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The first-ever graphic novel adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great anti-war books.  An American classic and one of the world’s seminal antiwar books, Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five is faithfully presented in graphic novel form for the first time from Eisner Award-winning writer Ryan North (How to Invent Ever The first-ever graphic novel adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great anti-war books.  An American classic and one of the world’s seminal antiwar books, Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five is faithfully presented in graphic novel form for the first time from Eisner Award-winning writer Ryan North (How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler) and Eisner Award-nominated artist Albert Monteys (Universe!).    Listen: Billy Pilgrim has... ...read Kilgore Trout ...opened a successful optometry business ...built a loving family ...witnessed the firebombing of Dresden ...traveled to the planet Tralfamadore ...met Kurt Vonnegut ...come unstuck in time.   Billy Pilgrim’s journey is at once a farcical look at the horror and tragedy of war where children are placed on the frontlines and die (so it goes), and a moving examination of what it means to be fallibly human. 


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The first-ever graphic novel adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great anti-war books.  An American classic and one of the world’s seminal antiwar books, Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five is faithfully presented in graphic novel form for the first time from Eisner Award-winning writer Ryan North (How to Invent Ever The first-ever graphic novel adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, an American classic, is one of the world’s great anti-war books.  An American classic and one of the world’s seminal antiwar books, Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five is faithfully presented in graphic novel form for the first time from Eisner Award-winning writer Ryan North (How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler) and Eisner Award-nominated artist Albert Monteys (Universe!).    Listen: Billy Pilgrim has... ...read Kilgore Trout ...opened a successful optometry business ...built a loving family ...witnessed the firebombing of Dresden ...traveled to the planet Tralfamadore ...met Kurt Vonnegut ...come unstuck in time.   Billy Pilgrim’s journey is at once a farcical look at the horror and tragedy of war where children are placed on the frontlines and die (so it goes), and a moving examination of what it means to be fallibly human. 

30 review for Slaughterhouse-Five, or the Children's Crusade

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ryan North

    I wrote this book, but I think it's really good! And I can say that because comics is a collaborative medium, and my script was only a small part of it: Albert's beautiful art and graphic storytelling sensibility took what was there in my script and turned it into something incredible. And of course Vonnegut's original prose novel is timeless and one of my favourite books of all time. The book itself is the result of all theses talents and more, and I can say without ego that it's something real I wrote this book, but I think it's really good! And I can say that because comics is a collaborative medium, and my script was only a small part of it: Albert's beautiful art and graphic storytelling sensibility took what was there in my script and turned it into something incredible. And of course Vonnegut's original prose novel is timeless and one of my favourite books of all time. The book itself is the result of all theses talents and more, and I can say without ego that it's something really special. If you're curious about this version of Slaughterhouse-Five, let me tell you that our goal with it was to make it feel like it was written as a comic first, to make it feel at home in the medium. This isn't the prose novel crammed into boxes with some pictures added, but rather a version of the same story that lives within comics, that does everything it can to tell the same story - and make you feel the same sense of sorrow and loss and hope and love - in this new medium. If you've read Slaughterhouse-Five before you'll feel at home with this graphic novel and hopefully discover something new and wonderful about the book you love... and if you've never read it, or Vonnegut, I can promise you that you'll find in him a unique, powerful and above all sympathetic and humanist voice that you can carry with you for the rest of your life. I'm really proud of this book, and I hope you like it!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Slaughterhouse-Five is a weird book. In prepping to review this adaptation I saw several mentions of it being practically unadaptable to any other format. However, I think this graphic novel version does a pretty darn good job. Both the original and this version are weird. They are hard to follow. But they are oh so beautiful in their melancholy cynicism that is tainted with a little bit of hope. The story is a non-linear reflection on life that varies from the gut-wrenchingly real to the outland Slaughterhouse-Five is a weird book. In prepping to review this adaptation I saw several mentions of it being practically unadaptable to any other format. However, I think this graphic novel version does a pretty darn good job. Both the original and this version are weird. They are hard to follow. But they are oh so beautiful in their melancholy cynicism that is tainted with a little bit of hope. The story is a non-linear reflection on life that varies from the gut-wrenchingly real to the outlandishly absurd. It really is a story worthy of classic status and it was expertly handled and adapted by Ryan North and Albert Monteys. The art is perfect and wonderful to look at. It goes from light to dark and realistic to far fetched with perfect fluidity around our tragic hero, Billy Pilgrim. It is detailed where it needs to be, simple in other perfectly placed areas. I think it was the art that really helped make the unadaptable adaptable. I would love to read more works illustrated by this artist. I always say you should read the source material first – and I agree with that statement here. However, this is an adaptation worthy of the original and should be checked out by fans of Vonnegut’s work.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Well it turns out a comic book is the perfect way to adapt an unadaptable novel. The time jumps work perfectly and are easy to follow. The horrors of war come through delicately. Even an alien abduction doesn't seem too absurd for the story of a man so horrified by war he becomes unstuck in time. Received a review copy from Boom! and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned. Well it turns out a comic book is the perfect way to adapt an unadaptable novel. The time jumps work perfectly and are easy to follow. The horrors of war come through delicately. Even an alien abduction doesn't seem too absurd for the story of a man so horrified by war he becomes unstuck in time. Received a review copy from Boom! and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    How do you adapt a notoriously unadaptable novel to another medium? You choose to make it a graphic novel, so you can skillfully portray the time jumps inherent to the story, while having the complete freedom to comment on the characters, what is happening to them, has already happened and will happen in the future. So it goes. The first time I read Slaughterhouse-Five was only last year, and I loved it. This book is about as good an adaptation as I could imagine. It fully transfers the humour, t How do you adapt a notoriously unadaptable novel to another medium? You choose to make it a graphic novel, so you can skillfully portray the time jumps inherent to the story, while having the complete freedom to comment on the characters, what is happening to them, has already happened and will happen in the future. So it goes. The first time I read Slaughterhouse-Five was only last year, and I loved it. This book is about as good an adaptation as I could imagine. It fully transfers the humour, the horror and the insanity of the novel to the illustrated page. I already was a fan of Albert Monteys' work on Universe! over at Panel Syndicate, and his style fits the tone of Slaughterhouse-Five perfectly. Monteys' has a knack for portraying the insane bordering on the silly. Thoroughly recommended. (Kindly received an ARC from Boom! Studios through NetGalley)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five, a science fiction classic, has been morphed into a bold creative graphic novel that does the story real justice. It’s a standout among graphic novel adaptations. The graphic version doesn’t just repeat the story from the novel, but also provides the reader with handy dandy charts and displays of all the characters, the timelines, and even all the equipment worn into battle by Billy Pilgrim’s wartime buddy. The story intersperses comic relief ala Hogan’s Heroes POW Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five, a science fiction classic, has been morphed into a bold creative graphic novel that does the story real justice. It’s a standout among graphic novel adaptations. The graphic version doesn’t just repeat the story from the novel, but also provides the reader with handy dandy charts and displays of all the characters, the timelines, and even all the equipment worn into battle by Billy Pilgrim’s wartime buddy. The story intersperses comic relief ala Hogan’s Heroes POW camps with the horrors of war including particularly the Dresden Bombing. And then for something completely different, soldier Billy Pilgrim is so traumatized that he becomes unstuck in time, flitting back and forth over the years and is captured by aliens who put him in the zoo on their planet with a kidnapped buxom bride to exhibit fornication with on full display. The aliens have a different view of time then we do. For them, like unstuck Billy Pilgrim, everything is observable now, past , present, future. Every moment exists always. And their motto seems to be to always exist in the moment, at least the good moments. Kind of like Monty Python’s Always Look on the Bright Side Of Life. But, I digress. The point is that, like the companion novel, it’s just not a traditional story structure. Anyway, if you dig the novel, you’ll get a real kick out of the graphic novel version.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Briar's Reviews

    I have wanted to pick up Slaughterhouse-Five for years, ever since I was given 1984 in high school instead of this book. I had always been interested in what I missed out in reading this book, and lucky for me NetGalley had the graphic novel version of this book! I thought this was a great way to present the story, even if I haven't read the original work. If I had options like this way back in my high school days then it would have made reading some of these classics way more entertaining! I'd h I have wanted to pick up Slaughterhouse-Five for years, ever since I was given 1984 in high school instead of this book. I had always been interested in what I missed out in reading this book, and lucky for me NetGalley had the graphic novel version of this book! I thought this was a great way to present the story, even if I haven't read the original work. If I had options like this way back in my high school days then it would have made reading some of these classics way more entertaining! I'd highly recommend educators and students grab books like these to add a little spice and fun to your reading lists. I really enjoyed the illustrations, and I found the book really intriguing and well done. Three out of five stars. Thank you to NetGalley and BOOM! Studios for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shannara

    I’ve had a few days to compose myself and I’m ready to actually review this graphic novel. I read Slaughterhouse Five years ago and I’d be lying if I said I remember too much about it beyond there being a human zoo and a terrible war. But that seriously does seem to sum this up, but the meaning and heartbreak is so much more. Poor Billy’s life is not great and while he experienced a whole hell of a lot of shit, he also experienced some seriously amazing stuff too. The main focus for the majority I’ve had a few days to compose myself and I’m ready to actually review this graphic novel. I read Slaughterhouse Five years ago and I’d be lying if I said I remember too much about it beyond there being a human zoo and a terrible war. But that seriously does seem to sum this up, but the meaning and heartbreak is so much more. Poor Billy’s life is not great and while he experienced a whole hell of a lot of shit, he also experienced some seriously amazing stuff too. The main focus for the majority of the story is the war, how awful it was, and how awful it still is. Billy’s part in it is not substantial besides being a prisoner and having to see so many vicious things happen to people around him. What makes his story unique is that he becomes “unstuck” from the time he’s in and begins to experience his life jumping from one moment in his life to another. It’s fascinating and confusing to see him go through this. Things get even more interesting when he gets abducted by aliens. Anyway, all of that really isn’t even the point. Billy could be lying in a hospital bed in a coma for all the reader really knows or believes, but you start to feel just how disjointed a person can be after having the horrific experiences that Billy had. Not even just with the war, but life in general. It almost feels like there is no point to his whole life, which is absolutely heartbreaking. I feel like it goes from, what’s the point of sending these children to fight these wars, what’s the point of wars, what’s the point of life at all. Of course, that’s just how I felt while reading this. So while I very much did enjoy this graphic novel, it is much more serious and depressing than I do recall. It does bring to life the “unsticking” of Billy’s life, which is interesting. I recommend this to those who have read Slaughterhouse Five in its original form because this can bring a new way to view the book. Thanks to NetGalley and Archaia for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Madara

    Slaughterhouse-Five was my first Kurt Vonnegut Jr. I had just graduated high school and I obviously knew nothing. I remember reading it before bed and not being able to go to sleep because I was so damn confused! 9 years later and I'm no wiser. World War II, the bombing of Dresden, time travel, aliens and "being unstuck in time"... Slaughterhouse-Five is a really weird anti-war book and this graphic novel is a pretty good adaptation. The art fits the story, it helps to explain what's actually goi Slaughterhouse-Five was my first Kurt Vonnegut Jr. I had just graduated high school and I obviously knew nothing. I remember reading it before bed and not being able to go to sleep because I was so damn confused! 9 years later and I'm no wiser. World War II, the bombing of Dresden, time travel, aliens and "being unstuck in time"... Slaughterhouse-Five is a really weird anti-war book and this graphic novel is a pretty good adaptation. The art fits the story, it helps to explain what's actually going on. It's still really confusing and I can see why people could be confused and not enjoy this graphic novel. Especially if they haven't read the source material and don't know how weird Vonnegut's writing style was. Review copy provided by the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    Reading this graphic novel reminds me just how masterful, funny, mordant, and humane Kurt Vonnegut's writing was. Ryan North does a great job adapting the novel and keeping the tone pitch perfect (poo-tee-weet) and Albert Monteys' art is both cartoonish and realistic at the same time (matching the tone of the novel perfectly). This is a novel about the cruelty of man, the absurdity of war, the unceasing cruelty of time, and about how utterly inadequate the strategy of focusing on the good times Reading this graphic novel reminds me just how masterful, funny, mordant, and humane Kurt Vonnegut's writing was. Ryan North does a great job adapting the novel and keeping the tone pitch perfect (poo-tee-weet) and Albert Monteys' art is both cartoonish and realistic at the same time (matching the tone of the novel perfectly). This is a novel about the cruelty of man, the absurdity of war, the unceasing cruelty of time, and about how utterly inadequate the strategy of focusing on the good times really is. I need to go back and re-read all of Vonnegut asap. **Thanks to the adapter, artist, publisher, and NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I read Slaughterhouse-Five when I was in my teens or early twenties, and I mostly remember being annoyed by it, with its time slips and alien abductions. Either being older or, more likely, the extreme skill of this graphic novel adaptation has given me a new appreciation for Vonnegut's story. Darkly humorous and sadly still too timely. I read Slaughterhouse-Five when I was in my teens or early twenties, and I mostly remember being annoyed by it, with its time slips and alien abductions. Either being older or, more likely, the extreme skill of this graphic novel adaptation has given me a new appreciation for Vonnegut's story. Darkly humorous and sadly still too timely.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Rarely does a comic adaptation meet the expectations of the original novel, but this does, because Vonnegut's metafiction and hyper self-awareness is perfectly suited to the medium. Sad, funny, sobering and sparse, Kurt's 1969 anti-war classic Slaughterhouse Five is brought to life with Albert Monteys' beautiful cartoony illustrations which are polished and yet somehow derivative of Kurt's own style. Ryan North (Adventure Time) writes the script and somehow it works. A lovely way to honor the or Rarely does a comic adaptation meet the expectations of the original novel, but this does, because Vonnegut's metafiction and hyper self-awareness is perfectly suited to the medium. Sad, funny, sobering and sparse, Kurt's 1969 anti-war classic Slaughterhouse Five is brought to life with Albert Monteys' beautiful cartoony illustrations which are polished and yet somehow derivative of Kurt's own style. Ryan North (Adventure Time) writes the script and somehow it works. A lovely way to honor the original work.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kammy

    Thank you to the publisher for an advance copy via netgalley! What an interesting idea to turn this into a graphic novel. I enjoyed reading it. It reads very well, and the illustrations Capture well the environment and moment being described. Wish it was longer!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I honestly don't have much to say about this other than, the graphic novel was the perfect way to read this story. I had always felt like Slaughterhouse-five was a great work, but something was missing from it. Ryan North and Albert Monteys really put together an amazing graphic novel. It was deep, it was impactful, and it help true to the original story, yet allowed for a deeper understanding of its core values. I would recommend anyone really to pick this up (some themes are not great for child I honestly don't have much to say about this other than, the graphic novel was the perfect way to read this story. I had always felt like Slaughterhouse-five was a great work, but something was missing from it. Ryan North and Albert Monteys really put together an amazing graphic novel. It was deep, it was impactful, and it help true to the original story, yet allowed for a deeper understanding of its core values. I would recommend anyone really to pick this up (some themes are not great for children), but i would highly recommend you read the original story first, because in my mind this one just adds a new level to its understanding. Thanks to Netgalley for giving me a copy in exchange for an honest review!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    I find it hard to rate this book - I recognize it for what it is [and the brilliance that is Kurt Vonnegut and the talent of Ryan North in adapting something so difficult], yet I also did not enjoy it, so three stars seems to be good compromise. I knew nothing about the original book when I requested the ARC of this graphic novel. I do know that that I won't be reading the original novel, no matter how tremendous it might be. For me, this was upsetting and brutal and extremely sad, mixed with the I find it hard to rate this book - I recognize it for what it is [and the brilliance that is Kurt Vonnegut and the talent of Ryan North in adapting something so difficult], yet I also did not enjoy it, so three stars seems to be good compromise. I knew nothing about the original book when I requested the ARC of this graphic novel. I do know that that I won't be reading the original novel, no matter how tremendous it might be. For me, this was upsetting and brutal and extremely sad, mixed with the absurd and confusion. And I am pretty sure those are the emotions you are supposed to feel. Which makes me know that I could not handle the longer original book. Billy Pilgrim's story, though not a new one [though the aliens story-line was different], was a sad, unique way of looking at war and the aftermath of such atrocities. I am not sorry that I read this as I think it's important to remember things that happened in the past, in WW2 and what happened in places like Dresden [a place and incident that is rarely talked about and should be talked about more, in my opinion. The Nazi's were not the only ones inflicting horror on people - war is brutal, on BOTH sides] AND the aftermath of war and what it does to people; both the people who fought and those who were waiting for them back home. I found a lot of relevance to what is happening right now - "And so it goes" reminded me over and over of the current administrations admonishment of "it is what it is" and that made for some tough emotions as well. I can imagine that Mr. Vonnegut would have been a loud dissident of the current administration and all the lies and trope they spread. But I digress. All this said, this was still a very rough read for me and I doubt I will be reaching for any more of Mr. Vonnegut's works [though you never know and I never, ever, say never]. Thank you to NetGalley and BOOM! Studios/Archaia for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review. ***An adjustment: Due to reading Carry [a book I received an ARC for], I needed to change this rating. Just because it was horrific doesn't mean it isn't necessary and isn't brilliantly done and when that happens a three star review is a slap in the face. It is a lesson learned and one that I can hope to remember as I move forward in my reading life.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nikki "The Crazie Betty" V.

    Not sure of the best way to review this. I kind of think if you’ve read the original story by Vonnegut that this graphic novel was based on, you may enjoy this graphic novel more as you already know the meat of the story and can just enjoy the artwork and how the story unfolds without feeling like you’re missing something. If you’ve read Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, and you’re a fan, I would definitely recommend picking this up. I highly enjoyed it as a Vonnegut fan and I felt like the style Not sure of the best way to review this. I kind of think if you’ve read the original story by Vonnegut that this graphic novel was based on, you may enjoy this graphic novel more as you already know the meat of the story and can just enjoy the artwork and how the story unfolds without feeling like you’re missing something. If you’ve read Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, and you’re a fan, I would definitely recommend picking this up. I highly enjoyed it as a Vonnegut fan and I felt like the style of the artwork really worked great for the story being told. Received via Netgalley. All opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roxie |The Book Slayer| Voorhees

    Beautiful adaptation of the book I already love. I highly suggest this to both fans of Kurt but also people new to his writings. Great job Ryan North. I look forward to more of your work.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jess Meylikhov

    I wanted to like this. Slaughterhouse-Five and Kurt Vonnegut hold a dear place in my heart. Vonnegut and his personal battles with the novel were the main subjects of my thesis. This graphic novel adaptation is greatly missing that connection. There is no denying that the artwork is beautiful (though I might argue that the soldiers are illustrated to look much older, which contradicts Vonnegut’s intention of reminding the reader how young these soldiers are via “The Children’s Crusade”). To put I wanted to like this. Slaughterhouse-Five and Kurt Vonnegut hold a dear place in my heart. Vonnegut and his personal battles with the novel were the main subjects of my thesis. This graphic novel adaptation is greatly missing that connection. There is no denying that the artwork is beautiful (though I might argue that the soldiers are illustrated to look much older, which contradicts Vonnegut’s intention of reminding the reader how young these soldiers are via “The Children’s Crusade”). To put it plainly, this is an accurate adaptation, but it’s missing a major component, Vonnegut’s style and overall essence, which is easily unadaptable. To truly see the humanity and inhumanity in Vonnegut’s semi-autobiographical story, his voice is the only one who can properly deliver the comedy, desperation, and fleeting reality of it. Furthermore, some of the structural decisions of this graphic novel are clearly made to create an easier read. However, these decisions also contradict Vonnegut’s specific intentions of his non-linear and elusive style that he meticulously weaved throughout his novel. It’s choices like these that make this adaptation miss the point at times. While I commend the adaptation, as it is no easy feat, it feels like a lackluster versions of Slaughterhouse-five that would’ve been written by anyone but Vonnegut.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    I haven't actually read Slaughterhouse- Five but this graphic novel adaptation was pretty freakin awesome. What a weird kooky crazy story. I'm almost hesitant to read the book except I'll totally read it since Ethan Hawke narrates. I haven't actually read Slaughterhouse- Five but this graphic novel adaptation was pretty freakin awesome. What a weird kooky crazy story. I'm almost hesitant to read the book except I'll totally read it since Ethan Hawke narrates.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Oxana Tomova

    As someone who's just getting started with Kurt Vonnegut, I knew that Slaughterhouse-Five is a must a some point. Seeing the comic that's about to come out, I knew I'd be very much interested to see how Vonnegut and graphic novels mash up. On the writing front, we see a great representation not only of the story itself, but also Vonnegut's witty writing and dark humour. I really enjoyed reading, as it was as captivating as the books from him that I've read. I do think however that the art in this As someone who's just getting started with Kurt Vonnegut, I knew that Slaughterhouse-Five is a must a some point. Seeing the comic that's about to come out, I knew I'd be very much interested to see how Vonnegut and graphic novels mash up. On the writing front, we see a great representation not only of the story itself, but also Vonnegut's witty writing and dark humour. I really enjoyed reading, as it was as captivating as the books from him that I've read. I do think however that the art in this title is very important to note - it's beautiful and ugly at the same time, just as the story itself. It captures well the theme, atmosphere and overall feeling so graciously, you can almost imagine Kurt Vonnegut being personally involved in the drawing process. The style and colour palettes match up fantastically, sucking you right into the story. I wholeheartedly recommend the book to both long-time fans and to people that have yet to read anything from Vonnegut. *Thanks to NetGalley and BOOM! Studios for providing me with an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review.*

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    To say that this is a book about war, and its effects is not saying enough about it. Kurt Vonnegut Jr. was in Dresden when it was firebombed. We hear about the atomic bombs, but forget, or were never taught about the fire bombs that wiped the city of Dresden off the map. I read this book back when I was in High School, but still remember it, and was wondering how it would work as a graphic novel, and let me say it works amazingly well. The time shifts make sense, and are clearly visible, and the i To say that this is a book about war, and its effects is not saying enough about it. Kurt Vonnegut Jr. was in Dresden when it was firebombed. We hear about the atomic bombs, but forget, or were never taught about the fire bombs that wiped the city of Dresden off the map. I read this book back when I was in High School, but still remember it, and was wondering how it would work as a graphic novel, and let me say it works amazingly well. The time shifts make sense, and are clearly visible, and the images of the fire bombed Dresden are truly horrific. And so it goes. Of course, I would still recommend reading the novel, but this an excellent way to get the gyst of this very powerful novel. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    ava

    4.5* yeah this was highkey better than the actual book but at least now i can say i like a classic.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah E.

    I was gifted an ebook via Netgalley. I voluntarily read and reviewed it. All thoughts are my own. Actual rating: 2.5 stars I have always been willing to give a classic a try. They are definitely hits or misses for me. I really enjoyed the artwork in this graphic novel a whole lot. It was so interesting and I really like the different styles within the book. I may have read the synopsis at some point but couldn't remember what it was about. So as per usual, I went in blind. I appreciate what the au I was gifted an ebook via Netgalley. I voluntarily read and reviewed it. All thoughts are my own. Actual rating: 2.5 stars I have always been willing to give a classic a try. They are definitely hits or misses for me. I really enjoyed the artwork in this graphic novel a whole lot. It was so interesting and I really like the different styles within the book. I may have read the synopsis at some point but couldn't remember what it was about. So as per usual, I went in blind. I appreciate what the author was trying to do with it. I, however, am a person who likes a clear plot and a non-ambiguous ending and this story doesn't really have it, unless I'm too dim to get it. I do like the time jumps and the "and so it goes" and the "everything is beautiful and nothing hurt" - which I have on a bookmark and is one of my absolute favorites. Overall, it was a really interesting book and I think that there is definitely a group of people that do appreciate and adore this way more than I do, but I still wanted to give it a try. It wasn't hard to read at all, so it beats out Austen and Steinbeck and Twain for me!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jarrah

    Vonnegut's novels are peppered with important but subtle tonal shifts that make them notoriously challenging to adapt, but Ryan North and Albert Monteys have absolutely triumphed with their take on his classic Slaughterhouse-Five. The original Slaughterhouse-Five packed a punch the first time I read it, leaving me slightly stunned and awed afterwards by all the devastation and loss and love and the strangely fitting surreal sci-fi elements. The adaptation masterfully captures all of the elements Vonnegut's novels are peppered with important but subtle tonal shifts that make them notoriously challenging to adapt, but Ryan North and Albert Monteys have absolutely triumphed with their take on his classic Slaughterhouse-Five. The original Slaughterhouse-Five packed a punch the first time I read it, leaving me slightly stunned and awed afterwards by all the devastation and loss and love and the strangely fitting surreal sci-fi elements. The adaptation masterfully captures all of the elements of the original and adds a new layer of meta self-awareness that is probably not just beneficial for understanding by readers unfamiliar with Vonnegut, but essential to maintaining a feeling of the story's completeness in this new format. Many very good graphic novels adaptations can't help but omit key pieces that feel glaring to fans familiar with the original, but I didn't have this problem with North and Monteys' handling of Slaughterhouse-Five. The visuals and meta narrative are employed cleverly to add layers to things you might not even have picked up in the original. Monteys' also employs very smart use of colour to shift between eras and settings so you don't feel disoriented by following a character who's "unstuck in time." I can't say enough about how perfect this reading experience was. It sets a high bar for graphic novel adaptations in general, and as a Vonnegut fan I can only hope that it might lead to more courageous and clever attempts to adapt his other "unadaptable" novels.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brahm

    I loved SF-5 (the novel) and I am a big Ryan North fan, but I set neutral, cautious expectations when I picked this up. Can you spin off or make a derivative work of (what a top reviewer called) a "notoriously unadaptable" book? So much yes. Everything about this just worked for me. The graphic novel format was brilliant for all of the jumping-around-in-time; it make the reading experience with Billy feel more linear and continuous than the novel. Albert Monteys absolutely crushed the illustratio I loved SF-5 (the novel) and I am a big Ryan North fan, but I set neutral, cautious expectations when I picked this up. Can you spin off or make a derivative work of (what a top reviewer called) a "notoriously unadaptable" book? So much yes. Everything about this just worked for me. The graphic novel format was brilliant for all of the jumping-around-in-time; it make the reading experience with Billy feel more linear and continuous than the novel. Albert Monteys absolutely crushed the illustrations but where he ascended to a higher plane of existence was the colouring. I'd better call out Ricard Zaplana for "colouring assistance". Wow!!! I lack the right words to describe the effects, but the tones, palettes (?), etc. hammered home the dreariness, confusion, seriousness, humour... just incredible stuff. One technical detail I thought was neat was the font size was smaller than most graphic novels, so you end up bringing the book closer, and it creates this sense of immersion and depth. Would recommend to both fans of the novel and people that may have struggled a bit with the novel and didn't love it (but didn't hate it) - I think the graphic novel will change your experience with the story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ruthsic

    Warnings: wartime, massacre, PTSD, animal cruelty Now, generally I am not inclined to read classic novels simply because I find prose styles of these quite different from modern styles in that they aren't able to sufficiently engage me in the text. Which is why, seeing a graphic novel adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five, I was interested, simply because sometimes medium matters. Now, the book is an anti-war themed story about a WWII veteran, Billy, who has the ability to time travel, which is why Warnings: wartime, massacre, PTSD, animal cruelty Now, generally I am not inclined to read classic novels simply because I find prose styles of these quite different from modern styles in that they aren't able to sufficiently engage me in the text. Which is why, seeing a graphic novel adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five, I was interested, simply because sometimes medium matters. Now, the book is an anti-war themed story about a WWII veteran, Billy, who has the ability to time travel, which is why this book works on a non-linear timeline, with Billy slipping in and out of his present, going to the future or to the past, and it mainly centers around his time in the military, and the Dresden bombing. Billy is initially a part of a scout group, along with Roland and two others; the former two get captured and the other two get killed. He then lives as a prisoner of war, where the conditions are harsh and Roland dies from gangrene and entrusts his revenge to a fellow inmate, and then they are all moved into the camp where they are keeping British soldiers, and finally they are moved to Dresden to work. Billy, being a not-ideal soldier candidate, with his leaner physique and disinterest in the glory, makes for a good PoV to see the war through. Especially in the prisoner camp with the British soldiers, it becomes apparent that most of the soldiers are disillusioned with the war, or have come to realize the absurd cost of it. Roland, who is living for the glory of being a veteran forms a counterpoint to Billy, who just wants to escape this war. Most apparent is the fact that during tense moments, he travels to another moment in his life, so it is questionable whether he is actually time-traveling, but there are hints where it feels true like him knowing about events beforehand, like the flight that goes down later on, or him knowing when he'll die. There are a lot of other things going on in the story, but the character of Billy himself remains unknown to us for the most part - I couldn't figure out his reasoning for his choices or what he thought of certain events in his life. Even his abduction by aliens and being given another abducted woman as a bride basically, we don't see what he truly feels in those scenarios - the only insight into him is his philosophy towards death and the impermanence of it for someone who can instead just see it as something that happens in this and every moment, at once. Eventually, I don't really know what I think of how the story and its themes are presented - I feel it detaches us from the character while involving us in the narrative. The artwork, though, is quite effective in presenting the story - with its handy charts and introductions to characters in three panels, or the way the time slipping is presented. The character design is also pretty good, and with clean lines and an aesthetically matching palette, it makes for a good graphic novel. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Archaia, via Netgalley.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    This is a cleverly made adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five, the time shifts are handled really well and the graphic novel stays true to the tone and plot of the book. You can tell that those involved really cared about the original story and wanted to do it justice. I'd highly reccomed this to fans of the original, even if you're not this is a great way to experience a classic in a contemporary way. Thanks to Netgalley and BOOM! Studios for the ARC in return for a fair and unbiased review This is a cleverly made adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five, the time shifts are handled really well and the graphic novel stays true to the tone and plot of the book. You can tell that those involved really cared about the original story and wanted to do it justice. I'd highly reccomed this to fans of the original, even if you're not this is a great way to experience a classic in a contemporary way. Thanks to Netgalley and BOOM! Studios for the ARC in return for a fair and unbiased review

  27. 4 out of 5

    Renata

    Oh man Slaughterhouse-Five has been one of my all-time fav books ever since I was a #teen. I periodically revisit it and I'm always a little afraid that something will have switched in my brain and it won't resonate with me as much anymore but that hasn't happened yet. I thought this adaptation was great. Really captured the weirdness and the pain and the tiny moments that make this book so powerful to me. ;_; Oh man Slaughterhouse-Five has been one of my all-time fav books ever since I was a #teen. I periodically revisit it and I'm always a little afraid that something will have switched in my brain and it won't resonate with me as much anymore but that hasn't happened yet. I thought this adaptation was great. Really captured the weirdness and the pain and the tiny moments that make this book so powerful to me. ;_;

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    An excellent introduction to Vonnegut for graphic novel lovers and an excellent introduction to the graphic novel for Vonnegut lovers. The artistry in this one creates the same sense of disjointed, unsettled, dark satire that I experienced when I first read Slaughterhouse Five over 30 years ago. I can see success for this one on multiple levels across different communities of readers. Well done. Thank you to NetGalley and to Archaia for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Cody

    An amazing graphic novel adaptation. I forgot how powerful this story is. Damn.

  30. 5 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    I’m super leery of adaptations, especially when one of my favorites is involved, but Ryan North absolutely does Slaughterhouse-Five justice. The time travel bits were handled brilliantly. Some of Monteys’s art gave me literal chills. Vonnegut fans, you must get your hands on this! It’s gorgeous. I think Father Kurt would approve.

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