counter create hit Not Even Past: The Stories We Keep Telling about the Civil War - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Not Even Past: The Stories We Keep Telling about the Civil War

Availability: Ready to download

The American Civil War lives on in our collective imagination like few other events. The story of the war has been retold in countless films, novels, poems, memoirs, plays, sculptures, and monuments. Often remembered as an emancipatory struggle, as an attempt to destroy slavery in America now and forever, it is also memorialized as a fight for Southern independence; as a f The American Civil War lives on in our collective imagination like few other events. The story of the war has been retold in countless films, novels, poems, memoirs, plays, sculptures, and monuments. Often remembered as an emancipatory struggle, as an attempt to destroy slavery in America now and forever, it is also memorialized as a fight for Southern independence; as a fratricide that divided the national family; and as a dark, cruel conflict defined by its brutality. What do these stories, myths, and rumors have in common, and what do they teach us about modern America? In this fascinating book, Cody Marrs reveals how these narratives evolved over time and why they acquired such lasting power. Marrs addresses an eclectic range of texts, traditions, and creators, from Walt Whitman, Abram Ryan, and Abraham Lincoln to Margaret Mitchell, D. W. Griffith, and W. E. B. Du Bois. He also identifies several basic plots about the Civil War that anchor public memory and continually compete for cultural primacy. In other words, from the perspective of American cultural memory, there is no single Civil War. Whether they fill us with elation or terror; whether they side with the North or the South; whether they come from the 1860s, the 1960s, or today, these stories all make one thing vividly clear: the Civil War is an ongoing conflict, persisting not merely as a cultural touchstone but as an unresolved struggle through which Americans inevitably define themselves. A timely, evocative, and beautifully written book, Not Even Past is essential reading for anyone interested in the Civil War and its role in American history.


Compare

The American Civil War lives on in our collective imagination like few other events. The story of the war has been retold in countless films, novels, poems, memoirs, plays, sculptures, and monuments. Often remembered as an emancipatory struggle, as an attempt to destroy slavery in America now and forever, it is also memorialized as a fight for Southern independence; as a f The American Civil War lives on in our collective imagination like few other events. The story of the war has been retold in countless films, novels, poems, memoirs, plays, sculptures, and monuments. Often remembered as an emancipatory struggle, as an attempt to destroy slavery in America now and forever, it is also memorialized as a fight for Southern independence; as a fratricide that divided the national family; and as a dark, cruel conflict defined by its brutality. What do these stories, myths, and rumors have in common, and what do they teach us about modern America? In this fascinating book, Cody Marrs reveals how these narratives evolved over time and why they acquired such lasting power. Marrs addresses an eclectic range of texts, traditions, and creators, from Walt Whitman, Abram Ryan, and Abraham Lincoln to Margaret Mitchell, D. W. Griffith, and W. E. B. Du Bois. He also identifies several basic plots about the Civil War that anchor public memory and continually compete for cultural primacy. In other words, from the perspective of American cultural memory, there is no single Civil War. Whether they fill us with elation or terror; whether they side with the North or the South; whether they come from the 1860s, the 1960s, or today, these stories all make one thing vividly clear: the Civil War is an ongoing conflict, persisting not merely as a cultural touchstone but as an unresolved struggle through which Americans inevitably define themselves. A timely, evocative, and beautifully written book, Not Even Past is essential reading for anyone interested in the Civil War and its role in American history.

34 review for Not Even Past: The Stories We Keep Telling about the Civil War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tim Williams

    Another book on my sabbatical scholarly reading list for my new project. This monograph makes as strong a case for the Civil War’s impact on American arts and letters as any work of literary studies I have read recently. This achievement stems not only from penetrating textual analysis and lucid (and often moving) prose but also from its politics. Marrs challenges us to think deeply about what a true reckoning with our racial past involves: new stories, new monuments, new policy, and new freedom Another book on my sabbatical scholarly reading list for my new project. This monograph makes as strong a case for the Civil War’s impact on American arts and letters as any work of literary studies I have read recently. This achievement stems not only from penetrating textual analysis and lucid (and often moving) prose but also from its politics. Marrs challenges us to think deeply about what a true reckoning with our racial past involves: new stories, new monuments, new policy, and new freedom fighters. His exegesis of twenty-first-century Black voices, continuing the tradition of Douglass, DuBois, King, and others, is particularly noteworthy. A quick yet important read, which is accessible to general and scholarly readers alike.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    The day after rioters attacked the Capital, I taught Lincoln's First Inaugural Address and Stephen's Cornerstone Speech. To say it was surreal would be an understatement. I started reading this book last week and it has helped me begin to organize some of my thinking about the state of the country. It is one that, although written for academics interested in literary criticism, would be beneficial to any to read. The day after rioters attacked the Capital, I taught Lincoln's First Inaugural Address and Stephen's Cornerstone Speech. To say it was surreal would be an understatement. I started reading this book last week and it has helped me begin to organize some of my thinking about the state of the country. It is one that, although written for academics interested in literary criticism, would be beneficial to any to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

    Phenomenal--Marrs classifies Civil War narratives, both fiction and nonfiction, across four different traditions that call attention to ideologies that continue to linger in the United States long after the 19th Century. This is as much a book about historiography as it is about our present sociopolitical landscape.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  5. 5 out of 5

    Debra

  6. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  9. 5 out of 5

    YoBunnyBunny

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pete

  11. 4 out of 5

    Vince

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sue Ann

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joe Lucibello

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

  16. 5 out of 5

    Neverdust

  17. 5 out of 5

    April

  18. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen Stiles

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rilley McKenna

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kat Cui

  22. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Mustread

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karla

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aprovertte

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen Lempert

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nevona Friedman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cindi Stewart

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

  30. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kalisha Holmes

  32. 4 out of 5

    J.

  33. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

  34. 5 out of 5

    Iona

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.