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DIY Grey Water Wetland: How to build a permaculture inspired, drought tolerant, kitchen water filtering, raised bed vegetable garden and wetland.

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A useful practical DIY guide This book guides the reader in building a raised grey water wicking bed to serve as a beautiful food producing mini wetland and bio filter. There is a detailed description of the building methods. A plus for the household, the garden and environment. Anyone with a small budget can build it. The manual will equip the reader to: Build the system A useful practical DIY guide This book guides the reader in building a raised grey water wicking bed to serve as a beautiful food producing mini wetland and bio filter. There is a detailed description of the building methods. A plus for the household, the garden and environment. Anyone with a small budget can build it. The manual will equip the reader to: Build the system themselves at low cost, with tips on using recycled and free available materials, and an extensive description of the building process. Design for easy maintenance. In our experience the system looks after itself and maintenance is about an hour's work a month. My mistakes and suggestions should help to further fine tune the design for low maintenance. Build a drought resistant garden, grow food and save soil. Grey water recycling is integral to increasing one's water resources in a dry climate, but can contaminate soil. A system like this keeps soil healthy and this conserves water. The wetland can also help solve garden irrigation problems in drought by growing water and nutrient hungry vegetables and berries in its raised beds. Benefits of this grey water system: Cleans grey water naturally. Earth worms, biofiltration and plants work to clean dirty kitchen waste water. These organisms all flourish by absorbing the excess nutrients, and release cleaner water back to the garden. Recycles grey water nutrients. All the nutrients that flow out of the kitchen in used dish water will no longer go to waste. Adds value to grey water by growing food. Instead of flushing down the drain, the kitchen sink water can feed food plants in its raised beds. Saves on irrigation and labor. Garden irrigation can be a chore in the heat of summer. Without carrying buckets or installing expensive irrigation, water hungry food plants can have optimal water supply on demand, when their roots reach the deep layers of the beds in the grey water system. Saves soil. The builder of this grey water filter will have an advantage that is relatively uncommon in organic gardening and permaculture design. Discharging soapy grey water directly into the garden can harm soil fertility in the long run. A biological grey water filter removes many of these contaminants, and the manual also explains in simple terms how to choose soil friendly soaps. Recycle grey water sustainably. The reader can recycle grey water, but instead of direct feeding grey water form the house into the garden, they can pre-clean it first, preserve their soil's fertility and ensure their ability to feed themselves from the vegetable garden in the future. The sooner the precaution is taken of pre-filtering grey water in a wetland like this, the better for the soil. What you will find in the manual: Down to earth writing. This manual is based on the description of an actual physical building project, without using technical jargon. The honest description of mistakes made should be very instructive. There is very little theory and no internet hype. Extensive description of building process. The reader will follow each aspect of the building process by a woman-builder who built this raised bed filtration system herself. Lots of useful information. This manual offers practical advice on building and information on choosing plants that suit the grey water filter and enhance its function. It describes one specific project, but the functioning of the filter and much of the construction experience can be translated into other projects and used for other designs. There is a whole chapter on the advantages and benefits of the grey water filter, a chapter on the arrangement of the system and the functions of its parts, chapters on the building method, on the materials with costs and suppliers, and finally a chapter on plants.


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A useful practical DIY guide This book guides the reader in building a raised grey water wicking bed to serve as a beautiful food producing mini wetland and bio filter. There is a detailed description of the building methods. A plus for the household, the garden and environment. Anyone with a small budget can build it. The manual will equip the reader to: Build the system A useful practical DIY guide This book guides the reader in building a raised grey water wicking bed to serve as a beautiful food producing mini wetland and bio filter. There is a detailed description of the building methods. A plus for the household, the garden and environment. Anyone with a small budget can build it. The manual will equip the reader to: Build the system themselves at low cost, with tips on using recycled and free available materials, and an extensive description of the building process. Design for easy maintenance. In our experience the system looks after itself and maintenance is about an hour's work a month. My mistakes and suggestions should help to further fine tune the design for low maintenance. Build a drought resistant garden, grow food and save soil. Grey water recycling is integral to increasing one's water resources in a dry climate, but can contaminate soil. A system like this keeps soil healthy and this conserves water. The wetland can also help solve garden irrigation problems in drought by growing water and nutrient hungry vegetables and berries in its raised beds. Benefits of this grey water system: Cleans grey water naturally. Earth worms, biofiltration and plants work to clean dirty kitchen waste water. These organisms all flourish by absorbing the excess nutrients, and release cleaner water back to the garden. Recycles grey water nutrients. All the nutrients that flow out of the kitchen in used dish water will no longer go to waste. Adds value to grey water by growing food. Instead of flushing down the drain, the kitchen sink water can feed food plants in its raised beds. Saves on irrigation and labor. Garden irrigation can be a chore in the heat of summer. Without carrying buckets or installing expensive irrigation, water hungry food plants can have optimal water supply on demand, when their roots reach the deep layers of the beds in the grey water system. Saves soil. The builder of this grey water filter will have an advantage that is relatively uncommon in organic gardening and permaculture design. Discharging soapy grey water directly into the garden can harm soil fertility in the long run. A biological grey water filter removes many of these contaminants, and the manual also explains in simple terms how to choose soil friendly soaps. Recycle grey water sustainably. The reader can recycle grey water, but instead of direct feeding grey water form the house into the garden, they can pre-clean it first, preserve their soil's fertility and ensure their ability to feed themselves from the vegetable garden in the future. The sooner the precaution is taken of pre-filtering grey water in a wetland like this, the better for the soil. What you will find in the manual: Down to earth writing. This manual is based on the description of an actual physical building project, without using technical jargon. The honest description of mistakes made should be very instructive. There is very little theory and no internet hype. Extensive description of building process. The reader will follow each aspect of the building process by a woman-builder who built this raised bed filtration system herself. Lots of useful information. This manual offers practical advice on building and information on choosing plants that suit the grey water filter and enhance its function. It describes one specific project, but the functioning of the filter and much of the construction experience can be translated into other projects and used for other designs. There is a whole chapter on the advantages and benefits of the grey water filter, a chapter on the arrangement of the system and the functions of its parts, chapters on the building method, on the materials with costs and suppliers, and finally a chapter on plants.

8 review for DIY Grey Water Wetland: How to build a permaculture inspired, drought tolerant, kitchen water filtering, raised bed vegetable garden and wetland.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tilo Asmussen

    A beginner publishes her project I congratulate the author for what she has achieved. However, the book is essentially a story about one way to build a wicking bed which uses waste water from the kitchen sink resulting in water that has such a high pH which is suboptimal to unsuitable for most plants without any information of longer term performance. The internet is full of stories like this. They are worth a read at times and can help to inspire. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge A beginner publishes her project I congratulate the author for what she has achieved. However, the book is essentially a story about one way to build a wicking bed which uses waste water from the kitchen sink resulting in water that has such a high pH which is suboptimal to unsuitable for most plants without any information of longer term performance. The internet is full of stories like this. They are worth a read at times and can help to inspire. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge and this resulted in many mistakes. I am sure, the author feels very passionate about the subject and has invested lot of time and effort but 'See one, do one, teach one' is not really good enough. What the author calls a manual is rather than a diary and the wetland is really just a wicking bed. Personal option, hearsay and information copied from the internet do not replace knowledge and facts. In summary, I quote the author which I copied straight from her book: 'Avoid taking the information as tried and tested, and rather gather more information before acting on anything written here.'

  2. 5 out of 5

    carol cook

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Ready

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Cox

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carl

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samir Patel

  8. 4 out of 5

    Everet Nestripke

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