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The legendary FBI criminal profiler and international bestselling author of Mindhunter and The Killer Across the Table returns with this timely, relevant book that goes to the heart of extremism and domestic terrorism, examining in-depth his chilling pursuit of, and eventual prison confrontation with Joseph Paul Franklin, a White Nationalist serial killer and one of the mo The legendary FBI criminal profiler and international bestselling author of Mindhunter and The Killer Across the Table returns with this timely, relevant book that goes to the heart of extremism and domestic terrorism, examining in-depth his chilling pursuit of, and eventual prison confrontation with Joseph Paul Franklin, a White Nationalist serial killer and one of the most disturbing psychopaths he has ever encountered. Worshippers stream out of an Midwestern synagogue after sabbath services, unaware that only a hundred yards away, an expert marksman and  avowed racist, antisemite and member of the Ku Klux Klan, patiently awaits, his hunting rifle at the ready.  The October 8, 1977 shooting was a forerunner to the tragedies and divisiveness that plague us today. John Douglas, the FBI’s pioneering, first full-time criminal profiler, hunted the shooter—a white supremacist named Joseph Paul Franklin, whose Nazi-inspired beliefs propelled a three-year reign of terror across the United States, targeting African Americans, Jews, and interracial couples. In addition, Franklin bombed the home of Jewish leader Morris Amitay, shot and paralyzed Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt, and seriously wounded civil rights leader Vernon Jordan. The fugitive supported his murderous spree robbing banks in five states, from Georgia to Ohio. Douglas and his writing partner Mark Olshaker return to this disturbing case that reached the highest levels of the Bureau, which was fearful Franklin would become a presidential assassin—and haunted him for years to come as the threat of copycat domestic terrorist killers increasingly became a reality. Detailing the dogged pursuit of Franklin that employed profiling, psychology and meticulous detective work, Douglas and Olshaker relate how the case was a make-or-break test for the still-experimental behavioral science unit and revealed a new type of, determined, mission-driven serial killer whose only motivation was hate.A riveting, cautionary tale rooted in history that continues to echo today, The Killer's Shadow is a terrifying and essential exploration of the criminal personality  in the vile grip of extremism and what happens when rage-filled speech evolves into deadly action and hatred of the “other" is allowed full reign. The Killer's Shadow includes an 8-page color photo insert.


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The legendary FBI criminal profiler and international bestselling author of Mindhunter and The Killer Across the Table returns with this timely, relevant book that goes to the heart of extremism and domestic terrorism, examining in-depth his chilling pursuit of, and eventual prison confrontation with Joseph Paul Franklin, a White Nationalist serial killer and one of the mo The legendary FBI criminal profiler and international bestselling author of Mindhunter and The Killer Across the Table returns with this timely, relevant book that goes to the heart of extremism and domestic terrorism, examining in-depth his chilling pursuit of, and eventual prison confrontation with Joseph Paul Franklin, a White Nationalist serial killer and one of the most disturbing psychopaths he has ever encountered. Worshippers stream out of an Midwestern synagogue after sabbath services, unaware that only a hundred yards away, an expert marksman and  avowed racist, antisemite and member of the Ku Klux Klan, patiently awaits, his hunting rifle at the ready.  The October 8, 1977 shooting was a forerunner to the tragedies and divisiveness that plague us today. John Douglas, the FBI’s pioneering, first full-time criminal profiler, hunted the shooter—a white supremacist named Joseph Paul Franklin, whose Nazi-inspired beliefs propelled a three-year reign of terror across the United States, targeting African Americans, Jews, and interracial couples. In addition, Franklin bombed the home of Jewish leader Morris Amitay, shot and paralyzed Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt, and seriously wounded civil rights leader Vernon Jordan. The fugitive supported his murderous spree robbing banks in five states, from Georgia to Ohio. Douglas and his writing partner Mark Olshaker return to this disturbing case that reached the highest levels of the Bureau, which was fearful Franklin would become a presidential assassin—and haunted him for years to come as the threat of copycat domestic terrorist killers increasingly became a reality. Detailing the dogged pursuit of Franklin that employed profiling, psychology and meticulous detective work, Douglas and Olshaker relate how the case was a make-or-break test for the still-experimental behavioral science unit and revealed a new type of, determined, mission-driven serial killer whose only motivation was hate.A riveting, cautionary tale rooted in history that continues to echo today, The Killer's Shadow is a terrifying and essential exploration of the criminal personality  in the vile grip of extremism and what happens when rage-filled speech evolves into deadly action and hatred of the “other" is allowed full reign. The Killer's Shadow includes an 8-page color photo insert.

30 review for The Killer's Shadow: The FBI's Hunt for a White Supremacist Serial Killer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    If you like books about criminal profilers from the FBI, and the seriously twisted killers they are after, this book fits the bill. Back in the late 1970s, profiling was just beginning to get a start, with it getting a chance to be used outside the FBI by other agencies. This case would help to highlight its effectiveness and bring it more into use, if all went well as John Douglas took off to try and help catch the guy who’d been shooting people at random all over the country. His name was Jose If you like books about criminal profilers from the FBI, and the seriously twisted killers they are after, this book fits the bill. Back in the late 1970s, profiling was just beginning to get a start, with it getting a chance to be used outside the FBI by other agencies. This case would help to highlight its effectiveness and bring it more into use, if all went well as John Douglas took off to try and help catch the guy who’d been shooting people at random all over the country. His name was Joseph Paul Franklin, but he also used many false names as well. Profiler Douglas had been requested to assist police as things got bad, with Franklin randomly killing minority folks and mixed couples, showing his hatred for non-whites. He would even go after prominent white people, if he felt his reasons were good enough like when he wrote his letter to President Carter. He also wanted to show how he felt about Jewish people as well, so he began targeting them too. Franklin grew up with a lot of mistreatment and he wanted to let out his anger and rage when he felt like it. Abusing his wives wasn’t enough. He had this “mission” that he had come up with to kill as many of his targeted types of people as he could, and he was going to follow it through. Franklin became fairly proficient at robbing banks to keep himself going while he was on his mission. I found it to be an excellent look at a not too well known killer who was active in the 70s for 3 years. The case helped bring profiling into the mainstream as it helped them narrow down who to look at more, and who could be ruled out. Advance electronic review copy was provided by NetGalley, authors John Douglas & Mark Olshaker, and the publisher.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John

    Story - 4/5 Narration - 5/5 Interesting story, but not the typical Douglas case.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angus McKeogh

    The opening featured some rehash material if you’re a reader of Douglas’s previous books. Then it gets down to the data about capturing a white supremacist sniper who started in the 70s. The whole account in my opinion was a little anemic. The trial and everything was covered in very few pages. I just don’t think there was a lot of revealing information there. However, the best section of the book was the epilogue about how this sniper had become a hero to the fascist and racist movements. There The opening featured some rehash material if you’re a reader of Douglas’s previous books. Then it gets down to the data about capturing a white supremacist sniper who started in the 70s. The whole account in my opinion was a little anemic. The trial and everything was covered in very few pages. I just don’t think there was a lot of revealing information there. However, the best section of the book was the epilogue about how this sniper had become a hero to the fascist and racist movements. There was even an interesting piece about the FBI’s monitoring of Nazis and white supremacists through their publications and how these individuals within the movement had gleaned from Trump’s rhetoric that Trump had “promised to return the country to us (white supremacist)”. Guess that matches the FBI’s recent declaration that domestic terrorism by white supremacists is the most dangerous current faction in the country. Just amazing that the guy running the country wouldn’t denounce and summarily condemn such a thing. Kind of makes one wonder?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andi

    When the fucking Mindhunter makes an epilogue and calls Trump out on his shit, that's like being given a knighting by thr queen. More to say but that epilogue was the icing on the cake. When the fucking Mindhunter makes an epilogue and calls Trump out on his shit, that's like being given a knighting by thr queen. More to say but that epilogue was the icing on the cake.

  5. 4 out of 5

    CrabbyPatty

    Joseph Paul Franklin wanted to become famous - famous for killing interracial couples, Jews, young black boys, white girls who dated black boys, and ultimately for starting a race war and being embraced as a hero. I wasn't familiar with Franklin prior to reading this book, but the authors do a stellar job of presenting the case along with giving us a flavor of the 1970's time period. Franklin was that most difficult of killers to catch - he expertly used a sniper rifle but had no set MO for his Joseph Paul Franklin wanted to become famous - famous for killing interracial couples, Jews, young black boys, white girls who dated black boys, and ultimately for starting a race war and being embraced as a hero. I wasn't familiar with Franklin prior to reading this book, but the authors do a stellar job of presenting the case along with giving us a flavor of the 1970's time period. Franklin was that most difficult of killers to catch - he expertly used a sniper rifle but had no set MO for his kills. Some were spur of the moment, others were meticulously planned out, and he had no personal connection to his victims. Given his hard wiring and the effects of his upbringing and environment, and especially his view of his mother's abuse and neglect, it was as if nature had loaded the gun and nurture pulled the trigger.The author lay out Franklin's background in detail, as well as efforts to create a profile, identify Franklin and ultimately capture him and bring him to trial. But Franklin's case is only part of the story. The authors give us related cases that really hammer home the simple fact that WORDS MATTER. And eventually all that dangerous speech turns into real actions. And all we have to do is look around us to see that hatred "metastasizing across social media platforms as well." Franklin committed his crimes in the 1970's and was captured in 1980, but our country is still immersed in his mindset and philosophies. And that is why this book is equally fascinating and terrifying. 5+ stars and I highly recommend this book. "The journey to reckon with our nation's searing history of racial hatred, intolerance, and discrimination is ongoing, and there are no neutrals in that struggle. " I received an ARC from the Publisher, via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review. Visit my new blog "I Love True Crime Books"

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tara Yglesias

    3.5 The prose is as if an American flag somehow wrote true crime but the topic is fascinating and horribly timely.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Very topical, possibly released, definitely reworked if not, to cover crimes that are increasingly relevant in today's world. Racism went from something that people were shamed into hiding to something to be publicly proclaimed with pride thanks to trump and his supporters. As much as I am devastated that we are at that point I sometimes feel that peeling back that false face and showing the hidden hatred is for the best. The disease cannot be eradicated if it is not acknowledged. This book delv Very topical, possibly released, definitely reworked if not, to cover crimes that are increasingly relevant in today's world. Racism went from something that people were shamed into hiding to something to be publicly proclaimed with pride thanks to trump and his supporters. As much as I am devastated that we are at that point I sometimes feel that peeling back that false face and showing the hidden hatred is for the best. The disease cannot be eradicated if it is not acknowledged. This book delves deeply into the hate crimes committed by a person who would fit right into the White House today in 2020 and it is something we should be discussing. As was stated in the book, words have power, and we have to recognize that the words being spewed from on high are affecting the world. Audio: I love Holt McCallany and listening to his narration was very enjoyable even though what he was narrating was awful to listen to.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Talie

    Thank you to Harper Audio for the complimentary copy of this audiobook. I don't typically read true crime novels but given the current political climate a book about a white supremacist serial killer seemed oddly compelling to me. Combine it with the fact that it is the same author who wrote the book the Mindhunter series was based off of and I was sold. And bonus the audiobook is narrated by Holt McCallany, the actor on the Mindhunter series. The book centers around Joseph Paul Franklin, a White Thank you to Harper Audio for the complimentary copy of this audiobook. I don't typically read true crime novels but given the current political climate a book about a white supremacist serial killer seemed oddly compelling to me. Combine it with the fact that it is the same author who wrote the book the Mindhunter series was based off of and I was sold. And bonus the audiobook is narrated by Holt McCallany, the actor on the Mindhunter series. The book centers around Joseph Paul Franklin, a White Nationalist serial killer, who wreaked havoc in the late 1970s. The book is a fascinating look into a serial killer, his crimes, his background and his motivations. The book also outlines the beginning of the FBI profiling program and the methods they were rolling out. While the book outlines the murders that occur, it is not overly graphic or gory as Franklin was primarily a sniper. As I was listening to the book what really struck me was the underlying racism that fueled Franklin. So many of the sentiments really rang true with what I see happening with white supremacists in the US now. Overall I think this is a very timely and interesting book. The narration on this audiobook is top notch. With Holt McCallany I felt like a FBI profiler was telling me his story.

  9. 4 out of 5

    The Romance Book Disciple (Samantha)

    I have highly enjoyed Douglas' previous books, but this one missed the mark a bit. First, I felt the story was more focused on the killer and not the method of capture. I enjoy Douglas' books because of the unique insight into profiling. In this book that was just a TINY chapter. Second, the story seemed disjointed at times. The killer has a LOT of crimes and he traveled a great deal. Trying to keep up with all he did was challenging. Again, had the focus been on Douglas attempts to identify the I have highly enjoyed Douglas' previous books, but this one missed the mark a bit. First, I felt the story was more focused on the killer and not the method of capture. I enjoy Douglas' books because of the unique insight into profiling. In this book that was just a TINY chapter. Second, the story seemed disjointed at times. The killer has a LOT of crimes and he traveled a great deal. Trying to keep up with all he did was challenging. Again, had the focus been on Douglas attempts to identify the killer, it would have made more sense. Honestly, Douglas seemed to be a passive storyteller. However, the story is still timely and intriguing. This is not a killer I was familiar with, but his actions are increasingly more common. I was surprised to know he took responsibility for a double homicide in my town of Cincinnati, OH.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    The Killer's Shadow is an interesting book, detailing how the FBI and state/local law enforcement agencies tracked down neo-nazi serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin (named after Joseph Paul Goebbels and, oddly enough, Benjamin Franklin). This story was particularly engaging to me because, as a young interracial couple, my wife an I fit Franklin's victim profile perfectly. In this book, Douglas works through the case's history, stopping along the way to discuss relevant investigative procedures an The Killer's Shadow is an interesting book, detailing how the FBI and state/local law enforcement agencies tracked down neo-nazi serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin (named after Joseph Paul Goebbels and, oddly enough, Benjamin Franklin). This story was particularly engaging to me because, as a young interracial couple, my wife an I fit Franklin's victim profile perfectly. In this book, Douglas works through the case's history, stopping along the way to discuss relevant investigative procedures and principles of profiling. As one of the founders of the FBI's BAU, Douglas has valuable insight into federal law enforcement procedures and the details of particular cases. There is some overlap with Douglas's other books, but overall, this one is an easy recommendation for readers of true crime.

  11. 5 out of 5

    KC

    Well-known FBI profiler John E. Douglas (Mindhunter fame) takes us back to 1977 when the country was terrorized by a string of heinous offenses, ranging from shootings to bombings targeting African Americans, Jews, and interracial couples. Behind the crime-spree was a professed racist and skilled sharpshooter, Joseph Paul Franklin. This is a thoroughly comprehensive look at one of the most notorious racist serial killers of the 20th Century.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Jordan

    You pretty much know when you pick up a John Douglas book what you are going to get. A deep dive into the criminal mind, what motivates them; the how's, when's and why's. Sticking to his tried and true method, Douglas uses this book to pick apart a cowardly sniper/serial killer. Although the events in this book take place in the late seventies and early eighties, there is a timely appeal to the content. If you loved Mindhunter or any of the subsequent books by John Douglas, or enjoy true crime re You pretty much know when you pick up a John Douglas book what you are going to get. A deep dive into the criminal mind, what motivates them; the how's, when's and why's. Sticking to his tried and true method, Douglas uses this book to pick apart a cowardly sniper/serial killer. Although the events in this book take place in the late seventies and early eighties, there is a timely appeal to the content. If you loved Mindhunter or any of the subsequent books by John Douglas, or enjoy true crime reads, this book is for you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Molli B.

    Very good. I knew nothing about Joseph Paul Franklin before reading this (that I remember), and I refrained from googling stuff while I was reading the book, because I didn't want to "spoil" the end. :) Boy, what an asshole. The one from whom Dylann Roof took inspiration, so that gives you a sense of what this guy was about. He's also the guy who shot Larry Flynt (or said he did), although he never stood trial for it. Douglas discussed many different aspects of what made Franklin who he was and w Very good. I knew nothing about Joseph Paul Franklin before reading this (that I remember), and I refrained from googling stuff while I was reading the book, because I didn't want to "spoil" the end. :) Boy, what an asshole. The one from whom Dylann Roof took inspiration, so that gives you a sense of what this guy was about. He's also the guy who shot Larry Flynt (or said he did), although he never stood trial for it. Douglas discussed many different aspects of what made Franklin who he was and why he did what he did—sadly relevant even now, when you wonder why and how someone becomes so radicalized, what even starts them down that path. It's all interesting and sad and scary, and Douglas and Olshaker lay out their thoughts in a cohesive, cogent way. (There's one thing in particular that I don't remember Douglas mentioning. Franklin had wanted to be a cop but couldn't be because he had vision in only one eye, and Douglas theorizes that Franklin learning the impairment would prevent him from fulfilling his dream was perhaps an inciting life-change, part of what sent him down the path he traveled. What Douglas doesn't explicitly discuss is that if Franklin had been able to become a cop, he probably would have been one of the very, very bad ones; he'd have used the shield as exactly that—a shield—to protect himself while carrying out the hate crimes and racially motivated murders that defined his life. He was already bad before he found out he wouldn't be able to join the police force, and maybe he started killing people earlier in life because he didn't have a career to focus him, but it sure seems like if he'd been able to be a cop, at some point, he would have just killed Black and Jewish people anyway, whether on the job or not. The power would have emboldened him further. Maybe Douglas wouldn't agree with that assessment, but I'd've liked to have heard his thoughts on it.) Overall, very engaging (and enraging!) read. Well written, as Douglas and Olshaker's works are. I actually liked this better than The Killer Across the Table, just a bit. Maybe because of the heavier focus on a single criminal (although there are certainly references to and mentions of others) rather than a bunch of different people, with less focus. I listened to the audio, and while I'd initially been disappointed that Jonathan Groff wasn't doing this one, too, I thought Holt McCallany was perfect. Excellent book if you like this sort of thing!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Thanks to Dey Street Books and Edelweiss for providing the ARC of this non-fiction title. Overall, this fell flat for me. I found it dry and closer to textbook-like than I was expecting. I would recommend this for those deeply interested in behavioral science but not so much for those who may pick it up based on watching the Netflix Mindhunter series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stacey OBrien

    Perfect for today's uptick in white supremacist violence One of my favorite authors, John Douglas (with Olshaker) goes into detail about possibly the most prolific serial killer in American history. And his murders were based solely on killing Jews and any white person who would even consider dating a black person and vice versa. If he even saw a male and female of separate races talking, he would kill them like a sniper, with long range weapons, hoping to start a race war. At the end, Douglas tie Perfect for today's uptick in white supremacist violence One of my favorite authors, John Douglas (with Olshaker) goes into detail about possibly the most prolific serial killer in American history. And his murders were based solely on killing Jews and any white person who would even consider dating a black person and vice versa. If he even saw a male and female of separate races talking, he would kill them like a sniper, with long range weapons, hoping to start a race war. At the end, Douglas ties this kind of killer (and there are more and more of them) to the increased propaganda online and a president who encourages these groups to use violence to act out their hate. He makes it clear that these killers are losers with absolutely nothing worthwhile going on in their lives, whereas their victims were good people with great lives ahead of them - nurses, teachers, people who helped others and were killed by this lowlife before being able to complete their important work on earth. I learned q lot from this book. The writing of this team is always compelling - John was one of the original FBI profiles and mindhunters, who understands the mindset of such killers better than almost any other living person. His research and ability to find patterns and connect the dots are legendary and he takes you along with him through his adventures. I hope he writes a lot more because everything he has to say is especially important during these fraught times where even the president threatens civil war, and the barriers have gone down that kept most people from becoming violent. Maybe this and other books will take the sheen off of violence and show it for what it is - cowardly acts perpetuated by loserd.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    Warning: Racist Language and Violence The Killer's Shadow is a non-fiction book about the profiling and eventual capture of a white supremacist serial killer. It's a look into how this particular serial killer changed the way some serial killers are profiled and how it helped the FBI expand their serial killer profiling database. I loved the Netflix show Mindhunter which was about the establishment of the FBI's criminal profiling unit back in the 1970's. I have always found true crime interestin Warning: Racist Language and Violence The Killer's Shadow is a non-fiction book about the profiling and eventual capture of a white supremacist serial killer. It's a look into how this particular serial killer changed the way some serial killers are profiled and how it helped the FBI expand their serial killer profiling database. I loved the Netflix show Mindhunter which was about the establishment of the FBI's criminal profiling unit back in the 1970's. I have always found true crime interesting and when I had heard that one of the people who helped create the unit wrote books, I decided to check them out. I find Douglas to be an interesting character and his stories to be fascinating. This book was a mix of emotions for me. On the one hand, John Douglas and Mark Olshaker have a way of writing that is very accessible to the reader. It allows people who may not know much about true crime be able to read their books and find an avenue into such a vast world of content. These books are generally fast reads for me and something I know I can read in just a few days. On the other hand, the ideology of the serial killer they were hunting in this book made me feel sick. He is a racist who has read Hitler's book and see's himself as a Charles Manson type, trying to start a race war by targeting African American's, anyone who is Jewish and mixed race couples. He spouts absolute nonsense about government conspiracies and making the world "pure." I could rant about what an idiot this guy is and how is ideals are absolutely deplorable but I won't. What I will say is that Douglas and Olshaker did an amazing job conveying just what a disgusting human being this man was. I also really like the fact that Douglas will harken back to older cases that he has been a part of. It's interesting to see him compare serial killers together in both how they are alike and how they are different. It gave me a way to try to see the mindset of these people who commit violent acts. I do like that Douglas also focuses on the victims of the crimes and never forgets that these cases are not about the killer's but the victims who were senselessly taken away. Overall, I really liked this book. I found it to be fascinating and informative. This was something I didn't know about or didn't know that the FBI had been a part of, especially the profiling unit. If you are looking for an accessible true crime book that is really fascinating, I cannot recommend this one enough.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bruna (bruandthebooks)

    4.5 If you like true crime books, John Douglas’ books are mandatory reads. He was the head of the FBI's Behavioral Science Unit in the 70s and him and his group basically created the term "serial killer." He has interviewed and studied hundreds of serial killers to try to understand their motives, modus operandi and psychology. I highly recommend reading his previous books: Mindhunter, The Killer Across the Table, and The Cases That Haunt Us. The Killer’s Shadow details step by step the hunt for 4.5 If you like true crime books, John Douglas’ books are mandatory reads. He was the head of the FBI's Behavioral Science Unit in the 70s and him and his group basically created the term "serial killer." He has interviewed and studied hundreds of serial killers to try to understand their motives, modus operandi and psychology. I highly recommend reading his previous books: Mindhunter, The Killer Across the Table, and The Cases That Haunt Us. The Killer’s Shadow details step by step the hunt for Joseph Paul Franklin. He was a white supremacist serial killer who was shooting innocent black people all over the country in the 80s. Since he was moving around a lot, it was very difficult to link him to different killings. This book intrigued me because as John Douglas says, Franklin scared and repulsed him as much as Charles Manson did. If John Douglas, a man who’s talked to the most terrifying serial killers, defines Franklin as as repulsive as Manson, I want to read about him. Franklin was caught after killing two young black men in Cincinnati. He was being held in the Florence, KY prison for interrogation when he escaped. And that’s when John Douglas enters. They were suspicious that Franklin was responsible for more killings besides the two men in Cincinnati. This was a challenge for John Douglas since he was used to profiling possible serial killers before they’re caught, not going after a killer who has already been caught and escaped. Nonetheless, the police needed John Douglas to profile Franklin and see if he really was the most likely suspect for the killings. This book is very detailed and as always, while reading Douglas’ books, I feel like I’m in a very interesting class and he’s the best teacher I’ve ever had. Everything is very well explained and he makes it easy to digest the information. I’m sure part of it is because Mark Oshaker is his writing partner and he’s awesome as well. Please note that this detailed story has some graphic and potentially upsetting content. They quote Franklin a lot and everything he says about black people and Jews is gruesome and appalling. His hate for mixed race couples is tremendous. He was a member of the Ku Klux Klan and Nazi-inspired groups, and the reason why he left these groups was because he thought they were all about talking and no action. And he wanted to take action on his mission of exterminating black people. Yes, awful.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    FFS. Not one statistic covered about violent crime in the USA. So I’ll do it for them. Based on Obama era DOJ, 85% of all violent crimes (including homicide of course) are within the same race. In other words, most crimes are white-on-white, black-on-black, hispanic-on-hispanic. Of the remaining 15%, there are twice as many black-on-white than there are white-on-black violent crimes. I did the math from the reported data. So all of these riots over 2020 and this book about white supremacy is hig FFS. Not one statistic covered about violent crime in the USA. So I’ll do it for them. Based on Obama era DOJ, 85% of all violent crimes (including homicide of course) are within the same race. In other words, most crimes are white-on-white, black-on-black, hispanic-on-hispanic. Of the remaining 15%, there are twice as many black-on-white than there are white-on-black violent crimes. I did the math from the reported data. So all of these riots over 2020 and this book about white supremacy is highlighting the least observed circumstances and the least problem. Literally. And want to know what no one actually talks about at all?!? Much of the crime from these statistics happen in PRISON. I need to dig into Heather Mac Donald’s research — but her research reflects that if you pull out prison crime, America is actual quite safe. And if you pull out drug crime & gang activity, America is in the top 10 for safety and low gun crime. But the TRUTH doesn’t sell books, ad time, or chaos. FFS This book highlights a very interesting case, fascinating to get into the mind of a real racist. I’m a Conservative, so I’m called a racist constantly, which is ludicrous. My black colleagues and friends know better, which is all that matters to me. Another misrepresentation of President Donald Trump’s commentary on the Charlottesville riots, by LEO who know better. Including Trump supporters with white supremacists is precisely the tool of the Leftists, who want the status quo government swamp to be maintained. If perhaps the FBI would have DONE THEIR JOBS, listened to the tips about the Parkland HS shooter, or Adam Lanza or the myriad other kooks, rather than their hoax of persecuting Donald Trump as a Russian asset for 4 years, we wouldn’t have had those successful mass shooters. Many in the USA need to reprioritize their focus. There is so much more good in the country, but many want us to believe the bad. 🤦🏼‍♀️

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paige Turner

    An interesting procedural look into the mind of a serial killer who hates others based only on race and/or religion. I found it intriguing how the author brought up the advancement of social media which has allowed these kind of sick minded people to have a platform to reach millions today. I also liked the fact that the author related how some of these people are Trump supporters because I do believe that Trump has empowered these individuals, as they feel he thinks like they do...which I belie An interesting procedural look into the mind of a serial killer who hates others based only on race and/or religion. I found it intriguing how the author brought up the advancement of social media which has allowed these kind of sick minded people to have a platform to reach millions today. I also liked the fact that the author related how some of these people are Trump supporters because I do believe that Trump has empowered these individuals, as they feel he thinks like they do...which I believe he does. There is an adage that says "While all Trump supporters are not racist, all racists are Trump supporters." I do not think this is exactly true because Trump is a racist and if you support a racist, that makes you a racist as well. Racism is an ugly thing and we've seen it rear it's ugly head quite a bit since Trump began campaigning the first time in 2015. I was hoping that with his loss, these disgusting people would go back to their basements and private gathering places, but seeing the behavior of his supporters...AKA, worshipers...these past 7 weeks since the election, I think that ship has sailed. They will always be prolific on social media, now more than ever since Trump has so many brainwashed into believing the election was rigged and that he is the one who actually won. My biggest fear is that we will have more unstable people like Franklin going on racist killing sprees in the future on maybe even another civil war because Trump refuses to admit his defeat and encourages "his people" to defend him at any cost.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Reading Mama

    The authors of Mindhunter and The Killer Across the Table (which are both phenomenal btw) are back with a new true crime book. I have been sitting on my thoughts on this one for awhile because there was so much, for me emotionally, to process. TKS is a horrifying, true account of Blacks, Jews and interracial couples literally being killed in broad daylight, through heinous crimes such as targeted assassinations and bombings. Even though these events took place in the 1970s, you can imagine why t The authors of Mindhunter and The Killer Across the Table (which are both phenomenal btw) are back with a new true crime book. I have been sitting on my thoughts on this one for awhile because there was so much, for me emotionally, to process. TKS is a horrifying, true account of Blacks, Jews and interracial couples literally being killed in broad daylight, through heinous crimes such as targeted assassinations and bombings. Even though these events took place in the 1970s, you can imagine why this was a hard read to stomach, but even more so because what is happening in our country today. Douglas discusses the heart of extremism and domestic terrorism, and describes the killer as "one of the most disturbed psychopaths he ever encountered". The level of hatred and racism is truly incomprehensible. When the FBI finally catches him, they saw the pure, unadulterated hatred that fueled his actions. He didn't care how he killed, he just cared about there being one less Black person in the world. We all know the saying, "Those who fail to understand history are doomed to repeat it." It seems like a pretty common sense, straightforward concept, but here we are. Goodreads calls this a "riveting, cautionary tale rooted in history that continues to echo today." Overall, this is a hard read to stomach, but if you can, it is a compelling and powerful read that is SO important for today's society. Thank you @deystreet @williammorrowbooks for sending me this review copy. This book will be out November 17!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    So, if you are like me maybe you are wondering why John Douglas is writing another book as he has written so many, covered so many killers and mind hunting psycho babble, what else could there be left to go over in mind numbing detail? Well, the answer became clear to me somewhat early into this book which is all about a white supremacist serial killer who also enjoys killing Jews. That is, he wanted to get his two cents worth on the current ridiculous climate of telling us all about how racist So, if you are like me maybe you are wondering why John Douglas is writing another book as he has written so many, covered so many killers and mind hunting psycho babble, what else could there be left to go over in mind numbing detail? Well, the answer became clear to me somewhat early into this book which is all about a white supremacist serial killer who also enjoys killing Jews. That is, he wanted to get his two cents worth on the current ridiculous climate of telling us all about how racist this country is and then to really ram his point home, spent the epilogue bashing president trump by repeating already debunked bull shit quotes claiming he’s a racist. That is enough to remove stars for me, but then to really bring the lecture to a crescendo, he praises the riots of this past summer as a “coming together.” Just stfu. This was a waste of time if you don’t enjoy the lectures of the left. Also, this just affirms the fact that the fbi has been turned into a complete partisan whackadoo agency. Sad.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thanks to the publisher for the free copy in exchange for my honest review After reading and watching MINDHUNTER I’ve been wanting to pick up more from John Douglas. Despite this being true crime and nonfiction, it doesn’t read that way. I will forever love the profiling and getting into the minds of theses killers in order to track them down. I had never heard of Joseph Paul Franklin or his horrific crimes, so this was fascinating and all new information. Don’t get me wrong, I love reading the n Thanks to the publisher for the free copy in exchange for my honest review After reading and watching MINDHUNTER I’ve been wanting to pick up more from John Douglas. Despite this being true crime and nonfiction, it doesn’t read that way. I will forever love the profiling and getting into the minds of theses killers in order to track them down. I had never heard of Joseph Paul Franklin or his horrific crimes, so this was fascinating and all new information. Don’t get me wrong, I love reading the new books and information that comes out on the prolific and more publicized serial killers, but it’s always great learning about new ones (not that I want more to learn about, if that makes sense). I highly recommend this and MINDHUNTER if the profiling intrigues you like it does for me. THE KILLER’S SHADOW also included photo inserts that really made this come to life and makes it hit you that this is a real killer and not something of fiction.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Coley

    John Douglas’ books are must reads for any true-crime buff. He wrote the Mindhunter book (on which the series is based) and essentially created the term “serial killer”. He also was the head of the FBI’s original “BSU” (Behavioral Science Unit)—essentially, he’s the reason why we have and study criminals and their behaviors. This particular novel focuses on the hunt for white supremacist John Paul Franklin during the 70’s. Franklin was a serial killer who had a penchant for killing not one parti John Douglas’ books are must reads for any true-crime buff. He wrote the Mindhunter book (on which the series is based) and essentially created the term “serial killer”. He also was the head of the FBI’s original “BSU” (Behavioral Science Unit)—essentially, he’s the reason why we have and study criminals and their behaviors. This particular novel focuses on the hunt for white supremacist John Paul Franklin during the 70’s. Franklin was a serial killer who had a penchant for killing not one particular “brand” - he went after blacks, interracial couples, Jewish congregations (coming out of religious ceremonies). This novel is well-written, intriguing and also kept me on the edge of my seat. You learn so much about both Franklin and about Douglas, as he takes what he’s been practicing on convicted serial killers to the streets to actually use to catch an acting serial killer at large.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Denice Langley

    When reading a gruesome murder mystery, you always think, "At least it couldn't happen in real life". But it can and does. John E Douglas was an FBI profiler when the BAU was not as famous as it is currently. He is the author of the Mindhunter book, yes the one the Netflix series is based on. This is the story of the FBI's hunt for John Paul Franklin, a serial killer whose victims were racially chosen yet had nothing in common. This made the investigation and ultimate capture very difficult. The When reading a gruesome murder mystery, you always think, "At least it couldn't happen in real life". But it can and does. John E Douglas was an FBI profiler when the BAU was not as famous as it is currently. He is the author of the Mindhunter book, yes the one the Netflix series is based on. This is the story of the FBI's hunt for John Paul Franklin, a serial killer whose victims were racially chosen yet had nothing in common. This made the investigation and ultimate capture very difficult. The story is more thrilling than your average fictional phycological thriller, and worse, it's true. An absolutely engrossing read that left me with much more information on how the FBI investigations work.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Xanthi

    I listened to this on audiobook format. I’ve read a few books by these authors now and they’ve all been interesting and well written. This latest one is no exception. Probably some of the best true crime writing there is. This one centres on hate crimes - racially motivated, mostly. Very sobering. It’s American centric and so paints a very grim picture of some elements of their society, but really, it can apply to others, mine included (Australian), though perhaps not to the same extent thanks to I listened to this on audiobook format. I’ve read a few books by these authors now and they’ve all been interesting and well written. This latest one is no exception. Probably some of the best true crime writing there is. This one centres on hate crimes - racially motivated, mostly. Very sobering. It’s American centric and so paints a very grim picture of some elements of their society, but really, it can apply to others, mine included (Australian), though perhaps not to the same extent thanks to tougher gun laws here and just different attitudes and demeanour of our society at large. Still, there’s always to outliers who can and do cause so much havoc and devastation for others.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    Fascinating story about the FBI’s search for racist serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin. Was interested in the book because one of his earliest crimes was a synagogue bombing in the city where I live. I wanted to know more about the crime, which occurred while I was in college. Authors point out how Franklin was different from many serial killers but unfortunately has spawned one-off copycats. Book has some repetition of facts and is non-political except for one slip in its last few pages where i Fascinating story about the FBI’s search for racist serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin. Was interested in the book because one of his earliest crimes was a synagogue bombing in the city where I live. I wanted to know more about the crime, which occurred while I was in college. Authors point out how Franklin was different from many serial killers but unfortunately has spawned one-off copycats. Book has some repetition of facts and is non-political except for one slip in its last few pages where it repeats a frequent media error of taking out of context a remark President Trump made about protesters in Charlotte, N.C. Otherwise, it is a solid effort.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angelica

    John Douglas does it again! I really enjoy the combination of Douglas and Olshaker writing together. I like when my true crime reads like fiction. It is easy to get lost in the story, as if I was watching a movie. Douglas, probably best known for Mindhunter is try go-to for all things FBI and true crime. This story was a little less known than some of his other work, but it was still a very interesting read. Some may say Douglas likes to toot his own horn a bit, but he is damn good at what he do John Douglas does it again! I really enjoy the combination of Douglas and Olshaker writing together. I like when my true crime reads like fiction. It is easy to get lost in the story, as if I was watching a movie. Douglas, probably best known for Mindhunter is try go-to for all things FBI and true crime. This story was a little less known than some of his other work, but it was still a very interesting read. Some may say Douglas likes to toot his own horn a bit, but he is damn good at what he does, and his profiling work is fascinating.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Craig David

    I don't know how I hadn't heard this case. John E. Douglas does it again by bringing us to an iconic case that has been lost to serial killer hype. I still can't believe John Douglas is able to so accurately analyze a perpetrator without having any information on them other than the crime that was committed. Incredible read and I can't wait for the rest of the true crime community to get their hands on this. I don't know how I hadn't heard this case. John E. Douglas does it again by bringing us to an iconic case that has been lost to serial killer hype. I still can't believe John Douglas is able to so accurately analyze a perpetrator without having any information on them other than the crime that was committed. Incredible read and I can't wait for the rest of the true crime community to get their hands on this.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy "the book-bat"

    This was interesting and about I case I was unfamiliar with. The psychology kept me interested. My biggest issue was that it felt a little scattered. The author kept bringing in other cases that he worked to illustrate concepts, but at times it felt intrusive. I have read other books by this author which seemed to be less scattered. I am always intrigued by the cases he presents.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Jarc

    If you have watched the show “Mindhunter ” on Netflix, then this book will be familiar. Written by the same lead FBI agent who started the Behavioral Science Unit in the late 70’s, this book focuses mainly on one serial killer. Just fascinating. I loved how the author would explain certain aspects of criminal science behind the mind of a serial killer. He spoke of the many cases he worked.

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