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Warhol's Mother's Pantry: Art, America, and the Mom in Pop

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Winner of the Gournay Prize for Creative Nonfiction: Innovation in the Essay “Part prose poem, part mix tape, part mash-up, and part commonplace book, Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry channel surfs the cultural waves of the long twentieth century as they break on the shores of pop.” —Mike Chasar, author of Poetry Unbound: Poems and New Media from the Magic Lantern to Instagram “In c Winner of the Gournay Prize for Creative Nonfiction: Innovation in the Essay “Part prose poem, part mix tape, part mash-up, and part commonplace book, Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry channel surfs the cultural waves of the long twentieth century as they break on the shores of pop.” —Mike Chasar, author of Poetry Unbound: Poems and New Media from the Magic Lantern to Instagram “In critico-lyrical prose that pops off the page and skips over boundaries with the agility native to its most daring subjects—from Stevie Smith to Leonard Cohen, from Andy Warhol to Kendrick Lamar—Devine issues a dare to his readers: Let us go. Take him up. You won’t regret it.” —Boris Dralyuk, Executive Editor, Los Angeles Review of Books “What are these fragments we’ve Jersey Shored against our ruin?” asks M. I. Devine, remixing T. S. Eliot, in this dizzying collection of essays that pays homage to the cultural forms that hold us steady. These fragments are stored in Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry, which takes us deep beneath the surfaces of pop to explore our shared quest for meaning today. Julia Warhola, an immigrant who arrived as the US was closing its borders a century ago, is the muse of reuse in these essays that cross boundaries—between now and then, high and low. She is the mom in pop who cut tin cans into flowers and taught Andy (and us) how to reshape and redeem our world. In essays as lyrical, witty, and experimental as the works they cover, Devine offers a new account of pop humanism. How we cut new things from the traditions we’re given, why we don’t stop believin’ (and carry on, wayward sons) when so much is stacked against us. Here are Leonard Cohen’s last songs and Molly Bloom’s last words; Vampire Weekend’s Rostam and Philip Larkin too; Stevie Smith, John Donne, and Kendrick Lamar; sonnets and selfies; early cinema and post–9/11 film, pop hooks, and pop art. In Devine’s hands, these literary and cultural artifacts are provocatively reassembled into an urgent and refreshing history that refuses to let its readers forget where pop came from and where it can go. Chicago Review of Books: "In a lyrical mix of memoir and criticism... with playful, plosive prose rich with cultural allusion... Devine suggests we may not be as alienated from one another as we seem." The Millions: "an inventive, playful, and rangy consideration of that human depth upon the surfaces of things—Devine has a way of magnetizing himself to past and present, bounding across references and texts."


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Winner of the Gournay Prize for Creative Nonfiction: Innovation in the Essay “Part prose poem, part mix tape, part mash-up, and part commonplace book, Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry channel surfs the cultural waves of the long twentieth century as they break on the shores of pop.” —Mike Chasar, author of Poetry Unbound: Poems and New Media from the Magic Lantern to Instagram “In c Winner of the Gournay Prize for Creative Nonfiction: Innovation in the Essay “Part prose poem, part mix tape, part mash-up, and part commonplace book, Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry channel surfs the cultural waves of the long twentieth century as they break on the shores of pop.” —Mike Chasar, author of Poetry Unbound: Poems and New Media from the Magic Lantern to Instagram “In critico-lyrical prose that pops off the page and skips over boundaries with the agility native to its most daring subjects—from Stevie Smith to Leonard Cohen, from Andy Warhol to Kendrick Lamar—Devine issues a dare to his readers: Let us go. Take him up. You won’t regret it.” —Boris Dralyuk, Executive Editor, Los Angeles Review of Books “What are these fragments we’ve Jersey Shored against our ruin?” asks M. I. Devine, remixing T. S. Eliot, in this dizzying collection of essays that pays homage to the cultural forms that hold us steady. These fragments are stored in Warhol’s Mother’s Pantry, which takes us deep beneath the surfaces of pop to explore our shared quest for meaning today. Julia Warhola, an immigrant who arrived as the US was closing its borders a century ago, is the muse of reuse in these essays that cross boundaries—between now and then, high and low. She is the mom in pop who cut tin cans into flowers and taught Andy (and us) how to reshape and redeem our world. In essays as lyrical, witty, and experimental as the works they cover, Devine offers a new account of pop humanism. How we cut new things from the traditions we’re given, why we don’t stop believin’ (and carry on, wayward sons) when so much is stacked against us. Here are Leonard Cohen’s last songs and Molly Bloom’s last words; Vampire Weekend’s Rostam and Philip Larkin too; Stevie Smith, John Donne, and Kendrick Lamar; sonnets and selfies; early cinema and post–9/11 film, pop hooks, and pop art. In Devine’s hands, these literary and cultural artifacts are provocatively reassembled into an urgent and refreshing history that refuses to let its readers forget where pop came from and where it can go. Chicago Review of Books: "In a lyrical mix of memoir and criticism... with playful, plosive prose rich with cultural allusion... Devine suggests we may not be as alienated from one another as we seem." The Millions: "an inventive, playful, and rangy consideration of that human depth upon the surfaces of things—Devine has a way of magnetizing himself to past and present, bounding across references and texts."

31 review for Warhol's Mother's Pantry: Art, America, and the Mom in Pop

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Johnson

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roarda12

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  5. 5 out of 5

    M.I. Devine

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ching-In

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hogmire

  8. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  10. 5 out of 5

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  11. 5 out of 5

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  12. 4 out of 5

    Voodooenglishman

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eshani Bhattacharjee

  14. 4 out of 5

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  15. 4 out of 5

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  17. 5 out of 5

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  18. 4 out of 5

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  19. 5 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

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  24. 5 out of 5

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  25. 5 out of 5

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  27. 4 out of 5

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  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennilee Psaro

  29. 5 out of 5

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  30. 4 out of 5

    Ananya Ranjan

  31. 5 out of 5

    Arya

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