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In this novel full of surprises from the New York Times bestselling author of We Were Liars and Genuine Fraud, E. Lockhart ups the ante with an inventive and romantic story about human connection, forgiveness, self-discovery, and possibility. If you could live your life again, what would you do differently? After a near-fatal family catastrophe and an unexpected romantic uph In this novel full of surprises from the New York Times bestselling author of We Were Liars and Genuine Fraud, E. Lockhart ups the ante with an inventive and romantic story about human connection, forgiveness, self-discovery, and possibility. If you could live your life again, what would you do differently? After a near-fatal family catastrophe and an unexpected romantic upheaval, Adelaide Buchwald finds herself catapulted into a summer of wild possibility, during which she will fall in and out of love a thousand times—while finally confronting the secrets she keeps, her ideas about love, and the weird grandiosity of the human mind. A raw, funny story that will surprise you over and over, Again Again gives us an indelible heroine grappling with the terrible and wonderful problem of loving other people.


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In this novel full of surprises from the New York Times bestselling author of We Were Liars and Genuine Fraud, E. Lockhart ups the ante with an inventive and romantic story about human connection, forgiveness, self-discovery, and possibility. If you could live your life again, what would you do differently? After a near-fatal family catastrophe and an unexpected romantic uph In this novel full of surprises from the New York Times bestselling author of We Were Liars and Genuine Fraud, E. Lockhart ups the ante with an inventive and romantic story about human connection, forgiveness, self-discovery, and possibility. If you could live your life again, what would you do differently? After a near-fatal family catastrophe and an unexpected romantic upheaval, Adelaide Buchwald finds herself catapulted into a summer of wild possibility, during which she will fall in and out of love a thousand times—while finally confronting the secrets she keeps, her ideas about love, and the weird grandiosity of the human mind. A raw, funny story that will surprise you over and over, Again Again gives us an indelible heroine grappling with the terrible and wonderful problem of loving other people.

30 review for Again Again

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    4 1/2 stars. Now, this is the sort of YA contemporary I love: wistful, bittersweet, and sad, but hopeful too. Again Again is actually quite different to anything Lockhart has written before. I was a big fan of her earlier fun "chick-lit" stuff and never really got on board with her dabbles in the mystery/thriller genre, but while this one is definitely more suited to my tastes, I would say it is not much like her recent thrillers OR her older fluffy books. It's a book about love and loving, but i 4 1/2 stars. Now, this is the sort of YA contemporary I love: wistful, bittersweet, and sad, but hopeful too. Again Again is actually quite different to anything Lockhart has written before. I was a big fan of her earlier fun "chick-lit" stuff and never really got on board with her dabbles in the mystery/thriller genre, but while this one is definitely more suited to my tastes, I would say it is not much like her recent thrillers OR her older fluffy books. It's a book about love and loving, but it is not, in my opinion, a romance. At the start of the book, we meet Adelaide as she struggles in the aftermath of a devastating break-up, as she tries to juggle her feelings about her brother and his opioid addiction, as she falls in love, maybe, possibly, with someone new. Alongside the main plot, we also see Adelaide's story play out in different universes, in snippets of what might have happened, what could have happened, what never did, if she had made other choices. I was unsure about this at first, but I really grew to love it as the story progressed. There is something about the multiverse theory, especially when applied to love and relationships that might have happened or never did happen, that makes me quite inexplicably sad. I think Lockhart taps into that here. There's a lot going on here for such a short book (304 pages and that's including many pages of texts); a lot of food for thought. The author sensitively portrays grief-- though not the kind that follows a death, as we most often see in YA --and the effects of addiction on the families of the addict. Emotions are complex in this book, just as they are in real life, and Adelaide battles with complicated feelings of love, fear and anger following her brother's relapse. Which emotion wins out? Well, that depends on what universe you live in. In the end, Again Again shows there's good and bad, happiness and sorrow, wins and losses in every universe. For every chance you didn't take, there's another one you did. It's about accepting the good with the bad. I thought it was all quite beautiful. Facebook | Instagram

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    My head is spinning so fast and I’m truly seeing the stars. I think I start singing “Swinging on a star” right now. ( Which reminded me the heist scene of Bruce Willis’ Hudson Hawk movie. See I’m already thought hungover after reading the book!) Sometimes if we have second or third chances to do something differently and even though we choose the different paths at the end each path may drag us into the same consequence. Maybe we cannot prevent the inevitable, maybe we’re just puppets who think My head is spinning so fast and I’m truly seeing the stars. I think I start singing “Swinging on a star” right now. ( Which reminded me the heist scene of Bruce Willis’ Hudson Hawk movie. See I’m already thought hungover after reading the book!) Sometimes if we have second or third chances to do something differently and even though we choose the different paths at the end each path may drag us into the same consequence. Maybe we cannot prevent the inevitable, maybe we’re just puppets who think we can control our own strings which we called them freewill and beat the master to perform our own life plays. “Again and again” is a complex story makes you think “what ifs” of your life, your regrets, your wishes to redoing something, changing your life. What if there are parallel universes and different version of ourselves act different, talk different and show different reactions to the same curveball life throws you. Could you be braver, happier, lonelier, more determined, more devastated, more regretful? Yes, this book opens up can of worms and make you question everything in your life, confusing the hell of you, frying your brain cells, pushing you out of the comfort zone but eventually it helps you to accept things you cannot change and hidden message is forgiving yourself and approving your choices you made, the actions you took, and the words came out of your mouth. This story is so unique, thought-provoking, remarkable and exhausting. You may give your full concentration because you read alternated versions of the same events between the characters at the same time and sometimes you can ask yourself: “What”, “Ha!”, “ Wait a minute, come again!” and you turn back to reread to make sure you understand everything correctly. Our heroine Adelaide is sad, heart- broken, suffers from egg yolk of misery( her definition of depression in her own words). She tries to look vivid, happy, strong but she cannot act anymore: she misses her unique relationship with her brother who is an addict and she is so scared he’s going to relapse again. She wants to take care of him, playing weird vegetable attack games, sharing her secrets and gossiping about parents’ over protective attitudes. She also wants to be loved; but her boyfriend ended her 8 month relationship and now she meets with Jack when she’s dog-walking and she remembers him wrote a poem for her during their first meeting at a party in Boston two years ago (She still keeps the poem inside her wallet). She starts to think she might be the one. So she has so many alternated versions of her own story to prove herself that her guts tell her the truth or she cannot be so wrong! Overall; this is quiet fascinating story about the loss (not as a grief but connection loss with the loved ones you shared important parts of your life), siblings, addiction, family, love, future plans, regrets, choices. I loved Adelaide’s profession choice and the ideas she brought out when she was designing theater set of “Fool for Love”. That design was also the reflection of her family’s skeletons in the closet and unhealthy relationship patterns she has. It might look like sad, depressing, mind-bending story but when you finish it, you realize you read something surprisingly promising, hopeful and refreshing and you start smiling, taking a deep breath and keep on thinking your other version of yourself and what would you do if you more chances to do over things! Yes, I loved this promising premise. I enjoyed Adelaide’s story and I loved the book’s approach to help me get a closer look to my own life. Full, well-deserved, complex but also entertaining stars! Special thanks to NetGalley and Random House Children’s/Delacorte Press fro sharing this unique ARC with me in exchange my honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    Well, this was lovely, bittersweet and melancholy. And welcome back, E. Lockhart. I was afraid you'd succumbed fully to the mystery genre, to writing of the stories I don't enjoy. I wouldn't call Again Again a complete return to the lighter chick-lit-type stuff of her early writing career. But this is monumentally better than the unfortunate Genuine Fraud. Again Again is a story about accepting the pain and joys of loving people. The cover might give one an impression that this is a romance, whic Well, this was lovely, bittersweet and melancholy. And welcome back, E. Lockhart. I was afraid you'd succumbed fully to the mystery genre, to writing of the stories I don't enjoy. I wouldn't call Again Again a complete return to the lighter chick-lit-type stuff of her early writing career. But this is monumentally better than the unfortunate Genuine Fraud. Again Again is a story about accepting the pain and joys of loving people. The cover might give one an impression that this is a romance, which it is, somewhat, however the focus of Again Again is on allowing yourself to love, even with the knowledge that this love (romantic, sibling) can and will bring you heartache. I know I am being unclear and rambly. You just need to explore this for yourself. Lockhart achieved quite a lot of depth in this work, even though the novel is set in a pretty standard YA landscape of school, family and romantic woes. And her characters, unfailingly, are great conversationalists, if you don't mind the uppity, a-bit-too-precocious tone of her works. There is also an interesting gimmick (?) of the same events playing out in different parallel worlds inserted here. For a lot of this novel I thought it had only entertainment value, but the last part of the book pulled it all together. All in all, a delightful reading experience, made even more so by my simultaneous binge of DEVS. #multiverseftw.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nataliya

    “And this other guy, he makes you happy?” “It’s not his job to make me happy,” she told him.” Building a book around a gimmick takes some courage. If it doesn’t resonate with the reader, the book may end up forever discarded, spending its life in a sad dusty corner. But if it works, then your bold approach has paid off and the book can be smugly proud of its shiny fancy self. I’ll start with the gimmick that almost triggered a migraine. For no discernible reason the narration breaks into a verse at “And this other guy, he makes you happy?” “It’s not his job to make me happy,” she told him.” Building a book around a gimmick takes some courage. If it doesn’t resonate with the reader, the book may end up forever discarded, spending its life in a sad dusty corner. But if it works, then your bold approach has paid off and the book can be smugly proud of its shiny fancy self. I’ll start with the gimmick that almost triggered a migraine. For no discernible reason the narration breaks into a verse at least once per page or so it seems, out of the blue. And it gets annoying. And then the narration resumes as though there has not been any interruption. I’m not sure what all this random switching back and forth is supposed to achieve besides a headache. Maybe it’s supposed to be artsy or evoke the memory of a poem Jack once wrote for Adelaide or remind nostalgically of teenage poetry-writing days. I have no clue, but what I do have is mild annoyance. Another gimmick is the entire structure of the book. The titular “Again Again”, which does exactly what it says on the tin. Yes, it has a purpose - for that Part IV of the book to have any emotional impact. But in the meantime it does take a while to adjust to it. “That summer she would fall in and out of love more than once, in different ways in different possible worlds.” The idea, brought up at a random party full of aspiring philosophers, is that of multiverses where “There’s got to be another possible world for every way that our world might have been but isn’t”. And so from the moment of Adelaide meeting Jack on the first day of that eventful summer we see the events play out in small snippets, every situation shown in a few possible permutations showing us what could have been. To keep it simple, each of these possible versions is in a slightly different font, and our “main” story of what actually happened in the universe that we follow is therefore easy to follow — but with the added benefit of knowing bits and pieces that played out in the other universes in this multiverse, knowing things that the “main” Adelaide does not yet know or see. And all those angles and permutations and insights from these parallel-ish universes flesh out otherwise unremarkable story of a summer in a young girl’s life, her heartbreaks and hopes and a journey to self-realization. (Although also at times they make me wonder why in the world we follow this particular universe out of all the other ones, and why I am supposed to care.) (view spoiler)[And then we have that Part IV which can be interpreted as a long-awaited catharsis of maturation — or a cheap trick to rewrite the whole messy story in a “good” way. (hide spoiler)] ———————— Adelaide Buchwald is seventeen, and secretly unhappy. On the surface she holds it together - a happy, “talky” and “sparkly” girl with a perfect boyfriend, enrolled in a fancy boarding prep school where her father teaches — a school that offers fancy-pants classes such as Greek and Set Design and a class in making puppets (no, really) and all such dream stuff: “Alabaster Preparatory Academy is a boarding school. It is the sort of place that offers classes like Eastern Religions, Theories of Popular Culture, and Microeconomic Theory. Students play lacrosse and row crew. They live in quaint residence halls that smell of wood and have no elevators. There is a chapel with large stained-glass windows. Most of the buildings are gray stone. There are woods on one side of the campus, and there’s a small town on the other.” But her shiny sparkly pretend happiness is just a plaster covering the cracks. Adelaide’s formerly ordinary world becomes fractured after her younger brother Toby has a near-fatal opioid overdose and ends up in rehab — twice. Her world now encompasses hurt and fear, disappointment and mistrust — and deep sadness. To cope, she puts on a sparkly veneer of pretend happiness while seemingly falling in love with her perfect boyfriend Mikey. “Adelaide wasn’t depressed. She never felt bleak. She had energy. She was talky. She painted her fingernails green and wore floral-print dresses and enormous cardigan sweaters. But you can be talky and paint your fingernails and still be very sad. In fact, you can be talky and paint your fingernails to protect other people from how sad you are.” But as this story starts, the veneer begins to crack. The perfect boyfriend Mikey realizes he does not love her, and casually dumps her. And now she faces a summer on the empty campus with dog-walking as her only distraction. Well, and her obsessive attraction to Jack - who is handsome and mysterious and who does not remember not only having met her before but also having written her a poem once, years prior. Jack, who certainly can make her happy. Or maybe it’s Mikey who can make her happy. Or maybe Jack. Or whoever fits that perfect boyfriend mold. “Romantic obsessional tendency—that is not a good quality in a person.” ————————— This is a story about Adelaide dealing with issues, about learning to find and assert herself, about realizing that you cannot let others deal with the burden of making you who you need to be, of making you happy. This is a story about finding clarity to deal with things and accept yourself and make yourself be a person you want to be. With the balance of sweet and slightly safely edgy-ish, it is nothing earth-shattering, really. But the memorable thing about the book, something that (outside of the gimmicks) broke the mold for me was Adelaide’s brother Toby, the recovering addict whose downward spiral had been the turning point of Adelaide’s life. Toby’s story (unlike Adelaide’s obsessive teenage struggles) actually felt like it had resonance and weight. Toby, who at fifteen is realizing the weight of the mess his addiction created and needs to figure out how to deal with it and how to be this new person who is always marred by who he used to be. And it’s sad and heartbreaking, and thoughtful. “I AM NOT THE GUY WHO did narcotics and told the lies and took cash from your wallet and wouldn’t talk to you and acted terrible in therapy and was just a thunder-butt. I mean, I did all that stuff. I just don’t want to walk around every day saying to myself, I am a complete and utter shit. I feel like a reasonably nice human. I would rather say I used to be an addict. But that is NOT what you are supposed to say. You have to say, I am an addict. […] And Mom is scared of the addict. Justifiably scared, Like it might take me over, like a werewolf changing at the full moon. And she can’t trust the me that’s here because of the addict that’s inside” So yeah. There were parts that resonated with me, and there were parts where I was really wondering about the point of endless permutations of mundane conversations and events — what did they really accomplish here? Sweet book, but perhaps not too memorable. But managed to put me off reading random verse for a while. 3 stars. “And this other guy, he makes you happy?” “It’s not his job to make me happy,” she told him.”

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest DNF @ p.40 I have a new policy where if a book doesn't grab me within the first 30-40 pages, I no longer finish the book unless I absolutely have to. I feel like if a book fails to grab you from the beginning, or at least make you think it will, that is a shortcoming great enough that it warrants a review. AGAIN AGAIN was a book I was excited about ever since I first heard about it because I've been a fan of Lockhart since high school (do Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest DNF @ p.40 I have a new policy where if a book doesn't grab me within the first 30-40 pages, I no longer finish the book unless I absolutely have to. I feel like if a book fails to grab you from the beginning, or at least make you think it will, that is a shortcoming great enough that it warrants a review. AGAIN AGAIN was a book I was excited about ever since I first heard about it because I've been a fan of Lockhart since high school (don't ask how long ago that was) with her Ruby Oliver series, which was much edgier than a lot of the offerings that were being promoted to me and my fellow kiddos at the time. With books like WE WERE LIARS and GENUINE FRAUD, she seemed to get edgier, and trying to capitalize on the growing trend of Gillian Flynn-esque mysteries among the 13-18 set. A lot of my friends didn't like WE WERE LIARS, but I actually really enjoyed it-- far more than Ruby Oliver, even. I love unreliable narrators and I liked the fact that there were no easy answers or flawless characters in the book. AGAIN AGAIN isn't like Lockhart's earlier or later stuff, so if I am to give kudos for one thing, it's that this is an author who constantly seems to be evolving and trying new things. She doesn't stagnate. Which is a check when it comes to creative progress, but kind of hard for us readers, who will never really be 100% certain whether one of her books will be for us-- they're all so different. The premise is that there are two(?) timelines in this book, and I guess we get to see how the heroine, Adelaide, makes different decisions that change the progress of each world? It's not science-fiction so much as a speculative young adult work with some mild supernatural events fueling the plot, kind of like how BEFORE I FALL did the same thing with life after death-- only this heroine isn't dead. I thought the premise was interesting, but I couldn't easily tell the difference between the two timelines which made reading confusing, I was also really not a fan of the writing style. This had a pretentious, forcibly artistic "Maggie Stiefvater vibe" to it that I really did not like at all. The heroine likes poetry and some parts are in verse and it just feels way too affected and pretentious, and I did not enjoy it at all. Some might, particularly if you enjoy Maggie Stiefvater, but I hate that author's work and steer clear of it at all costs, so seeing one of my faves start writing in that kind of style felt like a betrayal. Your mileage may vary, of course. But I know what I like and don't like in fiction, and it seemed pointless to force myself through this book as soon as it became clear that it wouldn't be something I enjoyed. I think if you enjoyed her newer books because of their edge, you should avoid this one, because it has none. It feels like a YA that is being targeted at a much younger audience. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!  1 to 1.5 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katie B

    This book is tough to rate because while I did have some problems with the story, l appreciate how the author was creative in her storytelling. There were aspects of the story I really loved, particularly the storyline involving the brother. But as a whole, I wouldn't say this was the most satisfying read. I do think there are readers who will connect more with the story and character than I did. High school student Adelaide Buchwald is spending her summer as a dog walker. And that's pretty much This book is tough to rate because while I did have some problems with the story, l appreciate how the author was creative in her storytelling. There were aspects of the story I really loved, particularly the storyline involving the brother. But as a whole, I wouldn't say this was the most satisfying read. I do think there are readers who will connect more with the story and character than I did. High school student Adelaide Buchwald is spending her summer as a dog walker. And that's pretty much all you need to know other than the story explores alternate realities or scenarios or whatever you want to call them. Throughout the course of the book a situation plays out but then you get the chance to see if the outcome is different if something else had been said or done differently by Adelaide. Sounds confusing? Well yeah, it kinda was confusing. I've read a couple other books that went the alternate scenarios route and really enjoyed them but I wasn't impressed with the execution of it in this book. The heart of the story for me was everything regarding Adelaide's brother, Toby. There was just so much raw honesty that resonated with me. It's amazing how I've seen the same subject explored in many other novels, but yet I walked away from reading this one and felt like the author managed to convey something in a new way. I actually would have preferred if more of the book revolved around him instead of so much devoted to Adelaide's love life. Other than a few moments here and there, I just wasn't invested in the romance elements of the story. This was my first time reading a book by this author and even though this wasn't a perfect read, I can at least recognize she is a talented writer. Not all books are going to be an exact fit for every reader and I would much rather read a story that aims high and misses the mark a bit than one that doesn't even attempt to bring something new to the table. I received a free advance copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Angelica

    I am conflicted!! On the one side, this book is not 'technically' a bad book. E. Lockhart is a wonderful storyteller. The story itself is also told in a fantastically creative way. On the other hand, I didn't actually enjoy the book. I wasn't satisfied. I wasn't as involved as I would have liked. I like to get lost in a story, and I simply couldn't do that here. All of that said, I do think this is an extremely interesting novel. Especially seeing the repetition of events happening in all the diff I am conflicted!! On the one side, this book is not 'technically' a bad book. E. Lockhart is a wonderful storyteller. The story itself is also told in a fantastically creative way. On the other hand, I didn't actually enjoy the book. I wasn't satisfied. I wasn't as involved as I would have liked. I like to get lost in a story, and I simply couldn't do that here. All of that said, I do think this is an extremely interesting novel. Especially seeing the repetition of events happening in all the different possibilities. Despite what the cover implies, this is not so much a romance novel, as it is a book about love. Love for yourself, for your family, for all the people that hurt you. If anything, the romantic aspect of the story was my least favorite part. I much preferred to see the family relations, especially between Adelaide and her brother, Toby. I enjoyed the way the book dealt with grief and loss. And I liked the fact that the loss is not related to death. It is the loss of a person that while they remain physically here, is lost to you in all other ways. Seeing how Toby's struggles with addiction and seeing how his family has fallen apart due to it was both interesting and heartbreaking. Overall, I thought the book to be well written and interesting, and yet, almost contradicting myself, I didn't fully enjoy it how I would have liked. I sill prefer E. Lockhart's We Were Liars. I also think this is the kind of book that a lot of people might not enjoy if you aren't familiar with, and interesting in, the author's style of writing. Follow Me Here Too: My Blog || Twitter || Bloglovin' || Instagram || Tumblr

  8. 5 out of 5

    Angela Staudt

    Thank you NetGalley for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. “Or maybe our encounter was in another possible world. That is, in one of the countless other versions of this universe, the worlds running parallel to this one, we are already in love.” I don’t really know how I feel about this book. I absolutely loved the author’s book We Were Liars, and internally screamed when I was approved for an eARC, but I just don’t really know what I read. I enjoyed some aspects of this book, but for the m Thank you NetGalley for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. “Or maybe our encounter was in another possible world. That is, in one of the countless other versions of this universe, the worlds running parallel to this one, we are already in love.” I don’t really know how I feel about this book. I absolutely loved the author’s book We Were Liars, and internally screamed when I was approved for an eARC, but I just don’t really know what I read. I enjoyed some aspects of this book, but for the most part I didn’t really like how it was written. We follow Adelaide who is staying on campus for the summer, and is a dog walker of five dogs. Her relationship with her boyfriend has just ended abruptly and she is heartbroken. Her brother is a recovering addict and she has a lot of emotions about everything, but puts on a happy face and never really brings up those emotions. This book explores alternate realties and the, “what ifs” that we all face in life. We see multiple ways a moment in her life is going to go, but then we see how it actually played out. I went into this thinking it was going to be a unique look at love and have some form of alternate reality with it. After reading it, I think my least favorite part was the love component. I found Adelaide quite annoying with her love life, and she was kind of crazy with all of her boyfriends. I would have much rather read more about Toby, her brother and their relationship. How the author puts in those gut-wrenching moments of what addiction is like made my heart hurt. I loved reading the horrible honest truth of addiction. I really appreciated how Adelaide dealt with her brother and their relationship meant the most to me in this book. All in all, I still don’t really know what the author wanted to convey with readers, and it saddens me that I didn’t like this book. I just felt that the plot was bizarre, don’t get me wrong I love when authors experiment with unique story lines, but this one didn’t seem to have a main point. I couldn’t connect with any of the characters and it just fell flat for me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sylvie

    2.75 out of 5 stars. It had been a hot minute since I read an E. Lockhart book, and when I remembered yesterday that 'Again Again' was released I knew I had to read it. The story overall was peculiar and I don't mean this either in negative or in a positive way. The writing style was very strange, I didn't quiet understand what was the purpose of the ''time lapses'' It didn't make sense to me. I know in a way that this was sort of a coming of age book, but I just disn't get the vibe of that. Maybe 2.75 out of 5 stars. It had been a hot minute since I read an E. Lockhart book, and when I remembered yesterday that 'Again Again' was released I knew I had to read it. The story overall was peculiar and I don't mean this either in negative or in a positive way. The writing style was very strange, I didn't quiet understand what was the purpose of the ''time lapses'' It didn't make sense to me. I know in a way that this was sort of a coming of age book, but I just disn't get the vibe of that. Maybe I myself wasn't in the right mood to enjoy or appreciate this book's concept.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    E. you have got to stop doing this to me! I only have the one heart! You can only fill it to the brim and then break it so many times before I drop dead! The concept of the multiverse is a very, very hard one to nail in fiction. (Please see my review of Blake Crouch's enormously awful attempt in "Dark Matter" for more on how easy it is to screw this up). It turns out simplicity and truth are the key. Adelaide is a teenage girl about to start her senior year at a pretty prestigious private school t E. you have got to stop doing this to me! I only have the one heart! You can only fill it to the brim and then break it so many times before I drop dead! The concept of the multiverse is a very, very hard one to nail in fiction. (Please see my review of Blake Crouch's enormously awful attempt in "Dark Matter" for more on how easy it is to screw this up). It turns out simplicity and truth are the key. Adelaide is a teenage girl about to start her senior year at a pretty prestigious private school that she attends because her dad is the new English literature teacher there. Well, she'll be starting her senior year if she doesn't flunk out. As the book, and her summer, begin she's got one chance left to create a set model for her theater design class in order to pass or she'll be looking for a new school come fall. To add insult to injury her boyfriend has just broken up with her and later dayed it out to Peurto Rico. Then there's the matter of her brother who is battling an incredibly serious illness. Adelaide has a lot on her plate in other words and any number of things could happen to disrupt the tenuous, taught tight rope she's currently walking on. What better subject then a teenage girl to explore the endless possibilities of the multi-verse with? Its that time in your life when all you do is consider the possibilities, what will happen if you do or don't talk to that boy, finish that project, say what you really mean when your mom asks how you are? Everything that happens to you is the most heart breaking, monumental, earth shattering, life changing thing that has ever happened in the whole history of the universe. E. Lockhart is also the perfect author to take on this kind of story. She is an absolute master of what I'm coming to think of as "a touch of strange." Her stories are incredibly grounded, her characters are very real people. But she manages to infuse her world's with just a bit of magic, enough to make it seem like it could be real. She takes Adelaides moments of indecision or tragedy or romantic hope and branches them out to give the reader multiple stories that somehow blend seamless together into one larger one. This isn't some hamhanded soap opera where you're constantly re-reading the same scenes over and over again. Its more like watching the waves come in while you sit on the beach. This wave comes up high enough to wipe away your sand castle, this one doesn't, this one comes all the way up and soaks your towel. Adelaide texts with a boy she likes and we see three quick versions of the conversation, each one totally believable and likely. She tries to show her project to her teacher, three different teachers respond to it in three different, totally viable ways. There's no transition between moments but it never feels stilted or stumbly. You start to realize how even the smallest of changes completing reframes the story but its hard to pinpoint exactly what happens to make things turn out differently becomes Adelaide herself stays fundamentally the same. She comes to certain realizations at different times but grows in the same organic, believable way. In some versions of her story she's a bit more sympathetic, more likable. In some she's clingy and insecure and harder to like. I wish books like this had been around when I was a green girl with so many feelings and hopes and needs and angry neediness. This is a total treasure, as I'm beginning to realize all E. Lockhart's books are.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sheena

    If there is a dog on the cover, I am going to read it. I enjoyed Adelaide and Toby's relationship - it was heartbreaking, pure, and real. I love reading about complex sibling relationships and I expected this to be more focused on the love interest mostly but I'm glad it didn't though. Adelaide seemed a little too much in love with each and every boy she met and maybe that is the point of young love but it made her come off as desperate and annoying. I did like that the author included her feeli If there is a dog on the cover, I am going to read it. I enjoyed Adelaide and Toby's relationship - it was heartbreaking, pure, and real. I love reading about complex sibling relationships and I expected this to be more focused on the love interest mostly but I'm glad it didn't though. Adelaide seemed a little too much in love with each and every boy she met and maybe that is the point of young love but it made her come off as desperate and annoying. I did like that the author included her feelings of depression as I found it relatable. This did end in a way I didn't expect and I'm actually content with how it ended. The alternative endings or situations was a bit confusing and I had trouble figuring out what actually happened and what was in Adelaide's mind. Sadly, that part didn't work out for me and it was what I was most excited for. Thank you to Netgalley for the advanced copy!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    What if you made other choices? What if your life was playing out in a different way in another reality? I cannot believe how wildly close to today’s reality Lockhart’s new book was and it was such a refreshing return to her writing that I loved. I wasn’t a fan of her thrillers, but this….felt very much like the E Lockhart I found so compelling before. Adelaide is at a boarding school, Alabaster Prep Academy, where her father is a teacher. Her mother and younger brother Toby are living still in B What if you made other choices? What if your life was playing out in a different way in another reality? I cannot believe how wildly close to today’s reality Lockhart’s new book was and it was such a refreshing return to her writing that I loved. I wasn’t a fan of her thrillers, but this….felt very much like the E Lockhart I found so compelling before. Adelaide is at a boarding school, Alabaster Prep Academy, where her father is a teacher. Her mother and younger brother Toby are living still in Baltimore, hours away from her father. The why of this remains quiet for a while in a book, but it is revealed that Toby has a drug addiction and their mother is staying there to help ensure he finds a way to recover. Adelaide and her father move so he can continue to make an income for the family and so she can get a good education. Except it won’t be that way. Or at least not in this reality. Adelaide and her boyfriend broke up, and she’s feeling lonely and sad while walking the dogs she’s watching this summer. She meets Jack at the dog park and he looks familiar to her, but she can’t really place it. But she knows immediately she likes him and begins to pursue him hard. In the mean time, she’s failed to turn in a major project to her set design class and her teacher isn’t thrilled. Yes, it’s summer. Yes, it’s break. But she’s been given more time to complete it anyway, since her teacher believes she has talent. Set building is, you see, about executing an idea in a way that isn’t necessarily the real image of the thing, but as true a rendition as possible so the audience understands what it is. In Adelaide’s experience, the people in her life are the set, but none of it is real to her. She’s walking through it, but none of it is real, alive. Mired in grief and sadness, worry and fear, Adelaide begins to attach herself to Jack who isn’t interested in her in that way. When her ex reaches back out, in desperation, Adelaide feels compelled to forgive him. That’s the story in one reality. But this book is about the multiverse, or the idea of multiple realities. So the story plays out in a number of different ways throughout the book. Sometimes Adelaide and Jack are together. Sometimes Adelaide is a good sister to her sick brother. Sometimes, she’s a nasty human being -- and in each of these realities, we see a complex picture of who she is. This is a love story but the romance is no where near central. It’s purposefully peripheral, as it’s there as a means of Adelaide waking up to how she behaves towards others in her life and specifically, those people who are closest to her. She’s privileged and healthy, but she can’t take those blinders off to see the bigger picture and to see where she herself is falling apart or too dependent upon others to give her reason and purpose. Clever, unique, and packed with emotional moments, depth, and philosophical fun, Lockhart’s book is one that will delight many readers. It packs in a lot without saying too much -- this is a slight book, with chapters written in broken-apart dialog and texts -- and doesn’t rely on anything cheap to pack a punch. Fun fact: Alabaster Prep is where The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau Banks was set as well, and Jack from this story was inspired by Jack in Lockhart’s short story in the “21 Proms” anthology. I love those little Easter eggs and more, love this book had signature Lockhart writing and smoothly-executed wit. Some of the marketing suggests this is funny, and it’s not really. It’s clever, but not necessarily funny. And important to note: none of the dogs die or get hurt.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Noelle

    I ended up really liking Again Again - or should I say The Verse and the Multi-Verse (badumdum, tip your waiters). E. Lockhart has this ability to just cut to the quick of emotions - especially the fraught emotions of adolescence - in a way that makes an examination of self-worth and emotional maturity not only accessible but still believable. Like, she brings up specific emotional issues in YA books that I can vividly remember experiencing in my youth but not reading about in my own teen readin I ended up really liking Again Again - or should I say The Verse and the Multi-Verse (badumdum, tip your waiters). E. Lockhart has this ability to just cut to the quick of emotions - especially the fraught emotions of adolescence - in a way that makes an examination of self-worth and emotional maturity not only accessible but still believable. Like, she brings up specific emotional issues in YA books that I can vividly remember experiencing in my youth but not reading about in my own teen reading selections. Who knows, maybe it would have sailed over my head back then but now I find her empathy and approachability about painful, scary, “ugly” emotions so valuable and admirable. The last few Lockhart novels proved too gimmicky for my tastes but in this case the gimmicks added instead of detracted from the reading experience, especially the multi-verse conceit. It mirrored the incessant what-ifs and over-thinking of an adolescent (or you know, anyone with anxiety, hello how are you) while also reinforcing the idea that there is no such thing as perfection. There will always be ups with downs, heartache with love, risks inherent in vulnerability. When I got to the last section I had a bit of a battle within: What was real? Did it matter? But after sitting with it a moment, beyond my wish for a "happy" ending, those questions were almost beside the point. Our world is made anew each day. (Totally sobbed about the sibling stuff <3) Oh, Lockhart you got me again.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Adelaide and her family were still coming to terms with her brother's addiction. As her family supported him through multiple stints at rehab, Adelaide wanted to be the good daughter, the easy child. She found comfort in assuming these roles, but the longer she played them, the more she lost touch with herself. Now dumped by her boyfriend and on academic probation, she finds herself adrift, but not lost, in a sea of possibilities. The hook of this book is supposed to be the idea of the multiverse Adelaide and her family were still coming to terms with her brother's addiction. As her family supported him through multiple stints at rehab, Adelaide wanted to be the good daughter, the easy child. She found comfort in assuming these roles, but the longer she played them, the more she lost touch with herself. Now dumped by her boyfriend and on academic probation, she finds herself adrift, but not lost, in a sea of possibilities. The hook of this book is supposed to be the idea of the multiverse. That the entirety of our world is the sum of a group of universes. Heady stuff, but don't worry, because it's not that complicated in AGAIN AGAIN. In the book, we follow Adelaide over the course of a summer. We watch her fall in and out of love, confront her fears, reconnect with her brother, and complete her design project. As the story plays out, there are points, where multiple possibilities are explored, and we get to see how each choice she makes affects the outcome. I read these little branch points, and found it interesting, but when I saw how it all came together at the end, I was a bit awed. I tip my hat to you, Ms. Lockhart. I loved seeing the different potential outcomes. It was fascinating to imagine how big an impact small decisions could make. Each thread had Adelaide making different choices for her love life, but in all of them, she was a sister desperately trying to restore her relationship with her younger brother. It was the moments she shared with her brother, that hit me the hardest. Those scenes were touching and heart wrenching, and I think they impacted me more, because I lost a cousin, who had lived with my family, to addiction, and was therefore, I understood her pain and fear. It was also fantastic seeing her grow in each possible universe. Different choices yielded different outcomes, yet each augmented Adelaide's understanding of herself, her brother, her parents, love, and life. When I finished this book, I wiped my tears, and just sat back, so I could quietly appreciate the beauty of the story. It was a little bit sad and bittersweet, but it was also imbued with hope. It reminded me that life is full of endless possibilities, and that I do wield some power over it via the choices I make. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  15. 4 out of 5

    Irena BookDustMagic

    Review to come.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hristina

    I haven't really be writing reviews this year. I've been trying my best to find a balance between work, book reviews, and hobbies, and the one that suffered most was book reviews. Reading and reviewing this book is my comeback, and I was really hoping I'd start off on a good note. But nah. I love E. Lockhart's writing, because it never overwhelms the story, instead it's exactly that light approach that keeps me reading. In this book, however, I feel like her light approach to it took away from it I haven't really be writing reviews this year. I've been trying my best to find a balance between work, book reviews, and hobbies, and the one that suffered most was book reviews. Reading and reviewing this book is my comeback, and I was really hoping I'd start off on a good note. But nah. I love E. Lockhart's writing, because it never overwhelms the story, instead it's exactly that light approach that keeps me reading. In this book, however, I feel like her light approach to it took away from it. You can't do a character that's so complex and has so much trauma, and not back it up with stronger exposition. Between all the parallel universes we get a glimpse of, and how none of the stories actually feel complete or have a satisfying end, the only thing that could've potentially worked with this idea would've been a detailed character study. In my opinion, I didn't get that. I only got the beginnings of it. I wish I liked it more. E. Lockhart is always going to be an author I will admire because of her Ruby Oliver quartet, and how it changed my life. But this is the second time one of her books leaves me frustrated, so me and her writing are no longer besties. We're friends now, and I really hope we don't end up acquaintances.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    4.5 stars A little bit difficult to follow at first, once you get into the groove this is a breathtakingly heartbreaking--and yet at the same time, heart-affirming novel. I just loved Adelaide and the many manifestations of her life and her romance. Where the deepest strengths of this novel lie, however, are in its depiction of addiction and its real effects on a family. I was moved to tears at different times during the interactions between Adelaide and Toby. How awkward and difficult and still a 4.5 stars A little bit difficult to follow at first, once you get into the groove this is a breathtakingly heartbreaking--and yet at the same time, heart-affirming novel. I just loved Adelaide and the many manifestations of her life and her romance. Where the deepest strengths of this novel lie, however, are in its depiction of addiction and its real effects on a family. I was moved to tears at different times during the interactions between Adelaide and Toby. How awkward and difficult and still absolutely loving they were when the siblings were trying to find their way through the terrible circumstances. There's humor here, and some definite room for reflection--what could my own life have been if I had lived each situation in a parallel universe with one tiny change? What would have changed and what would have stayed the same? Would I even be the same? Lots of pondering in a very good way. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    4 1/2 stars (which I would normally round down but this is the Woman who wrote We Were Liars) What I need right now is to sit down with E. Lockhart, have some tea and discuss two things: 1. How she continuously manages to pull the words from my soul. Just like with We Were Liars, with this book she again manages to put emotions and thoughts into words in a way that, to me, feels so personal and familair and almost makes me think: "I would have written this the same way. I wish I had written this." 4 1/2 stars (which I would normally round down but this is the Woman who wrote We Were Liars) What I need right now is to sit down with E. Lockhart, have some tea and discuss two things: 1. How she continuously manages to pull the words from my soul. Just like with We Were Liars, with this book she again manages to put emotions and thoughts into words in a way that, to me, feels so personal and familair and almost makes me think: "I would have written this the same way. I wish I had written this." Her sense for language and nuance hits so close to home with me that simply because of the way she writes on a linguistic level, I will always get excited again when she announces a new book. And I get that it's not for everyone, the way she writes, and that makes me like it even more, because it absolutely feels like it is for me. I will never get over that. 2. What motivated her to execute the final quarter of the story the way she did. I don't want to take away anything for fear of spoilers, but I can't lie and say I really know how I feel about the ending yet. Up until the 4th part of this book, this would have been a no doubt about it, set in stone 5 stars for me. And I still liked what the final few chapters explored within the concept of this novel (which I thought was, all in all, explored perfectly, the whole multiverse aspect was interwoven so wonderfully), but it nonetheless made other parts feel unsatisfyingly incomplete to me, and almost like we got no real ending. Which, maybe that was the point? Hence my need for a discussion with the author. I'll have to think on this one for a moment. Ultimately, I loved almost, very nearly everything about this. Aside from the writing, which was so poetic and moving and unique in a way I felt was missing from Genuine Fraud, the characters and especially Toby just carved their way into my heart. Adelaide's complicated relationship with her brother was probably the shining center of the novel for me. I personally have no experience with opioid addiction in my family or my circle of friends, and if you do I'd advise you to be cautious in approaching this book, but just having a younger brother myself and seeing how devastating it was for everyone really broke my heart. I felt it was handled very delicately and their text message exchanges simultaneously hurt and healed me. Further love goes to the campus setting, the discussion on happiness and how we cannot let it depend on other people, the realistic and non-perfect portrayal of male appearances in a YA novel, and above all, the chapter titles. We need more books with chapter titles. On a final note: If you have the time, I'd recommend reading this book in one sitting, or in one day. For lack of time, I had to spread it out over two, but it's a very fast read that I feel would be most effective when consumed in a short period of time. I don't really know how to explain it, but I thought I'd mention it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bookphenomena (Micky)

    DNF at 50% I struggled with this Contemporary YA quite early on. It's a plot of alternating realities, what-ifs, maybe it could have played out another way. It was confusing initially, but even when I settled into it, I didn't gel with the idea of these characters replaying events and finding different ways to end a scene or situation. Because of this, I basically didn't really care about the characters so I decided not to push on. I think if you like the idea of repetitive scenes played out diff DNF at 50% I struggled with this Contemporary YA quite early on. It's a plot of alternating realities, what-ifs, maybe it could have played out another way. It was confusing initially, but even when I settled into it, I didn't gel with the idea of these characters replaying events and finding different ways to end a scene or situation. Because of this, I basically didn't really care about the characters so I decided not to push on. I think if you like the idea of repetitive scenes played out differently, this might work for you. Ultimately, it just wasn't my style. I've decided to rate this one because I got halfway and had a good feel for the book. Thank you to Hot Key Books for the early review copy. I'm just sorry this one didn't work for me.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish // stan shea couleé

    I'm also a Book Blogger (ARC provided by NetGalley, my opinions are unbiased.) This book smelt like independent coffee shops and felt like slouchie hats. It sounded like discussions about Proust and tasted like avocado toast. In short, it was the most pretentious Hipster horse hockey I have ever read, and I've suffered through multiple Levithan books. This book does have it's merits, I particularly liked the idea of it, just not the execution. Adelaide Buchwald (Book Forest if you slam two German w I'm also a Book Blogger (ARC provided by NetGalley, my opinions are unbiased.) This book smelt like independent coffee shops and felt like slouchie hats. It sounded like discussions about Proust and tasted like avocado toast. In short, it was the most pretentious Hipster horse hockey I have ever read, and I've suffered through multiple Levithan books. This book does have it's merits, I particularly liked the idea of it, just not the execution. Adelaide Buchwald (Book Forest if you slam two German words together I guess) meets Jack while walking some professor's dogs, and then she meets him again - in another universe. Five meetings with different outcomes can take up a single page and quickly becomes repetitive and confusing. I struggled to see the point of this. It didn't have much of an outcome, literally switching to a different suitor later on just to fill space. The ending didn't leave me feeling satisfied with Adelaide's journey, of which not much happened. I didn't feel like she or I learned much during the course of the story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight What if we got do-overs when we didn't love how we handled something? Wouldn't that be fabulous? It would. We don't, but Adelaide might. Here's the thing: I have no idea which of Adelaide's attempts on living are the "real" ones. I suspect we aren't supposed to know. I won't lie, it frustrated me a bit as a very logic-driven, concrete thinker. But I can absolutely appreciate that there's You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight What if we got do-overs when we didn't love how we handled something? Wouldn't that be fabulous? It would. We don't, but Adelaide might. Here's the thing: I have no idea which of Adelaide's attempts on living are the "real" ones. I suspect we aren't supposed to know. I won't lie, it frustrated me a bit as a very logic-driven, concrete thinker. But I can absolutely appreciate that there's something thought-provoking in the not knowing, something that challenges us to almost choose-her-adventure, if you will. Adelaide, when we meet her, isn't particularly likable. Oh, we feel bad for her because she's just been dumped and is kind of a mess of a person, sure. She's going through a lot of family stuff (which unwinds as the story does, so I won't say much more about that), and it's certainly not easy. But sometimes, as we all do, Adelaide brings on some of her hardships. But during the course of the story, she begins to actually see that she is sometimes her own worst enemy, and somewhat of a self-fulfilling prophet. So while none of Adelaide's do-overs may even be "real", Adelaide's ability to grow and move forward is very real. That even if she is forced to live with the very first set of events, she has learned so much from them that she will be able to have much better futures, no matter the past. And that is something we can all stand to remember. Bottom Line: Truly lovely and thought provoking, Adelaide's growth and trajectory made her story worth reading, no matter what version of her life she ends up in.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kelsea

    This was my third E. Lockhart book (We Were Liars & Genuine Fraud being the other two) and her books are always interesting. Her style borders on the experimental, which can be hard to get into, but also promises to be really different from what else is out there. I enjoyed that about the book! And there were some interesting themes at play here. Some I think other readers will connect to. That being said, this feels like a book that was written for a very specific kind of person. It doesn't have This was my third E. Lockhart book (We Were Liars & Genuine Fraud being the other two) and her books are always interesting. Her style borders on the experimental, which can be hard to get into, but also promises to be really different from what else is out there. I enjoyed that about the book! And there were some interesting themes at play here. Some I think other readers will connect to. That being said, this feels like a book that was written for a very specific kind of person. It doesn't have what I'd consider mass appeal. It's a quiet, strange, niche story. And while I'm not quite the right person for it, there may have been a time in my life when I was. Probably when I was close to or around the age of the book's target age group (young adult). I don't want to spoil what makes the book interesting, but if you're reading this, you may be deciding if this might be a book for you. So I'll share what will appeal to some about this book so you can decide for yourself! You might be the right reader for Again Again, if you're interested in stories... - exploring "what if" questions and best case/worst case scenarios, - about intense heartbreak and healing, - where one of the MC's loved ones is an addict, - with more experimental writing and unusual formats, - featuring characters suffering depression - about a lost teen finding her way Personally, I think I'm just beyond my angst years. Or, I should say, my angst is no longer about the kinds of things featured in this book. This story wandered a bit too much for my tastes and I didn't find myself connecting strongly with anyone in the book, which made it hard to stay invested, given that it's entirely character-driven. I do wonder what I'd think of the story if I read it a decade or so back. Thank you to Get Underlined / Delacorte Press for providing a free advanced e-copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lauren (the.peachy.reader)

    Firstly, happy release day to this amazing book I was so excited to read this, especially because I absolutely adored We Were Liars by the same author Again, Again is an amazing coming of age story full of all of the emotions! It's about family and relationships and finding yourself in a confusing time of your life. (Also there's plenty of doggo scenes and I absolutely adored all of the doggos names) If you're after an emotional YA read then this is the story for you!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)

    DNF @ 25% I think I can definitively say that E. Lockhart just isn't the author for me. While the writing was absolutely beautiful and had a graceful rhythm that pondered along with Adelaide's thoughts. I don't actually know what the hell was going on. I think this might be a book I need to physically hold in my hands and see the words on a page to try and understand what was happening. It's a good story, I think, with Lockhart's expected pretentiousness, but I don't think I'm mentally capable of DNF @ 25% I think I can definitively say that E. Lockhart just isn't the author for me. While the writing was absolutely beautiful and had a graceful rhythm that pondered along with Adelaide's thoughts. I don't actually know what the hell was going on. I think this might be a book I need to physically hold in my hands and see the words on a page to try and understand what was happening. It's a good story, I think, with Lockhart's expected pretentiousness, but I don't think I'm mentally capable of getting anything from the story other than a huge question mark. But if you're looking for a weird time and want a cerebral book that engages you with a stream of conscious style narrative, I think you'll enjoy this. I received a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  25. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

    I hate to say it, but this book was disappointing. I was so prepared to love this book which makes it even sadder to say that I did not enjoy it. The cover was adorable and the description was very promising. The idea of a broken girl falling in and out of love during the summer with different possibilities for how the romances played out sounded so fascinating. I wanted to leave my heart in this book and watch a beautiful story unfold in front of me of love and hurt and brokenness and just raw I hate to say it, but this book was disappointing. I was so prepared to love this book which makes it even sadder to say that I did not enjoy it. The cover was adorable and the description was very promising. The idea of a broken girl falling in and out of love during the summer with different possibilities for how the romances played out sounded so fascinating. I wanted to leave my heart in this book and watch a beautiful story unfold in front of me of love and hurt and brokenness and just raw emotion. Instead, I'm not even sure what it was that I read. It started off kind of adorable and interesting; the chapter titles also seemed funny. I was intrigued. Then the book rapidly went downhill. It was honestly slightly bizarre at times. It would go from the story in the present to several other possible outcomes before returning to the story at present. It also got inappropriate, something I'm seeing happen so often these days in YA novels. While the book is not graphic, it is still not clean and I would not recommend letting younger readers read it. I was exhausted from trying to figure out what was real all the time. Also, saying that the main character fell in and out of love is somewhat deceiving. We start the book knowing that Adelaide's boyfriend broke up with her and very suddenly a new boy walks in and she switches gears really quickly. But she keeps having thoughts about her ex. It's a somewhat stupid and confusing thing to watch happen. The last part of the book completely changes from the beginning of the book. I almost felt like I was reading another book. Some scenes throughout the novel just didn't seem to make much sense, or have a point, or fit in with the rest of the book. And for any readers looking for a happy ending, you will not find it here. I'm not really sure it was much of an ending at all. However, there were some parts of this book I enjoyed, Sometimes the raw emotion and brokenness I wanted to see did shine through, I liked the idea of broken people finding themselves and learning how to love again; if that was the main point of the book, I probably would have enjoyed it more. Instead I got strange multiple timelines and bizarre characters and a plot that did not seem to be much of a plot at all. This book just wasn't for me, which is sad because I so badly wanted it to be. I can tell the author is extremely talented, but this book just was not great.

  26. 5 out of 5

    PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps

    ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of AGAIN AGAIN by E Lockhart in exchange for my honest review.*** After Adelaide’s boyfriend breaks up with her, she finds herself in and out of love over a summer of dog walking, family issues and self discovery. I love E Lockhart’s ability to tell stories in unique and fresh styles so much that I’ll select books I would pass on from another writer. As an older YA reader, I veer toward dark and twisty stories rather than rom-coms, but ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of AGAIN AGAIN by E Lockhart in exchange for my honest review.*** After Adelaide’s boyfriend breaks up with her, she finds herself in and out of love over a summer of dog walking, family issues and self discovery. I love E Lockhart’s ability to tell stories in unique and fresh styles so much that I’ll select books I would pass on from another writer. As an older YA reader, I veer toward dark and twisty stories rather than rom-coms, but everything Lockhart writes demands to be read. GENUINE FRAUD and WE WERE LIARS are two of my favorites, books I can reread and find new insights and clues I missed. In AGAIN AGAIN, Adelaide looks at different possible scenarios for approaching conversations and interactions, which reminded me of the thoughts of an anxious person imagining talking to someone, before getting up the courage to speak. What if he says this? What if she says that? What if she doesn’t know what I’m talking about? I loved Adelaide and all her awkward imperfections. AGAIN AGAIN showcases Lockhart’s versatility as a writer. It’s not my favorite of her stories because of my reading preferences, not the quality of the story, characters or writing. Readers who enjoy creative storytelling and rom-coms with devour AGAIN AGAIN.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Trisha

    Not what I thought it was going to be, and all the better for that. Am still thinking about it now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Gabrielle

    4.5 IGNORE the average review score and pick up this masterpiece plz.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Tomé

    Ambitious, human and so beautifully written. E. Lockhart is becoming one of my favorite YA authors

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katja (Life and Other Disasters)

    *I was provided with an eARC by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!* This is not a love story, or, at least, not a romantic love story. I feel like that’s what the cover might suggest and what you could interpret the blurb to be, but it’s not. Maybe it is part of why I went into this book with a sort of wrong idea, but then, I learned a long time ago to never truly expect E. Lockhart’s books to be any specific way to begin with. I quite enjoyed her earlier chick-lit-esque *I was provided with an eARC by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!* This is not a love story, or, at least, not a romantic love story. I feel like that’s what the cover might suggest and what you could interpret the blurb to be, but it’s not. Maybe it is part of why I went into this book with a sort of wrong idea, but then, I learned a long time ago to never truly expect E. Lockhart’s books to be any specific way to begin with. I quite enjoyed her earlier chick-lit-esque work (for those of you who followed her career and are fans of The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks, you’ll get a fun little easter egg) but was truly the most enamored with We Were Liars, which was what I would consider more in the mystery genre. Now, Again Again, doesn’t really fit into either category and proves once again that E. Lockhart won’t be confined to any genre. Again Again is partially written in verse and takes place in a multitude of universes, although mainly two. I think this approach could go over either way with the reader. Sometimes it felt repetitive in a tiresome way, other times it showed you how one moment can unfold in such vastly different ways that you yearn for a different outcome. It definitely takes time to get used to this unconventional style of storytelling, although I think the visual formatting helped get the point across. Still, I’m really torn on this matter myself, because I would be lying if I told you that the final universe wasn’t my favourite and I was so very relieved that it existed – imperfections and everything. As far as the characters go, I found it a bit difficult to really fall for Adelaide. She was putting on this bubbly front of happiness, which didn’t reflect her inner sadness and turmoil at all, bordering on obsession in so many departments of her life. Her erratic behaviour made me dislike her sometimes, especially when she was impulsive and neurotic about boys that were only an escape, but not a solution. I understood why she acted the way she did. Grieving for someone, even if it wasn’t the kind of grief related to death, and being burdened by constant worry will change you. It makes you act strange and impassive and everyone deals differently, but even though I got that on some level, it didn’t prevent me from getting frustrated with her sometimes. I appreciated the realness of her brokenness, while also resenting it. I am contradictory that way. I did really like her creative side though! I would love to see some of the stuff she made in this book in real life! However, as I said at the very beginning of this review, this is not a romantic love story, because all these boys (which were really only three) couldn’t have been more inconsequential, if I’m being completely honest. The most important relationship in this book, at least in my eyes, is the one between Adelaide and her brother Toby. Theirs is a love story of a different kind, because loving a family member can be just as hard and disappointing and necessary. Them finding their way back to each other was the only thing that really mattered to me. Lastly, I just want to mention that I always love it when dogs are in the mix! I want to warn all of you that a dog gets punched in the face in this book (out of defense), but that they also seem to be able to talk to the main character in a way and that was surprising and quirky and I still don’t know what to make of it. Fazit: 3.5/5 stars! Hit and miss in a lot of ways.

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