counter create hit From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture

Availability: Ready to download

Koritha Mitchell analyzes canonical texts by and about African American women to lay bare the hostility these women face as they invest in traditional domesticity. Instead of the respectability and safety granted white homemakers, black women endure pejorative labels, racist governmental policies, attacks on their citizenship, and aggression meant to keep them in "their pl Koritha Mitchell analyzes canonical texts by and about African American women to lay bare the hostility these women face as they invest in traditional domesticity. Instead of the respectability and safety granted white homemakers, black women endure pejorative labels, racist governmental policies, attacks on their citizenship, and aggression meant to keep them in "their place." Tracing how African Americans define and redefine success in a nation determined to deprive them of it, Mitchell plumbs the works of Frances Harper, Zora Neale Hurston, Lorraine Hansberry, Toni Morrison, Michelle Obama, and others. These artists honor black homes from slavery and post-emancipation through the Civil Rights era to "post-racial" America. Mitchell follows black families asserting their citizenship in domestic settings while the larger society and culture marginalize and attack them, not because they are deviants or failures but because they meet American standards. Powerful and provocative, From Slave Cabins to the White House illuminates the links between African American women's homemaking and citizenship in history and across literature.


Compare
Ads Banner

Koritha Mitchell analyzes canonical texts by and about African American women to lay bare the hostility these women face as they invest in traditional domesticity. Instead of the respectability and safety granted white homemakers, black women endure pejorative labels, racist governmental policies, attacks on their citizenship, and aggression meant to keep them in "their pl Koritha Mitchell analyzes canonical texts by and about African American women to lay bare the hostility these women face as they invest in traditional domesticity. Instead of the respectability and safety granted white homemakers, black women endure pejorative labels, racist governmental policies, attacks on their citizenship, and aggression meant to keep them in "their place." Tracing how African Americans define and redefine success in a nation determined to deprive them of it, Mitchell plumbs the works of Frances Harper, Zora Neale Hurston, Lorraine Hansberry, Toni Morrison, Michelle Obama, and others. These artists honor black homes from slavery and post-emancipation through the Civil Rights era to "post-racial" America. Mitchell follows black families asserting their citizenship in domestic settings while the larger society and culture marginalize and attack them, not because they are deviants or failures but because they meet American standards. Powerful and provocative, From Slave Cabins to the White House illuminates the links between African American women's homemaking and citizenship in history and across literature.

45 review for From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hartness

    From Slave Cabins to the White House is an examination of African American history and culture and how it has been shaped. I feel that it is an important topic and one that I want to learn more about. The introduction is very long and I found it difficult to understand. There were a few terms I needed to look up, and it was much more intellectual than I am used to. Once I made it to the actual chapters I had a slightly easier time with the text. I should explain that I received an advance copy i From Slave Cabins to the White House is an examination of African American history and culture and how it has been shaped. I feel that it is an important topic and one that I want to learn more about. The introduction is very long and I found it difficult to understand. There were a few terms I needed to look up, and it was much more intellectual than I am used to. Once I made it to the actual chapters I had a slightly easier time with the text. I should explain that I received an advance copy in exchange for my honest review. I only finished the second chapter before the arc expired, in part due to my schedule and in part due to my difficulty reading the introduction. My observation was that the premise of the book- that black men and women have always pursued success and achievement despite knowing that doing so always has and still does incur white violence and anger- is repeated so often it is practically every other sentence. It did get annoying, as I found the rest of the content interesting, but I couldn't get past the excessive repetition. The author does make a convincing argument, and it is an idea I had not heard expressed before. Each chapter focuses on a different time period by examining cultural works such as plays, autobiographical texts and works of fiction, as well as the public personal of Michelle Obama. I would still suggest it is worth a read, but this is my impression. *Once this is published, I intend to finish reading it.*

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    From Slave Cabins to the White House is a work of non-fiction that has the potential to be a timeless piece of literature. Very well researched and the literature referenced was fantastic. Kortiha Mitchell takes the reader on a journey of the enslaved black woman to the Black First Lady of the United States of America. With references to Ida B. Wells, Toni Morrison, W.E.B. DuBois and so many more black scholars; this text is a wealth of knowledge that doesn't short change you on the author's vie From Slave Cabins to the White House is a work of non-fiction that has the potential to be a timeless piece of literature. Very well researched and the literature referenced was fantastic. Kortiha Mitchell takes the reader on a journey of the enslaved black woman to the Black First Lady of the United States of America. With references to Ida B. Wells, Toni Morrison, W.E.B. DuBois and so many more black scholars; this text is a wealth of knowledge that doesn't short change you on the author's viewpoint. I can see how some reviewers might have faced a challenge being unfamiliar with some of the references but I sincerely hope that motivates one to explore those works as well. I will agree that the introduction is a bit long and somewhat repetitive but nevertheless I enjoyed this book and can not wait to add a physical copy to my library. Thank you to NetGalley, the publisher and author for my copy in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mia | The Bookish Feminist

    I think Koritha Mitchell pulled off a pretty incredible feat here: she presented relatively cerebral, intellectual work in a digestible, narrative format that makes her point clear, her analysis easy to follow, and the stories of the texts she reviews come to life. Mitchell really embarks on a journey of theoretical analysis in order to aggregate and ultimately synthesize a body of primary texts that spans centuries. She manages to bring all these separate, mostly unrelated texts together to for I think Koritha Mitchell pulled off a pretty incredible feat here: she presented relatively cerebral, intellectual work in a digestible, narrative format that makes her point clear, her analysis easy to follow, and the stories of the texts she reviews come to life. Mitchell really embarks on a journey of theoretical analysis in order to aggregate and ultimately synthesize a body of primary texts that spans centuries. She manages to bring all these separate, mostly unrelated texts together to form a cohesive narrative while she posits that’s Black womxn have been dismissed and marginalized, even as they fulfill the historical criteria of “success” in American culture. Womxn who have dedicated their lives to the home - raising children and other tireless obligations - are shunned from mainstream American society and demoralized because of their work, all while white womxn were allowed entry into the same society for dutifully fulfilling their expected gender roles. Mitchell talks about the Black womxn we look up to, like Michelle Obama, and explores how white commentators devalue and belittle the achievements and validity of Black womxn by stereotyping and name-calling them. One of the other things Mitchell discusses is the ways in which Black Americans have essentially formed “citizenship” to their own created communities, since white policy makers, pundits, and the general public have done everything they can to prevent Black folx from achieving “success,” no matter how traditionally “successful” they are. This is a way of maintaining oppression and attempts to marginalize this diverse community. I’m used to academic texts but have spent most of the last decade exploring mostly fiction and some non-fiction, but Mitchell’s work feels really accessible and readable to me. Not only does she provide history and context, she also fully synthesizes it and helps us see how we got where we are and what we need to do to change it. No matter how much thinking I’ve done on the subject of equity and justice, I’ve never thought of a lot of the topics discussed within “From Slave Cabins to the White House” in such a clearly linked way. I think Mitchell has written a work that is invaluable and really hasn’t been done before, which is quite an achievement given how many remarkable works have been published on adjacent topics. I’d highly recommend this text to anyone who’s hoping to learn some about history via historical texts, analyze the images and messages we receive from the media, and how the ladders of opportunity continue to be systemically weakened for Black Americans, and particularly Black womxn. Thank you very much to the publisher and NetGalley for an advance copy of this text. This review is wholly unbiased.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marian P

    In From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell Ohio State University English professor interrogates key African American texts to understand their conceptions of success and achievement. The book itself is a literary criticism pivoting on the question of citizenship and notions of success. Because Black men and women had been precluded from the official definitions of citizenship as outlined in the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Cons In From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell Ohio State University English professor interrogates key African American texts to understand their conceptions of success and achievement. The book itself is a literary criticism pivoting on the question of citizenship and notions of success. Because Black men and women had been precluded from the official definitions of citizenship as outlined in the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, they had to devise other manners of marking their success and participation. Thus, the crux of the book is a response to the kind of “know your place” aggression that Black people have been subjected to since (and before) the nation’s inception. The book is organized chronologically as Mitchell interrogates works by Harriet Jacobs (Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl), Frances Watkins Harper (Iola Leroy), Nella Larsen (Quicksand), Zora Neale Hurston (Their Eyes Were Watching God), Lorraine Hansberry (Raisin in the Sun), Octavia Butler (Kindred), Toni Morrison (Beloved) and the performative text of Michelle Obama, as First Lady. Mitchell is successful at providing close readings of the works under consideration, especially in the detailed coverage of Quicksand, Kindred, Raisin in the Sun, and Iola Leroy. In some of these examples, an author, such as Larsen or Hurston, creates characters that rail against the expectations of Black womanhood as mothers and wives. In this regard, Mitchell is extremely effective. In other examples, such as Jacobs’ Incidents, the analysis seems slightly weighed down with close readings. In other words, despite it being a work in African American literary criticism, it may have been more effective with summaries of the works prior to the analytical examples. The book is an invaluable resource for those interested in literary criticism, African American literature, and feminist analysis.

  5. 4 out of 5

    T.B. Caine

    Thank you to Netgalley & the publisher for giving me an ARC! It's weird to explain nonfiction, because this is one of those genres of books that the synopsis tells you basically everything you need to know about the book and exactly what to expect. I felt like the book delivered exactly what was promised. And I liked that the main thing that was discussed in this book was the re-framing of history as Black citizens trying to live and white people getting angry at them for being successful. It wa Thank you to Netgalley & the publisher for giving me an ARC! It's weird to explain nonfiction, because this is one of those genres of books that the synopsis tells you basically everything you need to know about the book and exactly what to expect. I felt like the book delivered exactly what was promised. And I liked that the main thing that was discussed in this book was the re-framing of history as Black citizens trying to live and white people getting angry at them for being successful. It was a very interesting take on history, and I feel like that is the way we need to be studying it from now on. It made a lot of sense once you saw it in action through the texts. The reason it is at a 4 and not a 5, just has to do with my own experience with the text as I hadn't read the literature that was mentioned and therefore it ended up feeling a bit too dry. However, that might totally be different for someone that has read the texts that this book analyzes!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tanya Barnett

    I'm not even half way through so I will definitely come back to complete this review. As of right now, it is fantastic! I love how Koritha references other texts and the actual stories of enslaved women to give us a glimpse into their lives. "Black people are always making themselves at home" really resonated with me as I often find myself in spaces where I definitely belong but the white folk there make you feel like you don't. I cannot wait to finish the book but if you are on the fence, you d I'm not even half way through so I will definitely come back to complete this review. As of right now, it is fantastic! I love how Koritha references other texts and the actual stories of enslaved women to give us a glimpse into their lives. "Black people are always making themselves at home" really resonated with me as I often find myself in spaces where I definitely belong but the white folk there make you feel like you don't. I cannot wait to finish the book but if you are on the fence, you definitely need to get this book and also get one for a Black woman you love.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This is a well-researched look at the history of African Americans, especially African American women, throughout this country’s history. I appreciated the immediate identification of the treatment of Michelle Obama while in office and how the underlying prejudice promoted the treatment of one of the ladies in the highest office in the country. This is a must-have for any American History collection. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest re This is a well-researched look at the history of African Americans, especially African American women, throughout this country’s history. I appreciated the immediate identification of the treatment of Michelle Obama while in office and how the underlying prejudice promoted the treatment of one of the ladies in the highest office in the country. This is a must-have for any American History collection. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie Martin

    I have received this title via NetGalley and publishers in exchange for an honest review I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I believe that everyone can learn something from this book. I did not like the introduction at all. It was painfully slow and long to get through. It also felt that the author was trying to prove her intelligence in this section. After the introduction, the book was amazing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    A huge thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an advanced release copy in exchange for my honest review. I found the premise of the book to be very interesting and the author did a good job of providing the supporting evidence. Unfortunately, the introduction is sooo long and so fact based, that it is a chore to slog through it. The book itself has more of a narrational qyality but after the introduction, you have to push yourself to read it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dora Yang

    I learned a lot from this book, however I found it to be dry. I think the narrative is a very important one, and it makes people rethink the history we think we've known. I hadn't read the literature that the book references to unfortunately, so the parts discussing them seemed long and essay-life; it may be a different experience for others who have read them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I found From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture to be an interesting read. I believe it is a must read. Five stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Bannister

    I Enjoyed everything about this book there was nothing I didn't like about the book. I would gladly reread it again. I Would recommend this book to anyone.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lori White

    From Slave Cabins to the White House by Koritha Mitchell is an intensely-written and often dogmatic book which attempts to highlight and define the many ways African American women have been disrespected as homemakers, and how that translates into an overarching disrespect for all African Americans who seek success - especially domestic success - both as they define it and as the majority culture defines it. The author uses a wide variety of cultural productions (books, plays, etc) to support th From Slave Cabins to the White House by Koritha Mitchell is an intensely-written and often dogmatic book which attempts to highlight and define the many ways African American women have been disrespected as homemakers, and how that translates into an overarching disrespect for all African Americans who seek success - especially domestic success - both as they define it and as the majority culture defines it. The author uses a wide variety of cultural productions (books, plays, etc) to support this belief, ranging from Harriet Jacob's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) to Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun (1959) to Toni Morrison's Beloved (1987), and finally the public persona of former First Lady, Michelle Obama. Seeing these texts through the filter of the author's premise was interesting, and definitely made me want to read the original documents to form my own opinion - I have a healthy suspicion when it comes to cherry-picking. That said, the author does a great job of supporting her premise, and does it convincingly. She weaves a compelling narrative, and, with the exception of the wandering and poorly-scoped introduction, the writing is engaging and challenging. In whole, From Slave Cabins to the White House provides a much-needed historical look at the topic of domestic success and African American women, and how that success has been denied, denigrated, withheld and ultimately claimed. This review is based on an advance copy read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Atkins

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jayne

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna Goldberg

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Marino

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  20. 4 out of 5

    B Sarv

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Johnston

  22. 5 out of 5

    Harlow

  23. 4 out of 5

    James Hill Welborn III

  24. 5 out of 5

    Izetta Autumn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Latanya

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Bollman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Never Without a Book

  28. 4 out of 5

    Krystina

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cai Blue

  30. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  31. 5 out of 5

    Alexia Polasky

  32. 4 out of 5

    Camille

  33. 5 out of 5

    Theodore

  34. 5 out of 5

    Renee Bailey

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tasasha

  36. 4 out of 5

    Azalea Dunn

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee

  38. 4 out of 5

    Ishmael

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jazmin

  40. 4 out of 5

    Julie Evershed

  41. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Doherty Salone

  42. 5 out of 5

    TRISHA

  43. 5 out of 5

    Keatyn Figiel

  44. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

  45. 5 out of 5

    Abdel Rahman Amin

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.