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Sophia Chang’s debut memoir The Baddest Bitch in the Room is an inspiring story about her life as the first Asian woman in hip-hop, working with such acts as The Wu-Tang Clan and A Tribe Called Quest. The book spans her career in the music business, her path to becoming an entrepreneur, and her candid accounts of marriage, motherhood, aging, desire, marginalization, and Sophia Chang’s debut memoir The Baddest Bitch in the Room is an inspiring story about her life as the first Asian woman in hip-hop, working with such acts as The Wu-Tang Clan and A Tribe Called Quest. The book spans her career in the music business, her path to becoming an entrepreneur, and her candid accounts of marriage, motherhood, aging, desire, marginalization, and martial arts. Fearless and unpredictable, Sophia Chang prevailed in a male-dominated music industry to manage the biggest names in hip-hop and R&B. The daughter of Korean immigrants in predominantly white suburban Vancouver, Chang left for New York City, and soon became a powerful voice in music boardrooms at such record companies as Atlantic, Jive, and Universal Music Group. As an A&R rep, Chang met a Staten Island rapper named Prince Rakeem, now known as the RZA, founder of the Wu-Tang Clan, the most revered and influential rap group in hip-hop history. That union would send her on a transformational odyssey, leading her to a Shaolin monk who would become her partner, an enduring kung fu practice, two children, and a reckoning with what type woman she ultimately wanted to be. For decades, Chang helped remarkably talented men tell their stories. Now, with The Baddest Bitch In The Room, she is ready to tell her own story of marriage, motherhood, aging, desire, marginalization, and martial arts. This is an inspirational debut memoir by a woman of color who has had the audacity to be bold in the pursuit of her passions, despite what anyone—family, society, the dominant culture—have prescribed.


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Sophia Chang’s debut memoir The Baddest Bitch in the Room is an inspiring story about her life as the first Asian woman in hip-hop, working with such acts as The Wu-Tang Clan and A Tribe Called Quest. The book spans her career in the music business, her path to becoming an entrepreneur, and her candid accounts of marriage, motherhood, aging, desire, marginalization, and Sophia Chang’s debut memoir The Baddest Bitch in the Room is an inspiring story about her life as the first Asian woman in hip-hop, working with such acts as The Wu-Tang Clan and A Tribe Called Quest. The book spans her career in the music business, her path to becoming an entrepreneur, and her candid accounts of marriage, motherhood, aging, desire, marginalization, and martial arts. Fearless and unpredictable, Sophia Chang prevailed in a male-dominated music industry to manage the biggest names in hip-hop and R&B. The daughter of Korean immigrants in predominantly white suburban Vancouver, Chang left for New York City, and soon became a powerful voice in music boardrooms at such record companies as Atlantic, Jive, and Universal Music Group. As an A&R rep, Chang met a Staten Island rapper named Prince Rakeem, now known as the RZA, founder of the Wu-Tang Clan, the most revered and influential rap group in hip-hop history. That union would send her on a transformational odyssey, leading her to a Shaolin monk who would become her partner, an enduring kung fu practice, two children, and a reckoning with what type woman she ultimately wanted to be. For decades, Chang helped remarkably talented men tell their stories. Now, with The Baddest Bitch In The Room, she is ready to tell her own story of marriage, motherhood, aging, desire, marginalization, and martial arts. This is an inspirational debut memoir by a woman of color who has had the audacity to be bold in the pursuit of her passions, despite what anyone—family, society, the dominant culture—have prescribed.

30 review for The Baddest Bitch in the Room: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest When I first saw the title of this memoir, I thought it was one of those self-help books geared towards making women feel more confident and enabling their inner #girlboss. THE BADDEST is not that book-- although honestly, reading this book was about a thousand times more valuable and inspiring than the few self-help books that I've tried to read. The woman striking the power pose on the cover who looks like she could be a model for Fashi Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest When I first saw the title of this memoir, I thought it was one of those self-help books geared towards making women feel more confident and enabling their inner #girlboss. THE BADDEST is not that book-- although honestly, reading this book was about a thousand times more valuable and inspiring than the few self-help books that I've tried to read. The woman striking the power pose on the cover who looks like she could be a model for Fashion Nova is Sophia Chang, considered to be the first Asian woman in hip-hop. She managed a lot of very famous and influential artists who were keystones of the 80s and 90s hip-hop scene, including the Wu-Tang clan guys. On one level, this is a career retrospective, but it's also a fascinating memoir of motherhood, family, friendship, overcoming adversity, and embracing the things that you love. I feel like some people are going to be put off by this memoir because Sophia Chang doesn't fit into the box that is labeled (in feminine script, of course *eye roll*) "acceptable woman behavior." She is crass at times, outspoken at others; she is confident and completely unapologetic, and embraces her sexuality in a way that I couldn't help but admire. Honestly, though, I feel like the people who are put off by those things should probably read this anyway, because an important tenet of feminism-- and basic human respect, actually-- is respecting others for the choices they make, even if they aren't necessarily the ones you would make-- as long as they don't cause any harm. Women need to be allowed to take risks and make the mistakes that men do in their pursuit of happiness. As long as we condemn one group and not the other for making those same decisions, our society will never be equal. She has a great chapter in here about how so many people are quick to judge a woman for having too many partners, and yet nobody thinks badly of a man for doing so. I loved that, and it's just one example of how Chang doesn't allow herself to be bound to what's expected. My favorite chapter in the beginning had to be about her family's escape from North Korea. It was so harrowing and intense, and provided a wonderful showcase for the quality of the writing in this book. Chang is an excellent story-teller, and the passages of her growing up with her family within that cultural context shaped in the beginning and throughout the book were so fascinating and pleasurable to read. She writes about how her heritage shaped her upbringing but didn't let it determine the choices she wanted for herself, and how her parents tried to be supportive to the best of their ability. I also really enjoyed the portions about music. Even though hip-hop isn't a genre of music I listen to, the way she describes how a powerful love for a song or genre can just take over you is relatable to any music lover. She also isn't afraid to throw shade. I've complained that too many celebrity memoirs are afraid to be mean, and end up sounding like acceptance speeches. Chang has ringing accolades for the people who stand in her corner, but she also isn't afraid to name drop the people who did her dirty, and I admired that, because it made the memoir feel more authentic, more real. There's so much more that happens in this book-- the struggles of balancing motherhood with a career, the Shaolin monk who fathered her children, the way she hung out with the members of Wu-Tang like they were a squad of superheroes chilling at HQ, being a part of such a game-changing music scene right when it happened, and palling around with one of the Ramones... there was a lot. She says at the end that she wasn't sure if she wanted to write a book and was basically forced into it by people demanding her story, and I can see why. She doesn't have to try very hard to sound interesting because she is interesting, and she's a great writer, too. Even if you don't like hip-hop music, you should read THE BADDEST. It's really, really good. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!  4 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carey Renee

    “…hoping the whole way that he would chase me…but he wasn’t that man and this wasn’t a rom com….i got into bed and in a fit of sadness and frustration, reached out to all the boys I’d been ignoring since getting together with William, I hadn’t deleted all the phone numbers and certainly not the emails- I needed to fill this hole, so to speak.” Yuck. Baddest B in the room? Hardly. This book should really be called “I Hope The Boys Like Me Because I REALLY Need Them To Like Me!”. She’s co-dependent “…hoping the whole way that he would chase me…but he wasn’t that man and this wasn’t a rom com….i got into bed and in a fit of sadness and frustration, reached out to all the boys I’d been ignoring since getting together with William, I hadn’t deleted all the phone numbers and certainly not the emails- I needed to fill this hole, so to speak.” Yuck. Baddest B in the room? Hardly. This book should really be called “I Hope The Boys Like Me Because I REALLY Need Them To Like Me!”. She’s co-dependent on men in general- any man around, it seems. This was really quite painful to listen to. My sister loved this book, but I'm just not getting it. Maybe other people will connect with her story and voice, but I do not. I don’t doubt Sophia is spunky, has worked hard, faced major challenges, had an interesting life and has some stories to tell of working in the industry. Maybe she's just misrepresenting herself in this book. Or maybe the book should just have a different title so she's not misrepresenting herself right off the bat. But nothing in her memoir leads me to believe she is in any way qualified to call herself the baddest B in any room, unless perhaps it is a kindergarten classroom. She seems like a super insecure grown ass woman who is trying way too hard and is letting dudes walk all over her left and right. At best, they seem to treat her like a little sister- she adores them and they don’t seem to really give her the time of day. She sends one of the guys a gushing text about how wonderful he is and how much she loves him and his response is basically “cool, thanks”. She gets involved with a married man, doesn’t really ask any questions about why he left his wife and children on the other side of the world, throws away her own career ambitions and financial security basically because she’s infatuated with how cool and hot he is, and then is surprised when he cheats on her too?? And don’t even get me started on her relationship with William. Teenage girls are better at sticking up from themselves. Also, thanks for sitting idly by while men in the music/hip hop industry degraded the sh!t out of women for decades. I guess thanks for agreeing they leave women out of one single music video because you knew women would be given a degrading role in the video. In the audible version, the narration from the various dudes in the story is just super distracting, and it seems clear that she did that to be like “See! I told you all these boys like me! I convinced them to read a few lines, coached them on what to say and how to say it so I could copy paste them into the audible version! It's super authentic though how much they all like me!” The epilogue was the best part of the book, but it was completely incongruent with the message in rest of the book. Hard pass on this brand of feminism. I honestly couldn’t sleep last night because I laid in bed thinking “GOOD LORD- if this is the type of woman we are championing, women as a species are (in the words of Sophia) f*cked.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laianna

    I loved this Audible memoir from the moment I heard Sophia Chang promoting it on NPR. Like many people, I had no idea that Sophia Chang existed last week, but after hearing her story - narrated in her own, powerful voice - I find her to be an inspiration. This memoir is the candid, star-studded, fun, sad, and most of all, strong, tale of the Wu-Tang Clan’s honorary sister, “Soph.” In a captivating narrative that includes many notable figures speaking their own lines, Sophia divulges so much abou I loved this Audible memoir from the moment I heard Sophia Chang promoting it on NPR. Like many people, I had no idea that Sophia Chang existed last week, but after hearing her story - narrated in her own, powerful voice - I find her to be an inspiration. This memoir is the candid, star-studded, fun, sad, and most of all, strong, tale of the Wu-Tang Clan’s honorary sister, “Soph.” In a captivating narrative that includes many notable figures speaking their own lines, Sophia divulges so much about her life, from highs and lows in her career to love and heartbreak in her personal life. Sophia does not shy away from taboo subjects such as sex and money, and frees the listener to revel with her and take solace with her in equal measure. Like all women, Sophia is well-rounded. She is the woman who was told that she was too “hard” to find a man, and too “aggressive” to run someone’s career, but she is also the woman whose voice breaks in grief over lost loved ones, and swells with joy at the thought of her children. She shaved her head in accordance with her martial arts practice in her thirties and started documenting herself living her best life in her fifties, but as a petite Asian woman, for much of her life she felt small and in need of protection. I loved the inside details about well-known artists and the bonus content at the end of the memoir showing that Sophia’s love for her “bodyguards” is reciprocated, but the main draw for me was Sophia herself. She’s honest with the listener and does not hold back parts of her personality that could be off-putting for some people. She embraces who she is, strengths and vulnerabilities alike, and doesn’t give a fuck what anyone thinks... she’s the baddest bitch in the room! And for that reason, this memoir was exactly what I needed right now.

  4. 5 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    Sophia Chang is an interesting woman, one of whom I have no doubt had to crawl her way from the depths to make it to the heights of where she was working with big names in the hip-hop industry. I have a few issues with this book. However, since it’s a memoir I’m not going to go into all my issues with someone else’s life but what I will say is a couple of things… I felt like there was a lot of very loud unspoken, understated facts about who she is and what she’s done, that you could read between Sophia Chang is an interesting woman, one of whom I have no doubt had to crawl her way from the depths to make it to the heights of where she was working with big names in the hip-hop industry. I have a few issues with this book. However, since it’s a memoir I’m not going to go into all my issues with someone else’s life but what I will say is a couple of things… I felt like there was a lot of very loud unspoken, understated facts about who she is and what she’s done, that you could read between the lines and sort of piece together. You can understand the facts if you read a little deeper than face value. Anyone really into hip hop knows how these bars go already. After seeing the documentary, On The Record, it’s weird that knowing what we know about the industry that Sophia Chang glosses over any hardships she had with anyone in the music industry, while working with one of hip-hop’s largest and most multifaceted groups. Outside her husband and his mistresses and Raphael Saadiq, who didn’t want her near his work, she very lightly touches on any issues or independent successes she experienced as a woman in this male-dominated industry. It’s also unusual when Sophia constantly describes herself as a petite person of power and attribute that to you being seen as a “sister”, protected by “big, black, bear-like” energy which is also problematic when being used to describe the black men that you were around, that allowed you in their space for “no reason and with nothing to contribute initially” but allowed you build off them, etc. Suspect. Then, towards the end of the book to go on and on and talk about your deep, deep love for Method Man, who’s BEEN & still is married, and how integral he has been in your life, is also a little suspect. She never speaks about the relationship to his family as an entity, but does speak to the fact when he essentially told her that they can’t be as close as they once were couched in a fight scenario that happened at a party? Muddled. Kind of messy. Not my business, just interesting that she chose to write an entire chapter about that. Re: her marriage/relationship, it was a very powerful share on the type of growth it takes to realize what you got wasn’t what you wanted in your partnership. It’s of note that folks lose their partners how they got them in a relationship. She talks about her heartbreak at her man’s infidelity, but doesn’t talk about the heartbreak she caused building a life with someone who was already married with kids. She just said it wasn’t an issue for her. My mama always said that if you take a next woman’s man without any questions — you can’t be surprised when his character finds him a similar situation with someone else. That’s who that person is at their core. It was an interesting memoir directly relational to the sense of scrappiness that it takes to climb ranks and be resourceful. I wish there was more of that, discussions around building connections with folks — not just the men, of whom you’ve bagged 70. No shade, but not one of those dudes was integral to your ability to climb the ladder with no-to-minimal credentials? I mean, I personally would have loved a story about the dudes one has to bag to reach higher levels! I love a resourceful chick who takes what she wants and moves where she wants to be career-wise and drops dudes like a hot potato, once she’s got what she needed to get. It’s cut throat and it’s exciting. I love the honesty and transparency of that real world experience, the: this is how I lived, take no prisoners - truth of it all. Instead what we get is this sister, sister vibe but all the women around me don’t like me/disowned me vibe. I get it the men were married, but so was your husband when you met him.. don’t matter, we see your flex, just tell your truth sis. Peace to Soph for really spilling tea on her family, re/ mom, dad, brother and kids.. those were sweet and bittersweet moments. I also loved the photos in the book. I’d love to read some memoirs by Black women who worked in the hip-hop music industry, will have to look around. I read a review that accurately summed up all my other thoughts about this book and you can read it here.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Fayla

    Is this only available on Audible? I mean, that’s how I read it but I only bring this up because in Audible there’s a performance rating and a story rating. So my 3 star rating is for the story only. Sophia’s story in and of itself is fascinating, but I think that if I had to read it in print, it would be kinda boring. The book had a very hey-look-at-me,-I’m-a-5’-Canadian-Korean-woman-who-made-it-in-the-rap-industry vibe. Probably because that was mentioned at least once in every chapter. Maybe Is this only available on Audible? I mean, that’s how I read it but I only bring this up because in Audible there’s a performance rating and a story rating. So my 3 star rating is for the story only. Sophia’s story in and of itself is fascinating, but I think that if I had to read it in print, it would be kinda boring. The book had a very hey-look-at-me,-I’m-a-5’-Canadian-Korean-woman-who-made-it-in-the-rap-industry vibe. Probably because that was mentioned at least once in every chapter. Maybe it’s just me, but that really detracted from the narrative. Another distracting aspect was overuse of certain words like inner sanctum, ass, and protector. That aside, the narration is AMAZING! Sophia narrates her story in the way she wants it to be presented, but when she relays what Method Man said to her, Method Man actually says it. The guest narrations add texture to the story. There’s also a bit of a soundtrack going on in the background to help fill out the story. In short, listen to the audiobook.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Yana Minchenko

    I was excited to learn about an amazing woman establishing her power in the music world of men. I wished I would learn more about her creative work with the artists, helping grow the temple community, and her trips to China and Korea. I needed to hear less of her personal endeavors with men.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul Spence

    When I first saw the title of this memoir, I thought it was one of those self-help books geared towards making women feel more confident and enabling their inner #girlboss. THE BADDEST is not that book-- although honestly, reading this book was about a thousand times more valuable and inspiring than the few self-help books that I've tried to read. The woman striking the power pose on the cover who looks like she could be a model for Fashion Nova is Sophia Chang, considered to be the first Asian w When I first saw the title of this memoir, I thought it was one of those self-help books geared towards making women feel more confident and enabling their inner #girlboss. THE BADDEST is not that book-- although honestly, reading this book was about a thousand times more valuable and inspiring than the few self-help books that I've tried to read. The woman striking the power pose on the cover who looks like she could be a model for Fashion Nova is Sophia Chang, considered to be the first Asian woman in hip-hop. She managed a lot of very famous and influential artists who were keystones of the 80s and 90s hip-hop scene, including the Wu-Tang clan guys. On one level, this is a career retrospective, but it's also a fascinating memoir of motherhood, family, friendship, overcoming adversity, and embracing the things that you love. I feel like some people are going to be put off by this memoir because Sophia Chang doesn't fit into the box that is labelled (in feminine script, of course *eye roll*) "acceptable woman behaviour." She is crass at times, outspoken at others; she is confident and completely unapologetic, and embraces her sexuality in a way that I couldn't help but admire. Honestly, though, I feel like the people who are put off by those things should probably read this anyway, because an important tenet of feminism-- and basic human respect, actually-- is respecting others for the choices they make, even if they aren't necessarily the ones you would make-- as long as they don't cause any harm. Women need to be allowed to take risks and make the mistakes that men do in their pursuit of happiness. As long as we condemn one group and not the other for making those same decisions, our society will never be equal. She has a great chapter in here about how so many people are quick to judge a woman for having too many partners, and yet nobody thinks badly of a man for doing so. I loved that, and it's just one example of how Chang doesn't allow herself to be bound to what's expected. My favourite chapter in the beginning had to be about her family's escape from North Korea. It was so harrowing and intense, and provided a wonderful showcase for the quality of the writing in this book. Chang is an excellent story-teller, and the passages of her growing up with her family within that cultural context shaped in the beginning and throughout the book were so fascinating and pleasurable to read. She writes about how her heritage shaped her upbringing but didn't let it determine the choices she wanted for herself, and how her parents tried to be supportive to the best of their ability. I also really enjoyed the portions about music. Even though hip-hop isn't a genre of music I listen to, the way she describes how a powerful love for a song or genre can just take over you is relatable to any music lover. She also isn't afraid to throw shade. I've complained that too many celebrity memoirs are afraid to be mean, and end up sounding like acceptance speeches. Chang has ringing accolades for the people who stand in her corner, but she also isn't afraid to name drop the people who did her dirty, and I admired that, because it made the memoir feel more authentic, more real. There's so much more that happens in this book-- the struggles of balancing motherhood with a career, the Shaolin monk who fathered her children, the way she hung out with the members of Wu-Tang like they were a squad of superheroes chilling at HQ, being a part of such a game-changing music scene right when it happened, and palling around with one of the Ramones... there was a lot. She says at the end that she wasn't sure if she wanted to write a book and was basically forced into it by people demanding her story, and I can see why. She doesn't have to try very hard to sound interesting because she is interesting, and she's a great writer, too. Even if you don't like hip-hop music, you should read THE BADDEST. It's really, really good.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Lee

    This is one of the better audiobooks I've listened to. She is such an interesting person, so fierce and unapologetic. This a high four star review but Goodreads isn't showing me any stars, so I will fix it soon! This is one of the better audiobooks I've listened to. She is such an interesting person, so fierce and unapologetic. This a high four star review but Goodreads isn't showing me any stars, so I will fix it soon!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Sophia Chang's memoir is different in tenor, delivery, and content than any other memoir I've read (rapper or otherwise). That's bound to be the case for a girl from Vancouver, BC, who moved to NYC and at times managing various hip hop and RnB acts and in the process, learned to embrace her own cultural heritage through none-other-than the Wu-Tang Clan. Through this unlikely bond, she'd meet an I-shit-you-not, Shaolin Monk, who'd eventually be the father of her two children. If that at least doe Sophia Chang's memoir is different in tenor, delivery, and content than any other memoir I've read (rapper or otherwise). That's bound to be the case for a girl from Vancouver, BC, who moved to NYC and at times managing various hip hop and RnB acts and in the process, learned to embrace her own cultural heritage through none-other-than the Wu-Tang Clan. Through this unlikely bond, she'd meet an I-shit-you-not, Shaolin Monk, who'd eventually be the father of her two children. If that at least doesn't give you pause, there's not much hope for you. Despite the declaration of "Baddest bitch", Sophia is more aptly described as the coolest operator in the room, navigating gender and race in an era and environments not known for their sensitivity. She's interesting and candid but at the same time, a bit limited in her expressiveness. Every rapper mentioned throughout the book is pretty much presented as a teddy-bear, and with her over-tendency to describe every plutonic relationship as "love" works against some of the more pivotal moments like dealing with her father's death or rekindling her friendship with Chris Lighty days before his suicide. Despite all the too-oftenly-repeated love, it mostly seems unidirectional as most of the famous males in her life seem distant, sans perhaps RZA who reciprocates (likely there's more than in the book). She also over-relies on some forced braggadocio/swagger that sometimes walks back her previous statements and has a mild tendency for the hyperbolic. Between these awkward moments is a fantastically interesting life lived, but just decently told. Also, as an audiobook only (or first) release, there's some jarring transitions, chiefly with cuts to various lines being unenthusiastically delivered by famous friends and family in lo-fi. Then there's the poor decision to use sound FX, which cheapens certain moments like GZA observing the night sky, that even the rich people get better views of the stars... complete with cartoonish cricket sounds. Lastly, there are a few jarring moments of asides that break the narration flow, although much less egregious than the goofy SFX and bad spliced in quotes (the most awkward being her own kids in cringe inducing performances). Even with the missteps, Chang is a natural narrator, fairly charismatic, and (semi-)inspiring. It's rough around the edges, but so is her impetus and inspiration.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Such a great memoir! I’m reviewing it for the Asian Review of Books soon, so check that site soon.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    When you read this, be sure to get your music streaming service or YouTube pulled up. This text most definitely has a soundtrack, and it's banging. Especially if you're a fan of '90s hip-hop and R&B. Sophia Chang's memoir is a powerful work that dives into her unbelievable life story. It begins with the incredible obstacles faced by her family in the Korean War, spanning her decades of growth, loss and success. She is fierce, determined, and most definitely earned the notoriety of being the Badde When you read this, be sure to get your music streaming service or YouTube pulled up. This text most definitely has a soundtrack, and it's banging. Especially if you're a fan of '90s hip-hop and R&B. Sophia Chang's memoir is a powerful work that dives into her unbelievable life story. It begins with the incredible obstacles faced by her family in the Korean War, spanning her decades of growth, loss and success. She is fierce, determined, and most definitely earned the notoriety of being the Baddest Bitch in the Room. Her depictions of life with WuTang and and other hip hop legends brings you a rich deep history and understanding of the culture. Chang then pivots into her shift inside the world of Shaolin and kung fu. You see her develop into a lover, mother, while still hanging onto her strong urge to hustle. Chang's recount of past relationships are raw and filled with emotion. No flowery prose or trying to be demure, this is the deep cut of who she is. By the end of this book you will feel like you just walked with a hurricane. In a time like now, stories like this...stories of women of color, who up lift and encourage us all (especially other women of color) are things that should be encouraged and celebrated. Definitely worth a read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    La'Tonya Rease Miles

    I'm really glad that I got to know Sophia Chang via an Audible version of the book. Like the average reader, I'm guessing, I had not heard of her before, and yet, she touched many of my favorite musicians, including QTip, D'Angelo and, of course, the Wu. Like other reviewers on this page, I wasn't entirely convinced that Ms. Chang is "the baddest bitch in the room." As previously noted, she comes across as quite naive at times and very fixated on male approval. I even wanted to shake her when sh I'm really glad that I got to know Sophia Chang via an Audible version of the book. Like the average reader, I'm guessing, I had not heard of her before, and yet, she touched many of my favorite musicians, including QTip, D'Angelo and, of course, the Wu. Like other reviewers on this page, I wasn't entirely convinced that Ms. Chang is "the baddest bitch in the room." As previously noted, she comes across as quite naive at times and very fixated on male approval. I even wanted to shake her when she pretty casually mentions that the man of her dreams has a wife and children back in China that he--and she--chose to ignore. So why was she so surprised when he was once again an absentee dad to their kids? Does she not see the irony in the situation? But you know what? If I laid my life out on the table for complete strangers, I'm sure they would delight in pointing out my inconsistencies, too. To me, though, the book earns its worth in the epilogue, which features some of the author's best and most passionate writing. It is there that Sophia sums up her major points and pretty much slams the Model Minority Myth. I mean, that alone is critical.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rishi Sahgal

    Sophia is a good salesperson. I listened to her on the recode media podcast and bought the hype. Unfortunately it was mainly just that. No doubt she has had an interesting life and career, but instead of crafting an interesting narrative with what I am sure are interesting anecdotes and recollections from her time in the music industry and the hip hop world, this book is basically a very inwardly oriented chronology of her life. Unfortunately chronologies can often be boring because they often t Sophia is a good salesperson. I listened to her on the recode media podcast and bought the hype. Unfortunately it was mainly just that. No doubt she has had an interesting life and career, but instead of crafting an interesting narrative with what I am sure are interesting anecdotes and recollections from her time in the music industry and the hip hop world, this book is basically a very inwardly oriented chronology of her life. Unfortunately chronologies can often be boring because they often trade depth and reflection for inconsequential factual details. We don't get much insight into what she really thought about the industry in which she built an incredible and unlikely career, which is a shame. She also really over sold things by name dropping guys like Method Man and indicating that they made significant contributions to the book, but they were basically poorly recorded pre canned lines ... I was expecting them to share little stories about her, or a shared experience or at least have some real conversation but it was literally a phoned in line she asked them to say. I think there was an element of dishonesty there , which I did not like.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Loved this! It was amazing to listen to Sophia pour her heart and soul into telling her story. I enjoyed every minute of listening to her journey of making it through the music industry, learning to love herself and change her body into a machine and about her relationships and family life. This is chocked full of so much empowerment. Everything she said about race and finding herself as a Korean-Canadian resonated.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dana Marie

    Strong, raw, authentic, real, resilient and just so much I could appreciate and in many ways relate to. Listening to this through Audible immersed you in Sophia’s voice and personality, and those of her friends and family. While this story is about her life, it’s also a glimpse into the music industry. If you get this through Audible listen through to the bonus track.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ms

    Now I know why she's the baddest bitch in the room. Anybody wo can call Wutang family, write, produce, raise a family, all while being insecure, honest, and vulnerable can't be anything less. Now I know why she's the baddest bitch in the room. Anybody wo can call Wutang family, write, produce, raise a family, all while being insecure, honest, and vulnerable can't be anything less.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katie Clancy

    Sophia Chang’s life is CRAZY! Crazy good, crazy unusual, crazy inspiring and crazy beautiful. This is a performance, not a narrative. Listen in power.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Catapult

    The Baddest Bitch in the Room is Sophia Chang’s inspiring story about her life as the first Asian woman in hip-hop—working with such acts as The Wu-Tang Clan and A Tribe Called Quest—who has had the audacity to be bold in the pursuit of her passions, despite what anyone have prescribed. The book spans her career in the music business, her path to becoming an entrepreneur, and her candid accounts of marriage, motherhood, aging, desire, marginalization, and martial arts.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    What I took from this: Go into the world & claim what's yours. Love with a whole heart, live without regrets & apologize when you're wrong but not for being yourself. Life has many twists & turns but make it your own. What I took from this: Go into the world & claim what's yours. Love with a whole heart, live without regrets & apologize when you're wrong but not for being yourself. Life has many twists & turns but make it your own.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tina G.

    “Something in the music spoke to me.” The Baddest Bitch in the Room by Sophia Chang is by far the best memoir I’ve listened to. I unconditionally recommend it, especially if you enjoy memoirs, want to learn a little more about the music industry, or just looking for something new. Go on, listen to it, you won’t be disappointed. What to expect (a small amount of what’s covered in the book): life with her parents and brother (growing up to current time), her parents history, humor, losses, meeting J “Something in the music spoke to me.” The Baddest Bitch in the Room by Sophia Chang is by far the best memoir I’ve listened to. I unconditionally recommend it, especially if you enjoy memoirs, want to learn a little more about the music industry, or just looking for something new. Go on, listen to it, you won’t be disappointed. What to expect (a small amount of what’s covered in the book): life with her parents and brother (growing up to current time), her parents history, humor, losses, meeting Joey Ramone, working with Paul Simon, what lead her to the path of managing Wu-Tang and other artists, moving from Vancouver to New York, various jobs in the industry, mentors, the rise of hip-hop, martial arts training, pregnancy/child birth, relationships, trip to China, losing oneself and finding oneself again (and the continued search), change of the music industry to digital, relying on parents even in adulthood, family illness, why asking where are you from is a loaded question, the friendships between Sophia and members of Wu Tang and other artists, and the general ups and downs of life. There’s cameos from other well-known artists and family members. There is bonus content at the end, which includes audio from the recording process. Occasional slang is used (listeners may not know the meaning but should have no problem understanding). There are emotional moments in the book and they will make you feel something. Sophia narrating her own book was fantastic- she is easy to listen to and the emotional parts of it add to the overall greatness. There are added sound effects throughout and at first I wasn’t sure about them being in a memoir, but as it progressed it made sense/fit, so if you are like meh, stick with it. Why should you listen if you don’t know who Sophia Chang is? Because it’s a phenomenal book! The cover is fierce and that’s what drew me in. I didn’t know who Sophia was and it kept me interested from start to finish- who needs to sleep? I listened in one sitting, so be warned before you start, you won’t want to put it down. Glad I took a chance on this one, you should do the same. By the end, you won’t be asking who is Sophia Chang, you’ll be saying she’s the woman behind the scenes, a role model, strong, gorgeous, able to do anything... A couple quotes from the book: “Listening to that song was like taking the red pill in the matrix, once I’d heard it, I could never unhear it.” “That after all is what we’re here for, to be in service of others.” “F*ck your model minority!” Parental guidance/trigger warnings: swearing (in the explicit version), Korean War talk and the atrocities, abuse from a school teacher, racism (some slurs used), mention of the LA riots, suicide (Chris Lighty), death (ODB and her father’s cancer), infidelity, R. Kelly and Michael Jackson mentioned, sex talk, Hurricane Sandy. Probably more I’m forgetting (I just wanted to listen and not write down but hopefully this gives you a general idea).

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tamiko

    Walk in the room like you own it! This was an incredible memoir-in Sophia Chang’s own voice you hear her amazing journey told in the rawest of forms. You are taken on an adventure coast to coast and to the other side of the world. On audible the cameos of her mom, brother and members of the music industry makes you feel like you’re on the inside. If you’re not inspired to kick down doors and claim your seat at the table after reading this, you need to read it again.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fifilaboomboom

    Omg, what a fabulous fun ride this book is! Seriously, if I didn’t know the author (or NYC... or the music industry...), I’d think it was all bullsh*t but because I do know Sophia, I can verify that this book is 100% true. It’s an outstanding and inspiring example of how to live life. Grab it by the balls and squeeze hard, people - what have you got to lose??? Bravo, Soph - you are one in a kajillion!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bloodylupine

    Truly an in depth, emotional read and experience for anyone with a positive association with the true meaning of feminism. Additionally, a very raw and reflective journey of a memoir that beckons your own relations and memories involving family, relationships and experiences with "overlooked" subjects like racism, sexism, motherhood, class and monetary levels, and sex. This isn't a preachy book by any means. It is very brutally honest on the author's own personal experiences with those subjects a Truly an in depth, emotional read and experience for anyone with a positive association with the true meaning of feminism. Additionally, a very raw and reflective journey of a memoir that beckons your own relations and memories involving family, relationships and experiences with "overlooked" subjects like racism, sexism, motherhood, class and monetary levels, and sex. This isn't a preachy book by any means. It is very brutally honest on the author's own personal experiences with those subjects and how she reacted and thought back then versus how she thinks about her reactions or if her knowledge has changed since she matured. It is a solid read and I'd encourage those with an open mind to learn and enhance their knowledge of diverse concepts and culture to dive in.

  24. 4 out of 5

    D.W. Plato

    I've never been the baddest bitch in the room, but I have more in common with Sophia Chang than our resumes would suggest. This is a great story about NYC hip-hop royalty you may not have heard about until now. Her life as a first generation Korean, kung fu master, mother, daughter, wife as well as introducing the world to some of the original legends that shaped the industry. Grateful I listened on audio as I felt I got to know Sophia even more hearing her voice tell her life story. Great story I've never been the baddest bitch in the room, but I have more in common with Sophia Chang than our resumes would suggest. This is a great story about NYC hip-hop royalty you may not have heard about until now. Her life as a first generation Korean, kung fu master, mother, daughter, wife as well as introducing the world to some of the original legends that shaped the industry. Grateful I listened on audio as I felt I got to know Sophia even more hearing her voice tell her life story. Great story, amazing woman!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Quanita

    I downloaded the audible "explicit version" and was surprised that it wasn't as explicit as I expected. The f*bomb is used frequently, but not as often as I hear it on the street. Ms. Chang is very open about her good qualities and isn't afraid to highlight the bad ones. She firmly believes in learning from her mistakes and jumps in any new endeavor with both feet. She is very refreshing voice. I downloaded the audible "explicit version" and was surprised that it wasn't as explicit as I expected. The f*bomb is used frequently, but not as often as I hear it on the street. Ms. Chang is very open about her good qualities and isn't afraid to highlight the bad ones. She firmly believes in learning from her mistakes and jumps in any new endeavor with both feet. She is very refreshing voice.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Wu

    There’s something about Chang’s story that rings so humble and genuine, even though she takes us from the brutal troughs of the music industry to the Shaolin temples of rural China Her incredible story somehow retains an element of relatability that kept me fully immersed and wondering where she went next. Worth a read, and a definite treat, if you have any interest in the unlikely, heartwarming behind-the-scenes interactions of old school rappers and a tiny Korean-Canadian woman.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This ended up being less about the hidden corners of the music industry and more of a woman-coming-into-her-own memoir. But the setting and players were still fun and offbeat—Chang managed members of the Wu-Tang clan and other hip-hop stars, and was very immersed in that world as well as being partnered for many years with a Buddhist monk, who's the father of her two kids—and I really liked her candor about sex, money, friendship, and professional power. This ended up being less about the hidden corners of the music industry and more of a woman-coming-into-her-own memoir. But the setting and players were still fun and offbeat—Chang managed members of the Wu-Tang clan and other hip-hop stars, and was very immersed in that world as well as being partnered for many years with a Buddhist monk, who's the father of her two kids—and I really liked her candor about sex, money, friendship, and professional power.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Freaking loved this book! It was an Audible listen, read by the author, which I recommend bc Chang's voice totally makes it. I genuinely feel more powerful after listening to it. Wu-Tang is a big piece of it, but her discussions of growing up an outsider, relationships, sex, and crafting a career are powerful. Freaking loved this book! It was an Audible listen, read by the author, which I recommend bc Chang's voice totally makes it. I genuinely feel more powerful after listening to it. Wu-Tang is a big piece of it, but her discussions of growing up an outsider, relationships, sex, and crafting a career are powerful.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Clay Fernald

    Inspirational book, one I can relate to being in the music business and a fan of Wu-Tang Clan, Tribe and so many more artists she touched. I didn’t like the scratches on the swears but the story was great and as I get older I need stories like this to keep me motivated. Good length too. Nice cameos as well.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gladys Hamilton

    Good listen! I love autobiographies. Listening to Sophia Chang detail her relationship with the Wu-Tang Clan was insightful. I also enjoyed her personal journey with her family as a Korean-Canadian woman working in hip-hop.

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