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Wonder Woman like you've never seen her before--fighting monsters in a postapocalyptic Earth, as brought to life in a daring sci-fi epic by visionary writer and artist Daniel Warren Johnson! Princess Diana of Themyscira left paradise to save Man's World from itself. When Wonder Woman awakens from a centuries-long sleep to discover the Earth reduced to a nuclear wasteland, s Wonder Woman like you've never seen her before--fighting monsters in a postapocalyptic Earth, as brought to life in a daring sci-fi epic by visionary writer and artist Daniel Warren Johnson! Princess Diana of Themyscira left paradise to save Man's World from itself. When Wonder Woman awakens from a centuries-long sleep to discover the Earth reduced to a nuclear wasteland, she knows she failed. Trapped alone in a grim future, Diana must protect the last human city from titanic monsters while uncovering the secret of this dead Earth--and how she may be responsible for it. The celebrated creator of Murder Falcon and Extremity and artist of The Ghost Fleet, Daniel Warren Johnson, brings bold sci-fi chops to his DC debut with a harrowing vision of Wonder Woman unlike anything you've ever seen. Collects Wonder Woman: Dead Earth #1-4.


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Wonder Woman like you've never seen her before--fighting monsters in a postapocalyptic Earth, as brought to life in a daring sci-fi epic by visionary writer and artist Daniel Warren Johnson! Princess Diana of Themyscira left paradise to save Man's World from itself. When Wonder Woman awakens from a centuries-long sleep to discover the Earth reduced to a nuclear wasteland, s Wonder Woman like you've never seen her before--fighting monsters in a postapocalyptic Earth, as brought to life in a daring sci-fi epic by visionary writer and artist Daniel Warren Johnson! Princess Diana of Themyscira left paradise to save Man's World from itself. When Wonder Woman awakens from a centuries-long sleep to discover the Earth reduced to a nuclear wasteland, she knows she failed. Trapped alone in a grim future, Diana must protect the last human city from titanic monsters while uncovering the secret of this dead Earth--and how she may be responsible for it. The celebrated creator of Murder Falcon and Extremity and artist of The Ghost Fleet, Daniel Warren Johnson, brings bold sci-fi chops to his DC debut with a harrowing vision of Wonder Woman unlike anything you've ever seen. Collects Wonder Woman: Dead Earth #1-4.

30 review for Wonder Woman: Dead Earth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Vote: ☆☆☆☆ 1/2 (Read as single issues) Wonder Woman: Dead Earth is just not the DC's take on Old Man Logan or Batman: Last Knight on Earth re-telling/tie-in I was expecting for, but an epic, brutal, and sometimes distutbing mini-series with a grimdark main storyline much more metal than recent event/crossover with the same name and dripping with comics/games/movies references/easter-eggs. Dirty, gritty, raw artworks made me esitant to read this one, but in the end they turned out as perfect on Vote: ☆☆☆☆ 1/2 (Read as single issues) Wonder Woman: Dead Earth is just not the DC's take on Old Man Logan or Batman: Last Knight on Earth re-telling/tie-in I was expecting for, but an epic, brutal, and sometimes distutbing mini-series with a grimdark main storyline much more metal than recent event/crossover with the same name and dripping with comics/games/movies references/easter-eggs. Dirty, gritty, raw artworks made me esitant to read this one, but in the end they turned out as perfect ones painting a dying earth and a battered unpowered Diana, so different from the usual over-sexualized pin-up one, sadly  characters faces seemed too much childish to me sometimes. There are lots of great moments making this one allmost a five stars read, but I'm afraid I had to be far more familiar with Wonder Woman character to give that score. Besides that, I totally enjoyed this dark ride and author-artist Daniel Warren Johnson just gained a new fan. Suggested soundtrack: Where Hope and Daylight Die by Summoning. Play it on loop while reading and enjoy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    In the wake of nuclear annihilation, Wonder Woman wakes up from a centuries-long sleep in a contrivance pod, I mean a sleep pod, to find the world has changed quite a bit while she’s been napping! Dangers are everywhere as she leads the surviving humans to her old home, Themyscira for... Reasons - but is Paradise Island the refuge she believes it to be? Wonder Woman: Dead Earth was dead boring and dead stupid. The post-apocalyptic vision Daniel Warren Johnson presents is ridiculous - apparently In the wake of nuclear annihilation, Wonder Woman wakes up from a centuries-long sleep in a contrivance pod, I mean a sleep pod, to find the world has changed quite a bit while she’s been napping! Dangers are everywhere as she leads the surviving humans to her old home, Themyscira for... Reasons - but is Paradise Island the refuge she believes it to be? Wonder Woman: Dead Earth was dead boring and dead stupid. The post-apocalyptic vision Daniel Warren Johnson presents is ridiculous - apparently in his dystopian future, humans live in a medieval-type society wearing knight armour, while spending their leisure time in Roman-esque coliseums, and there’s also some jeeps?! It doesn’t make sense. Nuclear fallout mutation is a big feature of this book. (view spoiler)[I’ll accept the Amazons surviving because they’re god-like and don’t have normal human lifespans but Cheetah? She shouldn’t still be knocking around centuries later, should she? Why there was nuclear fallout in the first place was so unconvincing: the humans have a war with the Amazons over global warming and instantly escalate to using nukes. Johnson isn’t consistent with this sloppy explanation though as Diana’s mom says initially that Themyscira’s magical defences deflected the warheads and it was the nuclear fallout that engulfed the island that damaged them all - then later we see Diana smashing all the warheads single-handedly. So I guess it wasn’t magical defences, it was Wonder Woman? Eh, I don’t really care, it’s just another example of the bad writing in this book. The reasoning for why the Amazons continue to fight the surviving humans made them look petty and simple-minded (I guess that’s also a result of the nukes, eh? Sigh…) while Batman’s reasoning for putting Diana in that pod in the first place was even more nonsensical. Diana has an absurd fight with Superman (he apparently keeps a container full of kryptonite next to his chair) and the way she treats Superman’s remains is both gruesome and disrespectful. The latter action just underlines the gratuitously grim and depressing atmosphere of the book that only made me dislike it all the more. (hide spoiler)] The book is basically just Wonder Woman walking around and fighting monsters that look like they’ve stepped out of the pages of BPRD: Hell on Earth. Diana fighting monsters isn’t interesting whichever time period she’s in, not least because she’s never in any danger and always defeats them without much effort. It makes for dull, repetitive reading. Johnson’s art isn’t terrible, the grimy style just isn’t very appealing to me. This is also the homeliest-looking Wonder Woman I’ve ever seen - she’s Wonder Cavewoman and I don’t know why. Not that she has to look like a supermodel but she does have an established look that’s consistent across her numerous appearances and this is nothing like that. Wonder Woman: Dead Earth is a dreary, monotonous comic. What’s amazing to me is that someone could take such a flimsy concept and create a nearly 200-page comic out of it. DC Black Label has its share of crappy books but Dead Earth is down there as among the worst.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    With its post-apocalyptic setting, giant monsters, tone and art style, this felt like a BPRD book with Wonder Woman stepping into the Hellboy role. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, of course. I’d say it didn’t feel like a Wonder Woman story but I haven’t read Wonder Woman since John Byrne was on the book, so what do I know? I mostly liked the artwork, although the artist seems to have trouble with arms at times. The story was a good try at giving Wonder Woman her own version of The Dark Knight With its post-apocalyptic setting, giant monsters, tone and art style, this felt like a BPRD book with Wonder Woman stepping into the Hellboy role. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, of course. I’d say it didn’t feel like a Wonder Woman story but I haven’t read Wonder Woman since John Byrne was on the book, so what do I know? I mostly liked the artwork, although the artist seems to have trouble with arms at times. The story was a good try at giving Wonder Woman her own version of The Dark Knight Returns and I applaud its ambition and scale. I’d give this 3.5 stars if I could but I’ll round up rather than down, as that would feel uncharitable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. The future has always been easy for many to imagine. From the putrid, acid-filled, and chaotic disaster to the highly-technological, joyous, and stress-free paradise, humankind has allowed their imagination to go wild throughout history. Once rooted in actual global issues, it’s a bit more complicated to fancy a future that we’d love to leave for the next generation. Factor in the intervention of superheroes and it’ll be safe to say that anythin You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. The future has always been easy for many to imagine. From the putrid, acid-filled, and chaotic disaster to the highly-technological, joyous, and stress-free paradise, humankind has allowed their imagination to go wild throughout history. Once rooted in actual global issues, it’s a bit more complicated to fancy a future that we’d love to leave for the next generation. Factor in the intervention of superheroes and it’ll be safe to say that anything is possible when it comes to the fate of humanity. Adding to DC’s adult-content Black Label imprint, Daniel Warren Johnson (Extremity, Murder Falcon) presents readers with his DC debut, a post-apocalyptic science-fiction and fantasy horror tale gravitating around Wonder Woman’s terrifying odyssey into a bleak future that no one could’ve seen coming. What is Wonder Woman: Dead Earth about? The story follows Princess Diana of Themyscira and her discovery of an Earth reduced to a nuclear wasteland upon awakening from a centuries-long sleep. Led back to the last human city, Camp New Hope, she notices how the remaining human beings are barely surviving in these horrid conditions and vows to protect them from titanic monsters ravaging the world she once loved and protected with her whole being. As she tries to remember the events that led up to her slumber, she unearths the deep and dark secrets of this dead Earth and the role she might have had in the current state of the world. Feeling utterly defeated, she channels the iota of hope within her to try and make a difference that can allow humans to embrace a second chance at a life void of neglect, chaos, and destruction. This what-if story offers fans the chance to discover an unprecedented level of grim narrative and gore with Wonder Woman at the heart of this calamity. Split into four issues, the story immerses you in a ghastly world that looks nothing like the Earth this hero has known and protected with her compatriots of the Justice League. As the story progresses, the reader is immediately introduced to the variety of world-building elements that help piece together the history and war that led to its current state. The subtle and sometimes very brutal connection to some of the iconic heroes who perished from the war also smoothly consolidates the universe in which this story takes place. However, there’s nothing more ghastly in this tale than the reveal of the source of destruction, following the divide on the matter of climate change, and what it implicates for the remaining humans in their own war against the strange creatures called haedras. Fortunately, through Wonder Woman, it is possible to identify the very virtues she fights for and recognize her iron will and belief that there is still good in everyone despite what her environment reveals, giving readers a vessel of hope in this dilapidated world. The science-fiction and fantasy horror tone embraced by creator Daniel Warren Johnson is formidably established from the very beginning of this story without much effort. From Old Gotham to Themyscira, the consistency and coherence in style and atmosphere allow the world to take a life of its own and give way to an enthralling journey through macabre corners of the universe known to well-versed readers. Although certain stylistic details in the concept art for the characters and the world can be questionable due to logical concerns, they are quickly bundled into a visionary project that easily steers you away from those issues. Miker Spicer’s colours also give this graphic novel the alarming and gory edge that it requires to fully immerse the reader. It is mostly thanks to the underlying message of hope that this story manages to keep afloat and send readers off with the prospect of change, love, and happiness. Wonder Woman: Dead Earth is a grim and horrifying post-apocalyptic tale with a hero searching for hope and opportunities for redemption. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  5. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    THIS IS HOW YOU DO A BLACK LABEL BOOK! Like wow! I honestly haven't enjoyed a Black Label book this much since Batman: White Knight! The premise of the story is Diana waking up in an apocalyptic future where mankind is on its last legs and she's the only hero left who can save the world! The book straight away has an Old Man Logan vibe and the artwork and aesthetics remind me of Dark Knights Metal, you know without any of the convoluted pretentiousness! The story is so well written and it weaves THIS IS HOW YOU DO A BLACK LABEL BOOK! Like wow! I honestly haven't enjoyed a Black Label book this much since Batman: White Knight! The premise of the story is Diana waking up in an apocalyptic future where mankind is on its last legs and she's the only hero left who can save the world! The book straight away has an Old Man Logan vibe and the artwork and aesthetics remind me of Dark Knights Metal, you know without any of the convoluted pretentiousness! The story is so well written and it weaves its themes and commentary about the world so well. It talks about climate change and the idiots we have in power who treat the earth like a garbage bin, but it still ties into the world of Wonder Woman and her history! The book is really good at keeping the stakes feel personal and some of it is heartbreaking! The artwork isn't my usual cup of coffee, but it works really well with this story. This comic tells a gritty and dark story but has the writing and substance to back it all up! I can't say anything else other than go out and read this comic, whether your a Wonder Woman fan or don't know much about her, this comic I feel will become essential reading for the character!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    A did like this book. I was a little apprehensive as I had read mixed reviews. I think the story is ok but there are some really big twists that put it up to good. I think the artwork is a perfect companion for this story. There is a lot of moral ambiguity in this book that I really like. Sometimes you have to choose a side and leave the rest to faith. I also like the fact the the book us in a bigger format like Batman Dark Prince Charming. A good Wonder Woman story the guest stars do their part r A did like this book. I was a little apprehensive as I had read mixed reviews. I think the story is ok but there are some really big twists that put it up to good. I think the artwork is a perfect companion for this story. There is a lot of moral ambiguity in this book that I really like. Sometimes you have to choose a side and leave the rest to faith. I also like the fact the the book us in a bigger format like Batman Dark Prince Charming. A good Wonder Woman story the guest stars do their part really well. I think this is an all round good book. Very much in the style of Batman Last Knight on Earth, thought I did prefer LKOE slightly to this one. Though I might be biased as I am more of a Batman fan anyway.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Wonder Woman wakes up from a coma to find herself in a post-apocalyptic world. She mucks around with the survivors and fights some mutants until she discovers the terrible secret of how this dead Earth came to be. Seems like a pretty standard Elseworlds tale. There's some gore, but I'm not sure how this merits the Black Label imprint. It doesn't seem very mature with its simple theme of second chances. And its not particularly well done, with art in the style of Paul Pope and a story reminiscent o Wonder Woman wakes up from a coma to find herself in a post-apocalyptic world. She mucks around with the survivors and fights some mutants until she discovers the terrible secret of how this dead Earth came to be. Seems like a pretty standard Elseworlds tale. There's some gore, but I'm not sure how this merits the Black Label imprint. It doesn't seem very mature with its simple theme of second chances. And its not particularly well done, with art in the style of Paul Pope and a story reminiscent of Euro sci-fi. None of the DC superheroes shown seem to act in character. And for no given reason it limits the cast of the DC Universe, sort of ignoring the dozens of other heroes who probably would have been involved in the unlikely apocalyptic events outlined. So, yeah, in the end, I just don't buy the plot. It's not really a story so much as a string of wouldn't-it-be-cool beats and images.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    The end of the world. Diana awakes to have to kill a monster who is trying to kill two teenagers. Lost and confused we travel through a broken world to find out what happened but also who Wonder Woman really is. This is a awesome, action packed, crazy adventure for Wonder Woman to go through. Watching her highs and lows shown in such a devastating yet satisfying way was the best idea. The fight scenes are brutal, probably some of the best she's ever had. A fight especially at the end or her past The end of the world. Diana awakes to have to kill a monster who is trying to kill two teenagers. Lost and confused we travel through a broken world to find out what happened but also who Wonder Woman really is. This is a awesome, action packed, crazy adventure for Wonder Woman to go through. Watching her highs and lows shown in such a devastating yet satisfying way was the best idea. The fight scenes are brutal, probably some of the best she's ever had. A fight especially at the end or her past fight with a close friend, showcase Daniel Warren Johnson's skill at big bombastic fight scenes. The art can look muddy at times but fits the tone. And some of the Cheetah stuff was odd. But everything else? Awesome as hell. A 4 out of 5.

  9. 5 out of 5

    James

    Absolutely amazing story. Can’t recommend it enough. See the individual issues for more of my thoughts.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beelzefuzz

    More metal than Dark Knights Metal could ever dream.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wakizashi

    I'd never been interested in reading Wonder Woman comics before this book. It was artist and writer Daniel Warren Johnson that convinced me to buy it. I loved his work on Extremity and Murder Falcon, and found both titles to be an absolute blast to read. I really like his art style, which can leave some readers a bit cold. He's not going for realism; he's all about the energy and flow of the story. I find his drawings and panel-layouts exciting and cinematic. There is a real kinetic flow to the a I'd never been interested in reading Wonder Woman comics before this book. It was artist and writer Daniel Warren Johnson that convinced me to buy it. I loved his work on Extremity and Murder Falcon, and found both titles to be an absolute blast to read. I really like his art style, which can leave some readers a bit cold. He's not going for realism; he's all about the energy and flow of the story. I find his drawings and panel-layouts exciting and cinematic. There is a real kinetic flow to the action he depicts, reminding me of some of the best manga. But he adds his own unique twist to it, and it becomes a kind of cool hybrid of the American and Japanese styles. There is a great, entertaining story in here, and I enjoyed every panel and page. Diana might not look as wonderful as she usually does, but she well and truly kicks ass in Wonder Woman: Dead Earth. Recommended!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have a bit of mix and complicated feelings about this one and I think as a reader you’re supposed to feel that way. It’s uncomfortable taking sides because the circumstances that created this chaos for these characters is tragic for all involved. Both sides of this warring world are fighting for causes that you deeply feel are justified. I think this is a book I’ll need some more time to process and will probably want to revisit again in the near future. [SPOILERS] On one side you have the Amaz I have a bit of mix and complicated feelings about this one and I think as a reader you’re supposed to feel that way. It’s uncomfortable taking sides because the circumstances that created this chaos for these characters is tragic for all involved. Both sides of this warring world are fighting for causes that you deeply feel are justified. I think this is a book I’ll need some more time to process and will probably want to revisit again in the near future. [SPOILERS] On one side you have the Amazons who were attacked my man with nuclear weapons, which deformed them beyond recognition and on the other side you have humans who were not the ones that directly caused the pain inflicted on the Amazons. It’s a very awkward situation to put yourself in if you were to chose sides. I very much think the Amazons have every right to want to destroy the human race (they destroyed the planet and all the Amazons wanted was peace but the humans struck back) —but you also can’t fault humans who had literally nothing to do with what happened...this is definitely a book that’s going to keep me thinking 🤔

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Dead Earth starts off like The Walking Dead, turns into Mad Max, then ends up as Amazons Attack, all by the way of New 52 Wonder Woman. It's not terrible, but it's not what I want from a Wonder Woman story. I guess that's the point, right? Take the Wonder Woman mythos, twist it into something dark and grimy, and load it full of gore. The DC universe is basically just Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman, with a couple of supporting stuff built in. This feels more like an extension of the Snyderver Dead Earth starts off like The Walking Dead, turns into Mad Max, then ends up as Amazons Attack, all by the way of New 52 Wonder Woman. It's not terrible, but it's not what I want from a Wonder Woman story. I guess that's the point, right? Take the Wonder Woman mythos, twist it into something dark and grimy, and load it full of gore. The DC universe is basically just Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman, with a couple of supporting stuff built in. This feels more like an extension of the Snyderverse than of the DC universe. But hey, it's Black Label, they basically give free reign to whoever to do whatever and the darker, the better. I loved Daniel Warren Johnson's Murder Falcon, so I had high hopes for this. In the end it felt like some regular post-apocalyptic stuff but this time it had Wonder Woman's name on it, and that made it lesser. I always hate when the first thing that happens in some sci-fi/fantasy setting is female characters being abused, and boy oh boy that was certainly the first issue. Diana ends up hostage to the first man in the book and he is going to force her to be his "wife". She meets another character who implies a lot of abuse at his hands. I wish writers would leave this trope behind but hey if you're a man writing a 'dark' book you're obligated to do that, I guess. Then there's a bunch of spoiler stuff later into the book which... fits the world, doesn't fit the characters. That's my biggest gripe. If you can put aside this being a "Wonder Woman" book and isntead just read this as a post-apocalyptic book, it's pretty neat. There are giant monsters that DWJ pencils incredibly, with distorted bodies and and giant claws and some gorgeous colours courtesy of Mike Spicer. But as the series goes on it leans heavier and heavier on DC characters, and that takes me right out of it. The point of this book is that Diana, the Amazons, all of the "gods"... they're not great. They might be good, they might be powerful, but they're just as flawed as everyone else. Diana herself goes from making leadership speeches about love and hope, to murdering people before our eyes, to philosophizing fate and trust, to slaughtering soldiers. This book will show a beautiful establishing shot of a post-apocalyptic wasteland and have me falling in love with it, then everyone will murder and backstab each other and I'm taken right back out. Come to think of it "not great", "good", and "powerful" describe this book pretty well, too. I can see why people love it, I can see its merits, but I can also see why people might be repulsed by it. And I think that's me. It's not what I was expecting, it's not what I want, and that's fine. Maybe someone else will love it. If it weren't a DC Comics book, I might speak more highly of it, but sadly it's still entrenched in the world of DC and I can't get into it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This may have been my favorite Wonder Woman story ever. Wonder Woman finds herself in a post apocalyptic Earth with no idea what's happened. As the story unfolds, we get shock after shock. The art normally wouldn't fit Wonder Woman well, but considering the gritty setting of the story it worked out perfectly. The story never lost its way, the pacing was great, and it wasn't predictable. Highly recommended. Even if you're not a Wonder Woman fan this one could be worth checking out. This series coul This may have been my favorite Wonder Woman story ever. Wonder Woman finds herself in a post apocalyptic Earth with no idea what's happened. As the story unfolds, we get shock after shock. The art normally wouldn't fit Wonder Woman well, but considering the gritty setting of the story it worked out perfectly. The story never lost its way, the pacing was great, and it wasn't predictable. Highly recommended. Even if you're not a Wonder Woman fan this one could be worth checking out. This series could set the standard for future DC Black Label releases.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matty Dub

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is the best Superhero book I’ve read in a while and it’s my new favorite Wonder Woman book. As a futuristic elseworld tale, I find it superior to Miller’s Dark Knight Returns and I believe if it wasn’t a female led book, it’d gather the same accolades. This is set a few hundred years in the future as Diana wakes from a long sleep to find the earth in its post-apocalyptic condition. The cataclysm caused by a nuclear fallout at the end of the world war between the Amazons and the humans. At this This is the best Superhero book I’ve read in a while and it’s my new favorite Wonder Woman book. As a futuristic elseworld tale, I find it superior to Miller’s Dark Knight Returns and I believe if it wasn’t a female led book, it’d gather the same accolades. This is set a few hundred years in the future as Diana wakes from a long sleep to find the earth in its post-apocalyptic condition. The cataclysm caused by a nuclear fallout at the end of the world war between the Amazons and the humans. At this point she’s nearly powerless and amnesiac and this story depicts her struggle to find herself again, to uncover the past and take a stand in a conflict between 2 factions she loves. This book is so gruesome and beautiful. It’s heart wrenching and poignant in its narrative and the highly detailed art is visceral and precise. The visual strorytelling is so eloquent you’d understand everything without the text. This book is a work of art, it’s absolutely fucking perfect.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    Really fun story about a revived Wonder Woman coming to terms with a post-apocalyptic world and helping the few remaining humans to fight off giant bird-worm creatures called Haedras. The artwork is really wild and colorful (reminds me a bit of Frank Miller's work on his Dark Knight stories) and the story is pretty good, too, parceling out surprises bit by bit as it goes along. Not going to say it's the best story ever, but it is a lot of fun and definitely worth your time. Really fun story about a revived Wonder Woman coming to terms with a post-apocalyptic world and helping the few remaining humans to fight off giant bird-worm creatures called Haedras. The artwork is really wild and colorful (reminds me a bit of Frank Miller's work on his Dark Knight stories) and the story is pretty good, too, parceling out surprises bit by bit as it goes along. Not going to say it's the best story ever, but it is a lot of fun and definitely worth your time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    AJ Kallas

    This is the best book I’ve read in 2020! Fiction, nonfiction, comics— THIS is the best book! Daniel Warren Johnson is a master! I would’ve given it 5 stars for the art alone, but it’s also the best Wonder Woman story I’ve ever read! It is very funny that when DC came to him to do a black label miniseries, he originally wanted to do a story about Pa Kent struggling with his faith in God after Kal-El comes to earth. And while I would read any story Johnson dies from here on out, I’m glad we got th This is the best book I’ve read in 2020! Fiction, nonfiction, comics— THIS is the best book! Daniel Warren Johnson is a master! I would’ve given it 5 stars for the art alone, but it’s also the best Wonder Woman story I’ve ever read! It is very funny that when DC came to him to do a black label miniseries, he originally wanted to do a story about Pa Kent struggling with his faith in God after Kal-El comes to earth. And while I would read any story Johnson dies from here on out, I’m glad we got this epic book about the 3rd pillar of DC Comics.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah K

    Thoroughly impressive. Johnson deserves the highest praise for this book - an expert blend of action, emotion, and philosophy. Includes some truly magnificent scenes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    By the time I finished this dystopian tale I came up with a one sentence description of this mini series. Wonder Woman: Fury Road. Because in some ways this is that famous Mad Max movie, just replacing Max with Diana. Sure, that is an over simplification of the story-line. It is an accurate description of how I felt by the end of the tale (note: I liked Fury Road). Diana is woken from suspended animation to find a destroyed world. No spoilers, but part of her journey is discovering what caused t By the time I finished this dystopian tale I came up with a one sentence description of this mini series. Wonder Woman: Fury Road. Because in some ways this is that famous Mad Max movie, just replacing Max with Diana. Sure, that is an over simplification of the story-line. It is an accurate description of how I felt by the end of the tale (note: I liked Fury Road). Diana is woken from suspended animation to find a destroyed world. No spoilers, but part of her journey is discovering what caused the destruction and the agents behind the even more death and destruction in a devastated world. An enjoyable read, but not a great one. BTW really liked what was done with Cheetah. Disclaimer: read as digital floppies.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    This book was received as an ARC from DC Entertainment - DC Comics in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. I have been waiting for a dead earth edition of my favorite superhero of all time. The graphics were absolutely amazing and it captured the essence of the story and really brought it to life. Loved the concept through and through from beginning to end. This book really magnified what I love about Wonder Woman. No matter what hap This book was received as an ARC from DC Entertainment - DC Comics in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. I have been waiting for a dead earth edition of my favorite superhero of all time. The graphics were absolutely amazing and it captured the essence of the story and really brought it to life. Loved the concept through and through from beginning to end. This book really magnified what I love about Wonder Woman. No matter what happens to her or the world around her, she will always remain resilient and strong and let nothing stand in her way. This was also a good recap of what is going on right now in the world with COVID-19 and a good message to grasp that if we remain positive strong and resilient, we can get through anything. We will consider adding this title to our Graphic Novel collection at our library. That is why we give this book 5 stars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Bold choices, hiring an artist who's never been shown a picture of Wonder Woman and who also has no concept of human proportions. Never knew Batman had a 60 inch waist, 'cuz that's how long his fully loaded utility belt is when laid out - a belt that oddly also fits our new, pudgy and misshapen heroine. Never knew Superman was at least 10 feet tall, since he'd need to be to string his spine on a 6ft (minimum) whip. Too much other stoopid to even list. Bold choices, hiring an artist who's never been shown a picture of Wonder Woman and who also has no concept of human proportions. Never knew Batman had a 60 inch waist, 'cuz that's how long his fully loaded utility belt is when laid out - a belt that oddly also fits our new, pudgy and misshapen heroine. Never knew Superman was at least 10 feet tall, since he'd need to be to string his spine on a 6ft (minimum) whip. Too much other stoopid to even list.

  22. 5 out of 5

    The Lost Dreamer

    Great starting point, mind blowing art, quite an interesting take on Wonder Woman's character. And that's it. Black Label is DC's way of providing alternative, darker versions of our most beloved superheroes. But for me it is only interesting if you don't have to totally rewrite your hero's identity in order for them to become almost a villain. In this case the post-apocalyptic world doesn't count anything that you haven't seen, read or enjoyed before anyhow. But at least it's well crafted in it Great starting point, mind blowing art, quite an interesting take on Wonder Woman's character. And that's it. Black Label is DC's way of providing alternative, darker versions of our most beloved superheroes. But for me it is only interesting if you don't have to totally rewrite your hero's identity in order for them to become almost a villain. In this case the post-apocalyptic world doesn't count anything that you haven't seen, read or enjoyed before anyhow. But at least it's well crafted in its opening issue. The problems arise when you read any further: as you (too slowly) discover that it was Diana's inability to control her own power the one that caused the annihilation of most of the planet, you also realize that Johnson's version of Diana is much further than she should from the original character. This has been mentioned before by other readers, and I totally agree with that opinion. In the end, as someone who has read quite A LOT of Wonder Woman comics, this one won't make it into my bookshelf for one fundamental reason: I'm normally skeptic of the stories that try to make Diana redeem herself from some unspeakable act that she has commited. I find it really uncommon to be able to build a redemption arc for Wonder Woman in which Diana's personality is respected, her actions and decisions well-founded and her development is, at least, logical. And this book fails at every step of the way. So it's just a character dressed loosely like Wonder Woman behaving in poorly justified ways. The secondary characters and subplots felt empty, childish and unfulfilling. In the end, the artwork is amazing, really the kind of thing that has you staring at one single page for minutes, but it's not enough. A shame

  23. 5 out of 5

    FrontalNerdaty

    Wonder Woman: Dead World is the most recent Black Label comic from DC and is an excellent ‘what if’ story. Basic summary is that Diana is awoken in to a world of desolation and she’s no idea how she got there. The story goes on to explain why the world is the way it is and how and why Diana is so important to the future. What I liked - Everything! The story is told out of sync with each issue giving more backstory whilst progressing the current day. It’s well crafted and has some genuinely surpr Wonder Woman: Dead World is the most recent Black Label comic from DC and is an excellent ‘what if’ story. Basic summary is that Diana is awoken in to a world of desolation and she’s no idea how she got there. The story goes on to explain why the world is the way it is and how and why Diana is so important to the future. What I liked - Everything! The story is told out of sync with each issue giving more backstory whilst progressing the current day. It’s well crafted and has some genuinely surprising moments. It’s a darker/ more violent story than Wonder Woman normal gets but more importantly it never loses sight of what makes Diana Wonder Woman. Her limits are tested but the story never has her lose who she is and what makes her beloved. The art is perfect for this story, a mix of barbaric and bold with strong colours throughout. What I disliked - Honestly nothing really. I got exactly what I was hoping for with this one. Favourite moment/ panel - Diana driving a car in to a giant monster, then at the last moment jumping out and blowing it all sky high. Brilliant piece of over the top action. For fans of - Well known characters thrust in to, admittedly well worn, scenarios, well written female characters, story/ art tonal match and action. 5/5.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Wonder Woman: Dead Earth collects issues 1-4 of the DC Black Label series by Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer. Wonder Woman awakens to a burnt and destoryed Earth hundreds of years in the future. Small bands of humans fight to survive while giant beasts rule the planet. Wonder Woman must try to remember what happened to her memory and decide where she belongs in this new Dead Earth. This book rivals DC Metal in hardcore art style. The designs in this book are insane and there were many mome Wonder Woman: Dead Earth collects issues 1-4 of the DC Black Label series by Daniel Warren Johnson and Mike Spicer. Wonder Woman awakens to a burnt and destoryed Earth hundreds of years in the future. Small bands of humans fight to survive while giant beasts rule the planet. Wonder Woman must try to remember what happened to her memory and decide where she belongs in this new Dead Earth. This book rivals DC Metal in hardcore art style. The designs in this book are insane and there were many moments where I was saying "Holy shit!" The story was also great with Wonder Woman being forced to decide between her life of an Amazom or her love for humanity. This was such a fun read and I highly recommend it. With this being a Black Label book, DC gives the hardcover edition the treatment it deserves.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eric Mikols

    I dug the cartoon-y, grotesque punk rock art that seemed inspired by 80s anime, especially Fist of the North Star with a little of Akira's body horror. But, I also dug this as a trippy Wonder Woman story with a few surprising twists I didn't see coming. Now, she's a future Conan the Barbarian-type in a world gone mad. Daniel Johnson has made a pretty strong competitor for the Dark Knight Returns when it comes to Elseworld-futures. I dug the cartoon-y, grotesque punk rock art that seemed inspired by 80s anime, especially Fist of the North Star with a little of Akira's body horror. But, I also dug this as a trippy Wonder Woman story with a few surprising twists I didn't see coming. Now, she's a future Conan the Barbarian-type in a world gone mad. Daniel Johnson has made a pretty strong competitor for the Dark Knight Returns when it comes to Elseworld-futures.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zack! Empire

    One of the funniest books I've read in a while. It's just crazy artwork, and crazy action. There's a pretty good story going here. Diana really has to wrestle with her morals, and her faith. It's hard to keep faith in someone when they keep letting you down. Diana is really pushed beyond her limits. One of the funniest books I've read in a while. It's just crazy artwork, and crazy action. There's a pretty good story going here. Diana really has to wrestle with her morals, and her faith. It's hard to keep faith in someone when they keep letting you down. Diana is really pushed beyond her limits.

  27. 5 out of 5

    gillyweed

    Defending a civilization of rape survivors protesting climate change from nuclear genocide at the hands of a white supremacist nation state is not the villainous turn this book seems to think it is, wtf kind of ethical flex was this supposed to be?! 😂

  28. 5 out of 5

    Xroldx

    Review here (in Dutch) https://9ekunst.nl/2020/12/28/wonder-... Review here (in Dutch) https://9ekunst.nl/2020/12/28/wonder-...

  29. 4 out of 5

    John

    This book impressed me, since I was not expecting much. The art is obviously amazing, though the two page spreads did not look as good on a digital comic book. The story starts in a typical post-apocalypse but there are quite a few changes to Diana (Wonder Woman) and twists in the story that really made it feel fresh.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    I am...so conflicted about this. On the one hand, this is a visually stunning comic that takes full advantage of the Black Label imprint. Johnson’s art and Spicer’s colors are unreal—except in a few cases where the action becomes a little hard to follow—and it gives the comic an identity that is wholly distinct from anything else DC is doing right now. And the story is compelling and grapples with ideas and themes that I’m all about. But on the other hand, Johnson’s script fails to mind the them I am...so conflicted about this. On the one hand, this is a visually stunning comic that takes full advantage of the Black Label imprint. Johnson’s art and Spicer’s colors are unreal—except in a few cases where the action becomes a little hard to follow—and it gives the comic an identity that is wholly distinct from anything else DC is doing right now. And the story is compelling and grapples with ideas and themes that I’m all about. But on the other hand, Johnson’s script fails to mind the themes it introduces, opting instead for spectacle and mythological ideas. There are kernels of something deeply profound here—of what it means to be a victim, a perpetrator, of the consequences we carry with us and our inability to absolve ourselves of them—but the surface of them is merely scratched. This take on an angry, hurting, and volatile Wonder Woman is one I love in theory, but in execution, it feels weak. I don’t know if having a woman write this story would’ve solved the issues I have with it...but it definitely wouldn’t have hurt. Johnson gives a solid attempt at doing something unique, and he succeeds in that he capitalizes on his setting, but he fails in his attempts to weave meaningful thematics. The best example of the comic’s inability or unwillingness to go deeper than the surface is best seen in a supporting character’s “redemption” arc. He starts out as a ruthless, obviously horrid abuser who rebels in the power he has over others, but after spending a day (?) in a jail cell, is suddenly meant to be a sympathetic character? It’s frustrating, to say the least, and speaks to the deeper issues that prevent the comic from ever crossing the threshold from “cool” to “memorable.” “Wonder Woman: Dead Earth” is full of exceptional, memorable, and grisly artwork that I loved. It’s also full of ideas that seem right up my alley. But it never lives up to any of the potential if presents, and ultimately ends in a shallow, borderline soulless adventure. If you’re into the idea of Wonder Wiman by the way of Mad Max, then you’ll get a solid experience out of this. But if you’re hoping for anything that goes beyond that, as I was, you’ll probably walk away disappointed. (I edited this review because the longer I sat with it the more frustrated I became with it. Not even the art can make up for a story this lacking in conviction.)

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