade past the Return of the Jedi. Han and Leia have three children. Han, Leia, Luke (with Lando) and the children are in four different locations. Each is on an adventure of their own coming together in the end. I started this i with the middle book and I don't think you need to start at the beginning. Surprisingly enjoyable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexandr Iscenco

    Quite a good continuation of the Corellian Trilogy. The second part sheds more light on the origins of the crisis in the Corellian system, while still maintaining the suspense regarding who stands behind the star-buster plot.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sam Hval

    There are a lot of great moments, but this one tends to drag a bit (as expected with a second book in a trilogy). It's mostly build up and exposition for the next book, but the ending is great and the final pages are earned and exciting. There are a lot of great moments, but this one tends to drag a bit (as expected with a second book in a trilogy). It's mostly build up and exposition for the next book, but the ending is great and the final pages are earned and exciting.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

    I would give it 3.5 stars. Don't know what goodreads is waiting for to allow half stars. Better than the first. Great ending. The only question I am asking myself is why Leia has a red lightsaber and why Luke made her a red lightsaber. Now...on to the 3rd book... I would give it 3.5 stars. Don't know what goodreads is waiting for to allow half stars. Better than the first. Great ending. The only question I am asking myself is why Leia has a red lightsaber and why Luke made her a red lightsaber. Now...on to the 3rd book...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bennett Moody

    3.5/5 I’m really enjoying this trilogy so far. The characters are great and well developed. Definitely hope there is more development of Thracken in the final book though. Looking forward to finishing this trilogy soon!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    starting to get hooked on this trilogy, this is a good read

  25. 4 out of 5

    Myke Edwards

    I guess I just hated leaving a series unread. I was 14 and hungry for anything Star Wars. Shrug.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Doug Murphy

    The middle book of an overly complex, convoluted trilogy that didn’t age well involving the big names of Star Wars facing trouble in Han’s home world system.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Case

    Interesting developments in this installment.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Pelto

    Usual disclaimer, 3 stars for a Star Wars book, not a deep read. It is ok. Lots of copy editing errors and printing flaws. Not really exciting, but has some harder scifi than other SW books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    ShanDizzy

    This is book 2 in the Corellian trilogy and it is moving along with lots of action and intrigue. I like the periphery characters too.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Murphy

    the story moved along. better than i expected. now to the final.

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