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Racism as Zoological Witchcraft: A Guide to Getting Out

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In this scintillating combination of critical race theory, social commentary, veganism, and gender analysis, media studies scholar Aph Ko offers a compelling vision of a reimagined social justice movement marked by a deconstruction of the conceptual framework that keeps activists silo-ed fighting their various oppressions--and one another. Through a subtle and extended exa In this scintillating combination of critical race theory, social commentary, veganism, and gender analysis, media studies scholar Aph Ko offers a compelling vision of a reimagined social justice movement marked by a deconstruction of the conceptual framework that keeps activists silo-ed fighting their various oppressions--and one another. Through a subtle and extended examination of Jordan Peele's hit 2017 movie Get Out, Ko shows the many ways that white supremacist notions of animality and race exist through the consumption and exploitation of flesh. She demonstrates how a critical historical and social understanding of anti-Blackness can provide the pathway to genuine liberation. Highly readable, richly illustrated, and full of startling insights, Racism as Zoological Witchcraft is a brilliant example of the emerging discipline of Black veganism by one of its leading voices.


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In this scintillating combination of critical race theory, social commentary, veganism, and gender analysis, media studies scholar Aph Ko offers a compelling vision of a reimagined social justice movement marked by a deconstruction of the conceptual framework that keeps activists silo-ed fighting their various oppressions--and one another. Through a subtle and extended exa In this scintillating combination of critical race theory, social commentary, veganism, and gender analysis, media studies scholar Aph Ko offers a compelling vision of a reimagined social justice movement marked by a deconstruction of the conceptual framework that keeps activists silo-ed fighting their various oppressions--and one another. Through a subtle and extended examination of Jordan Peele's hit 2017 movie Get Out, Ko shows the many ways that white supremacist notions of animality and race exist through the consumption and exploitation of flesh. She demonstrates how a critical historical and social understanding of anti-Blackness can provide the pathway to genuine liberation. Highly readable, richly illustrated, and full of startling insights, Racism as Zoological Witchcraft is a brilliant example of the emerging discipline of Black veganism by one of its leading voices.

30 review for Racism as Zoological Witchcraft: A Guide to Getting Out

  1. 4 out of 5

    A. Breeze Harper

    I just finished Aph Ko’s newest book, “Racism as Zoological Witchcraft”. Here is my review. In this book, Aph Ko offers the reader to consider the space of ‘animality’ as a more productive framework in understanding the limits of mainstream animal rights rhetoric as well as traditional methods of USA mainstream anti-racism movements. Animality, a site of white supremacy and bedrock of the US racial caste system, is explored through two popular media: The Bachelor and the movie “Get Out”. Ko exami I just finished Aph Ko’s newest book, “Racism as Zoological Witchcraft”. Here is my review. In this book, Aph Ko offers the reader to consider the space of ‘animality’ as a more productive framework in understanding the limits of mainstream animal rights rhetoric as well as traditional methods of USA mainstream anti-racism movements. Animality, a site of white supremacy and bedrock of the US racial caste system, is explored through two popular media: The Bachelor and the movie “Get Out”. Ko examines the usage of taxidermy in the ways that white imagination about both non-human animals and nonwhite (mostly Black people) are fundamental to articulations of power, privilege, entitlement, and control over nature/the Other. Taxidermy, a marker of white supremacy in Bachelor and “Get Out”, involves hollowing out the authentic essence of an sentient being, and then stuffing that being to take on the desires of the dominant (White). I don’t want to give a way too much, but Ko’s analysis of taxidermy and racial power/dominance are refreshing. Ko also argues for why using ‘intersectionality’ is not as effective as other concepts that do not work within colonial logic and identity labels, which is how intersectionality, as a buzzword now, is utilized. Instead, she gives us ‘Afro-futuristic’ possibilities that do not rely on a Eurocentric animal rights and anti-racism rhetoric which have been accepted as ‘the only way’ by most in the USA. Ultimately, she urges the reader— especially minoritized racial groups in the USA, to ‘get out’ of the psychological traps of adhering to only Eurocentric and colonial methods of liberation, no matter how ‘benevolent’ these methods may at first appear to be. https://www.amazon.com/Racism-Zoologi...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Corvus

    Once in a while, a theorist comes along and helps you realize just how stuck in a paradigm your thinking is. There is a long history of our movements often being categorized by waves or generations- a practice that often puts white voices in the spotlight. As times and society change (and while many things stay the same,) daring authors, activists, thinkers, and others break through what is accepted at the time to create something needed and new. These people are critical to the evolution of thi Once in a while, a theorist comes along and helps you realize just how stuck in a paradigm your thinking is. There is a long history of our movements often being categorized by waves or generations- a practice that often puts white voices in the spotlight. As times and society change (and while many things stay the same,) daring authors, activists, thinkers, and others break through what is accepted at the time to create something needed and new. These people are critical to the evolution of thinking and activism. Aph Ko is one of these people. I have followed Ko's work since Black Vegans Rock and Aphro-ism and also had the privilege of seeing her speak at an Intersectional Justice conference (of which her talk was one of the best, if not the best.) I have been regularly blown away by her ability to use the knowledge we have to create new things, rather than only repeating or strengthening ideas that already exist. In "Racism as Zoological Witchcraft: A Guide to Getting Out," Aph Ko takes many belief systems regarding anti-racism, animal liberation, intersectionality, feminism, and other kinds of radicalism and dissects them mercilessly. While reading Ko's work in this book especially, I was moved by her unapologetic passion. Ko tells the truth and creates thought exercises that stimulate the mind and create change even if a particular concept is not fully fleshed out. Ko has clearly considered things outside the box so intensely that her excitement about the evolution and change of our movements shines through the pages. This book is well organized and fairly short at 126 pages, not including notes and sources. Normally, I would read something this short more quickly. But, Ko introduces so many complicated concepts and discusses so many intense and serious things, that I put the book down frequently. This book requires one to take their time and think. Ko begins from the premise that many of our movements are colonized and static in how they approach the subjects at hand- focusing mainly on racism and animality (though me dividing the two into separate camps for the sake of clarity goes against Aph's thesis.) Ko has a background in media studies and uses her experience to analyze these topics in various media- the movie Get Out being central to the text. I actually decided to rewatch Get Out after reading Ko's first analysis of it in the book. I am a person who often pays attention to how other animals intersect with humans' stories in media. However, I did not realize just how intertwined the constructs of "human" and "animal" were in Get Out until reading Ko's analysis and rewatching the film. Ko highlights how human and other animal suffering and exploitation are not just metaphors for one another, but are intimately intertwined as part of a much more insidious system of what she refers to as Zoological Racism. She weaves this analysis throughout the book as a cohesive thread. There was one section of the book that I struggled with and that was a chapter titled Moving from Intersectionality to Multidimensional Liberation Theory. Ko previously coined the term social layerism to describe "the ways in which intersectional activists and scholars often pile oppressions on top of one another without an "intersection" or "connection" ever really taking place." This is basically a colonized, white veganism version of faux intersectionality that is separate from the concepts promoted by Black lesbian feminists like the Combahee River Collective. It seemed to me through reading this chapter, that Ko was addressing social layerism rather than actual intersectionality. The idea of multidimensionality is central to intersectionality. It is not that Black women experience racism on top of sexism or vice versa, but that the intersection creates a multidimensional experience different from either oppression on its own. Now, it's clear that Ko understands this. She even goes on to say at the end of the chapter that some people will make the argument I just made and that it is incorrect. She claims that we are so steeped in intersectionality being the accepted theory that that stands in the way of us being able to grasp multidimensionality liberation theory. That said, I still found myself searching for the difference between the two. Ko goes on to explain multidimension liberation theory using a very helpful analogy, complete with illustration, of different kinds of houses. This is where her theories did begin to separate from and evolve past intersectionality for me. She explains that we currently look at oppressions from the front of the house seeing only the front doors as an entrance to fighting it. What oppression really is is a multidimensional house with many different entrances. We must find and explore those in order to most effectively fight oppression. I also was both enlightened and confused by her example of Black mens experiences as being gendered and sexualized. This also seemed to be in line with or expanding upon intersectionality to me, (i.e. the intersection of being Black and male creates a unique set of struggles.) It is undoubtedly important not to place Black men in the same patriarchal category as white men, but I think she took it a bit far. She quotes mens studies theorists Johnson and Curry throughout this section. While I did understand some of what she was saying- such as Black men needing to be included in the history of white sexual violence against Black bodies, the importance of dismantling the Black male predator trope especially with their history of victimization, and the horrific history of lynching enforced through the power that both white men and women have held over Black male bodies- some of the text seemed to border on the whole #notallmen/men-get-X-too phenomenon that is often used to silence women discussing struggle and violence at the hands of men- including Black men. I am not saying Ko was silencing women. On the contrary, I believe she is trying to expand upon often one-dimensional theories about race and gender in important ways. However, I was left saying to myself, "I would never claim that I lack white privilege due to the fact that my being trans, queer, disabled, etc causes me not to experience it in the same way as a white cis het man." Is Blackness in particular the oppression that overrides any other advantage? If a disabled man is violent towards a nondisabled woman, do we discount the patriarchy and misogyny involved because he is disabled and she is not? Perhaps it is that white supremacy and animality are the central tenets and the same thinking would not apply to all marginalized people. Johnson's quotes used by Ko were the ones that I felt uneasy about, but wasn't sure exactly why. As a result, I decided to read some of Johnson's posts online in case the small quotes out of context led to a misunderstanding on my part. Reading more from Johnson only bothered me more. He makes valid points about the oppression of Black men, but the way he frames them is from a staunchly anti-feminist viewpoint where he constantly devalues the voices of of women and often seems to suggest that Black women are oppressing Black men by asking that women be centered. He believes that Black men are incapable of having male privilege or patriarchal advantages because of their oppression based on race. He uses anecdotes artfully to paint a false picture that Black women have it easier than Black men. It is as if he does not understand the various reasons Black feminisms came about and reduces almost all of them to extremist misandrists. He demeans sensitive and gentle men, claims women actually want "hypermasculinity" "behind closed doors," and refers to hypermasculine men as real and others as just pandering to feminism. All in all, the messages about the needs of Black men to be included are overshadowed by the anti-feminism and low-key misogynoir in his writings. I could write more about this, but this was such a small section of the book that I don't want my opinions about this guy who did not write it to dominate. Also, having said all of that, I haven't stopped thinking about this. So, perhaps some of these things will settle into my mind and I will feel differently. Perhaps there are things I don't understand yet due to the phenomena that Aph Ko describes in which we are stuck in one way of thinking. In wrapping things up, Ko discusses "Afro-zoological resistance" as the solution to these conflicts arising from the static nature of our current understandings of oppression. She states, "Animal is part of the vocabulary of white supremacist violence; it signifies the rhetorical and social branding of certain bodies, which white supremacy wants to consume, exploit, and eliminate without question." She reminds us that single-issue and "two-dimensional" intersectional movements are colonized and locked in place requiring that they be upended in order to fully understand the scope of oppression. She also discusses how this fits into animal liberation in particular stating, "...veganism isn't just about kicking a meat-eating habit and getting some veggies into your diet... It's a powerful rejection of a racist food system and a racist, cannibalistic politics that characterizes animals and nonwhite people as disposable and consumable." Overall, Aph Ko provides the needed upheaval of current systems of anti-oppression thought and activism that is critical for the growth of all movements over time. I am very excited to watch the ideas she explores grow and affect change over time. This book raises more questions than it answers and I believe that was part of Ko's intention. I still have quite a lot to think about. This was also posted to my blog.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Robison

    I don't know how Aph Ko does it. She's like your kind and generous older sister with a PhD who re-states academic social theory in a way that makes it relevant to your life. She still uses phrases like "decolonial Black epistemic frameworks," but never leaves you hanging there confused. She puts things in the context of "The Bachelor" and the horror film "Get Out," which is used throughout the book to describe the ways that white supremacy exploits and consumes black and brown bodies as well as I don't know how Aph Ko does it. She's like your kind and generous older sister with a PhD who re-states academic social theory in a way that makes it relevant to your life. She still uses phrases like "decolonial Black epistemic frameworks," but never leaves you hanging there confused. She puts things in the context of "The Bachelor" and the horror film "Get Out," which is used throughout the book to describe the ways that white supremacy exploits and consumes black and brown bodies as well as animals. As with her great book "Aphro-ism" (co-authored with sister Syl Ko), one of my favorite parts is how she explains that intersectionality is not a good method for analyzing oppressions. Excerpt: Although activists are accustomed to taking “race,” “gender,” and “class” and making them intersect, most people don't question how they have been trained to understand what “race,” “gender,” and “class” are to begin with. The reason why Black women are excluded from both the anti-racist movement and the feminist movement is because our cultural understandings of what constitutes a “Black person” and what constitutes a “woman” are already tainted and separated at the root. The mainstream public thinks of a “Black person” as a man and a “woman” as a white female. Making these two spaces connect doesn't discursively birth a Black woman. Or she discusses how black men are excluded from positions of power in the Black Lives Movement as well as from stories of race-based sexual violence. I didn't know, for example, that Trayvon Martin might've thought George Zimmerman was a rapist. And I didn't know the long history of whites literally consuming slaves, making them into purses and even eating them, and how taxidermy has been used as a symbol of white supremacy. Anyway, if the following passage speaks to you, you'll love this book: How is it possible that we live in an era in which anti-racist activists are acutely aware of how white supremacy treats people of color “like animals,” but are discouraged from examining how literal animals are casualties of this racial caste system as well? While I loved the book from the beginning, I read it fairly slowly because of the big words. When I switched to the audio version, I raced through. Both were helpful — the former so I could highlight parts I wanted to think upon later, and the latter so I could simply enjoy the discussion of how our society deals with race, gender, and animals. Grade: A

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martin Rowe

    I'm the publisher of this book and wanted to share a few thoughts about it. In one sense, RACISM AS ZOOLOGICAL WITCHCRAFT is a deeper exploration of post-colonial philosophy and theory surrounding the animalization of the black body that Aph and her sister Syl lay out and discuss in their book APHRO-ISM. In another sense, it's a book of cultural criticism and media studies—particularly around the presentation of black bodies in popular culture. In still another sense, RACISM is a remarkably sinu I'm the publisher of this book and wanted to share a few thoughts about it. In one sense, RACISM AS ZOOLOGICAL WITCHCRAFT is a deeper exploration of post-colonial philosophy and theory surrounding the animalization of the black body that Aph and her sister Syl lay out and discuss in their book APHRO-ISM. In another sense, it's a book of cultural criticism and media studies—particularly around the presentation of black bodies in popular culture. In still another sense, RACISM is a remarkably sinuous and convincing critical appreciation of GET OUT, the 2017 smash-hit movie by Jordan Peele. In still another sense, it's a passionate call to re-imagine veganism and animal rights as philosophical constructs and social movements. Yet, while this extraordinary work is all those things (and more), it's true strength lies in how it weaves these themes together—AND how it offers a brilliant example of precisely the kind of engaged social, cultural, literary, and philosophical theorizing and analysis that Ko is asking of activists and theorists alike. I've been reading and publishing animal rights books and books on philosophy for decades. I don't think I've ever been as excited or intellectually engaged, or as inspired, as I have while reading RACISM AS ZOOLOGICAL WITCHCRAFT. I very rarely give five stars to any book, let alone ones I publish. No book is perfect, and this one is no exception. However, the scale of its ambition and what it does with its material is so impressive that it deserves that extra star. I highly recommend it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Graham Knight

    I read this book looking for new approaches after realising the separatism proposed by groups such as Anonymous for the Voiceless were not a way forward. This was obvious after their appalling responses to the Black Lives Matter movement. In this book the author is looking for a new approach to politics, specifically outside of the “colonised” anti-racist and animal liberation movements and the limitations of intersectionality. She proposes seeing oppressions as symptoms of a larger system which I read this book looking for new approaches after realising the separatism proposed by groups such as Anonymous for the Voiceless were not a way forward. This was obvious after their appalling responses to the Black Lives Matter movement. In this book the author is looking for a new approach to politics, specifically outside of the “colonised” anti-racist and animal liberation movements and the limitations of intersectionality. She proposes seeing oppressions as symptoms of a larger system which she identifies as white supremacy. She write that the solution has to go beyond simply linking different social justice movements together but in conceptualising a new multidimensional approach. I valued her insights into the current thinking behind the vegan and animal liberation movements and her discussion into the animalisation of black people. I found her analysis of the film Get Out particularly interesting and it's prompted me to see the film again. The book gives no solutions however and does not claim to. I don't know what a multidimensional liberation movement would look like in practise or if it's possible. Analogies are constantly employed and I found these sometimes complicated the points she was trying to make rather than make understanding easier. Long explanations are needed to explain why white supremacy is witchcraft and why it consumes black people. I was not always convinced at her attempts to link these explanations to the system of the exploitation and abuse of animals. Because her approach places oppression with a system of white supremacy I wasn't sure how useful her critique of intersectionality was. I was struck by later coming across a critique of intersectionality made by Mary Davis in her article Class Politics vs Identify Politics which I felt gave more clarity, "intersectionality relegates class to a mere aspect of identity, defining it as just another cultural construct rather than the most significant determining force of an individual’s position in and experience of capitalist social relations. Stripping its adherents of a systematic understanding of capitalism, intersectionality makes it impossible to understand the social sources and significance of the very identities it celebrates, and it undermines the possibility of collective struggle against the system which fosters discrimination, division and exploitation: capitalism." Seeing oppressions as symptoms of a bigger system was a useful approach but the system she locates them in is white supremacy. I kept wondering when capitalism would be mentioned or the relationship of white supremacy to capitalism but it never came. Capitalism is the system that sets down the conditions for white supremacy and (as Adolph Reed notes) our identity movements are an expression of neoliberalism. Ultimately, I felt that Aph Ko stopped her analysis short at white supremacy rather than taking the final step of locating it within capitalism. This led to her discussion of intersectionality and liberation movements as being colonial rather than expressions of neoliberalist individualism. I felt it was a stretch to use the analogy that white supremacy was witchcraft but then this unusual claim was the reason I read the book!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    In Racism as Zoological Witchcraft: A Guide to Getting Out, author Aph Ko describes the consumption and disposal of non-white bodies as a ritual necessary for the continuation of white supremacy. If this assertion makes you feel something, anything—confusion, excitement, discomfort—you owe it to yourself to read this book immediately. This book is not a plea to white people to address their racism, nor does it argue for its readers to become vegan. Rather, it examines the Euro-centricity at the h In Racism as Zoological Witchcraft: A Guide to Getting Out, author Aph Ko describes the consumption and disposal of non-white bodies as a ritual necessary for the continuation of white supremacy. If this assertion makes you feel something, anything—confusion, excitement, discomfort—you owe it to yourself to read this book immediately. This book is not a plea to white people to address their racism, nor does it argue for its readers to become vegan. Rather, it examines the Euro-centricity at the heart of the movements for animal and black liberation. By recognizing how the constructs of race and species have been invented to justify the exploitation of anything that is not white, Ko envisions an activism that deconstructs the notion of animality—that is, to be something other than the Euro-centric definition of white and human—in order to achieve liberation from white supremacy. I first heard of Aph Ko in an episode of the (excellent) podcast Citations Needed, and I've already started her other book, which she co-authored with her sister Syl Ko. I'm really excited to read more—her accessible writing style and pop culture references make it easy for the weight of her ideas to be fully appreciated, and while listening to Zoological Witchcraft in its audiobook format, I often found myself transfixed by her words, momentarily unable to engage in whatever activity I had been carrying out. I'll be getting a physical copy to keep on my shelf, no doubt.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Brown

    This book changed my outlook on tons of structures of power, the framing of animality and Black people, relations to power, and how to view compounded marginalized identities in individuals outside of intersectionality and its shortcomings (speaking of which wow this book really tore into intersectionality in a way that I just didn't know was coming.) Where it lost me though is how to navigate with this new outlook in regards to subgroups within marginalized communities/identities, and how to ta This book changed my outlook on tons of structures of power, the framing of animality and Black people, relations to power, and how to view compounded marginalized identities in individuals outside of intersectionality and its shortcomings (speaking of which wow this book really tore into intersectionality in a way that I just didn't know was coming.) Where it lost me though is how to navigate with this new outlook in regards to subgroups within marginalized communities/identities, and how to tackle intercommunity struggles within the framework of this. It loses me because this new outlook doesn't seem to truly be able to grapple with that. Obviously this isn't the goal of this book, but it's honestly hard not to see the vacuum the book left after it dissected and left intersectionality to the wayside and not be left wanting for a new way to deal with what it tore apart. I know this is vague but listen/read this book. It's phenomenal, graphic, and life-changing but it has blind spots too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ayoola

    This is the first book I’ve read by Aph Ko. Moving through this was a fantastic journey. I enjoyed Ko’s media analysis and her willingness to break from traditional ideas of how to do activism. I definitely want to learn more about Afro-zoological resistance. There were a few points that were not as strong, either because of not being fleshed out or because of being somewhat inaccurate. For example, I didn’t quite understand Ko’s assertion that speciesism is a Eurocentric/colonial framework. I wi This is the first book I’ve read by Aph Ko. Moving through this was a fantastic journey. I enjoyed Ko’s media analysis and her willingness to break from traditional ideas of how to do activism. I definitely want to learn more about Afro-zoological resistance. There were a few points that were not as strong, either because of not being fleshed out or because of being somewhat inaccurate. For example, I didn’t quite understand Ko’s assertion that speciesism is a Eurocentric/colonial framework. I wish this had been explained more. Still, I deeply enjoyed the book

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aurély

    Amazing! I absolutely recommend this book to anybody seeking to grasp a better understanding of white supremacy and the ways in which it affects us directly and indirectly in our everyday lives. This books highlights so many concepts and ideas about colonialism that are just so obvious once you've read them, but nearly invisible beforehand. This book is really one of the most powerful tools to begin decolonizing your brain, the first step to dismantling white supremacy

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Nation

    What a remarkable book. I learned about it through the latest issue of VegNews when one of the senior editors signal boosted it in the media section. The theories that Ko discusses are rich for analysis and discussion. The central call to action is centered on afro-zoological resistance as a means of liberation for both people and animals. By dissecting popular media, particularly Get Out (2017), Ko pulls imagery to the forefront to illustrate her arguments of how anti-Black and anti-animal cons What a remarkable book. I learned about it through the latest issue of VegNews when one of the senior editors signal boosted it in the media section. The theories that Ko discusses are rich for analysis and discussion. The central call to action is centered on afro-zoological resistance as a means of liberation for both people and animals. By dissecting popular media, particularly Get Out (2017), Ko pulls imagery to the forefront to illustrate her arguments of how anti-Black and anti-animal consumption and oppression manifests. She pulls in the voice of fellow scholars and overlooked violence in American history to round it out. Ko's intentional and meticulous word choice throughout the text further bolsters her arguments. She opts for "minoritized" over "minorities," to highlight the present and active work of white supremacy to control populations. This seemingly small word choice imbues the book with even more urgency. Ko calls out "intersectionality," showing its fallacies and missed opportunities as the term become co-opted by movements. Instead, she cites social layerism as a more precise vision of what's occurring. As others noted, Ko opts to skip over some preliminary background to anti-racist and animal rights activism, though she explains these decisions and the text is still effective in its mission without rehashing these well-established discourses.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alexxa

    This is a really fascinating read and perspective that’s important for any/all activists, not just those who identify as vegan, to read. It’s relatively short, but does read like a thesis, so it’s not what I’d call an easy or casual read by any means. That said, due to its length, it is one of the less intense anti-racism works out there that I’ve read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nandini

    I’ve never read theory like this! Really challenges many of the preconceived notions I had before. Loved that it was written in an accessible way that does not shame, but invites readers into going on this journey of questioning.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Serena

    So interesting!

  14. 4 out of 5

    NormaCenva

    Great book by an amazing and innovative Author. Super important and worth wile read!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette

    Excellent exploration and analysis of multidimensional nature of oppressive systems enacted and maintained by white supremacy, and what can be done to dismantle the systems.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gary Smith

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Thornburton

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dianna Cowles

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice Kelsey-Watts

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Segall

  23. 5 out of 5

    Noah Gregory

  24. 4 out of 5

    Clark Hays

  25. 5 out of 5

    Leah Thompson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jose

  27. 5 out of 5

    Al Bako

  28. 5 out of 5

    May Ramos

  29. 5 out of 5

    Drake Thomas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Margo Kurgan

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