counter create hit Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World

Availability: Ready to download

The story of freedom pivots on the choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves, their loved ones, and their futures. The story of freedom and all of its ambiguities begins with intimate acts steeped in power. It is shaped by the peculiar oppressions faced by African women and women of African descent. And it pivots on the self-conscious choices b The story of freedom pivots on the choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves, their loved ones, and their futures. The story of freedom and all of its ambiguities begins with intimate acts steeped in power. It is shaped by the peculiar oppressions faced by African women and women of African descent. And it pivots on the self-conscious choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves, their loved ones, and their futures. Slavery's rise in the Americas was institutional, carnal, and reproductive. The intimacy of bondage whet the appetites of slaveowners, traders, and colonial officials with fantasies of domination that trickled into every social relationship--husband and wife, sovereign and subject, master and laborer. Intimacy--corporeal, carnal, quotidian--tied slaves to slaveowners, women of African descent and their children to European and African men. In Wicked Flesh, Jessica Marie Johnson explores the nature of these complicated intimate and kinship ties and how they were used by black women to construct freedom in the Atlantic world. Johnson draws on archival documents scattered in institutions across three continents, written in multiple languages and largely from the perspective of colonial officials and slave-owning men, to recreate black women's experiences from coastal Senegal to French Saint-Domingue to Spanish Cuba to the swampy outposts of the Gulf Coast. Centering New Orleans as the quintessential site for investigating black women's practices of freedom in the Atlantic world, Wicked Flesh argues that African women and women of African descent endowed free status with meaning through active, aggressive, and sometimes unsuccessful intimate and kinship practices. Their stories, in both their successes and their failures, outline a practice of freedom that laid the groundwork for the emancipation struggles of the nineteenth century and reshaped the New World.


Compare

The story of freedom pivots on the choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves, their loved ones, and their futures. The story of freedom and all of its ambiguities begins with intimate acts steeped in power. It is shaped by the peculiar oppressions faced by African women and women of African descent. And it pivots on the self-conscious choices b The story of freedom pivots on the choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves, their loved ones, and their futures. The story of freedom and all of its ambiguities begins with intimate acts steeped in power. It is shaped by the peculiar oppressions faced by African women and women of African descent. And it pivots on the self-conscious choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves, their loved ones, and their futures. Slavery's rise in the Americas was institutional, carnal, and reproductive. The intimacy of bondage whet the appetites of slaveowners, traders, and colonial officials with fantasies of domination that trickled into every social relationship--husband and wife, sovereign and subject, master and laborer. Intimacy--corporeal, carnal, quotidian--tied slaves to slaveowners, women of African descent and their children to European and African men. In Wicked Flesh, Jessica Marie Johnson explores the nature of these complicated intimate and kinship ties and how they were used by black women to construct freedom in the Atlantic world. Johnson draws on archival documents scattered in institutions across three continents, written in multiple languages and largely from the perspective of colonial officials and slave-owning men, to recreate black women's experiences from coastal Senegal to French Saint-Domingue to Spanish Cuba to the swampy outposts of the Gulf Coast. Centering New Orleans as the quintessential site for investigating black women's practices of freedom in the Atlantic world, Wicked Flesh argues that African women and women of African descent endowed free status with meaning through active, aggressive, and sometimes unsuccessful intimate and kinship practices. Their stories, in both their successes and their failures, outline a practice of freedom that laid the groundwork for the emancipation struggles of the nineteenth century and reshaped the New World.

30 review for Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hoffman Brauman

    Johnson draws on records of colonial officials and slave-owning men (primarily) to explore the lives of African women and women of African descent, starting in the 1600's in coastal Senegal, moving through the Caribbean and to New Orleans through the early 1800's. She centers the women in this account and looks at the concept of freedom and the way women, both free and enslaved, leveraged their choices to assert varying levels of control over their own bodies and lives as well as those of their Johnson draws on records of colonial officials and slave-owning men (primarily) to explore the lives of African women and women of African descent, starting in the 1600's in coastal Senegal, moving through the Caribbean and to New Orleans through the early 1800's. She centers the women in this account and looks at the concept of freedom and the way women, both free and enslaved, leveraged their choices to assert varying levels of control over their own bodies and lives as well as those of their children. This is an academic read, well researched and meticulously supported in footnotes and data. I learned an incredible amount from this - there was so much that was completely new to me as well as a great deal that was presented from a different perspective than I had previously seen. One of the aspects that I most appreciated was the way Johnson used individual women's experiences to illustrate her point of view. Hearing about African women and women of African descent owning property and possessing significant economic influence and power in the 1600's, learning about women who sued for their freedom or economic rights, or seeing the way free women leveraged their own opportunities to secure a better economic standing - it was often these individual examples and stories that helped to connect me as a reader to the academic text. "The idea of human freedom rooted in embodied, social, spiritual, and interconnected belief in humanity's possibilities emerges in African women and women of African descent's confrontation with its utter opposite -- racial slavery and imperial violence. As individuals, these women and others existed and evidenced the extraordinary possibilities that surfaced amid overwhelming odds."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    This book's archival research into the lives of black women from the comptoirs of Senegambia to the quartiers of New Orleans was fascinating. Beyond the very important main emphasis on the key role played by women in brokering trade through their centrality in kinship networks, and its moral emphasis on black freedom, I found the arguments to be very vague to the point of nonsensical and often couched in jargon that was insufficiently explained in the context of the book (even if I am generally This book's archival research into the lives of black women from the comptoirs of Senegambia to the quartiers of New Orleans was fascinating. Beyond the very important main emphasis on the key role played by women in brokering trade through their centrality in kinship networks, and its moral emphasis on black freedom, I found the arguments to be very vague to the point of nonsensical and often couched in jargon that was insufficiently explained in the context of the book (even if I am generally familiar with it from other works).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mylynka

    My grad class discussed this book tonight. I highly recommend it. It looks at the transatlantic enslavement of African women and how they negotiated their spaces and freedoms (such as they were/weren't), especially in New Orleans under the French, Spanish, then the United States. It is a tough, but good, read and very interdisciplinary, too. My grad class discussed this book tonight. I highly recommend it. It looks at the transatlantic enslavement of African women and how they negotiated their spaces and freedoms (such as they were/weren't), especially in New Orleans under the French, Spanish, then the United States. It is a tough, but good, read and very interdisciplinary, too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Good read leading people through complicated history highlighting the ways African women and women of African descent navigated multiple worlds featuring competing empires, and claims on their bodies from their husbands to corporations and nations that endeavored to commodify them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sally Kenney

    I learned so much about the history of slavery, West Africa, New Orleans, and the Caribbean. Johnson's focus on women and women's agency and strategies for survival and freedom is powerful and persuasive, if deeply disturbing. She does a fabulous job of reading the silences of the archives. I learned so much about the history of slavery, West Africa, New Orleans, and the Caribbean. Johnson's focus on women and women's agency and strategies for survival and freedom is powerful and persuasive, if deeply disturbing. She does a fabulous job of reading the silences of the archives.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kris

  7. 4 out of 5

    Minosh

  8. 5 out of 5

    MaryAnn Baker

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle J

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kiki

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julian Pritchard

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dubie Toa-kwapong

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Alexander

  19. 4 out of 5

    Philana A J

  20. 4 out of 5

    Todd

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thalia

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Cavar

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erika Hardison

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Ward

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roz

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Casey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

  30. 4 out of 5

    J. Eik Diggs

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.