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The National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author of Heartland focuses her laser-sharp insights on a working-class icon and one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Growing up amid Kansas wheat fields and airplane factories, Sarah Smarsh witnessed firsthand the particular vulnerabilities—and strengths—of women in working pover The National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author of Heartland focuses her laser-sharp insights on a working-class icon and one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Growing up amid Kansas wheat fields and airplane factories, Sarah Smarsh witnessed firsthand the particular vulnerabilities—and strengths—of women in working poverty. Meanwhile, country songs by female artists played in the background, telling powerful stories about life, men, hard times, and surviving. In her family, she writes, “country music was foremost a language among women. It’s how we talked to each other in a place where feelings aren’t discussed.” And no one provided that language better than Dolly Parton. Smarsh challenged a typically male vision of the rural working class with her first book, Heartland, starring the bold, hard-luck women who raised her. Now, in She Come By It Natural, originally published in a four-part series for The Journal of Roots Music, No Depression, Smarsh explores the overlooked contributions to social progress by such women—including those averse to the term “feminism”—as exemplified by Dolly Parton’s life and art. Far beyond the recently resurrected “Jolene” or quintessential “9 to 5,” Parton’s songs for decades have validated women who go unheard: the poor woman, the pregnant teenager, the struggling mother disparaged as “trailer trash.” Parton’s broader career—from singing on the front porch of her family’s cabin in the Great Smoky Mountains to achieving stardom in Nashville and Hollywood, from “girl singer” managed by powerful men to leader of a self-made business and philanthropy empire—offers a springboard to examining the intersections of gender, class, and culture. Infused with Smarsh’s trademark insight, intelligence, and humanity, She Come By It Natural is a sympathetic tribute to the icon Dolly Parton and—call it whatever you like—the organic feminism she embodies.


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The National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author of Heartland focuses her laser-sharp insights on a working-class icon and one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Growing up amid Kansas wheat fields and airplane factories, Sarah Smarsh witnessed firsthand the particular vulnerabilities—and strengths—of women in working pover The National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author of Heartland focuses her laser-sharp insights on a working-class icon and one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Growing up amid Kansas wheat fields and airplane factories, Sarah Smarsh witnessed firsthand the particular vulnerabilities—and strengths—of women in working poverty. Meanwhile, country songs by female artists played in the background, telling powerful stories about life, men, hard times, and surviving. In her family, she writes, “country music was foremost a language among women. It’s how we talked to each other in a place where feelings aren’t discussed.” And no one provided that language better than Dolly Parton. Smarsh challenged a typically male vision of the rural working class with her first book, Heartland, starring the bold, hard-luck women who raised her. Now, in She Come By It Natural, originally published in a four-part series for The Journal of Roots Music, No Depression, Smarsh explores the overlooked contributions to social progress by such women—including those averse to the term “feminism”—as exemplified by Dolly Parton’s life and art. Far beyond the recently resurrected “Jolene” or quintessential “9 to 5,” Parton’s songs for decades have validated women who go unheard: the poor woman, the pregnant teenager, the struggling mother disparaged as “trailer trash.” Parton’s broader career—from singing on the front porch of her family’s cabin in the Great Smoky Mountains to achieving stardom in Nashville and Hollywood, from “girl singer” managed by powerful men to leader of a self-made business and philanthropy empire—offers a springboard to examining the intersections of gender, class, and culture. Infused with Smarsh’s trademark insight, intelligence, and humanity, She Come By It Natural is a sympathetic tribute to the icon Dolly Parton and—call it whatever you like—the organic feminism she embodies.

52 review for She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sage

    I really enjoyed this book. I’ve been a fan of Dolly Parton, and of country music, for my whole life, and the debt that country music owes Dolly is immense. I liked the juxtaposition of Dolly’s life/background with the author’s own background as a child growing up in rural Kansas. That was really well done, and really poignant when she talked about her grandma Betty being the same age as Dolly, and the parallels of their early life. I especially liked the introduction — the world has definitely I really enjoyed this book. I’ve been a fan of Dolly Parton, and of country music, for my whole life, and the debt that country music owes Dolly is immense. I liked the juxtaposition of Dolly’s life/background with the author’s own background as a child growing up in rural Kansas. That was really well done, and really poignant when she talked about her grandma Betty being the same age as Dolly, and the parallels of their early life. I especially liked the introduction — the world has definitely changed between the original publication of these essays and 2020. I appreciated the effort being made to put the essays in the context of their time. And I loved the exploration of women in country music — as a longtime fan of (specifically) women in country music (except Keith Urban, he can stay), I appreciated the recognition of the fact that female artists are played less on the radio than male artists, and all of the other bullshit. Hopefully that will change for the better in the future.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angela~

    I didn’t really care for this book too much. I thought it was a book about Dolly Parton, but it was a book about Dolly and feminism. And Dolly herself has said she’s not a feminist, that she just wants everyone to be equal, It says this very statement in this book, as well. Although I didn’t really like the book in general, there were some places in particular that discussed Dolly and her life and her thoughts on things that Interested me. That’s why I gave the 2 stars instead of 1. So, if you’r I didn’t really care for this book too much. I thought it was a book about Dolly Parton, but it was a book about Dolly and feminism. And Dolly herself has said she’s not a feminist, that she just wants everyone to be equal, It says this very statement in this book, as well. Although I didn’t really like the book in general, there were some places in particular that discussed Dolly and her life and her thoughts on things that Interested me. That’s why I gave the 2 stars instead of 1. So, if you’re looking for a autobiography or biography on Dolly, it’s not that at all. Or it isn’t in my opinion anyway. Thank you to #NetGalley and the publishers for the opportunity to read and review #SheComesByItNaturally . My thoughts and views are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    "She Come By It Natural" is an intellectualized fourth wave feminist critique of Parton's songs and portions of Parton's life. It reads like a graduate student's essay and, instead of talking about how Parton has overcome sexism and become a treasured national figure and a powerful woman who leads by example, is filled with virtue signaling of the worst kind. Not recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    J Earl

    She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs by Sarah Smarsh is a book that would have been interesting had it chosen a direction and actually followed it. Instead, it was just a jumble of facts, observations, a few connecting links, and a lot of self-congratulatory back patting (I hope she didn't hurt her shoulder patting herself on the back so much). I had such high hopes for this when I read the book description. As someone who has taught Women's Studies courses I ant She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs by Sarah Smarsh is a book that would have been interesting had it chosen a direction and actually followed it. Instead, it was just a jumble of facts, observations, a few connecting links, and a lot of self-congratulatory back patting (I hope she didn't hurt her shoulder patting herself on the back so much). I had such high hopes for this when I read the book description. As someone who has taught Women's Studies courses I anticipated something with some substance to it. It did not take long for me to realize this was not what the description implied but rather a poorly constructed series of articles that touched on the ideas but made no larger coherent argument. It isn't a bad book and as separate articles in a periodical, where rigorous construction is less important, they may well have been quite interesting. But not in this form. Smarsh gives the impression early in the book, and repeats it often, that Parton was considered just some dumb woman until recently. I can understand someone who didn't live through most of Parton's career thinking it wasn't until her generation came of age that Parton finally got the credit she deserved. But it is simply not true, at least not to the extent she implies. I remember quite distinctly in the late 80s and early 90s having discussions, both with friends of mine and in classes I both took and taught, about how savvy Parton was and how she did what she did on her own terms, or at least as close to her own terms as a male-centric industry would (often unknowingly) allow. So it wasn't just recently that she had been valued by people both outside the country music world and outside the music world entirely. Yes, she has still had to battle the prevailing male privilege and so has never likely received all of the credit she deserves, but among the part of society that sees talent and ability as gender neutral (or at least tries to as much as anyone raised in this society can) she has received credit for about three decades. That bit of overstatement colored the rest of the book for me, weak hyperbole bothers me. But I still looked forward to reading all of the accounts of these women who lived Parton's songs. Well, Smarsh basically used herself and her family with some short anecdotes from other women scattered throughout. Again, I was expecting this very interesting point to be made through plenty of examples, and not primarily through a writer who, as the occasion seems to fit, walks on both sides of the privileged and the underprivileged line. I guess what it comes down to for me is that I found the authorial voice weak, the argument disjointed (and it is an argument I agree with, which makes it doubly annoying), and the work to be more memoirish than about either Parton's songwriting and performance or the lives of very many of the women who likely fit the description of the title. I don't recommend this for readers who actually want something organized or actually sociological in nature. For those who just want a light fluffy piece that couples Parton's work with a few people Smarsh has known or talked to, this will be a fun read. It isn't poorly written, just poorly organized and argued. Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via NetGalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Debra Laughlin

    Though Dolly Parton wouldn't call herself a feminist in the vein that Sarah Smarsh sometimes to leans toward in She Come by it Natural, Parton is the steel magnolia to Sarah Smarsh's Midwestern bluestem and rye grass that under girds much of the prairies. Alongside the native grasslands and Smoky Mountain hollers, the strains of music plucked with frosted 3 inch nails wafts through a look at our American treatment of women during recent eras. Songs that make much of the scorned woman who smiles Though Dolly Parton wouldn't call herself a feminist in the vein that Sarah Smarsh sometimes to leans toward in She Come by it Natural, Parton is the steel magnolia to Sarah Smarsh's Midwestern bluestem and rye grass that under girds much of the prairies. Alongside the native grasslands and Smoky Mountain hollers, the strains of music plucked with frosted 3 inch nails wafts through a look at our American treatment of women during recent eras. Songs that make much of the scorned woman who smiles back at her oppressor and then saunters away with a better paycheck or a better deal. Like one character in a song who "makes off" with the mobile home as she leaves her loser of a man. Smarsh aptly shows how Dolly uses her appearance during times when many women are throwing off the male social expectations, the 'feminine ideal' of the sexy office assistant for the more masculine pantsuit and marching for the ERA. In fact, nearly a whole chapter is devoted to Parton's undaunted take on plastic surgeries and all the nips and tucks that some women, not the women Smarsh admires, keep hush-hush. Smarsh connects messages in Parton's songs to the forgotten among us: the working class, the waitress, an hourly fast food worker, the women who up and leave when they are sick and tired of the grind, the system, or some lowlife man who won't pick up his own underwear. Just because a gal doesn't march in a parade, she can slam the door off its hinges as she makes her point that the life behind it, "ain't gonna get it." Smarsh's well-written and thoughtful book draws on Parton's autobiography and many other sources to make the case that roots music and its deep connections to culture. In the particular cultural forefront, Smarsh's own people two-step through the narrative to their own life's dance. What Parton has going for her is her own solid Christian faith. Parton's faith is lived out in her philanthropies, self deprecating humor, service to others, and her downright rejection of public snark with a mean motivation. Smarsh highlights that subtle grace Dolly Parton has stemming from her beliefs, the hardworking and hard living people who she continues to generously reach out to. Perhaps that is the essence of Dolly that is so attractive and sustaining. If you've ever sung along with lyrics that mourn a loss, celebrate an exit, or show how a dumb blonde is no body's fool, you'll love the book. In fact, you probably "come by it natural."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    *Thank you to Net Galley and Scribner for the advanced copy* The most difficult part of writing this review is trying to come up with a way to introduce Dolly Parton. First of all, she's a household name. Second, she successfully wears so many different hats it makes it impossible to simply describer her. She's a businesswoman, singer, songwriter, author, actress, producer, etc who never lost touch with her Eastern Tennessee roots. Growing up, Dolly shared a one room cabin with her parents and 11 *Thank you to Net Galley and Scribner for the advanced copy* The most difficult part of writing this review is trying to come up with a way to introduce Dolly Parton. First of all, she's a household name. Second, she successfully wears so many different hats it makes it impossible to simply describer her. She's a businesswoman, singer, songwriter, author, actress, producer, etc who never lost touch with her Eastern Tennessee roots. Growing up, Dolly shared a one room cabin with her parents and 11 siblings. She split for Nashville the day after graduating college and began writing songs for other country music artists. After the success of her first country single, "Dumb Blonde," Dolly signed on to The Porter Wagoner Show, where she was taken advantage of and dealt with Wagoner's passive aggressive antics, before really branching out on her own. Smarsh's book takes a look at Dolly through the lens of poverty and feminism. Smarsh also grew up poor and draws comparisons between Dolly and the working class women in her life. throughout the book. Smarsh considers herself a feminist, Dolly does not. She operates on the principle that everyone is equal and deserves to be heard. While she might not say she is a feminist, she certainly acts like one. Dolly is in complete control of her aesthetic. She has earned her money and she'll spend it on whatever she damn well feels like be it face lift, wigs, funding for the COVID vaccine or producing Buffy the Vampire Slayer. This book also discusses Dolly's close ties to Eastern Tennessee. She's remains a presence through her non-profit that provides books to children (regardless of income), extensive financial relief to residents of natural disasters, her theme park, Dollywood. It's clear through Dolly's actions that she truly cares and will always consider herself an Eastern Tennessee girl. Overall, I enjoyed this glimpse into Dolly's life. Based on what I knew about Dolly before reading this book, Smarsh paints an accurate picture of Dolly, a spunky and ambitious woman with a no BS attitude ready to take down whatever stands in her way. I enjoyed the comparisons Smarsh made to her own life and thought it provided helpful context to the choices Dolly has made in her life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lori White

    She Come by it Natural by Sarah Smarsh is an insightful look at what feminism means to rural women, poor women, under-educated women, blue-color women, and how Dolly Parton exemplifies this grace-filled and pure definition of empowered womanhood. It is also a book for every woman who has ever been tested by hard times, who has ever looked for and found an unconventional role model, and who has ever chaffed at the feminist label because it doesn't quite fit her life. I am one of those women, and She Come by it Natural by Sarah Smarsh is an insightful look at what feminism means to rural women, poor women, under-educated women, blue-color women, and how Dolly Parton exemplifies this grace-filled and pure definition of empowered womanhood. It is also a book for every woman who has ever been tested by hard times, who has ever looked for and found an unconventional role model, and who has ever chaffed at the feminist label because it doesn't quite fit her life. I am one of those women, and I really felt at home in this book. The author's background in academic feminism combined with her own personal experience of feminism as a rural woman of a working-poor mother brought a level of honesty to the book that was refreshing. Like a lot of women who grew up in the 70s, I took up the one-size-fits-all banner of feminism, only to find it didn't really represent who I was or even who I wanted to be. I think a lot of us have been similarly put off by academic definitions and militant stereotypes of feminism, and this book is a wonderful reminder of what real feminism looks and sounds like: It isn't just a woman with a blowhorn spewing anger, it is also a petite lady in skin-tight clothes with big hair and high heels who speaks truth to the challenges of being a woman, and encourages others to be courageous in owning their lives, their pasts and their futures - however that may look to them. Dolly's story is inspiring in and of itself, but placed in the context of feminism and specifically the brand of feminism grown in poor, working women, that story becomes almost a parable. From her poor, rural upbringing to her bold decision to go to Nashville at 18, to her relationship to Porter Wagner and other men who misjudged her strength, to decisions about her public persona and what that imagery represents to her and others, this is a book that deserves a spot in feminist libraries as well as on the bedsides of women everywhere. This review is based on an advance copy read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    What sets this apart from other examinations of Dolly's career and personal life is how it fixates upon what her music means to the women who were so often the subjects of her songs. As Smarsh points out several times, these women (and Dolly) didn't necessarily know the terms associated with their need for freedom, for escaping oppression in whatever form, for their demands regarding equality, but they felt it in their hearts, acting upon it. To approach Dolly's work via this angle is clever and What sets this apart from other examinations of Dolly's career and personal life is how it fixates upon what her music means to the women who were so often the subjects of her songs. As Smarsh points out several times, these women (and Dolly) didn't necessarily know the terms associated with their need for freedom, for escaping oppression in whatever form, for their demands regarding equality, but they felt it in their hearts, acting upon it. To approach Dolly's work via this angle is clever and fresh, as, not only are there tons of books you could read about Parton, but the lady's put out her own autobiography. It's quite beneficial to (and especially in this day and age) assess Dolly's work in totality, if, for no other reason, to key in on her positive attitude toward those who are accosted for trying to be themselves and/or to achieve equality. Smarsh makes the case for her being about as Christian as one can get, and I'm in full agreement. Dolly doesn't shove her religion in your face, she'll hug you no matter what, she gives without expectation of reciprocation...the list goes on. It's not breaking news that Parton is a role model for everyone, but this book comes at a time when faux-Christianity dominates the news and inhabits political positions going all of the way to the top, and, as an East Tennessean, it's relaxing and refreshing that Dolly's still, well, DOLLY. Many thanks to NetGalley and Scribner for the advance read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Habib

    I really think this book is more of a 4.5 on the rating scale. Country music is not my favorite genre of music, but I do love Bluegrass and Roots. Dolly Parton has long been someone I admire. The more I've learned about her the more I love her. She Come By It Natural just expanded my view of how this living legend came to be and how she "takes no prisoners" in her business life. The author, Sarah Smarsh, parallels her hardscrabble life and childhood with the childhood of Miss Parton, drawing com I really think this book is more of a 4.5 on the rating scale. Country music is not my favorite genre of music, but I do love Bluegrass and Roots. Dolly Parton has long been someone I admire. The more I've learned about her the more I love her. She Come By It Natural just expanded my view of how this living legend came to be and how she "takes no prisoners" in her business life. The author, Sarah Smarsh, parallels her hardscrabble life and childhood with the childhood of Miss Parton, drawing comparisons of family, opportunities and tenacity in both women. It comes as no surprise that the Country Music industry is not very supportive of women artists and the opportunities (especially in the current time) for women are frustratingly unavailable when compared to men. This book shows how Miss Parton forged her own pathway, staying true to herself despite everyone telling her she was too (fill in the blank) and needed to be different. It's a lesson all women, especially girls need to hear. Dolly Parton has shown over a career spanning decades that she has her finger on the pulse of music and writes and performs music that resonates with everyone that loves a good story and tune. As if that wasn't enough, she also has a heart as big as Tennessee when it comes to supporting her home and community by her generous giving and her amazing charitable works, especially The Imagination Library that encourages childhood literacy around the world.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Cha

    I give this book 4.5 stars. I received a free copy from a goodreads giveaway. This book was about Dolly Parton but so much more. It is an academic take on Dolly, poverty, feminism, politics, and the authors Aunt Betty. I have always liked Dolly. As a kid, I remember boys making jokes about her. This book talks about her appearance and what too many people have said about it ( some of it I found disturbing). I finished this book very quickly for me. The writing is so good. It is so interesting. For I give this book 4.5 stars. I received a free copy from a goodreads giveaway. This book was about Dolly Parton but so much more. It is an academic take on Dolly, poverty, feminism, politics, and the authors Aunt Betty. I have always liked Dolly. As a kid, I remember boys making jokes about her. This book talks about her appearance and what too many people have said about it ( some of it I found disturbing). I finished this book very quickly for me. The writing is so good. It is so interesting. For the most part, I grew even a bigger liking to Dolly. The author was not afraid to state her disapproval of one of Dolly's business ventures ( with good reasoning). I liked that she talked about it later in the book. She was able to separate this one business from the rest of Dolly's career. I so enjoyed reading what Sarah Smarsh had to say. Thank you for the enjoyable read. I have to read Heartland soon.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This book is a republished series of four articles written for The Journal of Roots Music, No Depression. The articles themselves haven't been changed from their original form, but Smarsh does provide a forward in which she touches on some of the things that have happened in the world since they were written that she would have addressed in her writings had they been written today. Having listened to Dolly Parton's America podcast, which Smarsh was a part of, I'm not sure I gained a lot of new i This book is a republished series of four articles written for The Journal of Roots Music, No Depression. The articles themselves haven't been changed from their original form, but Smarsh does provide a forward in which she touches on some of the things that have happened in the world since they were written that she would have addressed in her writings had they been written today. Having listened to Dolly Parton's America podcast, which Smarsh was a part of, I'm not sure I gained a lot of new information in this book, but I still enjoyed reading it. It's nice to know that a woman like Dolly Parton lives in the world. I give it a 7 out of 10.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sinda Conrad

    While I thought that this was a book about Dolly Parton it is more a book of the author telling how Dolly's songs affected her family and other women who had come from similar circumstances as Dolly. It tells of the struggle Dolly had because of her background and the way she dressed and looked. It is more a book about the trials that women have faced while trying to make it in a man's world. If the cover had not depicted Dolly then I probably would not have expected to learn a lot more about Do While I thought that this was a book about Dolly Parton it is more a book of the author telling how Dolly's songs affected her family and other women who had come from similar circumstances as Dolly. It tells of the struggle Dolly had because of her background and the way she dressed and looked. It is more a book about the trials that women have faced while trying to make it in a man's world. If the cover had not depicted Dolly then I probably would not have expected to learn a lot more about Dolly's life. Because it was not what I anticipated that it would be, I gave it a 3 star rating.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Jo

    Dolly, Dolly, Dolly! Who doesnt love this woman?? I've been a fan since 9 to 5, great song and funny movie. Reading this book about her made me more of a fan. She has a bright light about her that draws you to her and she brightens your day. I adore Miss Dolly and this book is a must for any country fan! Thank you Netgalley, the author and publisher for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Growing up I loved listening to Dolly Parton but never really knew her story until I was well into my 30's. I since then have grown to love and respect her even more and this book is amazing. It tells of her natural talent and how she never let anyone tell her no. After visiting Dollywood a few years ago with my family, I knew that she had built this up with love and hard work. For anyone who is looking for a good read, this is your book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review of the story. I greatly enjoyed the author's narrative. While I am a fan of Dolly, the person, I don't listen to much of her music. So the author's reflections of how Dolly's music influenced feminism and , women evolving in the music industry, was fresh and captivating. . It's a solid read even if you are not a Dolly fan.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber Archambault

    Awesome book! I have always lived in East Tennessee so I have always loved Dolly! I agree that all of her songs have touched so many lives and have helped them get through though times.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Less biography, more political analysis on Patton’s influence (ironic as, mentioned here, Dolly does not consider herself a political person).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Smarsh provides an episodic overview of Parton's career and uses quotes from past interviews Parton has given as a lens through which she explores how she (Smarsh) has felt about feminism and the world as a poor white girl and woman. The book tells the reader more about Sarah Smarsh's take on feminism than Parton's, but that's not really a bad thing; and since Dolly Parton has always cheerfully allowed the public to take what it wishes from her life and career, it actually seems fitting.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carla Jean

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lucianna Wolfstone

  23. 5 out of 5

    JulieB

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  25. 4 out of 5

    Florence McCambridge

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Dahling

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A Hanley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julia Piper

  31. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  33. 4 out of 5

    Allison Cunningham

  34. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Pacho

  35. 5 out of 5

    Connie Thienes

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  37. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Duncan

  38. 4 out of 5

    Adrianne

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Van

  41. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  42. 5 out of 5

    Emily Jane

  43. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  44. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Sanderlin

  45. 5 out of 5

    Mariah

  46. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  47. 4 out of 5

    Taryn

  48. 5 out of 5

    Beck

  49. 4 out of 5

    Caseycrank

  50. 5 out of 5

    Katie McKinnie Walters

  51. 4 out of 5

    Jess Batchelor

  52. 5 out of 5

    Zach Stewart

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