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The Nemesis Manifesto

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Note: this book was formally known as "The Bourne Nemesis". The author is no longer writing for the Jason Bourne series. This book has then become the first in a new series. Russian meddling, American fragmentation, and global politics collide in this action-packed, international thriller. In The Nemesis Manifesto, New York Times best-selling author Eric Van Lustbader, "the Note: this book was formally known as "The Bourne Nemesis". The author is no longer writing for the Jason Bourne series. This book has then become the first in a new series. Russian meddling, American fragmentation, and global politics collide in this action-packed, international thriller. In The Nemesis Manifesto, New York Times best-selling author Eric Van Lustbader, "the master of the smart thriller", delivers an epic and harrowing adventure of the predatory forces that are threatening the very fabric of democracy and kicks off a compelling new series with a singular new hero for our time (Nelson DeMille). Evan Ryder is a lone wolf, a field agent for a black-ops arm of the DOD, who has survived unspeakable tragedy and dedicated her life to protecting her country. When her fellow agents begin to be systematically eliminated, Evan must unravel the thread that ties them all together...and before her name comes up on the kill list. The list belongs to a mysterious cabal known only as Nemesis, a hostile entity hell-bent on tearing the United States apart. As Evan tracks them from Washington, DC, to the Caucasus Mountains, from Austria to a fortress in Germany where her own demons reside, she unearths a network of conspirators far more complex than anyone could have imagined. Can Evan uproot them before Nemesis forces bring democracy to its knees?


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Note: this book was formally known as "The Bourne Nemesis". The author is no longer writing for the Jason Bourne series. This book has then become the first in a new series. Russian meddling, American fragmentation, and global politics collide in this action-packed, international thriller. In The Nemesis Manifesto, New York Times best-selling author Eric Van Lustbader, "the Note: this book was formally known as "The Bourne Nemesis". The author is no longer writing for the Jason Bourne series. This book has then become the first in a new series. Russian meddling, American fragmentation, and global politics collide in this action-packed, international thriller. In The Nemesis Manifesto, New York Times best-selling author Eric Van Lustbader, "the master of the smart thriller", delivers an epic and harrowing adventure of the predatory forces that are threatening the very fabric of democracy and kicks off a compelling new series with a singular new hero for our time (Nelson DeMille). Evan Ryder is a lone wolf, a field agent for a black-ops arm of the DOD, who has survived unspeakable tragedy and dedicated her life to protecting her country. When her fellow agents begin to be systematically eliminated, Evan must unravel the thread that ties them all together...and before her name comes up on the kill list. The list belongs to a mysterious cabal known only as Nemesis, a hostile entity hell-bent on tearing the United States apart. As Evan tracks them from Washington, DC, to the Caucasus Mountains, from Austria to a fortress in Germany where her own demons reside, she unearths a network of conspirators far more complex than anyone could have imagined. Can Evan uproot them before Nemesis forces bring democracy to its knees?

30 review for The Nemesis Manifesto

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melanie (mells_view)

    I will be the first to admit that a political spy thriller is not exactly my usual read. That being said Eric Van Lustbader may have just created a new fan out of me. Evan Ryder is an agent dedicated to protecting her country from threats. In The Nemesis Manifesto we go on a journey with her and a group of other agents that will have you on the edge of your seat. I appreciated how Lustbader showed agents in a negative and positive light. Sort of showing that dichotomy between humans period and no I will be the first to admit that a political spy thriller is not exactly my usual read. That being said Eric Van Lustbader may have just created a new fan out of me. Evan Ryder is an agent dedicated to protecting her country from threats. In The Nemesis Manifesto we go on a journey with her and a group of other agents that will have you on the edge of your seat. I appreciated how Lustbader showed agents in a negative and positive light. Sort of showing that dichotomy between humans period and not just the titles that they hold. I also appreciated the political and moral similarities of this fictional world compared to the real world. Yes, it’s nice to read to escape, but it’s also interesting to see hot topics hashed out in the fictional realm by fictional characters. I don’t want to give too much away, so I will end by saying that this story is incredibly well written and once things get started you will not be able to stop reading. At first I did feel a bit like I was playing catch up, like the storyline was already well established and I was late to the party, but I personally feel the author eventually makes up for that later on as you read. I do appreciate that there wasn’t the usual first few chapters info dumping, but it would have been nice to have a little more background from the start. Throughout this story I was easily rooting for Evan, and can’t wait for more of the stories in this world. Available NOW! *ARC provided by BookishFirst & Forge Books

  2. 5 out of 5

    The Cats’ Mother

    The Nemesis Manifesto is a complicated and preposterous spy thriller and the beginning of a new series about invincible American super-agent Evan Ryder. This is my first read from this author although I’ve seen the name about. I do like action novels with female main characters so liked the sound of this, but found it relatively hard word following the plot, although got there in the end I think. Evan Ryder is a superspy working for a secret black ops program run by the unflappable Ben Butler. The The Nemesis Manifesto is a complicated and preposterous spy thriller and the beginning of a new series about invincible American super-agent Evan Ryder. This is my first read from this author although I’ve seen the name about. I do like action novels with female main characters so liked the sound of this, but found it relatively hard word following the plot, although got there in the end I think. Evan Ryder is a superspy working for a secret black ops program run by the unflappable Ben Butler. The Russian intelligence services hate her for foiling their nefarious plots, and especially for her friendship with one of their assets, Ludmylla, who they regard as a traitor to the Motherland, so they have hatched a plot to bring her down. Sent to interrogate another agent, the only survivor from an operation in Georgia, Evan and her colleague Brenda are nearly killed. Who is behind the conspiracy to destroy the USA from within, and why does Evan keep having flashbacks of ravens and red bricks? I found the first third of this so confusing, with a huge array of interconnected characters, most of whom seem to be double if not triple agents with dubious loyalties and conflicted motivations, that I had to go back to the beginning and speed-Read through it again to sort out who was who, especially as there were also a number of important but apparently dead characters too. Even so I found myself constantly using the search function to remind myself who they all were - if you’re going to read this in paperback I suggest taking notes. By about halfway through this settles down and the plot begins to make sense. While obviously a work of fiction, this was pretty close to the bone with it’s references to an incompetent US President and vainglorious Russian leader - known as the Sovereign, the role of internet disinformation, the increasing power of neonazi groups, and venal politicians who’ll backstab anyone to increase their own power. The spies aren’t much better, and both the strength but also the most exhausting feature of this book was never knowing who you can trust. I’m still in the dark as to who Isobel was actually working for! Not all the storylines were wrapped up as this is clearly heading for a sequel. There’s plenty of action and globe-trotting, violent fight scenes and some gruesome deaths are implied rather than explicitly described. I liked Evan as a heroine, although she’s almost too good a warrior to be believable - although since that doesn’t bother me with Mitch Rapp or Evan Smoak, that didn’t bother me here either. Actually all the female characters, including the baddies, are tough as leather, which made a nice change. I definitely want to know what happens next! 3.5 rounded up for good storytelling & writing. My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the arc which allowed me to give an honest review. The Nemesis Manifesto is published on July 21st.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Athena (OneReadingNurse)

    Thank you to Bookish First and Forge for the raffle win ARC of The Nemesis Manifesto by Eric Van Lustbader! I loved his work in the Bourne series and was psyched to have a chance to read this one early. As the description makes obvious, The Nemesis Manifesto has a massive scope. It is a classic spy novel with modern day conspiracy theories and such a tangled web of operatives and agencies that I could hardly keep track of the layers of intrigue. It was very well written and so full of action that Thank you to Bookish First and Forge for the raffle win ARC of The Nemesis Manifesto by Eric Van Lustbader! I loved his work in the Bourne series and was psyched to have a chance to read this one early. As the description makes obvious, The Nemesis Manifesto has a massive scope. It is a classic spy novel with modern day conspiracy theories and such a tangled web of operatives and agencies that I could hardly keep track of the layers of intrigue. It was very well written and so full of action that it was quite hard to put down at times. From Washington D.C. to Russia, Georgia to Germany, arching eyebrows to immaculate suits and a Russian mafia style blood feud, this is a huge sweeping MUST for fans of spies and international intrigue The book introduced Evan Ryder. She is a truly kick ass agent, proficient and deadly and wanted all over the world. After a small dissertation on why females do or don’t work as agents, the book smoothed out and let her do her job. There was a fairly slow start in general but once the action started it moved so quickly. The other female agent, Brenda, seemed to be there to serve as an example of a bad female agent. She was a bit of a mental loose cannon which issues that seemed to stem from seeing her dad in a compromising position. For example there was some clearly consensual sex going on in her adult consensual relationship, but then as soon as she found out the guy was a double agent she started on a rape tirade and made all sorts of terrible field agent decisions. Crying rape is never cute and omg did I want to reach through the page and shoot her! Thankfully throughout the book a handful of other agents, and ultimately Evan was there to bail her out. Other than a few analogies and similes that seemed a bit over-written, the writing was fantastic and I don’t have much to say about it. The author is a strong storyteller. Other than Brenda, my other small qualm is that I don’t know if quite enough loose ends were wrapped up. We were dealing with everything from a hilariously childish interagency blood feud to some fucked up family ties to Nazis, and somehow the DOD got thrown back in at the end. Nemesis seemed to provide a lot more questions along with their answers, and I never quite understood how things pieced together. Why were they ever targeting Butler, and what happened to him? I think, maybe these questions are going to be the basis of book 2, which had it’s own can of worms opened up by a minor cliffhanger. The most impressive part was how relevant the plot is to today’s world. The American left and right are so obnoxiously far divided that it almost feels believable that Russian based dezinformatsiya is fueling it. Why not? They were alluding to a Trump type of POTUS as well, and it was even more interesting to consider who else in the international committee could be involved. Last but not least - it's time for the @OneReadingNurse infamous medical rant.  The book states a patients IV was pulled, and the nurse rushed to "put the needle back in."  Guys that is not a thing, once we get it into the arm THERE IS NO NEEDLE, just a plastic cannula.  There is NO way to reinsert it.  Huge cringe moment but otherwise the book passes inspection. Overall I would definitely recommend this to anyone who likes international thrillers and spy / black ops novels. There’s even a little agent holding a gun on the cover. Thank you again to BookishFirst and Forge for my copy. It releases in May so keep an eye out for it or preorder now!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    Evan Ryder is a female super spy, with a hole in her memories. When she and another female agent (Brenda) are nearly killed by a car bomb after interviewing a former colleague, with a similar hole, the two are determined to find out who tried to kill them and why. Along the way, we meet a number of Russian spys or doubles, making for a somewhat confusing plot, which eventually comes back together. As Evan and Brenda's boyfriend pursue one line of inquiry, Brenda follows her own path, eventually Evan Ryder is a female super spy, with a hole in her memories. When she and another female agent (Brenda) are nearly killed by a car bomb after interviewing a former colleague, with a similar hole, the two are determined to find out who tried to kill them and why. Along the way, we meet a number of Russian spys or doubles, making for a somewhat confusing plot, which eventually comes back together. As Evan and Brenda's boyfriend pursue one line of inquiry, Brenda follows her own path, eventually leading to a reunification at an unexpected location far from Moscow. There is even some intense family drama thrown in for good measure. While this is nowhere near as good as his early Asian series, Van Lustbader does use disturbing real world trends in the novel: the rise of the far right and anti-Semitism across the globe. Also, too many POVs.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dubi

    I usually wait until the end of my reviews to thank NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. But in this case, I'm sorry to report, the only honest review I can give is devastating, so I want to apologize in advance for having to be this brutally honest. Super-agent Evan Ryder is indestructible, expert with every weapon from her hands to throwing knives to splashing hot soup to the most sophisticated of firearms, blessed with eidetic memory -- yes, I just described I usually wait until the end of my reviews to thank NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. But in this case, I'm sorry to report, the only honest review I can give is devastating, so I want to apologize in advance for having to be this brutally honest. Super-agent Evan Ryder is indestructible, expert with every weapon from her hands to throwing knives to splashing hot soup to the most sophisticated of firearms, blessed with eidetic memory -- yes, I just described every super-agent ever, they always have eidetic memory -- and suffers from partial amnesia like Jason Bourne (guess who wrote some of the latter Bourne entries?). She is being targeted by an evil super-secret organization called, quite imaginatively, Nemesis. Why? Because she's, um, indestructible and has an eidetic memory. This being the inaugural installment in a planned series starring Evan Ryder, it struck me as odd that there was no background on how and why Evan became so deadly that she had to be so specifically targeted by Nemesis, and b) there was no background on how Evan's black ops cell learned that the super-secret unaffiliated Nemesis even existed let alone that they were targeting Evan. There has to be a thing, that something the good guys are trying to find out or the bad guys are trying to acquire, something us readers have to believe is important enough for them to go to such lengths to get it. That thing Hitchcock called the McGuffin. There is no McGuffin in this book. In the end there are some vague conspiracy theories that appear out of nowhere, but it's too little, too late, too too farfetched to count. With so many spy thrillers on the market, it's the McGuffin that makes a book stand out, and there is nothing here. No, in Eric Van Lustbader's world, espionage agents exists for the sole purpose of killing other espionage agents, even their own agents as often as not (and their friends and family). Whatever causes they believe in have long been forgotten. All they care about is killing each other in the worst way possible. Why would anyone sign up to be an agent in this world? How can there be any agents left alive if they've spent the past 75 years killing each other (and their friends and family)? Either Evan Ryder is a terrible agent or Eric Van Lustbader is a terrible writer. She finds the bomber who just bombed her car with her in it (which she survived because she is indestructible) and doesn't cuff her or subdue her, she lets her walk unhindered, pretext enough for a chase and fight to ensue (guess who wins). Either she's a terrible agent for letting her walk free, or the author is a bad writer for allowing that to happen just so that he can then write a chase and fight. Ditto when Evan tries to ID the motorcycle riding assassin she just shot (motorcycle riding assassin, that's original) and he's still alive enough to start another major fight -- either she's a bad agent for not making sure he was dead or he's a terrible writer for signalling so blatantly that a fight was about to ensue. And when she lets a guy she's interrogating have a bottle of water -- is she a bad agent for letting him have it or is EVL such a bad writer for so obviously giving the guy a chance to poison himself? And so it goes... Evan's sidekick Brenda gets blown up three times, kidnapped three times, tortured, terrorized, threatened, and her boyfriend cheats on her -- with a rival espionage agency. But she takes a lickin' and keeps on tickin'. Brenda's boyfriend turns out to be exactly who you thought he'd be -- so much for the big reveal (there was never any other possibility). Nemesis turns out to be this massive evil global conspiracy that is no different than our current real world autocracy, kleptocracy, and corporate oligarchy, except that they want to make it explicitly Nazi -- literally, not figuratively or inspirationally (trying to avoid spoilers, but there's nothing to spoil here, it comes pretty much pre-spoiled). Here's one example of how convoluted it all is: the bad guy had a chance to kill Brenda while she was in a hospital being treated for serious injuries -- simple, clean, we've seen it many times before. "It was the perfect place" to execute the, uh, execution, she says, quite reasonably. No, that would have been "untenable, too public". Instead, he has to trick her into traveling to the Bavarian Alps to a remote castle where the most tenable way to kill her is to hang her upside down and have his German Shepherd rip her throat out. (Cue Dr. Evil demanding his One. Million. Dollars -- actually, no joke, there are several times where bad guys cackle evilly in this book, except that one time it says chuckle instead of cackle, can you imagine someone chuckling evilly?) Occam would be rolling over in his grave, his razor dull and useless. That little colloquy comes as part of a long extended talking villain segment, you know, where instead of just killing his enemies and moving on to complete his dastardly deeds, the villain explains his plan in excruciating detail (in this case for about 15% of the book's word count). Usually just long enough for the good guys to escape and thwart it, but in this case even after they escape and thwart it. Can you say "discredited literary device"? It may as well have happened on a dark and stormy night -- actually, it was a dark and stormy night! OMG, I could go on and on and on. On a granular level, not necessarily having much to do with the story or characters, there are just mistakes upon mistakes that are as distracting as they are unnecessary -- unforced errors. "Poisonous wolf spiders" -- no, wolf spiders are not poisonous, which is lucky for us humans since they are large and live in every single corner of the world. "His moods seemed as unpredictable as they were mercurial" -- uh, anyone look up the definition of mercurial? "Unpredictable mood swings." Gothic architecture that is as ignominious as the country's history (Austria -- what exactly was ignominious, i.e shameful, about Gothic architecture or Austrian history?). And the scintillating dialogue! "'Don't worry.' -- 'I'm not worried.'" "Why do you answer a question with another question?" "You had to have your arm twisted. -- Figuratively speaking, yes." "He went through money like water through a sieve" (which is actually wrong as constructed, since "he" would be the water and "money" would be the sieve -- can't even get a cliche right). Coffee strong enough to put hair on your chest -- I shit you not. "Some looker you are, schatzi!" "'ID! Here's my ID.' Evan grabbed his head and slammed it down onto the sill." Yes indeedy do. "A penitent on the dusty road to Calgary." Auto-correct typo in a major publication? "Basilisk eyes" or "basilisk stare" -- eight times! Not even the same character's snake eyes. And the similes! "Snow lay in the gutters like the huddled masses around church fronts." As if huddled masses around church fronts are common everyday sights. "A face as furrowed as a plot of land ready to be seeded." Why not just have corn stalks growing out of his furrowed brow? "His tanned leathery face reminiscent of any number of cowboy actors out of the 40s and 50s." Metaphors mixed with abandon, and not purposely for effect. I'm not being nitpicky here -- these are just random samples of similar errors and cliches and nonsense that appear regularly throughout the text. Totally distracting -- although as I said the story really has nothing worthwhile going for it anyway, so the distractions are merely annoying. I really wanted to like this book -- the author has ties to the school my daughters went to and I wanted to support a fellow C&C alum. But there is nothing here worth reading. I can't imagine that this will actually turn into a series, as planned. Who's going to want to read any more volumes of this... this... I don't know what else to say.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tabitha

    I’ll be the first person to admit that political thrillers are far from my genre of choice – typically I stick more towards the fantasy and sci-fi end of the fiction spectrum. But I’ll also be the first to tell you that Eric Van Lustbader’s latest book was pleasantly surprising in the way it kept me involved to the point where I was on the edge of my metaphoric seat the whole time. The Nemesis Manifesto features a whole cast of wonderfully written and engaging characters but focuses its efforts I’ll be the first person to admit that political thrillers are far from my genre of choice – typically I stick more towards the fantasy and sci-fi end of the fiction spectrum. But I’ll also be the first to tell you that Eric Van Lustbader’s latest book was pleasantly surprising in the way it kept me involved to the point where I was on the edge of my metaphoric seat the whole time. The Nemesis Manifesto features a whole cast of wonderfully written and engaging characters but focuses its efforts on the enigmatic Evan Ryder, a slightly jaded and incredibly intelligent operative for an unnamed arm of the DOD. When we first meet Evan, she has been called in by her boss for a special assignment that has led more than one fine agent to their death. Now, with the pressure mounting and the stakes higher than ever, Evan must discover who the nefarious and deadly Nemesis is before its kill list can be completed. It’s a race against time as Evan fights not only unseen forces but also her own fractured memories, which tell her there might be more to this Nemesis than she – or anyone else – anticipated. Although the prologue started off a little slow to me and was subsequently hard for me to get into, the rest of the book overall was a fantastic thrill ride packed full of adventure and intrigue. In every chapter lies a new mystery, an exciting twist, or a heart-pounding action sequence. There are well over a handful of key players in the book, all of which have separate but interconnecting plotlines – and their own agendas. I think under ordinary circumstances, this would be quite confusing to read, but somehow Van Lustbader succeeds in making all of these individual and intricate characters and their plotlines surprisingly clear and easy to follow. Van Lustbader is equally successful in his ability to make long conversations about politics and government engaging rather than droll. Add this to the fact that Evan, the very definition of calm, cool, and collected – not to mention effective – is a female operative (even Van Lustbader throws in a time or two that female operatives have been sorely underused) who always seems to be ten steps ahead of the opposition is the star character and you have a winner on your hands for sure. I can’t say that I enjoyed all the female operatives. I found Brenda rather exasperating both for her inability to see the bigger picture and her foolhardy decision to soldier on when that was clearly the wrong choice. But I was easily able to overlook that fact because of how interesting the other characters were. The Nemesis Manifesto was gripping and thrilling, with unexpected elements, plot twists, relevant politics, and plenty of betrayals. Even if political thrillers aren’t normally your thing, I highly recommend giving it a fair shot – you might be surprised. *I received an ARC from BookishFirst in exchange for an honest review

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Dalton

    Sounded promising, but in the end it failed to impress me. I have been a fan of Eric's since 1980 with . I have read many of the sequels and several other books by Eric, to include a few of his Jason Bourne thrillers. This book just did not measure up to his usual high standards of plot. I really had to force myself to carry on. Just a month ago I re-read . Now that is good writing. So I figured I would jump on this new series. I kept thinking this book was co-written with his son or dau Sounded promising, but in the end it failed to impress me. I have been a fan of Eric's since 1980 with . I have read many of the sequels and several other books by Eric, to include a few of his Jason Bourne thrillers. This book just did not measure up to his usual high standards of plot. I really had to force myself to carry on. Just a month ago I re-read . Now that is good writing. So I figured I would jump on this new series. I kept thinking this book was co-written with his son or daughter or someone else. No, it was not. Seemed to me to be a watered down thriller. Kind of simplistic. Probably will not move on to the 2nd Evan Ryder novel. I still have a few more Ninja books to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Modern Miss Granger

    It had been a long time since I read a good spy book. I love all things Jason Bourne and Mission Impossible and this book was a wonderful blend of all of those things. I did not like all of the cussing and there were a lot of characters so it got a bit confusing, but overall it was a great story. The twist and turns and shocking plot reveals kept me turning the pages. I had zero expectations going into the book since I have never read anything by this author, so I was pleasantly surprised. If yo It had been a long time since I read a good spy book. I love all things Jason Bourne and Mission Impossible and this book was a wonderful blend of all of those things. I did not like all of the cussing and there were a lot of characters so it got a bit confusing, but overall it was a great story. The twist and turns and shocking plot reveals kept me turning the pages. I had zero expectations going into the book since I have never read anything by this author, so I was pleasantly surprised. If you love a spy book (that is not creepy) then check this one out. I also loved that the main character was a strong and independent female who could survive on her own. She had friends to back her up, but she could stand on her own two feet.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    I received a free ARC of The Nemesis Manifesto from Macmillan in exchange for an honest review. The guy who wrote the sequels to the Jason Bourne books has created his own character. Cool! It's a spy too, but it's a woman. Okay, cool. She has amnesia. Dang it! Come on! Once my eyes returned to their normal positions from rolling to the back of my head, I read a book consisting of episodic chapters with as much action and detective work as an episode of "Walker, Texas Ranger." The overall plot re I received a free ARC of The Nemesis Manifesto from Macmillan in exchange for an honest review. The guy who wrote the sequels to the Jason Bourne books has created his own character. Cool! It's a spy too, but it's a woman. Okay, cool. She has amnesia. Dang it! Come on! Once my eyes returned to their normal positions from rolling to the back of my head, I read a book consisting of episodic chapters with as much action and detective work as an episode of "Walker, Texas Ranger." The overall plot reads like a James Gardner novel when he was writing the James Bond sequels. To say I was disappointed and underwhelmed would be an understatement. What redeems this book is the mouth dropping ending which perfectly sets up the sequel.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gloria

    This author continued the Jason Bourne series created by fabulous suspense author Robert Ludlum after his death. I had read the first three books of the Bourne series obsessively but was afraid Lustbader would disappoint so never continued. Now he has a new series all his own and my curiosity led me to check it out. This is an international thriller that focuses on Russia, Germany and the USA so anyone with an interest in Russian meddling will be highly interested. This is also about neo-Nazis an This author continued the Jason Bourne series created by fabulous suspense author Robert Ludlum after his death. I had read the first three books of the Bourne series obsessively but was afraid Lustbader would disappoint so never continued. Now he has a new series all his own and my curiosity led me to check it out. This is an international thriller that focuses on Russia, Germany and the USA so anyone with an interest in Russian meddling will be highly interested. This is also about neo-Nazis and white supremacy, so this topic will intrigue that audience. Women are the chief positive players and men are largely evil, so this just may well appeal to women thriller readers. Evan (female) is an ace agent and can pretty much survive any situation presented to her, and there is indeed one 'situation' after another requiring creative weapons, facility with many languages, and extreme fighting techniques. As with the Bourne novels, there is a ton of subterfuge. Who are the good guys who are really the bad guys? Who is your ally? Who can you trust? These questions keep the pages turning. There is a large cast which is a bit hard to keep track of; was wishing I had kept notes. There is no indication of the author's beliefs through 3/4 of the novel, but by the end the reader will know how he feels about the current political administration, current civil unrest issues, and more. This makes it a timely novel, but I am inclined to think authors should not include personal agendas. Fast-paced, intriguing, and empowering. Nice set-up for the next novel.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deep Ranjan

    #TheNemesisManifesto is a dark,gritty and complex but intricately plotted must read thriller which gives you goosebumps.It is the beginning of a new action spy conspiracy series with a resolute and multidimensional female protagonist by Mr. @erikvanlustbader. 1.Following is my Bullet Review👇 * Rich Complex Plot👉9🌟 * Smooth Narrative👉8🌟 * Settings👉8🌟 * Shadowy Cunning Characters👉9.5🌟 * Character Development 👉8🌟 * Dialogue/Interactions👉8🌟 * Action Scenes👉8.5🌟 * Weapons Descriptions👉9.5🌟 * Climax👉8.5🌟 2.What #TheNemesisManifesto is a dark,gritty and complex but intricately plotted must read thriller which gives you goosebumps.It is the beginning of a new action spy conspiracy series with a resolute and multidimensional female protagonist by Mr. @erikvanlustbader. 1.Following is my Bullet Review👇 * Rich Complex Plot👉9🌟 * Smooth Narrative👉8🌟 * Settings👉8🌟 * Shadowy Cunning Characters👉9.5🌟 * Character Development 👉8🌟 * Dialogue/Interactions👉8🌟 * Action Scenes👉8.5🌟 * Weapons Descriptions👉9.5🌟 * Climax👉8.5🌟 2.What I loved👍 * Psychological paranoia moments * Tensed action scenes * Female protagonist+her character development 3.What Could've been better🤞 * Character Development of other intriguing characters * Narrative-sometimes hard to follow/remember * Almost all characters double agents/triple agents * Scarce gunfights 4.Overall DeepRating👉8🌟

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike Kennedy

    This book is not going to be published. Brian Freeman has taken over the series. Don’t believe Eric Van Lustbader ever finished this book. Excited for Mr. Freeman’s Version as the series needs some new blood.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ian Brown

    These books never cease to amaze me. Fast action but accurately described. As a martial arts instructor, I appreciate the attention to detail. A must read for action novel funs...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hanlie

    Finally, we see a badass female killing machine who can give Jason Bourne a run for his money! How apt that it was written by Eric Van Lustbader! This is an intriguing story of espionage pitting a new female character, Evan Ryder, against a company called Nemesis who is out to destroy America. It is full of action with well-developed characters and a fascinating storyline. There are twists and turns that will keep you on the edge of your seat with a brilliant climax. I did get a bit confused keepi Finally, we see a badass female killing machine who can give Jason Bourne a run for his money! How apt that it was written by Eric Van Lustbader! This is an intriguing story of espionage pitting a new female character, Evan Ryder, against a company called Nemesis who is out to destroy America. It is full of action with well-developed characters and a fascinating storyline. There are twists and turns that will keep you on the edge of your seat with a brilliant climax. I did get a bit confused keeping track with all the different characters but I still found it a very enjoyable read. It is the start of a new series and I'm really looking forward to seeing how this character will develop. Thank you to NetGalley and MacMillan - Tor/Forge for the ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan Beamon

    This is one of those spy thrillers that are so much fun as a summer read. While there may seem to be links to the current political environment, everything is wildly made up. This book references the current administration obliquely. That's part of it's fun. I do have some quibbles with the book, but they are minor. This is apparently the beginning of a series following the career of Evan Ryder, an agent in a black-ops agency that is part of the Department of Defense. Evan is pretty much the kind This is one of those spy thrillers that are so much fun as a summer read. While there may seem to be links to the current political environment, everything is wildly made up. This book references the current administration obliquely. That's part of it's fun. I do have some quibbles with the book, but they are minor. This is apparently the beginning of a series following the career of Evan Ryder, an agent in a black-ops agency that is part of the Department of Defense. Evan is pretty much the kind of super smart, super competent agent we are used to, sort of a modern day James Bond. In keeping with the modern dayness of the series, Evan is a woman. This is where I really had to suspend disbelief. Accept the female Evan and all is well in thriller land. Don't and you will have real trouble with the book. Most every character I met in the story was some kind double or triple agent, either flipping for money or being blackmailed. The major villains were our ever popular Russians, either being Russian or pretending to be Nazis. There is a sub-plot about some internal strife with upper level Russian leaders, but I found it to be more comic relief than anything else. I will admit I liked the book. In this time when mindless entertainment is badly needed, it fits the bill. I can see a fast moving action movie when I'm reading it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    wade

    A finely crafted tale of intrigue and espionage that links Russia, Germany and the United States. Central to the story are a secret group symbolized by ravens. There is almost a super hero woman named Evan who is the point person as the story evolves. Many times I get lost in the complexities of this type of novel. Although the plot is involved the author writes with such clarity that is was easy for me to understand. If you are a spy novel fan this is a good one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Abibliofob

    I am always glad to see new books with strong females. There aren't enough in the literary world in my opinion. This is not the best book by Lustbader I have read but the sum total is good. If there should come a sequel about Evan I would read it. Thanks to Forge Books, Macmillan and Edelweiss for letting me read this one.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Eric Van Lustbader typically writes some of the best thrillers available. Unfortunately he missed the mark on The Nemesis Manifesto. The storyline made little sense as it was difficult to follow the characters, the first few, who were politically corrupt in both the U.S. and Russia but faded from the book about two-thirds of the way through. Only to be replaced by Neo-Nazis (the so-called Nemesis) and various intelligence agents thought dead only to be discovered very much alive, and the revelat Eric Van Lustbader typically writes some of the best thrillers available. Unfortunately he missed the mark on The Nemesis Manifesto. The storyline made little sense as it was difficult to follow the characters, the first few, who were politically corrupt in both the U.S. and Russia but faded from the book about two-thirds of the way through. Only to be replaced by Neo-Nazis (the so-called Nemesis) and various intelligence agents thought dead only to be discovered very much alive, and the revelation that admired family members were treasonous double agents or possibly triple agents. It was never clear who was what. But the major disappointment to me was the key figure, super secret agent, Evan Ryder, feared by all, not once worked out, practiced her martial arts, or trained with her weapons but was able to dispatch bad guys with ease, heal quickly, and enjoy a good meal shortly after. Evan appears headed for a sequel. I hope the author finds his “A” game before Evan Ryder.2 hits the bookshelves.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    3 1/2 stars. I received a copy of The Nemesis Manifesto in exchange for a fair and honest review. Picture Black Widow meets Jason Bourne, and you'll have found The Nemesis Manifesto. Crated by Eric Van Lustbader, this is the start of a whole new series revolving around a highly competent spy and agent. Evan Ryder prefers to work alone – she gets better results that way. But her most recent case has forced her to change her ways, and perhaps not for the better. The agents around her are being pi 3 1/2 stars. I received a copy of The Nemesis Manifesto in exchange for a fair and honest review. Picture Black Widow meets Jason Bourne, and you'll have found The Nemesis Manifesto. Crated by Eric Van Lustbader, this is the start of a whole new series revolving around a highly competent spy and agent. Evan Ryder prefers to work alone – she gets better results that way. But her most recent case has forced her to change her ways, and perhaps not for the better. The agents around her are being picked off, and thus time is running out. A mysterious character known as Nemesis seems to be behind it all, but even the best reports have next to nothing on the person. That means all the hope resides in the best of their agents. It rests on Evan to solve the mystery and save countless lives. The Nemesis Manifesto is a spy thriller through and through – with a few fun twists along the way. As I was reading, I couldn't help but feel like I was reading some sort of blend of Black Widow (one of my favorites) and Jason Bourne. It made for an interesting read. There is no time wasted in the introduction here, you're quite literally thrown into the thick of things, with almost a sink or swim feeling. There are plenty of characters to keep up with, made all the more complicated by their varied motives. This is a novel that is fast-paced and full of action, as well as twists, turns, betrayals, and deceit. The usual for a spy thriller, you know? That doesn't make it any less fun, though I'll confess that it stands out from the pack less than I would have expected. On the whole, I enjoyed the read, and think others will as well. Especially people looking to branch out from their normal reading routine. I worry that fans of thrillers might find elements of the novel predictable, though sometimes that isn't a bad thing (it makes for a more relaxing read, for one thing). I love that Evan is such a strong and independent character, that made for an interesting twist on the normal spy thrillers, at least for me. Throw in the layers upon layers of politics, and there's something worth talking about here. I'm looking forward to seeing what sort of mess Evan gets herself into (and out of) in the following novels. While I didn't love The Nemesis Manifesto as much as I hoped, I still think that the series will be worth keeping an eye on. Check out more reviews over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gerd

    I liked The Nemesis Manifesto good enough that I'm certain I'll give the next book in the series a look, too. It did however not live up to some of van Lustbader's earlier books like The Ninja (or I may be overly nostalgic of his older work). The book's plot is pretty thin and mainly driven forward by jumping from one action scene to the next, reading like some old pulp story or Hollywood spy action. I found it initially hard to follow who's who in the story, and sometimes who they are working for I liked The Nemesis Manifesto good enough that I'm certain I'll give the next book in the series a look, too. It did however not live up to some of van Lustbader's earlier books like The Ninja (or I may be overly nostalgic of his older work). The book's plot is pretty thin and mainly driven forward by jumping from one action scene to the next, reading like some old pulp story or Hollywood spy action. I found it initially hard to follow who's who in the story, and sometimes who they are working for, and the fact that the two Russian main adversaries went by several different names for reasons not quite clear to me made following events at times even harder. Also there's a quickly escalating infight between these two Russians that never really adds to the story, maybe it becomes more important in future novels what happens here. I would have wished he had instead spent more time on developing some of the other side characters, like the completely enigmatic Charles Isaacs claiming to work for Interpol and possessing a lot of inside knowledge about Nemesis, a character whose role is never clearly defined beyond aiding the second main character and conveniently pointing her in the right direction when needed. What I did greatly enjoy about the novel was how topical it is, with Russian bots attacking social networks like twitter, spreading disinformation, feeding conspiracy theorists, and encouraging white supremacists. Meanwhile America's being lead by an incompetent President, the senate is compromised and the Russians are led by a Sovereign who's an unabashed fanfiction version of Putin: The Sovereign wore leather breeches that came up past his navel. Above the waistband he was naked, his hairless, hard-nippled chest bare to the first crescent of sun appearing over the horizon. He wore high boots, polished to a high gloss. Strapped to his right thigh was a leather holster that held his custom-made Colt .45 with crosshatched gold grips. It seemed to amuse him to be using an American manufactured sidearm. All in all The Nemesis Manifesto is a hugely entertaining read, but unfortunately also one that only really hits its stride past the mid-mark when it steadily progresses to its furious, satisfying finale.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mindo'ermatter

    Not So Sure About This Espionage Thriller! I tried to like this spy novel, initially seeing some of the depth, intrigue, and shadowy satire of a John le Carré tragic suspense. However, the book's initial strengths soon devolved into a rogue and repetitive Mission Impossible storyline. The preface is critical to the whole book, so take time to read it carefully, noting names and hidden meanings in the complex interactions between two senior Russian intelligence leaders. Thankfully, Kindle's search Not So Sure About This Espionage Thriller! I tried to like this spy novel, initially seeing some of the depth, intrigue, and shadowy satire of a John le Carré tragic suspense. However, the book's initial strengths soon devolved into a rogue and repetitive Mission Impossible storyline. The preface is critical to the whole book, so take time to read it carefully, noting names and hidden meanings in the complex interactions between two senior Russian intelligence leaders. Thankfully, Kindle's search option made it easy to link some critical names back to the several chapters for explanatory information. Lots of action, violence, surprises, and characters make it challenging to know what's really going on among the crucial interactions among the ever-shifting characters surrounding Evan Rider, the invincable woman lead character with a secret past of her own. A difficult read with the author's convoluted storytelling with too many details and subplots that never really came together. I was not satisfied with the strange ending that included so many "tricks," forcing the story into an inconsistent end. Possibly, the book is the first of a series, but I am not motivated to follow additional installments. Perhaps the novel's greatest strength was its portrayal of the stupidity of US political leaders and the American press for being so gullible and too easily manipulated by Russian disinformation, dividing the country against itself into it's own destruction. Much revealed here creates huge distrust of the bureaucratic incompetence of US intelligence agencies and the foreign agents embedded deeply within its ranks and at the highest levels, all provoking national suicide. Yikes! Some might find the book a worthwhile read, while most will likely fin the work having too many inconsistencies with an unbelievable storyline. Too many details made the plot lack substance or larger meaning. Audible's narration helped me get through the trudge of shifting plots and characters. As an escape read, it was okay, but it seemed much longer than it actually was. The slow start and mixed plotlines were hard to follow, and the characters were mostly unlikable. I kept hoping for more and in the end grew disappointed with both the book and my slugging it out to the end. Ugh! Please read the preview available from Kindle before you buy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I won an uncorrected ARC from a giveaway. This book is billed as the first novel in a new series centered on the adventures of Evan Ryder, but from the start it feels like you've been dropped into the middle of an ongoing series, with lots of references to past events that are often not fully fleshed out and don't seem to have any material relation to the story. This is mostly just a problem in Part One, after which it starts getting into the meat of things and becomes much smoother. Still, this I won an uncorrected ARC from a giveaway. This book is billed as the first novel in a new series centered on the adventures of Evan Ryder, but from the start it feels like you've been dropped into the middle of an ongoing series, with lots of references to past events that are often not fully fleshed out and don't seem to have any material relation to the story. This is mostly just a problem in Part One, after which it starts getting into the meat of things and becomes much smoother. Still, this series could be well-served with a prequel that sets up some of the character relationships. (view spoiler)[For example, maybe something that touches on Evan's original meeting/tour of field work with Benjamin; the shared loss of family members to GRU that either bonded them and/or drove them apart; Evan apparently getting to meet and bond with his daughter; Evan's original meeting with and subsequent training of Brenda. Basically all of the Evan-related threads that are mentioned but not fully worked into the story. (hide spoiler)] Beyond that, the story itself was sufficiently captivating. I particularly enjoyed the overall relevance of the novel which clearly tied into a lot of the events we see happening today. There were a fair amount of twists and turns, and of course a good-sized body count. It obviously takes a certain kind of damage to choose life as a spy. Their most valuable tools seem to be a whole lot of ingenuity and quick reflexes (plus luck, lots of luck) to help them get out of the messes they end up stumbling into. Evan quite grew on me over the course of the story. Her suspicious nature and attention to detail kept her mostly ahead of the game, though there was a running theme of people who had been injured continuing to push on in their weakened state instead of taking the time to heal up first, leading them to be overwhelmed at crucial moments. Should serve as a great warning about the value of self-care, lol. If you're into stories about well-trained, semi-rogue agents, investigating and taking down globe-spanning shadowy organizations, go ahead and give it a try.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thrillers R Us

    The master of the martial arts infused thriller [THE NINJA (1980) and JIAN (1986)] is back, this time with a relevant and timely novel about digital intrusion and exploitation. After the recent eleven outing turn with the Bourne saga, THE NEMESIS MANIFESTO has a definite spy thriller feel. Whereas Jason Bourne found himself in the waters of the Mediterranean wondering about his name, you needn't wonder here; the (support) character name alliteration is off the charts. THE NEMESIS MANIFESTO a The master of the martial arts infused thriller [THE NINJA (1980) and JIAN (1986)] is back, this time with a relevant and timely novel about digital intrusion and exploitation. After the recent eleven outing turn with the Bourne saga, THE NEMESIS MANIFESTO has a definite spy thriller feel. Whereas Jason Bourne found himself in the waters of the Mediterranean wondering about his name, you needn't wonder here; the (support) character name alliteration is off the charts. THE NEMESIS MANIFESTO also goes to extreme lengths to turn the gentle reader into a pro ornithologist, as many factoids about Ravens are worked into the story. Point in fact, a group of ravens is a conspiracy. A CONSPIRACY OF RAVENS sounds like a 80s grade Bourne/Ludlum adventure and with Lustbader having written eleven, it seems accurate. This is what NEMESIS is; a retrograde 80s spy thriller set in today's Russia interference reality. As such, this book has everything you'd find in a late night Cinemax flick; deft location changes, schlocky action scenes, shaky dialogue, and even a conversation between a protagonist and a brown widow spider. Lustbader is a master and does it well. The craft shines in dotting the chapters with social commentary on everything: selfies, fake news, tent cities, anti-semitism, craft beer, presidential mini-strokes (prescient!), kompromat and Kardashians. The thriller does justice to the genre with crosses and double crosses. Agents, double agents and triple agents. Everyone is playing everyone. In the end, you'll need a flow chart to keep it all straight. What also works are the descriptions of locations to shape the story, which is, after all, about dezinformatiya...and eating well. When characters pause to eat, they all do so with gusto. Who could blame them? Lustbader provides us with ample culinary gnoso that would turn any diet minded reader to ravenous eater. Read it now, thank me later.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Drw

    I haven't read a van Lustbader book since the 1980-1990 Nicolas Linnear series - which I found very exotic, exciting, and sexy. After reading Nemiesis Manifesto I'm now really sad that I've destroyed my decades-old image of this author as a dependable, great read. Instead, I found this book almost incomprehensible as it jumped around so much that I literally thought I was skipping pages. As I turned back to find out that I hadn't skipped a page, I'd then wonder if the printer was setting the book I haven't read a van Lustbader book since the 1980-1990 Nicolas Linnear series - which I found very exotic, exciting, and sexy. After reading Nemiesis Manifesto I'm now really sad that I've destroyed my decades-old image of this author as a dependable, great read. Instead, I found this book almost incomprehensible as it jumped around so much that I literally thought I was skipping pages. As I turned back to find out that I hadn't skipped a page, I'd then wonder if the printer was setting the book manually and just occasionally dropping a sentence here and there. But, since I know books are all digital now, I finally came to think that maybe there must be an editor who is so ruthless that they think transitions are only for sissys. Or, maybe - just maybe - this used-to-be-a-favorite author has become like a comic that's so in love with a joke that he jumps to the punch line without giving the setup. The comic is laughing uproariously but the audience doesn't get it because the comic's delivery left out some important pieces. So, you've got a book that just seems to have missing pieces and then you add some really unlikable characters with impossible-to-believe physicality (I'm sorry - women do not win fist-to-fist competitions with huge muscly men; they may win by shooting first or being good at setting explosives, or any kind of at-a-distance method of destruction but a woman who has had head injuries day after day after day doesn't win hand-to-hand combat with healthy men) and the book becomes both a series of erratic, ridiculous scenarios and downright irritating to read. I'm really sorry I picked this one up - ruined one of my decades-old positive vibes from the Linnear series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael Johnston

    The Nemesis Manifesto was a mixed bag. Evan Ryder is an unusual (and somewhat rare) character in the world of spy thrillers. A merciless, brilliant female master spy capable of extreme violence, Ryder is both feared and admired. Like many super-spies she is a loner with some serious emotional baggage and this first book in what appears to be a planned series only hints at the mysteries of her background. The elements of the plot are standard for this kind of story. A mysterious and secret intern The Nemesis Manifesto was a mixed bag. Evan Ryder is an unusual (and somewhat rare) character in the world of spy thrillers. A merciless, brilliant female master spy capable of extreme violence, Ryder is both feared and admired. Like many super-spies she is a loner with some serious emotional baggage and this first book in what appears to be a planned series only hints at the mysteries of her background. The elements of the plot are standard for this kind of story. A mysterious and secret international organization seeks to sow chaos and undermine the US. The story is complicated by the involvement of the Russians (or at least one branch of the Russian spy apparatus) in supporting the group. However, this story is the first that incorporates the real life efforts of Russia to undermine American democracy by sowing disinformation through the social media which makes it feel timely and relevant (if depressing). All of this makes the story telling interesting. Yet, the dialogue and character development can be clunky and slightly awkward. It doesn't overwhelm the story, but more nuanced dialogue and character development would make the book even better. To be fair, this is often a short coming of books in this category which typically emphasize plot over character development. The Nemesis Manifesto is no worse than others I've read. But once you've read books that successfully combine nuanced writing and thoughtful character development along side an interesting plot structure, it's hard to settle. There is enough here for me to continue with the series and I did enjoy the tale. However, I'm hoping for more in future additions to the series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Wayne

    Just like Lustbader's Bourne novels, you will need a guide to get through The Nemesis Manifesto; but there was enough mystery and intrigue to keep me reading to the end. "Nemesis was not just another terrorist group, not just a German neo-Nazi uprising. It was a full-blown revolution of catastrophic proportions." Getting to this realization, however, you read about Russians vs. Russians, Russians vs. Americans, Americans vs. Americans, Americans vs. Russians, and neo-Nazis pursued by both! "Aren Just like Lustbader's Bourne novels, you will need a guide to get through The Nemesis Manifesto; but there was enough mystery and intrigue to keep me reading to the end. "Nemesis was not just another terrorist group, not just a German neo-Nazi uprising. It was a full-blown revolution of catastrophic proportions." Getting to this realization, however, you read about Russians vs. Russians, Russians vs. Americans, Americans vs. Americans, Americans vs. Russians, and neo-Nazis pursued by both! "Aren't all people hypocrites? It's more or less part of the human condition." The Nemesis Manifesto introduces Evan Rider, a super human Dept. of Defense agent. Not only is HER name confusing....so too is just whom is she after, and who are her real friends and who are her enemies? One finds even Lustbader's ACKNOWLEDGMENTS following the story to be strange and mysterious as well. "Certain facts within this novel require acknowledgment, for they come from proper sources - sources who cannot be named, let alone written about." This acknowledgment comes across as strange and mysterious as the story itself. Nemesis is out to destroy the America run by "ultra-conservative billionaires, powerful evangelicals...led by a charismatic tyrant they can't control". Is Lustbader, perhaps, inserting his political philosophy in this novel. Regardless of all this, one twist after another kept me reading through to the strange end.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kirstyn Yosick

    **A Huge thank you to Bookishfirst for my ARC of The Nemesis Manifesto in exchange for an honest review** Okay -- this is not my normal genre, I'm still newer to thrillers as I used to stick with only fantasy and have only recently moved to thrillers. So, being newer to this genre and then seeing "political" right next to thriller I was a little bit nervous.. but let me tell you -- Eric Van Lustbader just created a brand new fan of political thrillers out of me! This book centers around Evan Ryde **A Huge thank you to Bookishfirst for my ARC of The Nemesis Manifesto in exchange for an honest review** Okay -- this is not my normal genre, I'm still newer to thrillers as I used to stick with only fantasy and have only recently moved to thrillers. So, being newer to this genre and then seeing "political" right next to thriller I was a little bit nervous.. but let me tell you -- Eric Van Lustbader just created a brand new fan of political thrillers out of me! This book centers around Evan Ryder who is a political agent charged with protecting her country from threats - in this book we go on a journey with Evan and a group of other agents that will have you at the edge of your seat the entire time waiting for more. You seriously will not want to put this book down! Be warned however, the prologue starts off a little slow, the rest of the book picks up quickly! The characters are wonderfully written and I love that agents are showed in both a negative and positive light, something that often lacks in character development is showing both the positive and negative sides of a character. Giving away too much will definitely ruin the plot here so I will say the story is very well written and the only thing I wanted more from was the general world building. This story will definitely have you hoping for Evan and leave you wanting more!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bruin Mccon

    The Nemesis Manifesto is a thriller set in a world clearly modeled on our own. Russian and American spies battle it out in this horrifying novel that feels way too familiar. From Russia’s “Sovereign” who is clearly Vladmir Putin (in one scene he rides a horse in heavy snow, shirtless). Major U.S. officials are Russian assets. The President has not-so-secretly suffered a series of mini strokes and gives rambling press conferences. He’s being used by the Russians who are also using bots to spread d The Nemesis Manifesto is a thriller set in a world clearly modeled on our own. Russian and American spies battle it out in this horrifying novel that feels way too familiar. From Russia’s “Sovereign” who is clearly Vladmir Putin (in one scene he rides a horse in heavy snow, shirtless). Major U.S. officials are Russian assets. The President has not-so-secretly suffered a series of mini strokes and gives rambling press conferences. He’s being used by the Russians who are also using bots to spread disinformation. So this book in many parts feels like an American liberal’s waking nightmare. The NM is complicated. There are many different characters who take over as the narrator. It allows us to get much more of the story but it’s really, really complicated. Somehow it comes together but it’s a bit like the TV show The Walking Dead where major characters die until you expect it. Huge body count in this novel. There is a lot of backstory left out. That’s by necessity as this would be a far longer book given the number of characters. Still, some characters are revealed and then killed. While this is a fast-paced novel with plenty of adrenaline, it was still fairly tame. I won’t be getting nightmares from the story, other than from one setting that exists in real life and can give people claustrophobia. 3.5 ⭐️s.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    This was another action packed book that grabbed me and wouldn't let me go until I found out what happens. Russian meddling, American fragmentation, and global politics collide in this action-packed, international thriller. In The Nemesis Manifesto, New York Times best-selling author Eric Van Lustbader, "the master of the smart thriller", delivers an epic and harrowing adventure of the predatory forces that are threatening the very fabric of democracy and kicks off a compelling new series with a s This was another action packed book that grabbed me and wouldn't let me go until I found out what happens. Russian meddling, American fragmentation, and global politics collide in this action-packed, international thriller. In The Nemesis Manifesto, New York Times best-selling author Eric Van Lustbader, "the master of the smart thriller", delivers an epic and harrowing adventure of the predatory forces that are threatening the very fabric of democracy and kicks off a compelling new series with a singular new hero for our time (Nelson DeMille). Evan Ryder is a lone wolf, a field agent for a black-ops arm of the DOD, who has survived unspeakable tragedy and dedicated her life to protecting her country. When her fellow agents begin to be systematically eliminated, Evan must unravel the thread that ties them all together...and before her name comes up on the kill list. The list belongs to a mysterious cabal known only as Nemesis, a hostile entity hell-bent on tearing the United States apart. As Evan tracks them from Washington, DC, to the Caucasus Mountains, from Austria to a fortress in Germany where her own demons reside, she unearths a network of conspirators far more complex than anyone could have imagined. Can Evan uproot them before Nemesis forces bring democracy to its knees?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The Nemesis Manifesto is page-turning drama for fans of novels such as Nelson DeMille's THE CHARM SCHOOL and Richard Condon's timeless thriller THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE. In Eric Van Lustbader's novel, female agent Evan Ryder is dedicated to solving the deaths of fellow agents and comes up against a group united in their determination to ruin the United States of America. The Russian power players have animosity and power struggles among themselves and use their positions of power to cheat on the The Nemesis Manifesto is page-turning drama for fans of novels such as Nelson DeMille's THE CHARM SCHOOL and Richard Condon's timeless thriller THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE. In Eric Van Lustbader's novel, female agent Evan Ryder is dedicated to solving the deaths of fellow agents and comes up against a group united in their determination to ruin the United States of America. The Russian power players have animosity and power struggles among themselves and use their positions of power to cheat on their wives with women who hope they will be the replacement. Evan, of course, must also deal with some of the male-female complications: Brenda is Evans' friend and the girlfriend of Peter with whom Evan works to solve the mystery of bodies which were drained of blood in another location. The irony of daily dezinformatsiya adds the 'au courant' touch to the political machinations. This is sure to be a movie! Thank you BookishFirst for the ARC. This is my honest review in exchange for the advance copy.

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