counter create hit Re-educated How I changed my job, my home, my husband and my hair - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Re-educated How I changed my job, my home, my husband and my hair

Availability: Ready to download

'I am immersed in a new world that feels a long way from my old one. Though I've not been re-invented, what has happened is just as radical and a lot more interesting: I am being re-educated.' Lucy Kellaway had a comfortable life. For years she had the same prestigious job, the same husband, and the same home. To the casual observer, she was both happy and successful. But o 'I am immersed in a new world that feels a long way from my old one. Though I've not been re-invented, what has happened is just as radical and a lot more interesting: I am being re-educated.' Lucy Kellaway had a comfortable life. For years she had the same prestigious job, the same husband, and the same home. To the casual observer, she was both happy and successful. But one day, Lucy began to realise that the life she had built for herself no longer suited her. Was it too late to start again? The answer was no - so she proceeded to tear down both marriage and career, and went back to school. Retraining as a teacher, Lucy discovers there is a world of new possibilities awaiting her - and learns that you can teach an old dog new tricks (providing they are willing to un-learn a few old ones along the way). A witty and moving story of one woman's pursuit of a new life, Re-educated is a celebration of education's power to transform our lives at any age, and an essential companion for anyone facing the joy - and pain - of starting again.


Compare

'I am immersed in a new world that feels a long way from my old one. Though I've not been re-invented, what has happened is just as radical and a lot more interesting: I am being re-educated.' Lucy Kellaway had a comfortable life. For years she had the same prestigious job, the same husband, and the same home. To the casual observer, she was both happy and successful. But o 'I am immersed in a new world that feels a long way from my old one. Though I've not been re-invented, what has happened is just as radical and a lot more interesting: I am being re-educated.' Lucy Kellaway had a comfortable life. For years she had the same prestigious job, the same husband, and the same home. To the casual observer, she was both happy and successful. But one day, Lucy began to realise that the life she had built for herself no longer suited her. Was it too late to start again? The answer was no - so she proceeded to tear down both marriage and career, and went back to school. Retraining as a teacher, Lucy discovers there is a world of new possibilities awaiting her - and learns that you can teach an old dog new tricks (providing they are willing to un-learn a few old ones along the way). A witty and moving story of one woman's pursuit of a new life, Re-educated is a celebration of education's power to transform our lives at any age, and an essential companion for anyone facing the joy - and pain - of starting again.

30 review for Re-educated How I changed my job, my home, my husband and my hair

  1. 4 out of 5

    Beth Bonini

    4.25 stars From the FT article: 'Do not buy this house' - Lucy Kellaway bought it anyway (April 5th, 2018) The photos on the website were a lie. The Framehouse was shabbier than they let on. Equally, the pictures failed to describe the magic of the place. The way the light shone through the branches of the sloping glass roof. The height of the ceilings. The quiet. I stood at the entrance, with the orange worktop stretching ahead towards the pond, and felt entirely certain. I had to live here. Lookin 4.25 stars From the FT article: 'Do not buy this house' - Lucy Kellaway bought it anyway (April 5th, 2018) The photos on the website were a lie. The Framehouse was shabbier than they let on. Equally, the pictures failed to describe the magic of the place. The way the light shone through the branches of the sloping glass roof. The height of the ceilings. The quiet. I stood at the entrance, with the orange worktop stretching ahead towards the pond, and felt entirely certain. I had to live here. Looking back, I don’t think it had much to do with beauty. Instead it was a dubious and surely dangerous conviction that this house would make me both happier and more interesting. If I were freed from the Georgian and Victorian up-and-down spaces that had defined family existence, this place would be a new start. Not only would life be more exciting among the bright orange, I would be more exciting too. Like Lucy Kellaway, I am totally addicted to the mind-expanding (potentially life expanding) 'hard-core property porn' that The Modern House has to offer. Many times over the years I have fantasised about buying various of the houses I have discovered there and then changing my life to fit around a house. (Just this week I found myself contemplating a house in Derbyshire that came with its own art-house cinema. For a day at least I was completely enamoured with the idea that I could live in Derbyshire - so near Chatsworth! - and run my own art-house cinema.) Anyway, I digress. For many years, Lucy Kellaway was a columnist at the FT (Financial Times) and it's pretty obvious - from the structure and style and tone of this book - that she knows exactly how to catch her audience's attention. She certainly snagged mine straight away. As it turns out, buying a wooden house in Hackney with a bright orange Corian countertop was a catalyst for a great many changes that happened in the author's life within a short span of time. The house is important, certainly - and Kellaway does devote an entire chapter to it - but really this book is not about a property search at all. It's more about taking a chance, following one's instincts, and the creative possibilities of creating a whole new life for oneself in 'young-old' age. Of all of the changes that Kellaway makes in her life, the one she dwells on the most in this book is her co-creation of the educational charity Now Teach which encourages accomplished early retirees (or career changers) to retrain as teachers. Kellaway did this herself and now works as as economics teacher at an academy in Hackney. A good deal of the book covers her attempts to bring attention (and more importantly, funding) to Now Teach and then she focuses in (with a lot of self-deprecating humour) on her fledgling teacher experiences. Kellaway does not make any attempt to hide or downplay her own background, with its various privileges, and instead she uses her personal experiences with education (her own, and her children's) as a way of understanding the different sorts of pressures that her students face. Today, in the UK, the latest GCSE grades have just been released and it is being pointed out that the gap in attainment between richer and poorer pupils has widened in this coronavirus-interrupted year. Kellaway was already predicting that outcome as she wrote her book. As Kellaway writes: Lockdown taught all of us - teachers, parents and students - something I hope we don't forget for a very long time. School is essential. It is there not only to teach, but to baby-sit, to socialise and to provide structure. Teenagers fared poorly without the routine and conviviality of school - and so did I. Kellaway tends to be quite a 'breezy' writer and I would have liked a bit more detail at times. Overall, though, I adored this book. It was a quick, engrossing read, but thoughtful, too. The way she shapes the ending - so humorous, so apt - is perfection.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    As you would expect from former FT journalist Lucy Kellaway, this was a well-written and enjoyable read. The book was about her decision in her late-50s to quit her job as a journalist, end her marriage, move house and become a teacher - plus setting up an organisation to encourage others towards the latter end of their career to become teachers as well. Even one of those things could be exhausting in itself, so to do all of them in a very short space of time (and survive) is more than impressiv As you would expect from former FT journalist Lucy Kellaway, this was a well-written and enjoyable read. The book was about her decision in her late-50s to quit her job as a journalist, end her marriage, move house and become a teacher - plus setting up an organisation to encourage others towards the latter end of their career to become teachers as well. Even one of those things could be exhausting in itself, so to do all of them in a very short space of time (and survive) is more than impressive! A lot of the focus of the book was about Lucy's decision to retrain as a teacher and how that then played out. Possibly part of the purpose of the book was to encourage others to consider becoming teachers as well. Had I ever considered such a possibility previously, having read this book, I would never consider it again. The dedication and seeming all life-consuming nature of being a teacher is more than I'm ever likely to want to give to a job (sorry Lucy...). But I think it will leave you a little bit in awe of what teachers do, if you didn't feel like that already. I think the book could be accused of showing the choices that are open to someone when they are middle-class and privileged. Can most of us really afford to make some of these choices, however well meaning we might be? But I think Lucy Kellaway would acknowledge that herself and also recognised the very different life-chances and opportunities that many of her pupils have. I thought this was a fascinating read that might encourage us to think about whether some part of our life would benefit, even in a small way, from change and to be bold and take a chance.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Claire O'Sullivan

    An interesting read, although to be frank this read more as a chance to follow a career change as a consequence of being in a positive financial position to do so . Many teachers would perhaps be infuriated at the lack of coverage of exhaustion, low salary and inability to find affordable housing ..

  4. 4 out of 5

    Philippa

    A thoroughly enjoyable read about making major changes to your life in your 50s and 60s - a time where many people might be hesitant to change their career, living situation or even their hair, such are the grooves they have settled into. At age 57, Lucy Kellaway changes everything about her life - she ends her marriage, stops dyeing her hair, moves to a new home that's the complete opposite of what she's lived in her whole life and, the biggest change of all, leaves her stable, financially-rewa A thoroughly enjoyable read about making major changes to your life in your 50s and 60s - a time where many people might be hesitant to change their career, living situation or even their hair, such are the grooves they have settled into. At age 57, Lucy Kellaway changes everything about her life - she ends her marriage, stops dyeing her hair, moves to a new home that's the complete opposite of what she's lived in her whole life and, the biggest change of all, leaves her stable, financially-rewarding job as columnist at the Financial Times to retrain as a secondary school teacher. I went through a similar experience in my 20s and now I'm 40, I've often thought that such a dramatic reinvention would not be something I could pull off now, or in the future. Reading this book has reminded me of the fact that we can always change our lives if we have the will and the courage to do so. Age is not just a number, it is simply the amount of time you've been alive for - and you'd do better, Kellaway argues, to focus on the life you have ahead of you. Lucy Kellaway doesn't shy away from the big questions - she discusses privilege, which she admits she has in abundance and that has certainly helped her to make the choices she did, as well as the racism faced by her students in the education system. In sharing her experiences, she presents a measured and thoughtful meditation on what makes a good teacher, and it isn't necessarily what she thought, going in. This is a great read for anyone who is thinking of taking a leap of faith - whatever age you are - as it's a bolstering and uplifting reminder that life is full of possibilities and change really is possible, with hard work, self belief and a bit of luck. But ultimately - and I think I liked this message most of all - our characters very rarely change, it is our experiences that educate and re-educate us. Highly recommended! With thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an ARC.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    I used to read Lucy Kellaway's column on FT and listen to her podcast. She made me laugh, think and reflect on business jargon and how absurd it can be. I love her style of writing, her sharp mind and the humor. It was a sort of role model in approaching the language of the enterprise world and consultancy. I was happy to read this ARC as I found all the characteristics I loved: humor, a sharp mind and a great dose of realism. As I'm not so younger than the author I can say that what she wrote refl I used to read Lucy Kellaway's column on FT and listen to her podcast. She made me laugh, think and reflect on business jargon and how absurd it can be. I love her style of writing, her sharp mind and the humor. It was a sort of role model in approaching the language of the enterprise world and consultancy. I was happy to read this ARC as I found all the characteristics I loved: humor, a sharp mind and a great dose of realism. As I'm not so younger than the author I can say that what she wrote reflected some of my feelings and experience. I decided to start a L&D certification two years ago (was the younger in my class) and I think I totally agree when she writes that you are not obsessed by career when you start something new later in your life. I loved how she talks about getting old and accepting the changes of your body. Her teaching experiences are really interesting and sometimes I thought i would have liked a teacher like her. I read this book in two days and was totally involved in what I was reading. It's heartfelt, gripping and thought provoking. It should be read by anyone who's over 50 and would like to change his/her life. I strongly recommend it. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  6. 4 out of 5

    Raph Zindi

    Immensely witty and a highly enjoyable read!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Klingler

    Not sure that I was the correct audience for the book; but certainly learned a lot about not wanting to read a memoir which is entirely written in the past tense. Also, reading it under the shadow of the current Kate Clanchy racism scandal revolving around how kids are identified; it didn’t feel introspective or critical enough.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Poppy

    In my previous school, I worked with several fantastic Now Teach trainees, teachers who join the profession as a later in life career change. Engineers, journalists, academics, they have a huge wealth of life experience which makes them very different to your fresh-faced twenty something trainee, but no less valued. Due to this, I was fascinated to read Lucy Kellaway's account of not only founding Now Teach but training as a Maths teacher after over 3o years working as a columnist for the Financ In my previous school, I worked with several fantastic Now Teach trainees, teachers who join the profession as a later in life career change. Engineers, journalists, academics, they have a huge wealth of life experience which makes them very different to your fresh-faced twenty something trainee, but no less valued. Due to this, I was fascinated to read Lucy Kellaway's account of not only founding Now Teach but training as a Maths teacher after over 3o years working as a columnist for the Financial Times. Kellaway documents her changing her life completely: new job, separation from her husband, new house and a new hair cut. We follow her struggles in teacher training, shining a light on what a tough job it can be. Just because she was an incredibly successful journalist, it does not mean she will shine in a classroom with a bunch of disinterested teenagers. It is good to follow her journey and celebrate the small wins alongside her. However, it is incredibly disheartening to see the quality of mentoring in her training year though. (Who gives 23 EBIs for a trainee's first ever lesson?? I doubt anyone's first ever lesson was that great...) Overall, I enjoyed this and it was a quick read. Ultimately, through, I would have liked slightly more focus on the heartwarming stories of students and their journeys. This is very much centred on Kellaway, but would certainly be inspiring for anyone wanting to find a reinvigorating purpose later in life. 4 stars. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher who provided an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Denyce

    The premise of this book is explained on the front cover - Lucy Kellaway, the author, does exactly that! A journalist for the Financial Times for a very long time, she decides to change her life and become a teacher in her fifties. She does indeed buy a house, separate from her husband, let her hair grow out grey and become a teacher. I didn't know what to expect when I began reading this book, but it grew on me. Lucy has a light hearted, entertaining and pragmatic approach to her life, which mak The premise of this book is explained on the front cover - Lucy Kellaway, the author, does exactly that! A journalist for the Financial Times for a very long time, she decides to change her life and become a teacher in her fifties. She does indeed buy a house, separate from her husband, let her hair grow out grey and become a teacher. I didn't know what to expect when I began reading this book, but it grew on me. Lucy has a light hearted, entertaining and pragmatic approach to her life, which makes for easy reading and it is easy to warm to her style of writing. At some points it made me laugh out loud, even though some of the subjects she writes about are thought provoking and also interesting. She realises that teaching is a difficult and challenging profession, but she rises to the occasion admirably and is happy to share her failures and successes equally. She tells us about the complexities of dealing with a diverse range of students, and how she has to think of issues that she's never had to face before. She considers how this change of circumstances may have affected her as a person, or not, by canvassing her friends and family for their opinions. Whether or not they feel she may or may not have changed, she eifinitely conveys that her decisions have made her more fulfilled and alive. This is a good read for anyone who feels the need for a life change! It's uplifting and funny, and I enjoyed it very much.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jaylen

    This was an interesting read! Lucy Kellaway's memoir of sorts was enjoyable for the most part. I think it was good that she was evaluating her situation and her ability to retrain as a teacher - if that discussion of privilege was omitted I would have been very annoyed! I found the day in the life of a teacher to be most interesting section as I'd like to go into teaching, I really enjoyed having that little glimpse into her day to day life. I liked how honest the book was as well. Yes, it did feel This was an interesting read! Lucy Kellaway's memoir of sorts was enjoyable for the most part. I think it was good that she was evaluating her situation and her ability to retrain as a teacher - if that discussion of privilege was omitted I would have been very annoyed! I found the day in the life of a teacher to be most interesting section as I'd like to go into teaching, I really enjoyed having that little glimpse into her day to day life. I liked how honest the book was as well. Yes, it did feel like the second half was a whistle-stop tour of the many ills plaguing teaching today (covid, damaging effects of racism, class, gender to name a few) but Kellaway touches on these topics with some insight. Unsure of their impact since they are spoken about so quickly. Her writing however was compelling and I enjoyed hearing her thoughts. Kellaway has written a book that is not for everyone - I can certainly see NQTs and young people looking into teaching becoming frustrated by this book. Kellaway however is simply telling her story, so can we fault her for that? For anyone looking for a memoir type book that touches on deeper issues rife within education, Some Kids I Taught and What They Taught Me by Kate Clanchy may be more up your alley! Overall a good read, a book can't be faulted for what it is not! 3.75 Stars

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I wasn't aware of Lucy Kellaway before picking up this book. The title intrigued me as I have recently undergone big changes myself in terms of relationship, home and career (hair not so much). Although I'm a younger generation than Lucy, and from a (seemingly) less privileged background, her story really resonated with me. As a former Financial Terms columnist, Kellaway is an excellent writer and each chapter has a clear purpose and topic. Her approach to life is inspirational and shows even as I wasn't aware of Lucy Kellaway before picking up this book. The title intrigued me as I have recently undergone big changes myself in terms of relationship, home and career (hair not so much). Although I'm a younger generation than Lucy, and from a (seemingly) less privileged background, her story really resonated with me. As a former Financial Terms columnist, Kellaway is an excellent writer and each chapter has a clear purpose and topic. Her approach to life is inspirational and shows even as you reach your late 50s/60s, it's not too early to start again and change your life path. Aside from her life just being extremely interesting, Kellaway retrains as a teacher - taking a huge pay cut in the process - and starts up the organisation Teach Now. As a sibling to Teach First, Teach Now encourages experienced workers to change careers later in life to become teachers and share their skills and experience with students. Overall this was a truly lovely, inspiring and interesting book. It's quite a quick read but I feel like that's perhaps indicative of Kellaways no-nonsense style and I liked it. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura Spira

    I have always enjoyed Lucy Kellaway's journalism and was quite sad when she left the FT but could see that her plan to become a teacher was a worthwhile project and admired her for it. But I found this book to be very solipsistic - I suppose a memoir must be to some extent but this seemed excessive, especially at the end where she asks her nearest and nearest how they think the change in her life changed her. i haven't taught in schools but after 30 years of teaching in further and higher educat I have always enjoyed Lucy Kellaway's journalism and was quite sad when she left the FT but could see that her plan to become a teacher was a worthwhile project and admired her for it. But I found this book to be very solipsistic - I suppose a memoir must be to some extent but this seemed excessive, especially at the end where she asks her nearest and nearest how they think the change in her life changed her. i haven't taught in schools but after 30 years of teaching in further and higher education I had some sympathy with some of her experiences. I would have appreciated further reflection on broader issues in education but I know that just keeping the plates spinning from day to day distracts from that. But I'm afraid I was deeply shocked by her account of disposing of her husband's surplus review copies of books in a skip. Who puts books in a skip? Couldn't they have gone to charity shops?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, even if I did find myself regularly asking my kindle to provide a definition of some of the words. The author was a previous writer for the FT and I left this explained the wide use of vocabulary. She has written about her own life and the changes she made. This was very interesting reading and provides inspiration that to those thinking of a new career path. It is refreshing that the author acknowledges her privilege and wonderful that she is continually prepared I thoroughly enjoyed this book, even if I did find myself regularly asking my kindle to provide a definition of some of the words. The author was a previous writer for the FT and I left this explained the wide use of vocabulary. She has written about her own life and the changes she made. This was very interesting reading and provides inspiration that to those thinking of a new career path. It is refreshing that the author acknowledges her privilege and wonderful that she is continually prepared to learn/adapt around subjects such as racism. This was a book I wanted to keep turning the pages on to find out more about the ladies life and also how she got on when she started teaching and how this progressed. Thank you to the author, publisher and Netgalley for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristīne Spure

    This book is a total surprise. FT columnist Lucy Kellaway’s story of changing her career in mid 50ies is so inspiring. First off, her writing flows so easily, the book reads like fiction (which is not surprising considering Kellaways’s 30+ years as a writer). I loved her take on age, feminism, how age is perceived within women and men, career change, and life goals overall. Oh, and she made teaching sound like a wonderful adventure (so that’s a bit of a romanticized take, I’d say). Yes, in a way This book is a total surprise. FT columnist Lucy Kellaway’s story of changing her career in mid 50ies is so inspiring. First off, her writing flows so easily, the book reads like fiction (which is not surprising considering Kellaways’s 30+ years as a writer). I loved her take on age, feminism, how age is perceived within women and men, career change, and life goals overall. Oh, and she made teaching sound like a wonderful adventure (so that’s a bit of a romanticized take, I’d say). Yes, in a way, Lucy Kellaway was privileged to make changes in her career as a result of a stable financial situation (but to be fair, her career was her own doing, so is it privilege? More like hard work pays off). But still, this books feels like a must read for everyone who feels stuck and believes life ends at 40.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    I wanted to read this book on the basis of the words on the front on the book. Changing your job, home, husband and hair sounded like lots of change. The book proves that it is. But at the heart of the book is the fact that Kellaway left a secure job at the Financial Times to retrain as a teacher. She had an initial idea to be a maths teacher but this is fairly short lived and it makes sense that she then decides that she is perhaps more suited to being an economics teacher. I read with interest I wanted to read this book on the basis of the words on the front on the book. Changing your job, home, husband and hair sounded like lots of change. The book proves that it is. But at the heart of the book is the fact that Kellaway left a secure job at the Financial Times to retrain as a teacher. She had an initial idea to be a maths teacher but this is fairly short lived and it makes sense that she then decides that she is perhaps more suited to being an economics teacher. I read with interest all her tales of being a new teacher. I became fond of the way she described her life including her 4 children and her ex husband. The title of the book is apt - Re-educated. Definitely possible for anyone. She kicked off the process in her late 50s.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Siddhartha Jain

    Excellent quick read! Lucy decided to quit her stable job at Financial Times at age 57, after 32 years there. She also goes to change her residence to something that she liked and does not talk about her ! Her re-invention makes for an excellent reading and makes one think of if we do give higher weightage to our past and where we are, rather than what gives us happiness and joy everyday, alongside learning and growing as an individual. Once our basic necessities are taken care of, Lucy’s exampl Excellent quick read! Lucy decided to quit her stable job at Financial Times at age 57, after 32 years there. She also goes to change her residence to something that she liked and does not talk about her ! Her re-invention makes for an excellent reading and makes one think of if we do give higher weightage to our past and where we are, rather than what gives us happiness and joy everyday, alongside learning and growing as an individual. Once our basic necessities are taken care of, Lucy’s example is like a beacon showing us that we have a lot more to look forward to and ‘retirement’ doesn’t mean anything. The book can be linked to others like 100-year life / if you are so successful, why aren’t you happy et al, which make us look at continuing to learn-and-grow!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I will be honest and never heard of the author before reading this book. I don't buy newspapers and really don't take main stream news as accurate these days. The title of the book drew me in and I really enjoyed the transformation of her life. Very much along the theme of feel the fear and do it anyway, the main body of the book is the transformation and finding joy, the latter part very much trying to understand the UK education.al system. Would generate some excellent discussion and make a go I will be honest and never heard of the author before reading this book. I don't buy newspapers and really don't take main stream news as accurate these days. The title of the book drew me in and I really enjoyed the transformation of her life. Very much along the theme of feel the fear and do it anyway, the main body of the book is the transformation and finding joy, the latter part very much trying to understand the UK education.al system. Would generate some excellent discussion and make a good book club choice. Well written, well it should be!, flowed well and a very honest memoir. Thank you #NetGalley and #EburyPublishing for the copy to review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sue Hayward-Ault

    My thanks to #NetGalley and #Edbury publishers for the opportunity to review this book. A well written memoir about something that the majority of us have thought about but havnt the courage or the finacial security to attempt. To change the direction that your life is heading especially when you have reached corporate Navana with its perksis both mad and foolhardy and yet Luccy Kellaway does it and puts her journey down on paper. It was an interesting read with humour and observations on society My thanks to #NetGalley and #Edbury publishers for the opportunity to review this book. A well written memoir about something that the majority of us have thought about but havnt the courage or the finacial security to attempt. To change the direction that your life is heading especially when you have reached corporate Navana with its perksis both mad and foolhardy and yet Luccy Kellaway does it and puts her journey down on paper. It was an interesting read with humour and observations on society in general. I'd definitely recommend this book if you're even considering teaching for its honest insight.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Frank O'connor

    This is a book about the difficulty of everything. It is good on the details of the older middle class in a Britain of a certain era. It is also good on how nothing is easy. While the grass may be greener, it is never easy to eat. There is an interesting capitalist/anit-capitalist reading of it, I am sure. It is there in the association of property investment with freedom, and in the sense of teaching as a way of 'giving something back' for the materially successful. Kellaway's achievements are This is a book about the difficulty of everything. It is good on the details of the older middle class in a Britain of a certain era. It is also good on how nothing is easy. While the grass may be greener, it is never easy to eat. There is an interesting capitalist/anit-capitalist reading of it, I am sure. It is there in the association of property investment with freedom, and in the sense of teaching as a way of 'giving something back' for the materially successful. Kellaway's achievements are remarkable, however and reading about these, and the details of teaching, and the teenage malaise in modern times, is illuminating.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lou Barber

    What happens when you reach 57 and blow up your whole life. A house, a marriage and a successful career as a FT journalist - boom. All gone. What happens is, you scare yourself silly, and feel fully alive again. Not only did Lucy Kellaway re-train to become a secondary school teacher, she also inspired and supported others to give up their careers to join Now Teach. Not all would make it. Not all would like it. Many would quit. But more would come to relish the challenge, and the sense of giving b What happens when you reach 57 and blow up your whole life. A house, a marriage and a successful career as a FT journalist - boom. All gone. What happens is, you scare yourself silly, and feel fully alive again. Not only did Lucy Kellaway re-train to become a secondary school teacher, she also inspired and supported others to give up their careers to join Now Teach. Not all would make it. Not all would like it. Many would quit. But more would come to relish the challenge, and the sense of giving back. An extremely candid glimpse into one woman's journey into education, or rather re-education. Self-deprecating, wise, warm and inspiring, a thoroughly enjoyable read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    I'm From Here

    This is a ripper of a book. It's easy to read, funny and I found it hard to put it down. Although this is focused on making life changes in your 50s and 60s. I think anyone thinking about changing careers or making a big life decision should read this. It's a great account of taking a leap of faith. Although, at times I found Lucy sanctimonious, I wanted her to succeed and enjoyed her self-deprecating, critical and honest account. This is a lesson on self-awareness and belief that things will be This is a ripper of a book. It's easy to read, funny and I found it hard to put it down. Although this is focused on making life changes in your 50s and 60s. I think anyone thinking about changing careers or making a big life decision should read this. It's a great account of taking a leap of faith. Although, at times I found Lucy sanctimonious, I wanted her to succeed and enjoyed her self-deprecating, critical and honest account. This is a lesson on self-awareness and belief that things will be okay if you put the effort in.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ute Weiß

    I loved reading this book because I can relate so much. I started a teaching career in my 50s and I have found out that it‘s a very demanding job alas satisfying. The difference between German and British schools is kind of mind boggling. I‘d love to visit a British comprehensive for some time. I actually did the life expectancy calculator which was fun. And I like the idea of being in the group of the young-olds. 😁 This is a good read for women in their 50s who think about changing careers, husban I loved reading this book because I can relate so much. I started a teaching career in my 50s and I have found out that it‘s a very demanding job alas satisfying. The difference between German and British schools is kind of mind boggling. I‘d love to visit a British comprehensive for some time. I actually did the life expectancy calculator which was fun. And I like the idea of being in the group of the young-olds. 😁 This is a good read for women in their 50s who think about changing careers, husbands, etc And it‘s funny. I giggled a lot and laughed out loud occasionally.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Having worked in the education sector this rings lots of bells. Everyone thinks teachers have any easy time. Retraining in your late 50s is a big challenge but yes you bring lots of experience and life to help guide the next generation. An inspiring and truthful account of leaving journalism to work in education in London. The frustrations of lock down and still trying to teach via what ever medium works. It made me smile and reminisce for my days at the front of the classroom.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather Jeffrey

    I really enjoyed this. Although I don't have the same background or pe haps financial security, Lucy made me realize that at 50, I can still change my career if I really want to. It also made me think differently, less, oh god, I've got 17 years left to work, and more, okay what do I want to do in that 17 years, and actually, why can't I work beyond that - if I want to and perhaps may need to financially. Lucy has an amazing work ethic and sense of purpose. I really enjoyed this. Although I don't have the same background or pe haps financial security, Lucy made me realize that at 50, I can still change my career if I really want to. It also made me think differently, less, oh god, I've got 17 years left to work, and more, okay what do I want to do in that 17 years, and actually, why can't I work beyond that - if I want to and perhaps may need to financially. Lucy has an amazing work ethic and sense of purpose.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gary Leeds

    A very interesting and enjoyable read. Having spent all my working life as a teacher and a teacher trainer, now soon to be retired, I found this book thought provoking, reassuring and challenging. Kellaway's discussion of the type of school regime and teaching best suited to meet the needs of children from disadvantaged backgrounds is relevant and addresses one of the key issues our educational system faces. The book is very well written and witty. Loved it! Well done!! A very interesting and enjoyable read. Having spent all my working life as a teacher and a teacher trainer, now soon to be retired, I found this book thought provoking, reassuring and challenging. Kellaway's discussion of the type of school regime and teaching best suited to meet the needs of children from disadvantaged backgrounds is relevant and addresses one of the key issues our educational system faces. The book is very well written and witty. Loved it! Well done!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    Lucy had the same job for years as a journalist and decides to change her life and retrain as a teacher, move house and divorce. The story I found was slow going, it shows how difficult teaching can be but it didn`t keep my attention and took a long time to read, though I did admire her for changing everything in life which having money helped a long way. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review. Lucy had the same job for years as a journalist and decides to change her life and retrain as a teacher, move house and divorce. The story I found was slow going, it shows how difficult teaching can be but it didn`t keep my attention and took a long time to read, though I did admire her for changing everything in life which having money helped a long way. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ljwatts

    A good read for anyone thinking of changing career later in life and moving from a comfortable existence, where you know what you are doing, to being a floundering newbie. Although the author is financially secure, and acknowledges that teaching doesn't have the same anxieties as it does for younger people, she doesn't gloss over the hard work involved and clearly wants to do the best for her students. A good read for anyone thinking of changing career later in life and moving from a comfortable existence, where you know what you are doing, to being a floundering newbie. Although the author is financially secure, and acknowledges that teaching doesn't have the same anxieties as it does for younger people, she doesn't gloss over the hard work involved and clearly wants to do the best for her students.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lara Farrell

    An easy and enjoyable read that I found inspirational - having just turned 40, Kellaway’s story of her later in life transformation certainly gave me the invigorating sense that I have many more chapters in front of me. I didn’t agree with all of her views but the passion behind them is evident and I was willing her on to succeed in her new life. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    I really loved this book. I thought the author was incredibly humble, honest and brave to make such huge changes in life and Lucy's story is relayed in such a poignant and heartfelt way. I read this and came away feeling completely inspired. Thank you to NetGalley and EBury Publishing/Penguin for the eArc. I really loved this book. I thought the author was incredibly humble, honest and brave to make such huge changes in life and Lucy's story is relayed in such a poignant and heartfelt way. I read this and came away feeling completely inspired. Thank you to NetGalley and EBury Publishing/Penguin for the eArc.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Crofts

    A great read Lucy Kellaway is a brilliant writer. Quite surprised she isn’t teaching journalism or writing rather than maths. Her honesty about her own shortcomings makes her achievements feel all the more real. I get the impression that being married to her may have been exhausting.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.