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“A powerful story of self-discovery, survival in the wild.” —Los Angeles Times Four travelers meet in Bolivia and set off into the heart of the Amazon rainforest, but what begins as a dream adventure quickly deteriorates into a dangerous nightmare, and after weeks of wandering in the dense undergrowth, the four backpackers split up into two groups. But when a terrible rafti “A powerful story of self-discovery, survival in the wild.” —Los Angeles Times Four travelers meet in Bolivia and set off into the heart of the Amazon rainforest, but what begins as a dream adventure quickly deteriorates into a dangerous nightmare, and after weeks of wandering in the dense undergrowth, the four backpackers split up into two groups. But when a terrible rafting accident separates him from his partner, Yossi is forced to survive for weeks alone against one of the wildest backdrops on the planet. Stranded without a knife, map, or survival training, he must improvise shelter and forage for wild fruit to survive. As his feet begin to rot during raging storms, as he loses all sense of direction, and as he begins to lose all hope, he wonders whether he will make it out of the jungle alive. The basis of an upcoming motion picture, Jungle is the story of friendship and the teachings of nature, and a terrifying true account that you won’t be able to put down.


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“A powerful story of self-discovery, survival in the wild.” —Los Angeles Times Four travelers meet in Bolivia and set off into the heart of the Amazon rainforest, but what begins as a dream adventure quickly deteriorates into a dangerous nightmare, and after weeks of wandering in the dense undergrowth, the four backpackers split up into two groups. But when a terrible rafti “A powerful story of self-discovery, survival in the wild.” —Los Angeles Times Four travelers meet in Bolivia and set off into the heart of the Amazon rainforest, but what begins as a dream adventure quickly deteriorates into a dangerous nightmare, and after weeks of wandering in the dense undergrowth, the four backpackers split up into two groups. But when a terrible rafting accident separates him from his partner, Yossi is forced to survive for weeks alone against one of the wildest backdrops on the planet. Stranded without a knife, map, or survival training, he must improvise shelter and forage for wild fruit to survive. As his feet begin to rot during raging storms, as he loses all sense of direction, and as he begins to lose all hope, he wonders whether he will make it out of the jungle alive. The basis of an upcoming motion picture, Jungle is the story of friendship and the teachings of nature, and a terrifying true account that you won’t be able to put down.

30 review for Jungle: A Harrowing True Story of Survival

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    On the inside of the cover of the book I am reading there is written in ink: "Ron: I think we could have co-authored this book!! Merry Christmas. Erik 2005" Would love to hear their story as well, so it is too bad that Erik didn't write his last name in the book, because then I could try to find him on the internet and if I had found him, I would have let him know that I now have the book and so on. I also would have loved to have taken a trip like this one when I was younger, that is, if I had no On the inside of the cover of the book I am reading there is written in ink: "Ron: I think we could have co-authored this book!! Merry Christmas. Erik 2005" Would love to hear their story as well, so it is too bad that Erik didn't write his last name in the book, because then I could try to find him on the internet and if I had found him, I would have let him know that I now have the book and so on. I also would have loved to have taken a trip like this one when I was younger, that is, if I had not been such a chicken. Yet, my friend Julie and I had walked 10 kilometers into one of the jungles of Mexico when trying to get to the ruins of Bonanpak, just 30 miles from the Guatemalan border. We spent the night there and were thankful to have gotten out alive. What Yossi went through with his four friends was horrendous; it was frightening. I couldn't put the book down although at times I had thought to do just that. The first time was when he had said that they bought rifles in order to kill animals. I thought, "Trophy hunting," which I am against, but no, it was for survival. Then they brought a dog with them because someone suggested that it would be a great idea. He would protect them from jaguars and boars. Perhaps, he would be fighting with an animal, and they could get away while he was busy protecting himself or them. I don't remember now how much I am reading into this "bring the dog" idea, but eventually the dog wore out, had to literally be dragged and then finally left. This was the second time I wanted to quit reading this book, but I knew that they were going to be in some serious trouble up ahead, and so my curiosity got the best of me. I picked up the book again, saw that I wasn't half way through and thought, "This will take me another two weeks to read." No, I read it that day and into the evening--just couldn't put it down. Best true adventure jungle story I have ever read. Next, they killed two monkeys and a sloth for food, and I was feeling bad again, that being another time I wanted to quit the book, but then I settled down into the book. Survival. Then their party got split up, the rains came, then the fire ants, flesh eating termites, jaguars, boars, bot fly larvae deposited under Yossi's skin by a mosquito, painful, peeling fungus on their feet and legs that made it hard for some of them to walk, and then Yossi, and his friend took a very dangerous raft trip. My friend Julie and I had experienced the rain, the grunting of a wild boar, and the low rumbles of a jaguar following us. Julie had contacted malaria, while I came home with bot fly larvae in my scalp, and all this after only 24 hours in the jungle. She and I both ended up in the hospital, and later I found that I had warts on the bottom of my feet. Fire ants, I have experienced, but only in America. I am really surprised that Yossi came home alive, really surprised. Not everyone on this trip survived because this jungle trip had many mishaps and dangerous moments. I believed every word of it. It was easy to believe after my own trip. On the raft: "Around noon we ran into trouble. A large rock jutted out from the shore, and the water pounding against it formed a treacherous whirlpool. The current carried us into its center. We tried for two hours to get out of it without success. Finally seeing no other way, Kevin swam to shore, climbed onto the rock, and tried to use the rope that was tied to the front of the raft to pull it out of the whirlpool. Twice he slipped, fell into the water, and was swept away by the current, but quickly recovered. On his third try the rope broke off in his hands, and he fell once again into the water, but this time he didn't return so quickly. I was left whirling with the raft, fear churning in my stomach. What if Kevin had drowned? What would become of me? I sat on the raft, craning my neck, trying desperately to catch a glimpse of him. When I saw his his star hat carried downstream, I froze."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane in Australia

    Very good book by Yossi about the 3 weeks he spent lost, and alone, in an uncharted section of the Amazon jungle in Bolivia. The tale begins in Peru, where he meets the other men, and they decide to go into the Amazon. The first half of the book relates their journey together. The last half of the book is about Yossi's ordeal all alone, and his eventual rescue. 4 Stars = Outstanding. It definitely held my interest.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    The book opens with Yossi Ghinsberg's 'Acknowledgements': a page and a half of flowery, gushing, quasi-mystical thank yous. This didn't auger well. Yossi Ghinsberg's writing style is pretty basic. I wonder if this is a translation - which might explain his style. I have read a few accounts of what could be labelled Travel Misadventures, Personal Disasters, or Idiots Taking Silly Risks & Living To Tell The Tale. These include, Touching the Void: The True Story of One Man's Miraculous Survival, Int The book opens with Yossi Ghinsberg's 'Acknowledgements': a page and a half of flowery, gushing, quasi-mystical thank yous. This didn't auger well. Yossi Ghinsberg's writing style is pretty basic. I wonder if this is a translation - which might explain his style. I have read a few accounts of what could be labelled Travel Misadventures, Personal Disasters, or Idiots Taking Silly Risks & Living To Tell The Tale. These include, Touching the Void: The True Story of One Man's Miraculous Survival, Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster, The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest, and Into the Wild. For the first two thirds of this book I concluded that 'Lost in the Jungle' was not up to the same standard, however I was gripped by the last third of the book and he certainly has an extraordinary tale to tell. At the end of the book he also touches on how his near death experience shaped the rest of his life and I was impressed by what he has gone on to achieve. Overall I rate this 3/5. It's worth reading and I feel Yossi's tale will stay with me. That said if you've yet to read Touching The Void or Into Thin Air, then I would suggest reading those first as I think they're both more accomplished and interesting books that explore similar themes. EDIT (Nov 2017): Someone told me this is being made into a film starring Daniel Radcliffe. What a strange and wonderful world

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    As far as the storyline goes, it is incredible, amazing, and a total 5 star entertainment keeping you on the edge of your seat until you finish the book. Then, if you think that it is actually a true story, and that these people get into all that trouble because of their absolute stupidity and unawareness of what might be happening to them, you ask yourself "why should i give this book 5 stars"? They are idiots who are convinced that going through the jungle is no different than walking through As far as the storyline goes, it is incredible, amazing, and a total 5 star entertainment keeping you on the edge of your seat until you finish the book. Then, if you think that it is actually a true story, and that these people get into all that trouble because of their absolute stupidity and unawareness of what might be happening to them, you ask yourself "why should i give this book 5 stars"? They are idiots who are convinced that going through the jungle is no different than walking through the park down the block.... And so just about all that could go wrong goes wrong... not only for them but for the poor animals who happen to run into them and get mercilessly slaughtered by them for no reason other than the arrogance of the human being.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sean Peters

    A touching, shocking, harrowing, incredible, story. Yosseph "Yossi" Ghinsberg is an Israeli adventurer, author, entrepreneur, humanitarian, and motivational speaker based in Australia. Ghinsberg is most known for his survival story when he was stranded in an uncharted part of the Bolivian Amazon jungle for three weeks in 1981. Yossi tells an incredible story of survival, the shocking facts of how to survive, how hard to survive, how the body can go through so much.... One thing is for sure, well a A touching, shocking, harrowing, incredible, story. Yosseph "Yossi" Ghinsberg is an Israeli adventurer, author, entrepreneur, humanitarian, and motivational speaker based in Australia. Ghinsberg is most known for his survival story when he was stranded in an uncharted part of the Bolivian Amazon jungle for three weeks in 1981. Yossi tells an incredible story of survival, the shocking facts of how to survive, how hard to survive, how the body can go through so much.... One thing is for sure, well a few things, mental toughness, common sense, and purely the will to live. A harrowing tale in the depths of the Amazon jungle gave this survivor the vision to make the world a better place. The rain forest was deafeningly loud. All the creatures sang their song or called out under the dense canopy as leaves danced in the humid air streams. There’s so much beauty. Yossi Ghinsberg couldn’t help but admire the wonders of this eco-system. It almost distracted him from his hunger pains. It’s been weeks and he hasn’t seen any sign of civilization. The woman beside him didn’t seem as weak as he was, yes his mind The ants didn’t seem to bite her, and her foot wasn’t being devoured by fungi like his was. It wouldn’t be until the end of his last bit of strength that the ants actually saved him. Ant bites can cause the release of hormones and steroids in the human body giving an extra push to survive. He covered himself with them, and that bit of energy saved him. “I actually went and shook a tree and showered myself with them because my feet couldn’t carry me anymore and I needed to stand,” he says. “I showered myself with the fire ants and, on the waves of pain, I managed to get up and keep on going.” With the last shred of hope he heard the sound of an engine. When he turned around to call on the woman, it became clear she never existed. He survived the Amazon alone. Eating it was not an easy feat, but at least it was food. He recounts his hunger, “I would have eaten human flesh. With hunger at that level, it’s just energy. It’s beyond disgust.” The next three weeks, he roamed without supplies or equipment. Completely lost, he had to survive as best he could. Creatures and beasts tried to devour him at every turn. Ants slowly ate away the skin of his deteriorating body as hope seemed to fade away. Fire ants bite and so painfully, the reality of all the scary days and nights, the sounds, jaguar paw prints, snakes and much more, trying to sleep while been bitten to death... At last there was a sound different from the din of the jungle — the sound of an engine. He made his way towards a river and reunited with his partner and a crew of natives that had launched rescue operations for him. They found him after three days of search and after three weeks of being stranded. He claimed a woman had kept him company. They were almost at their last bit of hope when they came upon him. He spent the next few months in recovery at a local hospital. The other two adventurers continued their journey into the jungle but were never seen or heard from again, not known at all if they survived. After two decades, a movie was finally made, The Jungle, a feature film retelling his adventure in the Amazon starring Daniel Radcliffe of Harry Potter fame. In 1993, he wrote his first book, Back from Tuichi, which sold millions of copies, gained extreme popularity in Israel, has been translated into 15 languages, and was published under a variety of names worldwide. Then in 2008, he wrote his second book, Laws of the Jungle: Jaguars Don’t Need Self-Help Books. “The story,” he says simply, “has been a blessing in every way I can see”. This true-life adventurer and his contributions to making a better world continues to this day. BRINGING AMAZON SURVIVAL SKILLS TO BUSINESS, HIS CAREER NOW. Great story, four stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Durnan

    I read the book "Lost in the Jungle", though when I search for that in goodreads this is what comes up. Same author, so I am assuming it's the same book (hopefully better edited than the .99 Amazon deal I got) I almost didn't make it past the first third of this book. I put it down for several days, with no intention of picking it back up. Three of the four men that this book is about are very unlikable; they are arrogant, brash and had zero respect for the jungle or its inhabitants. They mistrea I read the book "Lost in the Jungle", though when I search for that in goodreads this is what comes up. Same author, so I am assuming it's the same book (hopefully better edited than the .99 Amazon deal I got) I almost didn't make it past the first third of this book. I put it down for several days, with no intention of picking it back up. Three of the four men that this book is about are very unlikable; they are arrogant, brash and had zero respect for the jungle or its inhabitants. They mistreat every animal they come across, kill things that they didn't need to and it was the scenes of animal cruelty that caused me to skip over pages entirely, and then put the book down. Then for some reason I started reading the reviews on Amazon. Some reviewers agreed and said pretty much exactly what I was thinking, but one of them mentioned some deliberate lying that happened by the book's author, that got one of the men killed. This piqued my interest and so I picked the book back up. As the book goes on, the problems I had with lack of respect for the jungle and animals fell by the wayside. Possibly because of the fact that ooooh boy did the jungle get its revenge! The men faced crazy hardships that should have killed them, and that they had no one to blame for but themselves. The author continued to be unlikeable and make very questionable decisions, but manages to do a decent job of bringing the reader into the madness and unthinkable discomfort one endures being lost alone in the jungle, starving and suffering from numerous maladies. I found myself at a point where I just had to find out how he comes to be saved, and it is pretty unbelievable. This guy is one hell of a lucky guy, and it is mostly due to the persistence of his friend who starts out the biggest jerk of the bunch. Apparently the author is now a motivational speaker, and an activist for rainforest conservation, so I am glad to hear that he no longer advocates slashing and destroying the life of the jungle as he seemed to at the beginning of his story. If you can put your head down and power through the poorly written and developed, and at times disturbing, first half of the book, the second half is a pretty crazy ride.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kressel Housman

    Three different things pulled me toward this book, and I'm going to list them, not in order of their importance to me, but in chronological order of when I learned about each. First of all, Daniel Radcliffe is currently filming the movie adaptation of the book. Second, the author and protagonist is an Israeli Jew, and third, since it's about survival in nature, I hoped it would interest my oldest son. As it turns out, my son says he doesn't want to read any books about survival in nature unless Three different things pulled me toward this book, and I'm going to list them, not in order of their importance to me, but in chronological order of when I learned about each. First of all, Daniel Radcliffe is currently filming the movie adaptation of the book. Second, the author and protagonist is an Israeli Jew, and third, since it's about survival in nature, I hoped it would interest my oldest son. As it turns out, my son says he doesn't want to read any books about survival in nature unless they're how-to books, but I'm glad I read it anyway. I'm completely impressed with Yossi Ghinsberg, not just because of the book, but because of what he's done with his life since then. When the book begins, Yossi is a young man who finished his army service in Israel and is backpacking around South America. He meets up with a few other guys, including the middle-aged Karl, who dazzles him with stories of the jungle. Yossi is raring to go with him, but the two other guys take more convincing. Eventually, all four set out, with Karl as their guide. Some sections of the beginning bored me, and vegetarians are certain to be disgusted by it because these four guys kill animals right and left. They also begin to argue, which is inevitable as their trip gets tougher. Throughout the first half, I was thinking, "This is good, but A Walk in the Woods is better. At least it made me laugh." Then Yossi is accidentally separated from his friends. From that point on, the book is an absolute page-turner. With all the hardships he faced, it's nothing short of a miracle that Yossi survived. And that brings me to the "religious" aspect of this book. Now, don't get me wrong. Yossi is secular. At the beginning of the book, he eats pig and even monkey right along with his friends. But in the course of the book, he tells a story that I think most religious Jews will love. When alone in the jungle, he prays to G-d all the time. The cynical interpretation of this is the classic, "There are no atheists in foxholes," but I prefer to see Yossi's entire story as the pintele Yid shining through. There's even a moment of "prophecy" in it: while indulging in fantasies to help him get through his harsh reality, Yossi imagines writing his story and it being made into a movie. And now it's coming true! If you're a strict vegetarian or animal rights activist, you should probably skip this book. Ditto if you're a religious Jew who can't stomach the idea of a Jew eating tamei animals. But if you can look past that, you might find that Yossi has some great hashkafos. Check out his TED Talk and you'll see what I mean.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    The main story (a jungle trek gone bad) is slow to get started, and the character interactions are not very believable, despite this being nonfiction. Much of the book is taken up with petty bickering between the characters. The story reads more like the diary of a junior high school girl than the survival story of a grown man. It only gets 2 stars because the adventure manages to shine through in parts. Overall not worth the time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    'Jungle' by Yossi Ghinsberg is a memoir of an incredible month-long trek into and out of a Bolivian jungle! The trip was originally supposed to be only a fun two-week camping and hiking experience for four adventure junkies. After the first week, things went terribly wrong. Getting out became a survival walk of solitary hell. Awful parasites, jaguars, fire ants, constant rain, a major storm, bogs, overturned rafts in fast moving streams - I was horrified and intrigued by the descriptions. Ghinsb 'Jungle' by Yossi Ghinsberg is a memoir of an incredible month-long trek into and out of a Bolivian jungle! The trip was originally supposed to be only a fun two-week camping and hiking experience for four adventure junkies. After the first week, things went terribly wrong. Getting out became a survival walk of solitary hell. Awful parasites, jaguars, fire ants, constant rain, a major storm, bogs, overturned rafts in fast moving streams - I was horrified and intrigued by the descriptions. Ghinsberg had only a small pack of essentials for jungle survival - mosquito net, some food, one lighter, etc. - but rough terrain, mistakes, insects and starvation almost killed him. Everybody did not survive. It was deadly journey. Why do guys DO this to themselves? The book was first published in 1985, revised in 2015. Yossi talks briefly about his 1981 Amazon jungle trip in a YouTube video, apparently because of the movie about his extraordinary survival, made in 2017: https://youtu.be/kDx2fv33Ez8 Movie trailer: https://youtu.be/Ys9si3mFqGY The video is not very plain-spoken or explanatory about 'Jungle' (it seems a montage of jungle videos), but it gives you an idea of Ghinsberg today. The Epilogue chapter tells us he is a motivation speaker, and is a promoter for a technology curing opiate addiction. In Australia where he lives, he initiated the Alma Libre Foundation and a clinic to treat opiate addictions. Unbelievably, he still is enraptured by rainforests! When Ghinsberg had this jungle adventure he was only twenty-one years old and a mochilero (backpacker). I didn't know there was a huge culture of mochileros and supporting businesses which supplied them with cheap places to sleep and eat, although I knew many young American people of my generation were indulging in backpacking travels during the 1970's and 1980's - mostly to southeast Asia and India. However, I guess young people from many countries, and some not so young, were traveling everywhere around the world with a pair of jeans, sneakers and a backpack wherever they felt like going. Ghinsberg, an Israeli, met an Austrian, Karl Ruchprecter (thirty-five) and an American, Kevin Gale (twenty-nine) and a Swiss, Marcus Stamm (twenty-eight) in La Paz, Bolivia. Karl offered to guide them all to the Amazon jungle. He claimed he was one of the best guides they could hire, very familiar with the Bolivian part of the Amazon. The other young men had never hiked into a real jungle before! They couldn't wait! So thrilling! They wanted to see a real Amazon native village, and Karl promised to guide them to one which was untouched by civilization. Really? Really! The men were very different, so under the physical stress of jungle camping they soon were disputing with each other about divisions of labor and hunting. Marcus in particular did not like the shooting and cooking of various animals. Eventually, Gale and Ghinsberg teamed up more often than not, both English speakers. Marcus became sort of the odd man out. Ghinsberg does not hide his own participation in these disputes from readers. Questions about Karl's expertise began to percolate up into sotto voce conversations - did he know where he was going? Karl did seem to know things about hunting - but the Amazon jungle? Maybe not.... The book is well written and fascinating. It reminded me a bit of the fiction novel The Ruins, actually. The book has a lot of the same horrors, only worse, with insects as the creeping crawling horror instead of a plant. Wow. I will never set foot in a jungle. Never. No. Not.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Eddy

    Had to quit reading it...I normally love books like this, but Ghinsberg and his buddies were imperialistic idiots. I've read Amazonian accounts by men in the early 20th Century that sounded less bourgeois, arrogant and racist (he refers to indigenous tribes as "savages" on more than one occasion). If you're looking to read a better book on Amazonian adventures by white guys, read The Lost City of Z or The River of Doubt.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Allisonperkel

    "Jungle" is a wonderful, thrill ride of a book. Its the true story of Yossi, a young man just out of the Israeli army who is traveling around South America after his tour of duty. I can easily picture him, backpack and guide book in hand, striking up conversations with people at hostels and in bars as many travelers are wont to do. His travel plans get changed when he meets a man in Peru: Marcus. Marcus convinces him that instead of heading to Machu Picchu he should go to Boliva, with Marcus, in "Jungle" is a wonderful, thrill ride of a book. Its the true story of Yossi, a young man just out of the Israeli army who is traveling around South America after his tour of duty. I can easily picture him, backpack and guide book in hand, striking up conversations with people at hostels and in bars as many travelers are wont to do. His travel plans get changed when he meets a man in Peru: Marcus. Marcus convinces him that instead of heading to Machu Picchu he should go to Boliva, with Marcus, instead. There they meet two other people, a new travel companion Kevin and a more odd, strange man, Karl, who offers them a chance of a lifetime; a hike into the jungle. Now for people who travel, you man be amazed that Yossi and his friends would travel into the Amazon without first wondering about their guide, maybe do a little research to see if he has, I dunno, killed someone or if he's even who he claims to be. Especially when the "cost" goes from free to a few hundred dollars. But no, our protagonist is blissfully aware of nothing. There are many moments in this book where I wanted to shake him and go "stop that! Haven't you read at least one guidebook's scam section?" This is the second dumbest thing you can do! (the first is fighting a land war in Asia). The book details their trek, their getting lost and separated, and finally the outcome. Yossi is a very good writer, his words kept me glued to the book and I found myself drawn into his struggle to survive. I also learned that peeing on yourself in the jungle is a really bad thing - a life lesson I hope to never put into practice. If you are looking for a quick, fun and exciting read, this is a book for you.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shaikha Alahmad

    Jungle is a captivating book for explorers; not just of the physical world, but also of the mind. A touching, shocking, incredible story. The kind of experience that’ll make you hold your breath. Yosseph ”Yossi" Ghinsberg is an Israeli adventurer, author, entrepreneur, humanitarian, and motivational speaker based in Australia. Ghinsberg is most known for his survival story when he was stranded in an uncharted part of the Bolivian Amazon jungle for three weeks in 1981. Yossi tells an incredible stor Jungle is a captivating book for explorers; not just of the physical world, but also of the mind. A touching, shocking, incredible story. The kind of experience that’ll make you hold your breath. Yosseph ”Yossi" Ghinsberg is an Israeli adventurer, author, entrepreneur, humanitarian, and motivational speaker based in Australia. Ghinsberg is most known for his survival story when he was stranded in an uncharted part of the Bolivian Amazon jungle for three weeks in 1981. Yossi tells an incredible story of survival, a harrowing tale in the depths of the Amazon jungle gave this survivor the vision to make the world a better place. The rain forest was deafeningly loud. All the creatures sang their song or called out under the dense canopy as leaves danced in the humid air streams. There’s so much beauty. Yossi Ghinsberg couldn’t help but admire the wonders of this eco-system. It almost distracted him from his hunger pains. It’s been weeks and he hasn’t seen any sign of civilization. The woman beside him didn’t seem as weak as he was, the ants didn’t seem to bite her, and her foot wasn’t being devoured by fungi like his was. It wouldn’t be until the end of his last bit of strength that the ants actually saved him. Ant bites can cause the release of hormones and steroids in the human body giving an extra push to survive. He covered himself with them, and that bit of energy saved him. “I actually went and shook a tree and showered myself with them because my feet couldn’t carry me anymore and I needed to stand,” he says. “I showered myself with the fire ants and, on the waves of pain, I managed to get up and keep on going.” With the last shred of hope he heard the sound of an engine. When he turned around to call on the woman, it became clear she never existed. He survived the Amazon alone. He recounts his hunger, “I would have eaten human flesh. With hunger at that level, it’s just energy. It’s beyond disgust.” The next three weeks, he roamed without supplies or equipment. Completely lost, losing his will to survive. Creatures and beasts tried to devour him at every turn. Ants slowly ate away the skin of his deteriorating body as hope seemed to fade away. Fire ants bite and so painfully, the reality of all the scary days and nights, the sounds, jaguar paw prints, snakes, trying to sleep while being bitten to death and so much more... At last there was a sound different from the din of the jungle — the sound of an engine. He made his way towards a river and reunited with his partner and a crew of natives that had launched rescue operations for him. They found him after three days of search and after three weeks of being stranded. He claimed a woman had kept him company. They were almost at their last bit of hope when they came upon him. He spent the next few months in recovery at a local hospital. The other two adventurers continued their journey into the jungle but were never seen or heard from again, not known at all if they survived.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    I like the non-fiction, lost in the jungle, adventures. Yossi’s story captivated me from page one. I actually shed a few tears, despite knowing that he (obviously) survived.

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Fahy

    picked up this book in search of a nail biting adventure, instead I received a mind blowing, badly written, boring journal. I would rather read an account of someone who ventured into Walmart Asda to buy a pickled egg. I am shocked in regards to the authors lack of descriptive writing and to why he needs to literate boring details, such as eating a cucumber. it's as if a seven year old has written it...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Seemed like a work of fiction. No one to back up the story and just seemed made up.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Farhina Jannat

    I love survival stories.... So, this was certainly no exception. At first, the book felt a little slow but it was exciting once they enter in the Jungle.... Since I am in a block, it took me more time to finish than usual. But I will never forget this book, because it made me miss my stop and I had to get down two stoppage later from Bus 😑

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Normally, this is a book I’d be all over. I love this sort of survival story. However, I was shocked at not only how terrible his writing is but also how boring he could make it sound. Overall the impression I left with is this is a book about arrogant and entitled men who make one stupid decision after another.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barbarac

    Wow. Any desire that I had of ever traveling through a jungle has just vaporized. Don't give up on this book half way because, like me, you thought this is the story of some ignorant young hippies who decide to brave mother nature without any preparation. If you like the show Survivor, with all its soap opera drama, then you'll love the beginning part of this trip. Four semi-acquainted non-Bolivian men decide to go out on the Bolivian jungle on their own. Drama ensues. Fights and arguments and "y Wow. Any desire that I had of ever traveling through a jungle has just vaporized. Don't give up on this book half way because, like me, you thought this is the story of some ignorant young hippies who decide to brave mother nature without any preparation. If you like the show Survivor, with all its soap opera drama, then you'll love the beginning part of this trip. Four semi-acquainted non-Bolivian men decide to go out on the Bolivian jungle on their own. Drama ensues. Fights and arguments and "you're not a good friend" whines. Arrrrgh. This is why I don't watch reality TV. But at some point the men become separated and that's when the book took a turn for me and I started enjoying it. I have no idea how Yossi Ghinsberg survived this trip, or how he remained hopeful most of the time that he'd be rescued. I'm not a religious person, but if it'd been me in his position, I would have believed that God was making me pay for some past mistakes and I'd have no hope left. It was one bad thing after the other. And each grosser or more painful to read. A reminder to all of us that mother nature is still the boss around here.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Marlene♥

    What a great read. I added this book to my wish list cause I like survivor stories and this one was recommended to me by amazon plus it had good reviews. When I started I did not know anything really about this book and that is the best way to start reading so I won’t spoil here but I am going to tell you, if you like survivor stories buy this book. I can just say one word. Wow!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    It's hard to believe three reasonably intelligent young men would follow such an obvious shyster into the jungle. He was acting dodgy before they even left! It's easy to judge from the comfort of my couch. Yossis' story is incredible. Only someone with true grit could have survived that ordeal. An amazing adventure book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

    What an adventure. Four young men from very diverse backgrounds meet in South America nd decide to "explore" the jungle. They had no idea what they were in for and were even less prepared for the trip. This book is about the essence of stupidity. A thrilling page turner with a surprise ending.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara (A Gingerly Review)

    This was tougher to get through than I thought it would be. :( FRTC.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mook

    In some ways, I find non-fiction books a lot harder to review than fiction books. This is an account of actual events, narrated by Yossi Ghinsberg, making them a personal account of his survival during the two weeks he was lost in the Amazon rainforest. I will just start with a couple things I did not like. First of all, as a women who has traveled solo, no way in the world would I follow a strange man into the rainforest, without the proper gear or food supplies, under the assumption we would be In some ways, I find non-fiction books a lot harder to review than fiction books. This is an account of actual events, narrated by Yossi Ghinsberg, making them a personal account of his survival during the two weeks he was lost in the Amazon rainforest. I will just start with a couple things I did not like. First of all, as a women who has traveled solo, no way in the world would I follow a strange man into the rainforest, without the proper gear or food supplies, under the assumption we would be able to provide for ourselves. It would never happen. I do not relate. That doesn't mean I think less of the Yossi or his friends - I understand the urge to explore, to have authentic experiences, to take risks. This one is just a few steps farther than I would go. The friction between Marcus and his friends was also hard to read about. Yossi makes out Marcus to be the friendliest, the most sensible, and the nicest of his friends. And Yossi and Karl get so frustrated with him for not enjoying things I also would not like - the hunting, the lack of planning, being forced to walk around on infected feet etc. It's worse when you realize it's the last interactions anyone will have with Marcus - he never does make it out of the jungle. The actual description of being swept away down the river, losing his friends, losing almost all of his gear, and struggling to figure out how to get to a village - all of that is harrowing. I can't imagine surviving these circumstances as Yossi describes it. The lack of proper map, the lack of shelter, struggling to get food, being attacked by every insect and parasite in the jungle, the foot infection that forces him to crawl up and down hills, struggling to make it to safety; that must have taken an incredible amount of will to continue on, despite the odds. If I did have to get lost in a jungle though, I'd like a friend like Kevin looking for me. Kevin had an incredible amount of luck in being found by locals shortly after getting separated from Yossi. He did not rest though; he immediately contacted several embassies and anyone with any clout he could get a hold of to try and have search parties sent out, and he did not stop even when everyone told him Yossi was probably dead. He was directly responsible for getting a group to take him back up the river, a trip that ended with them finding Yossi just as they were going to head back. The most frustrating part was the one part Yossi and Kevin never could figure out. It's only after they both return that they realize Marcus, who they thought was fine, never returned. That no one has seen Marcus since they parted ways with him and Karl. This is also when they discover Karl was a lying con artist. Only why talk a bunch of tourists into going in the jungle? He did not make money off of it. And no one has seen him since either. Both Karl and Marcus disappeared, leaving behind nothing but questions. I really disliked the animal abuse that happens in the beginning, which is never remarked on at all (Karl beats a dog frequently, the others don't care?) and that they purposefully decided not to bring food so they could try to shoot every animal they saw for food instead. When Yossi is alone and starving, it's understandable that he needs any food he can get. Before that point though, it's completely unnecessary.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Being a "mochilero" myself, a lot of feelings in the book are very relatable. Backpackers experience such a diverse palette of emotions while setting themselves in the unknown, be it the Amazon jungle or the concrete jungle. As for the book itself, it felt very much like I was being told a story by one of my elders, complete with words of wisdom at the conclusion of the book. A couple parts did drag on a bit, hence the 4 stars. All in all, I highly recommend the book. It is a fairly quick and ea Being a "mochilero" myself, a lot of feelings in the book are very relatable. Backpackers experience such a diverse palette of emotions while setting themselves in the unknown, be it the Amazon jungle or the concrete jungle. As for the book itself, it felt very much like I was being told a story by one of my elders, complete with words of wisdom at the conclusion of the book. A couple parts did drag on a bit, hence the 4 stars. All in all, I highly recommend the book. It is a fairly quick and easy read, full of adventure.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katie Bliss

    I saw there was a movie based on this (I know, a lot of my posts start like that - just leave me alone) and I LOVE survival stories, so I gave this one a whirl. Though I definitely agree that it was harrowing and that guy should not be alive, the book just didn't grip me as much as I thought it would. The real survival story started about halfway through, and it was all narrated in first person, of course, but just not the greatest writing, though it did communicate his feelings (fear, excitemen I saw there was a movie based on this (I know, a lot of my posts start like that - just leave me alone) and I LOVE survival stories, so I gave this one a whirl. Though I definitely agree that it was harrowing and that guy should not be alive, the book just didn't grip me as much as I thought it would. The real survival story started about halfway through, and it was all narrated in first person, of course, but just not the greatest writing, though it did communicate his feelings (fear, excitement, hope, despair) very well. I'd give this a 3.5 if I could. I think the movie will be better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    A remarkable adventure with themes of bravery, hope and human nature stripped bare by the wilds of the jungle. If your interest was piqued by the movie, you'll enjoy the book. Lots more detail about the jungle experience, and a long juicy epilogue.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karndog

    Good solid survival story, just like I like them!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kay Campbell

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The beginning didn't grab me, as I'm not much of an outdoorsman. However, whenever Yossi begins his adventures as a lost soul, I couldn't put this book down.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    I was hoping for something much better, like The Lost Citt of Z or The Lost Girls but this was Animal cruelty, bad writing, stupid decisions, hunting exotic game, etc. pass.

  30. 5 out of 5

    cassie

    Could’ve used a ghost writer.

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