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30 years after "The Killing Joke" changed comics forever, "The Three Jokers" re-examines the myth of who, or what, is the Joker and what is at the heart of his ongoing battle with Batman? New York Times bestselling writer Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok, the writer/artist team that waged the "Darkseid War" in the pages of Justice League, reunite to tell the ultimate story of B 30 years after "The Killing Joke" changed comics forever, "The Three Jokers" re-examines the myth of who, or what, is the Joker and what is at the heart of his ongoing battle with Batman? New York Times bestselling writer Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok, the writer/artist team that waged the "Darkseid War" in the pages of Justice League, reunite to tell the ultimate story of Batman and The Joker! After years of anticipation, the epic story is finally here: find out why there are three Jokers, and what that means for the decades-long battle between the Dark Knight and the Clown Prince of Crime. In this powerful, emotional story Batman, Batgirl and Red Hood - all past victims of the Joker - work together to solve a mystery unlike anything they've ever faced before!


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30 years after "The Killing Joke" changed comics forever, "The Three Jokers" re-examines the myth of who, or what, is the Joker and what is at the heart of his ongoing battle with Batman? New York Times bestselling writer Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok, the writer/artist team that waged the "Darkseid War" in the pages of Justice League, reunite to tell the ultimate story of B 30 years after "The Killing Joke" changed comics forever, "The Three Jokers" re-examines the myth of who, or what, is the Joker and what is at the heart of his ongoing battle with Batman? New York Times bestselling writer Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok, the writer/artist team that waged the "Darkseid War" in the pages of Justice League, reunite to tell the ultimate story of Batman and The Joker! After years of anticipation, the epic story is finally here: find out why there are three Jokers, and what that means for the decades-long battle between the Dark Knight and the Clown Prince of Crime. In this powerful, emotional story Batman, Batgirl and Red Hood - all past victims of the Joker - work together to solve a mystery unlike anything they've ever faced before!

30 review for Batman: Three Jokers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    The Criminal, The Clown, and The Comedian. How many times have you heard that {insert random comic here} will forever change the mythos of {insert random character here}? If you've been reading comics for any amount of time, probably more times than you can count. I think this time around Geoff Johns actually managed to do it. Except for that one incredibly weird plot hole at the end. I can see where this actually helps shore up some of the inconsistencies (if you want to call them that) in the Jok The Criminal, The Clown, and The Comedian. How many times have you heard that {insert random comic here} will forever change the mythos of {insert random character here}? If you've been reading comics for any amount of time, probably more times than you can count. I think this time around Geoff Johns actually managed to do it. Except for that one incredibly weird plot hole at the end. I can see where this actually helps shore up some of the inconsistencies (if you want to call them that) in the Joker's past while paying homage to several of the iconic storylines that have become canon to this character. And it still manages to bring something new and daring to his origin story. The story involves the three members of the Batfamily who have been most affected by Joker - Batman, Batgirl, & Red Hood. Barbara and Jason have both been traumatized by a different Joker than the original Joker that Bruce started fighting way back in the day. Without spoiling any of the great plot twists and turns, the general gist is that they have to find a way to stop these Jokers before they make more of themselves. <--don't worry, that doesn't even scratch the surface. I'm not personally a huge Joker fan, nor am I what most people would consider a huge Batman fan. In other words, I don't read their comics just because I feel compelled by an obsessive love for the characters. But this was well worth the read for anyone who enjoys the DC universe. And as a bonus, you don't actually need to have kept up on everything that has happened for the past few years in order to read this. I'm pretty sure anyone with a vaguely working knowledge of these characters would be able to enjoy it. However, if you're looking for Barbara & Jason's original stories and want to read them for yourself? Batman: A Death in the Family Batman: The Killing Joke Ok, now I do have one major problem with the story, and I would love to hear what anyone else thought about it, but it involves talking about a MAJOR spoiler. So please don't click on this unless you've already read the story. (view spoiler)[ Alright. So at the end, we find out that Bruce is (as always) one step ahead of the Joker and has always known his true name. The only reason he keeps it a secret is to protect his wife and child, who he had ferreted away to Alaska after faking their deaths in that fire. *mind blown* HOWEVER. This means that it was completely ridiculous for Batman to ask the Mobius chair what the name of the Joker was, right? Am I missing something?! (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    I don't know fully what to think of this one. The Joker has always been one of my favorite comic characters, and one of the things I've liked about his is that he constantly re-invents himself without it breaking canon. Depending on the story he can be a harmless prankster, a psychopathic serial killer or a mobster with a twisted sense of humor. All very different, but all fitting. The idea here is that there have been three individuals called the Joker. First the Criminal, the more serious profe I don't know fully what to think of this one. The Joker has always been one of my favorite comic characters, and one of the things I've liked about his is that he constantly re-invents himself without it breaking canon. Depending on the story he can be a harmless prankster, a psychopathic serial killer or a mobster with a twisted sense of humor. All very different, but all fitting. The idea here is that there have been three individuals called the Joker. First the Criminal, the more serious professional, with his eyes always on the job (a throwback to the Golden Age). Next up is the Clown, the Joker who presented himself as something of a deranged entertainer, who used gimmicks like acid flowers and razor sharp cards (a nod to the Silver Age). Finally we have the Comedian, very clearly The Killing Joke's Joker, the psychologically complicated psychopath that comes up with the most horrific plans, but also at times seems the most sympathetic (the Modern Era). The plot follows Batman, the Red Hood and Batgirl as they try to track down the three before they can create a new Joker. This aspect I like, because choosing Jason Todd and Barbara Gordon as the two to accompany Batman on this case, gives a bit of closure. After all, of all the "Batfamily" they are the two who have been harmed by the Joker the most in classic story lines. Here we see how they react, and their very different approaches to this. We see how they've healed and the scars (both physical and emotional) that remain. Which we're dealing with multiple versions of the Joker it is inevitable that one take will appeal to the reader more than others. One page in this ranks up as one of my favorite pages in Batman history now, because it is the perfect sum up of one of the trends I personally like about the Joker. It's a major spoiler, but it's such a wonderful moment. (view spoiler)[ This is my personal favorite take on the Joker. One who hates Batman, but is also obsessed with him. One who can't imagine a world without him, and just wants to be the center of his attention as well. It's a twisted mindset, but one that fits the character so well... and it's the one that endures. (hide spoiler)] There's a lot of depth here and the art... the art is beautiful. Despite having three versions of the same character, I found it very clear the entire time which Joker was in each panel. The art at times seems very reminiscent of The Killing Joke, and I personally won't complain about that. Jason Fabok is the true hero of this book. Now, my issues. First, as I said, I'm not actually a big fan of the multiple Joker idea. While it was fun for a story, I honestly hope it doesn't really get brought back up again. Let this be it's own thing. We don't really need an explanation of the Joker. Every version contradicts the past versions in some way, but the Joker is one of the few characters in comics who can make that work. As Alan Moore once wonderfully put it for him: "If I have to have a past, I prefer it to be multiple choice." Second issue and this one is a major spoiler. (view spoiler)[ The ending. I honestly loved the ending until the last couple of pages. Batman has always known who the Joker (Comedian version) was? He was an abusive husband prior to being turned into the Joker? Why did we need that? You made Alan Moore's backstory canon, and then pulled it that he was a monster before becoming THE monster. It's a final twist that instead of being respectful towards the Killing Joke like all the panels that came before, instead tries to take away from the tragedy that made that comic so brilliant. (hide spoiler)] Final thoughts: Wonderful art. At times a very clever story and wonderfully plays with the history of the Joker in relation to Batman and his allies. That said, it tries to "explain" the Joker, and in doing so creates its own problems. 3.5/5 stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    "There are 3". I remember the line from the side issue of the Darkside War. Batman is given ultimate knowledge and he asks about the Joker, the answer is is cryptic. I waited years for this book, I could not be anything other then a Black Label book. I don't know is it is going to be folded into the main continuity or not,it is not what I expected but it is every bit as good as I hoped for. The heroes most affected by the Joker's rampages are not on the trail of the Jokers. Can genius counter mad "There are 3". I remember the line from the side issue of the Darkside War. Batman is given ultimate knowledge and he asks about the Joker, the answer is is cryptic. I waited years for this book, I could not be anything other then a Black Label book. I don't know is it is going to be folded into the main continuity or not,it is not what I expected but it is every bit as good as I hoped for. The heroes most affected by the Joker's rampages are not on the trail of the Jokers. Can genius counter madness? Can the scars of the past be heal or redeemed? Great story and artwork. I was hooked from the first page. Witness or relive the most defining moments of these characters lives. I think Jason and Barbara get more time than Batman in this book, but given their past I think this is fair. Not the most action packed comic, but monumental story. Each chapter/issues starts with that issues' front cover and a varient. I really like the hardcover format. Great story, great artwork and great characters.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    We've all been expecting it and I think the hype is a partial reason for its downfall. Again, it had an interesting concept, and I was actually willing to go with it at first. At the same time, I was a bit skeptical about it, because I wanted to see what would be the conclusion of it. Unfortunately, it ended as a bad joke without a punchline, literally. It also had to take a stab at ruining the famous comic Batman The Killing Joke, and sink along with it. There were just too many stupid things going We've all been expecting it and I think the hype is a partial reason for its downfall. Again, it had an interesting concept, and I was actually willing to go with it at first. At the same time, I was a bit skeptical about it, because I wanted to see what would be the conclusion of it. Unfortunately, it ended as a bad joke without a punchline, literally. It also had to take a stab at ruining the famous comic Batman The Killing Joke, and sink along with it. There were just too many stupid things going on in it, and it tried to make itself seem clever but it wasn't. A wasted potential, that could have offered more than what we have already got. It gets 2 stars out of 5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    After teasing us in Justice League: Darkseid War and DC Rebirth and a 4 year wait, Geoff Johns finally delivers Three Jokers. I went back and reread DC Rebirth so you wouldn't have to. These are the only three panels in DC Rebirth that reference Three Jokers. I love how this begins with Batman getting patched up, focusing in on his many scars and then flashing back to how he got them. Eventually, we move on to the Jokers after similar glimpses into Batgirl and Red Hood. Apparently, the Jokers have After teasing us in Justice League: Darkseid War and DC Rebirth and a 4 year wait, Geoff Johns finally delivers Three Jokers. I went back and reread DC Rebirth so you wouldn't have to. These are the only three panels in DC Rebirth that reference Three Jokers. I love how this begins with Batman getting patched up, focusing in on his many scars and then flashing back to how he got them. Eventually, we move on to the Jokers after similar glimpses into Batgirl and Red Hood. Apparently, the Jokers have committed three different crimes at the exact same time. The three Jokers, The Criminal (Golden Age), The Clown (Silver Age), and The Comedian (The Modern Age) are striving to create the next Joker. Where Johns shines though is in the portrayal of our three heroes. Batgirl hearkens back to her 70's roots, very strong and independent. She's dealt with the trauma of being paralyzed and hones herself into an even stronger character. Meanwhile, Jason Todd is the complete opposite. He's still completely broken, lashing out for vengeance after being beaten (nearly) to death by the Joker and left for dead. Jason Fabok does some real heavy lifting in this. Several sequences are told almost completely by the art alone. I love how he shows all three heroes in parallel, breaking into the same location through different means. It's a masters class in sequential art. Fabok is such a great Batman artist. His art hearkens back to Brian Bolland in Killing Joke.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A crime family wiped out, a comedian murdered during a live stream and a trio of corpses dressed to look like the Red Hood, splayed across the grounds of Ace Chemicals - all appear to have been killed by the Joker at the same time. But that’s impossible - how could the Joker have been in three places at once? Unless there are three Jokers: a Criminal, a Comedian, and a Clown. Three vigilantes - Batman, Batgirl and Red Hood - hunt down Joker(s) across three chapters in Three Jokers. Geoff Johns w A crime family wiped out, a comedian murdered during a live stream and a trio of corpses dressed to look like the Red Hood, splayed across the grounds of Ace Chemicals - all appear to have been killed by the Joker at the same time. But that’s impossible - how could the Joker have been in three places at once? Unless there are three Jokers: a Criminal, a Comedian, and a Clown. Three vigilantes - Batman, Batgirl and Red Hood - hunt down Joker(s) across three chapters in Three Jokers. Geoff Johns writes his second sequel to an Alan Moore ‘80s classic (the first being the Watchmen sequel, Doomsday Clock) with Three Jokers being the sequel to The Killing Joke. What, no V for Vendetta sequel, Geoff? You’d think the time would be right - instead of railing against a Thatcherite government, you could cast Trump in that role. Who knows, maybe there is one in the works? Or not, given that the fat orange baby is out now. Three Jokers is also the fulfilment of Johns’ tease from over four years ago in DC Universe Rebirth, the last teased storyline from that bumper issue (it’s been so long “Rebirth” isn’t even a thing anymore!). So was it worth the wait? Yay and nay. As ever with Papa Johns, I’m vexed by some of his narrative choices but overall I didn’t dislike the book. Jason Fabok draws some incredible pages here too, so Three Jokers isn’t a bad comic by any means. And here I’ll say SPOILERS for the rest of this review to anyone who hasn’t read it yet but is planning to - my rec for the latter is above. * So I’ll just get right into my biggest problem with this story: it’s pointless. Batman reveals that he’s known Joker’s real name and identity since the first week he met him, but doesn’t say anything further, saying that his name/identity isn’t important and never was. I totally agree with this and wouldn’t have wanted Johns to have given us those details anyway. So I wasn’t expecting to find out Joker’s full deets and we didn’t get it. But: I was expecting to find out what the point of the three Jokers was. Have there always been three Jokers since the very beginning or is this a recent development - ie. Joker’s latest demented scheme? We didn't find that out either and that was disappointing. Also, what’s the thinking behind producing multiple Jokers? One Joker - the Criminal - posits that the plan is to make a “better Joker”. What does that mean? Apparently, Joker(s) wants to create a Joker with a meaningful background to Batman to tie the two characters more closely together. On the one hand, The Killing Joke was an origin story and having its sequel also centre around origins is fitting, as is the motivation for Joker wanting to be closer to Batman, which is a recurring motive for Joker; on the other hand, it reads less like something Joker would want and more like something DC, as a corporate entity, would want for Joker - like we’re reading the minutes of a brainstorming meeting about a revision of one of DC’s most popular characters! And what form does this actually take - making a “better Joker”? Nabbing a vat load of chemicals and throwing dozens of randos into it! How does that make a better Joker? That aspect of the story was completely stupid - what, Joker(s) just hoped that the arbitrary strangers they picked up would somehow have deep meaning to Batman?? What was a better idea was Joker(s) considering turning Jason Todd into the new Joker, or even Joe Chill - both have massive personal significance to Batman, but Jason would’ve been the only real choice, not least because Chill here is dying of Stage 4 cancer. But what really underscores the futility of this entire concept of a “better Joker” is how it ends. Because it turns out only the Criminal was interested in making a “better Joker” while the real Joker was just going along with it until he got bored of it all. And even then the real Joker doesn’t explain why he felt the need to create other versions of himself! The book’s premise is a let-down because the “better Joker” concept is never realised, or fully committed to, or explained properly. The thing I’ve seen most Alan Moore fans really get wound up about - and let’s be clear, nothing Geoff Johns wrote was ever going to placate that crowd - didn’t really bother me: the reveal that the Comedian’s wife and child are alive and kicking in Alaska. Eh, whatevs. I get that Johns had to do something to build on The Killing Joke - it’s not THAT bad, it’s just underwhelming. The other critiques I have are smaller: Batman is uncharacteristically very accepting of Jason shooting Joker in the head - I guess guns don’t really bother him anymore? How is it a surprise to Batman that Joe Chill has been in a prison hospital for two months receiving treatment for terminal cancer - Batman keeps tabs on the Joker’s wife and child, who’re living in the middle of nowhere, who escaped Gotham years ago, but he doesn’t keep tabs on the man who murdered his parents, changing his life’s trajectory to becoming Batman, and living in the same city as him?! Also, in this story Gordon doesn’t know Barbara is Batgirl - which is crazy given how useless her mask is at hiding the features of her face anyway - but she flat out tells him by calling him “Dad” at the end - why?? Ok: the stuff I liked! As much as some parts of the story rang false to me, I was never bored reading it. This is an action-packed page-turner of a read. Johns throws in perfect cliffhangers at the end of each chapter to keep you interested and wanting to see what happens next, from the Joker execution at the end of the first part to the Joe Chill abduction at the end of the second. The showdown at the Monarch Theatre was exciting and unpredictable and I loved that Babs got to have payback of a sort by smashing Joker’s camera into his face yelling “Smile!” - a great callback to the infamous scene in The Killing Joke where he shoots and cripples her. And this was a pleasant surprise: the story is as much about Babs and Jason as it is Bruce. We see the devastation Joker has wreaked not just on Bruce’s life but on Babs (The Killing Joke) and Jason (A Death in the Family). I liked that Johns acknowledged this, incorporated them into the sequel and delved into the psychological damage the Joker has caused these characters - and did so convincingly. You got a strong sense of the anger and frustration both Babs and Jason feel towards Joker and Batman too, for allowing Joker to continue to exist and create ever more suffering and turmoil. I also liked that Johns toyed with the idea of a relationship between Babs and Jason. If Babs was going to be with someone in the Bat Fam, I always thought the more interesting choice would be Jason, not Grayson; Dick’s too “good”, like Barbara - Jason has that streak of malevolence to him that adds a frisson of excitement to the relationship (opposites attract, right?). Anyway, like everything else here, it doesn’t stick unfortunately. Unlike Johns’ writing, Jason Fabok’s art is flawless. This is an absolutely stunning book and I loved looking at every page. There’s so much cool stuff here: the smiling shark, the design of the Red Hood helmet after Joker’s torture, the subtle differences in design between the Three Jokers, the Batman scar sequence that shows the years of physical trauma he’s endured, the homages to Brian Bolland, the numerous fight sequences. I can’t fault any of it, I can only gush at the skill that Fabok used in bringing this all to life - full marks on the art! Like I said, Three Jokers is not a bad comic. It’s never boring, it looks amazing, and there’s some remarkably decent character work scattered throughout. What stops it from being a great comic is that it never delivers on what it sets up, making it an ultimately unsatisfying read. Three stars for Three Jokers!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Jason Fabok draws himself a heckuva Batman. That alone is worth an extra star.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    What started out as a promising and superhyped series, crumbles down to a poor joke by the end. The art by Jason Fabok is truly magnificient throughout the series, and the storytelling is great as well, but the problem is in the plot itself. Three Jokers continues from the revelation made years ago in "The Darkseid War" that there are in fact three Jokers. All the hype and build up turns into 'was this story really necessary?' by the end. Three Joker has phenomenal artwork but a dissapointing plot What started out as a promising and superhyped series, crumbles down to a poor joke by the end. The art by Jason Fabok is truly magnificient throughout the series, and the storytelling is great as well, but the problem is in the plot itself. Three Jokers continues from the revelation made years ago in "The Darkseid War" that there are in fact three Jokers. All the hype and build up turns into 'was this story really necessary?' by the end. Three Joker has phenomenal artwork but a dissapointing plot.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    The premise of this one is that there isn't just one Joker but three... and that there has been for years. It's an interesting concept and I think Geoff Johns did a great job of exploring it. The artwork was pretty darned good, too. There was a good dynamic here between Batman, Batgirl and the Red Hood. This was actually my first encounter with the new Red Hood, as the last time I read Batman regularly Jason Todd was still dead. Honestly, I think I'd've rather he stayed dead but the character wor The premise of this one is that there isn't just one Joker but three... and that there has been for years. It's an interesting concept and I think Geoff Johns did a great job of exploring it. The artwork was pretty darned good, too. There was a good dynamic here between Batman, Batgirl and the Red Hood. This was actually my first encounter with the new Red Hood, as the last time I read Batman regularly Jason Todd was still dead. Honestly, I think I'd've rather he stayed dead but the character works well in this book. Similarly, the last time I read the Batbooks, Barbara Gordon was still in a wheelchair. It was good to see her geared up as Batgirl again and she's an essential part of this story. Geoff Johns' work has always been wildly variable in quality in the past but I'm very glad I took a chance on this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Siona St Mark

    This definitely was not what I was expecting. I do like that this tried to give more context to the Joker, and I do think it was well done (mostly). I think the Jason/Barbara romance wasn’t necessary, but it wasn’t horrible either. I’m not a Dick/Barbara shipper so I don’t really care about that, and I do think that Barbara would be a good influence on Jason following this story, but.... eh, I think she could do that as just a friend. The ending about the Clown Joker’s identity.... I’m not sure t This definitely was not what I was expecting. I do like that this tried to give more context to the Joker, and I do think it was well done (mostly). I think the Jason/Barbara romance wasn’t necessary, but it wasn’t horrible either. I’m not a Dick/Barbara shipper so I don’t really care about that, and I do think that Barbara would be a good influence on Jason following this story, but.... eh, I think she could do that as just a friend. The ending about the Clown Joker’s identity.... I’m not sure that it was really necessary. In Snyder’s New 52 run they alluded to the Joker being a mythical/mystical figure for the darkness in Gotham and I really like that approach. I can appreciate that John’s was calling back to The Killing Joke, but the point of that story was that the Joker himself doesn’t really even remember his origin, so it’s usage in this volume seems... amateur-ish if I’m being honest. And the ending with Bruce in Alaska.... I mean I guess since apparently there is gonna be a sequel but tbh it was just completely unnecessary. I don’t care about or need a Son of Joker storyline, just let him be some random agent of chaos that’s obsessed with Batman. It can just be that and still be great. Overall I do think this is an enjoyable volume, but it is definitely problematic. I think it was an interesting exploration of the Joker, but I think John’s take is ultimately a failure, for me at least.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    So is Geoff Johns just going to be a full-time Alan Moore tribute band from here on out what with Doomsday Clock and now this sequel to Batman: The Killing Joke? (Don't get me started on his Green Lantern run and the echoes of Swamp Thing.) He does also bring in elements of Batman: A Death in the Family as Batman teams up with Batgirl and Red Hood -- the two members of the Batman family most traumatized by the Joker in the aforementioned tales -- to find out why there suddenly seem to be three J So is Geoff Johns just going to be a full-time Alan Moore tribute band from here on out what with Doomsday Clock and now this sequel to Batman: The Killing Joke? (Don't get me started on his Green Lantern run and the echoes of Swamp Thing.) He does also bring in elements of Batman: A Death in the Family as Batman teams up with Batgirl and Red Hood -- the two members of the Batman family most traumatized by the Joker in the aforementioned tales -- to find out why there suddenly seem to be three Jokers running around. And boy, is the multiple Joker scenario the worst idea. Horrible. Hate it. Already retconning it away in my mind. I'm also wiping *that kiss* from my mind, the second worse idea in this book. Stupidest Batman Family kiss since the one in the Batman: The Killing Joke animated adaptation. And isn't the ending of this book pretty much the same as Doomsday Clock? Does Johns have no other twist in his bag of tricks? I should probably rate this one-star, but I did get an involuntary buzz off the DC fanboy service and Easter eggs. And boy, don't those pages just look great as Jason Fabok does a Dave Gibbons/Brian Bolland fusion? Does the Black Label mean this isn't in continuity? Or like Killing Joke, it's in continuity when DC wants it to be?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. We all come from somewhere. With no one having the same starting point as everyone else, it’s what comes next that shapes us into the being we are today. For some, their origin is a mystery far bigger than life and there’s nothing more terrifying than a psychopath, with unknown origins, whose becoming fundamentally questions human nature. Alas, the Joker is one of them and his story has always been a secret until today. Following The Darkseid Wa You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. We all come from somewhere. With no one having the same starting point as everyone else, it’s what comes next that shapes us into the being we are today. For some, their origin is a mystery far bigger than life and there’s nothing more terrifying than a psychopath, with unknown origins, whose becoming fundamentally questions human nature. Alas, the Joker is one of them and his story has always been a secret until today. Following The Darkseid War Saga during the New 52 Justice League comic book run, Batman discovered a terrifying truth regarding the Joker: there are three of them. Despite being teased for years, lastly during DC Comics’ latest relaunch with DC Universe: Rebirth #1, writer Geoff Johns finally teams up with legendary artist Jason Fabok and colourist Brad Anderson to complete this highly-anticipated, mysterious, and strange story in a three-issue limited series published under the DC Black Label imprint. What is Batman: Three Jokers about? Three simultaneous Joker sightings have been reported in Gotham City, occurring at distinct locations with different victims, thus indicating specific motives that confirms the Clown Prince of Gotham’s hand in the matter. While the thought baffles the minds of many, one hypothesis remains on the table: the Joker was never one man. Accompanied by Barbara Gordon (Batgirl) and Jason Todd (Red Hood), two former victims of the Joker’s brutal crimes, this Bat Family embark on a journey to unravel this terrifying mystery while revisiting their past tragedies, the very life-changing events that have shaped them into the heroes they are today. Unfortunately for them, this mystery will send them down a highly-emotional trip down memory lane and none of them will come out of it unscarred once again. Shattering sales records, this highly-anticipated story drove every Gothamite to follow the publishing of this limited mini-series during the pandemic as it delivers another controversial chapter in the DC Universe lore, alongside the recently completed story of Doomsday Clock, this time exploring the Joker’s identity. What fans will finally be able to discover with this unconfirmed canonical tale published under an imprint usually reserved to stand-alone and unconnected stories, will, however, leave them divided as this creative team looks to retcon some of Batman’s past adventures, notably Batman: The Killing Joke, to establish a story revolving around the existence of three distinct Jokers. With countless pages of silent story-telling (little to no dialogue), the story mostly revisits Bruce Wayne, Barbara Gordon, and Jason Todd’s traumas while exploring the coping mechanisms they’ve established as superheroes today, on top of their bond with one another. While one would imagine that this graphic novel would answer many questions that have been floating around the Joker’s origin, it mostly introduces a myriad of more questions for fans to reflect upon, many that will continue to be unanswered, and some that are due to inconsistencies and plot holes that will leave readers baffled by the ludicrous plot developed before them. Despite telling an unnecessary story that struggles to effortlessly retcon well-established lore, writer Geoff Johns doesn’t fail to build excellent characterization. The suffering of each of these three heroes is portrayed with masterful authenticity, from Batgirl’s fierce determination and enviable sense of justice to Red Hood’s broken self and brutal modus operandi. Even the Joker’s personality is perfected, exploring every delusional and maniacal traits that composes his character, from his love for theatrics to his cynical and anarchic manipulation of others—nothing is left unexplored. Unfortunately, it is the narrative that does not raise to the challenge set by expectations and necessities. The artwork is also a flawless component to this graphic novel. Artist Jason Fabok, having showcased countless times his ability to draw over at DC Comics with his iconic character designs, displays once again his talent with stunning artwork, especially with his mind-boggling splash pages. Add in colourist Brad Anderson who brings life to these characters in an astonishing fashion, you are continuously scanning these pages in absolute wonderment. It’s not surprising to see that they went with silent story-telling as the artwork speaks for itself, sometimes without much action at all, but the little details, whether it’s in the transition between panels or the subtle nod to old school character designs, make all the difference. Batman: Three Jokers is an unnecessary retcon serving as a potential origin story for the Joker while exploring trauma, pain, and closure in three of the Clown Prince of Gotham’s victims. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kadi P

    Less happened in this than I thought would be happening. Maybe all the hype around it made me expect mind-blowing and world-changing things to happen, which sadly did not. I think the Jokers left too many clues, it was so easy to piece it all together. Some parts were just unnecessary. And, as always, I'm left wondering what time this takes place in and where the rest of the batfam are... Still this was a very solid story. It would've been 4 stars if not for that stellar ending. I would definitely Less happened in this than I thought would be happening. Maybe all the hype around it made me expect mind-blowing and world-changing things to happen, which sadly did not. I think the Jokers left too many clues, it was so easy to piece it all together. Some parts were just unnecessary. And, as always, I'm left wondering what time this takes place in and where the rest of the batfam are... Still this was a very solid story. It would've been 4 stars if not for that stellar ending. I would definitely welcome a sequel just to see what happens next with that ending.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    Note: I'm changing the score in further reflection, because while this book was enjoyable to read, it failed to give us any real answers to the Three Jokers concept, and didn't really deliver at all what I wanted. Original Review: A decent Batman story! Johns has once again delivered an engaging story, this time involving the Joker, DC's most interesting villain! I remember when they first teased this in Justice League Darkseid War and it made everyone's minds explode at the thought of there bei Note: I'm changing the score in further reflection, because while this book was enjoyable to read, it failed to give us any real answers to the Three Jokers concept, and didn't really deliver at all what I wanted. Original Review: A decent Batman story! Johns has once again delivered an engaging story, this time involving the Joker, DC's most interesting villain! I remember when they first teased this in Justice League Darkseid War and it made everyone's minds explode at the thought of there being three Jokers this whole time! And now we finally have the answers, whether there satisfying or not is up to the reader. To talk about what I did like, the art by Jason Fabok and Brad Anderson is fantastic as the colors and paneling are very reminiscent of Brian Bolland's work on the Killing Joke! I just love the art and between this and Doomsday Clock, I think Johns has a preference for the yellow circle, Bat Emblem from Batman '89, as both stories feature it! Johns also does a lot of character development with Jason Todd which I wasn't expecting. They've never really done much development with him since Under the Red Hood and it would be a shame if this book was declared an Elseworld, meaning main continuity Jason would just remain the same. This however unfortunately is one of my main issues with this book as it focuses a lot on the Red Hood subplot, when I was kind of hoping it would focus more on the Joker. We do get some interesting developments with the Joker, especially if you've read Killing Joke, but it often gets pushed to the side for the first two issues, in favor of the Jason story. The final issue promises a lot and delivers on some but for me it left some things to be desired. The ending will definitely spark interesting conversations between fans for years and while it definitely surprised me, I kind of was expecting more. It both keeps the mystery of the Joker but also does some thing that I'm still not sure how I feel about it. Otherwise, this is a good Batman story that's definitely worth a read if your a Batman fan!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scarlet Cameo

    Is ok, not great, not bad, just ok

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    For years now, it has long been teased that there are, in fact three Jokers. And this in my opinion is a perfectly sound idea. The mystery of having a Joker-trinity, though crazy, is highly sellable. Anything goes with the Clown Prince of Crime. Yes, but that is a lazy justification. So just think about the Joker iterations you have read throughout Batman's history: you have that Joker who killed Todd, or the Joker who shot Barbara. You have the New 52 Joker, you also have the golden age one. Ge For years now, it has long been teased that there are, in fact three Jokers. And this in my opinion is a perfectly sound idea. The mystery of having a Joker-trinity, though crazy, is highly sellable. Anything goes with the Clown Prince of Crime. Yes, but that is a lazy justification. So just think about the Joker iterations you have read throughout Batman's history: you have that Joker who killed Todd, or the Joker who shot Barbara. You have the New 52 Joker, you also have the golden age one. Geoff Johns capitalizes on the idea of us not knowing who the Joker in order to tell a story of who he is. And that is what The Three Jokers is all about. More than a detective story of knowing who they are, which is the plot by the way, T3J provides new connections and different perspectives to the Batman-Joker relationship (at this point, they should just kiss already). The Three Jokers is fairly straightforward, and is not groundbreaking as I had hoped it to be. It tries to be something but fails to do so because T3J I think has heavily relied on other Batman stories like the Killing Joke (but lacks depth) and Death in the Family (but lacks brutality). It tries to be in the same vein as Johns' Doomsday Clock in terms of meta, but is cut short of its simplistic story. I know what Johns' really wanted to convey at the end of the story, and I think readers should push through reading it until the final page. I mean, man, the art by Jason Fabok is something worth looking at. Sadly, the story felt flat and bland because it doesn't have something to offer to its readers. The story just went for a routine drive. It does not carry the mystery until the end like The Long Halloween. it does not have that philosophical gravitas like Doomsday Clock. Hell, even the Jokers themselves cannot prove any cohesive point to justify the whole story. Overall, Batman: The Three Jokers is a letdown. Geoff Johns has been handed the best ingredients to cook an average (yet beautifully-looking) stew.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Art work in this special outstanding book is beautiful and very dark. The 'new' Robin is an utter shit he is every bit a true murdering Joker. Three utterly different Jokers but who is real one? Is it Batman? This isn't a normal Batman. It's not normal Joker as their is three different types of Jokes. If you want good Batman book this it but make sure you get the best version the H/B graphic book that keep better and go up in value and not ghastly P/B graphic novels that don't. The Art work in this special outstanding book is beautiful and very dark. The 'new' Robin is an utter shit he is every bit a true murdering Joker. Three utterly different Jokers but who is real one? Is it Batman? This isn't a normal Batman. It's not normal Joker as their is three different types of Jokes. If you want good Batman book this it but make sure you get the best version the H/B graphic book that keep better and go up in value and not ghastly P/B graphic novels that don't.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mindi

    I literally read The Killing Joke right before this, so I’m thinking I have a lot of books to read that take place between that one and this book. Especially after reading a number of other reviews from readers who have read them all. I will say that the art is fantastic, but much of this story felt convoluted and forced. I don’t know if that’s due to my lack of knowledge concerning the books that came before this one, or if this story just needed some work. I know the basic information, but I w I literally read The Killing Joke right before this, so I’m thinking I have a lot of books to read that take place between that one and this book. Especially after reading a number of other reviews from readers who have read them all. I will say that the art is fantastic, but much of this story felt convoluted and forced. I don’t know if that’s due to my lack of knowledge concerning the books that came before this one, or if this story just needed some work. I know the basic information, but I wasn’t aware that the concept of three jokers was mentioned elsewhere.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    “The calendar in your closet, the wheelchair, the books. Why keep it all? Doesn’t it hurt to look at it?” “No. I mean it used to Jason. But healing… with the help of my dad. My physical therapist. And so many other people who were there for me … I try to look at the positive. A tragedy that I was able to literally walk away from thanks to the people that love me.” 3.5 stars. I really really wanted to love this comic. I thought it would be an easy 4-5 star for me, but unfortunately it wa “The calendar in your closet, the wheelchair, the books. Why keep it all? Doesn’t it hurt to look at it?” “No. I mean it used to Jason. But healing… with the help of my dad. My physical therapist. And so many other people who were there for me … I try to look at the positive. A tragedy that I was able to literally walk away from thanks to the people that love me.” 3.5 stars. I really really wanted to love this comic. I thought it would be an easy 4-5 star for me, but unfortunately it wasn’t quite there. This was still a fun read (I mean, throw Babs and Jason in anything and I’ll still read it. Especially Babs) but the story itself doesn’t hold up. Nothing really sticks. What I mean by that is, you could skip this comic and not feel like you’ve missed anything important in the overall story. I thought this was going to be a big deal that would change the whole game, definitely change the story for one very important character (or … I guess characters?) but not really. The full main plot is kind of hazy and not fully committed to. It’s the main storyline, but it feels like almost a background side story, and all the little things that happen feel more important and impactful. At the end of the day, I was just wondering what was the point of this? Without getting into spoilers, I don’t understand why there were three Jokers. At first, I loved the idea. The way the Joker has impacted Barbara, Jason, and Bruce do all seem very different so I was totally on board with the idea, but it just wasn’t executed well. I loved that this comic included Jason and Barbara. Not only are they two of my favorites, but they are the ones that have been most impacted/shaped by the Joker(s) so it felt right to have them in this. Speaking of Jason and Babs, I really loved the moments between them. I always thought the dynamic between them would and could be very interesting if done right, especially because of their somewhat shared trauma. There can be understanding there that can’t really be felt or given from any other member of the Batfam. Basically, this dynamic has been slept on and can be so great if well done but (notice how I keep giving that stipulation of if), much like everything else in this comic, it just wasn’t fully committed to. It almost felt like an afterthought that was added for the sake of an extra emotional layer but then dropped. Again, you could read the next issue and not even know what happened. Unless DC proves me wrong (please do!). I loved getting insight into Barbara’s room, just seeing how strong she is. I love her and it was nice to see her chair and everything. It made my heart hurt but not in a bad way and I just I love Barbara Gordon so much. The things she says to Jason later were literally what I’ve been wanting someone to say to him from day one. Also, I wanted to give Jason a million hugs. Poor boy has been through enough and they keep making it worse and he deserves all the love. Some parts of this were really painful to read. Lastly, unlike the storyline, the art was absolutely perfect. (Which, by the way, feel free to click on the images to see them in better quality!). Everything was so carefully drawn, the artwork was so brilliant, and the details! There are three Jokers and you can actually see the subtle differences between them. You can tell, just by looking, that there are three and which of the three you're dealing with. I loved it. Every page was gorgeously drawn and so well done I often stopped after reading just to look at everything. Beautiful. Overall, The Three Jokers never leaves you bored, is full of fantastic art, and includes some of DC’s (or my) favorite characters. It just lacks depth and could have been so much more. (view spoiler)[ GOODBYE (hide spoiler)] ---- This was something. The art was absolutely stunning, I got to see my two favs Barbara and Jason, and did I mention the art is stunning? Either way. After years and years and years of being on this site I finally won something in a giveaway and it came today and I was so excited I got to read it! Review to come.

  20. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    Wait... this comic is actually good? Hold up... GREAT? I am shocked right now! What’s it about? There’s a situation in Gotham where somehow there were 3 different Jokers doing Joker-y things at the same time. Now Batman, Batgirl and Red Hood have to figure out what’s going on, what the big plan is and how to stop the Joker(s)! Why it gets 5-stars: The story is actually good. When just hearing about it, it honestly sounds ridiculous. In fact when I saw all the hype I was just like “Oh my gosh, this s Wait... this comic is actually good? Hold up... GREAT? I am shocked right now! What’s it about? There’s a situation in Gotham where somehow there were 3 different Jokers doing Joker-y things at the same time. Now Batman, Batgirl and Red Hood have to figure out what’s going on, what the big plan is and how to stop the Joker(s)! Why it gets 5-stars: The story is actually good. When just hearing about it, it honestly sounds ridiculous. In fact when I saw all the hype I was just like “Oh my gosh, this sounds fucking ridiculous. THREE Jokers?” but it actually ends up making sense and being interesting. You really gotta read it to see what I mean. It’s a very dark and intriguing tale that was quite unexpected. The art works perfectly for the story. Very well drawn and detailed with a style that suits this book’s tone very well. Johns writes these characters surprisingly well. Batman is written the way I like him. This book’s Batgirl might actually be the most well written and interesting Batgirl I’ve read. Red Hood manages to be both a bad-ass antihero and a well written person. The Jokers are all very well written, interesting villains. Fabok helps by drawing the emotions of these characters very well in a way that makes them seem like people. This book’s pace is perfect! I never felt bored but I didn’t think this book was too rushed either. It goes at a pace that is honestly perfect. This book is very unpredictable. I sometimes complain about the predictability in superhero comics but holy shit that isn’t the case here at all. This story surprised me quite a few times (view spoiler)[ (I actually thought Batgirl was gonna stop Red Hood from killing that one Joker. Boy was I wrong) (hide spoiler)] and it kept me in suspense throughout! The dialogue is very well written. This book is surprisingly emotional throughout. I wasn’t expecting a Batman comic to be so damn heavy but it really is! The ending is great and completely shocked me. I may forever see Batman and Joker in a different way after this! Overall: I used to think Joker was an overrated villain TBH but between that masterpiece film in 2019 and this masterpiece comic in 2020, there might not be a better time to be a Joker fan! I’m not gonna sugarcoat it: I kinda expected this comic to suck. I mean... THREE Jokers? That sounds ridiculous. I am pleasantly surprised to say this is actually one of my favorite Batman comics ever now! The story is surprisingly brilliant, the artwork is amazing, the pace is perfect, there’s more suspense than I expect from a Batman story, it is both darker and more emotional than usual. I honestly can’t find anything to complain about here! I mean, really, this is even coming from someone who isn’t typically a big Geoff Johns fan (this is actually the first time I’m giving a book of his 5-stars). Highly recommended! 5/5

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sebastien

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is my very first review. I felt like I had to express what I felt. It all started several years ago, when a then-omniscient Batman asked the Mobius Chair one simple question, "What is the Joker's real name?" and was answered "There are three Jokers". This was the beginning of a five-year-long hype for millions of fans who wanted to know just what the heck was going on here. Finally, it's here. And DAMN. I'm beginning to think that Geoff Johns is seriously starting to lose his interest in writi This is my very first review. I felt like I had to express what I felt. It all started several years ago, when a then-omniscient Batman asked the Mobius Chair one simple question, "What is the Joker's real name?" and was answered "There are three Jokers". This was the beginning of a five-year-long hype for millions of fans who wanted to know just what the heck was going on here. Finally, it's here. And DAMN. I'm beginning to think that Geoff Johns is seriously starting to lose his interest in writing. First, the good stuff. -The art. The art was good. In fact, the art was flawless. I could spend hours losing myself in these pictures, not caring for the story. And now, the bad stuff. -The time. We already had the much-anticipated Doomsday Clock, which Johns took a whooping 2 years to conclude in order to deliver a book that was... there. And now he's doing it again. 5 years to deliver a 3-issues-book. This is. NOT. Acceptable. Especially for this result. -The story. It's not all bad; there are a few highlights, with Jason working on his trauma, Bruce bringing himself to forgive his parents' killer, and so on. But all of this is made irrelevant by the biggest flaw that drags the whole series to Hell with it: the main story. So. At the beginning, we have Three Jokers: the Criminal (the Golden Age Joker), the Clown (the Silver Age Joker) and the Comedian (the Joker from post-Crisis to our days). The three of them were actually working together this whole time, and are currently working on making a newer, better Joker. That's an awesome premise, which raises so many questions! The problem is: -Two of the three Jokers are killed, leaving only the one from Post-Crisis. AKA, the one most of us are familiar with. So there was really no change to the statu-quo. The other two might as well not have been there. -Think about all the questions you might have about these three Jokers. Then read the damn thing. Now ask yourself: which of your questions were answered? I'm willing to bet on none. Which Joker came first? We don't know. How do they create more Jokers? We don't know. What is the point of creating other Jokers? Not only we don't know, but by eliminating the two others and leaving the maybe-first, maybe-not-first who doesn't give a damn about creating more Jokers, we learn that the question itself is meaningless. There are also problems that are specific to the Comedian, AKA the last Joker alive at the end of this mess: -This is the Joker from The Killing Joke, by Alan Moore. This guy was originally a nobody who had a pregnant wife, money issues, a failed career, but who was not necessarily a bad guy. In fact, the whole point was that he was completely normal, yet "one bad day" turned him into the incarnation of evil. But in this book, we learn that this normal man was actually an abusive husband; so much that his wife faked her death in order to raise their child safely. ... none of this works. Not one second. In fact, this is insulting, both to Alan Moore and to Johns' own storytelling ability. First, making him an abuser and a psychopath before his accident negates the whole idea that "All it takes is one bad day" that has been the focal idea of the Joker ever since The Killing Joke was released. Johns casually threw away years of characterization for the sake of shock. Second, how are we led to believe that good ol' Jack was actually an abusive monster? By seeing a panel taken from The Killing Joke, where Jack briefly lashes out at his wife, without hurting her, following another devastating failure. In-context, it was a one-time moment of stress and anxiety, which he regretted, and his wife comforted him. But in Johns' version, the next thing we see is his wife in tears, telling policemen that her mentally broken husband, who would probably shoot himself if she left him, wouldn't allow her to leave him and would eventually hurt the child. That's all there is to see. We didn't see a truth that the Joker would have willingly forgotten, we didn't see him hurting her, or threatening her. We kept seeing the poor, desperate man that he was. So no, that doesn't work. Do you know what I see when I look at this? I don't see an abusive husband, or a potentially abusive father. I see a woman who is either paranoid, unbelievably delusional or uselessly cruel, lying to get away from a husband whom we have no reason to believe could hurt her in any way. And after Doomsday Clock, this is the second time Johns revisits one of Alan Moore's stories, in a negative way. I'm starting to think he seriously dislikes Moore's work. So what we're left with after five years of waiting is an outrageously short book that manages to be irrelevant and pointless AND to screw up its central character. If I was to rate this book in all honesty, I might give it a 2, or a 2.5 at best. But the angry fan in me is behind the wheel right now, and he gives it a 1, while mentally giving it a 0. And if I was working for DC's Editorial Staff, I would think the time has come to say goodbye to Geoff Johns. Send him waste Marvel's time for a change.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    It’s uncommon for a comic to change how I feel about a character, yet this happens for me here with Joker. Is it retconning? Sure as hell is. But it gives another dimension to Joker’s pervasiveness. My only real complaint is seeing the Origin for the 1000th time. Ultra violent and beautifully illustrated, Three Jokers is fantastic.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kesh✨

    One of the biggest letdowns of 2020 LOL. The art was nice at least, thank god

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jake Nap

    Even worse than Doomsday Clock, for that impossible feat it’s not a 0/10

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Ooh, this one's going to be controversial. After however many years since the Darkseid War where they ignited this plot point, Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok revisit the Three Jokers to unravel the mystery. Or do they? Yeah, they do. But the answers they give aren't going to be for everyone. Personally, I think that what Johns and Fabok put together here is about as conclusive as we could have hoped for. When something as big as Three Jokers goes on for as long as it has, whatever we got wasn't goin Ooh, this one's going to be controversial. After however many years since the Darkseid War where they ignited this plot point, Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok revisit the Three Jokers to unravel the mystery. Or do they? Yeah, they do. But the answers they give aren't going to be for everyone. Personally, I think that what Johns and Fabok put together here is about as conclusive as we could have hoped for. When something as big as Three Jokers goes on for as long as it has, whatever we got wasn't going to be as satisfying as what we've come up with in our heads. No spoilers, but most of the plot points land fairly well for me. There's some nice action, and the choice to involve Batgirl and Red Hood in the story helps give us some alternative viewpoints as well as ensuring that they have to face their traumas head on. There's a bit of a misstep involving two of the characters which seems to come out of left field, but it's easy to explain away, so I won't kick up too much of a fuss. And if nothing else, the book looks gorgeous. Fabok's artwork is always top notch, and coupling him with Geoff's almost patented 9 panel grid arrangement means we get so much more of it as well. The way he differentiates between the Three Jokers is subtle, and there are lots of little Easter eggs to be found as well. Three Jokers falls into the same camp as Heroes In Crisis - if you get on board with what it's trying to do, you'll probably enjoy it a lot more. It's not going to be for everyone, the ultimate Your Mileage May Vary book, but...I enjoyed it. And these reviews are personal, so what else am I supposed to say?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    One Joker story is great, now we get three? Give it to me!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Terrence Castonguay

    If you are a fan of Batman The Killing Joke then you will certainly be a fan of this book plus it's a great companion piece to the Killing Joke and the art is crisp the wait was definitely worth it. If you are a fan of Batman The Killing Joke then you will certainly be a fan of this book plus it's a great companion piece to the Killing Joke and the art is crisp the wait was definitely worth it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alek Hill

    What I loved. The artwork by Jason Fabok, the progression of Jason Todd's character, and the Joe Chill ending. Fabok's art makes me love comics as a medium and I loved the redesign of Red Hood. I liked what Geoff Johns did with Jason Todd and how he analyzed his relationships with Bruce and the Joker. To me it was the most meaningful stuff I've seen done with the character in a long time. The ending with Joe Chill was very significant to the Batman mythos. And I really like how DC seems to be ma What I loved. The artwork by Jason Fabok, the progression of Jason Todd's character, and the Joe Chill ending. Fabok's art makes me love comics as a medium and I loved the redesign of Red Hood. I liked what Geoff Johns did with Jason Todd and how he analyzed his relationships with Bruce and the Joker. To me it was the most meaningful stuff I've seen done with the character in a long time. The ending with Joe Chill was very significant to the Batman mythos. And I really like how DC seems to be making Bruce a healthier person. No more toxic masculinity presented as being "The Batman". What I dislike. I feel that Three Jokers has the same problem that Doomsday Clock did. And that's that Geoff Johns doesn't reference any of his New 52 Justice League stuff that set this up. He doesn't really explain why all of the sudden Bat's is looking for three Jokers or even why/how long there have been three jokers. And as someone who has been anticipating this since the end of Darkseid War, I really disliked that this story was just happening without any real explanation. It felt like it was going to have a bigger meaning than what it ended up being. Spoilers vvvvvv So eye witnesses see Joker committing 3 different crimes at the same time. Sparking the question of there possibly being 3 Jokers. So you got the Criminal: supposedly the original and older Joker that was essentially an anti-mob boss. Then you got the Clown: the Joker that killed Jason and who was the goofy sadist. And finally there's the Comedian: the one that paralyzed Barbara and who's the real Joker? This one seemed to be more in line with the current Joker characterization of crazy and obbsesed with Bruce. Criminal has apparently been making new Jokers to improve upon what Joker is to better suit Batman. Which I guess worked. Clown killed Jason and Comedian shot Barbara. But like why?... The story progresses to have us think Jason will be this "New Joker", before moving away from that red herring to get to Joe Chill. Here the ending comes. With the reveal of the Comedian being the most significant Joker and that he set all this up so that he could heal Batman and replace Joe Chill as the most hated person in Bat's life. I'm not sure how to take the final reveal that Batman knows who Joker really is and has hidden his family in Alaska. I mean it has a nice parallel that they both know who each other are, yet that's not important to their dynamic. But it does throw a continuity wrench into a lot of Joker stories like "The Killing Joke" or "Zero Year". But then again "Zero Year" had already done that to "The Killing Joke" so in a way it might have provided a bridge for the two stories?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alyssah Roxas

    As a fan of the Joker, this graphic novel was something that I have been anticipating. My friend Jaime was the one to tell me about this graphic novel and I'm so happy that I was able to pre-order this graphic novel and finish it in three days. The story line in this graphic novel was something that I did not expect. The craziness, the explanation, the darkness, and somewhat of a surprise was something that I was not expecting. But it is the Joker, expect the unexpected. I love details and how e As a fan of the Joker, this graphic novel was something that I have been anticipating. My friend Jaime was the one to tell me about this graphic novel and I'm so happy that I was able to pre-order this graphic novel and finish it in three days. The story line in this graphic novel was something that I did not expect. The craziness, the explanation, the darkness, and somewhat of a surprise was something that I was not expecting. But it is the Joker, expect the unexpected. I love details and how each Joker was describe in this story. The different scenarios and I can't wait to hopefully have a continuation in this story line. But then again, when it comes to Joker, you can never know if they will continue the story line or not.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rajiv

    Great concept and very good execution. The first book was absolutely brilliant with its three Jokers - criminal, comedian, clown. The second dragged a bit with a slow story that seemed to not know where it's going. But then I read the final book and it all clicked. It's the most "Batman" ending I've ever seen, which isn't a bad thing. I loved the rationale of the "Joker" we see near the end, and the way they wrap up Joe Chill's arc was deftly handled. Great concept and very good execution. The first book was absolutely brilliant with its three Jokers - criminal, comedian, clown. The second dragged a bit with a slow story that seemed to not know where it's going. But then I read the final book and it all clicked. It's the most "Batman" ending I've ever seen, which isn't a bad thing. I loved the rationale of the "Joker" we see near the end, and the way they wrap up Joe Chill's arc was deftly handled.

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