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From the author of the New York Times bestseller Wilder Girls comes a new twisty thriller about a girl whose past has always been a mystery—until she decides to return to her mother’s hometown . . . where history has a tendency to repeat itself. Ever since Margot was born, it’s been just her and her mother. No answers to Margot’s questions about what came before. No history From the author of the New York Times bestseller Wilder Girls comes a new twisty thriller about a girl whose past has always been a mystery—until she decides to return to her mother’s hometown . . . where history has a tendency to repeat itself. Ever since Margot was born, it’s been just her and her mother. No answers to Margot’s questions about what came before. No history to hold on to. No relative to speak of. Just the two of them, stuck in their run-down apartment, struggling to get along. But that’s not enough for Margot. She wants family. She wants a past. And she just found the key she needs to get it: A photograph, pointing her to a town called Phalene. Pointing her home. Only, when Margot gets there, it’s not what she bargained for. Margot’s mother left for a reason. But was it to hide her past? Or was it to protect Margot from what’s still there? The only thing Margot knows for sure is there’s poison in their family tree, and their roots are dug so deeply into Phalene that now that she’s there, she might never escape.


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From the author of the New York Times bestseller Wilder Girls comes a new twisty thriller about a girl whose past has always been a mystery—until she decides to return to her mother’s hometown . . . where history has a tendency to repeat itself. Ever since Margot was born, it’s been just her and her mother. No answers to Margot’s questions about what came before. No history From the author of the New York Times bestseller Wilder Girls comes a new twisty thriller about a girl whose past has always been a mystery—until she decides to return to her mother’s hometown . . . where history has a tendency to repeat itself. Ever since Margot was born, it’s been just her and her mother. No answers to Margot’s questions about what came before. No history to hold on to. No relative to speak of. Just the two of them, stuck in their run-down apartment, struggling to get along. But that’s not enough for Margot. She wants family. She wants a past. And she just found the key she needs to get it: A photograph, pointing her to a town called Phalene. Pointing her home. Only, when Margot gets there, it’s not what she bargained for. Margot’s mother left for a reason. But was it to hide her past? Or was it to protect Margot from what’s still there? The only thing Margot knows for sure is there’s poison in their family tree, and their roots are dug so deeply into Phalene that now that she’s there, she might never escape.

30 review for Burn Our Bodies Down

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Check out my instagram to see my dance moves with this book! 💃🏻📚😂 I’m seeing the stars! THIS IS…. THIS BOOK… THIS STORY… THI…TH…T… I lost the words! Please somebody tell me my lines! Oh boy, weklcjoj4ffejewoi! Oh no, I lost my cognitive skills! I lost my brain! I lost my mind! I lost my mouth! Oh no, how can drink wine without my mouth? Who is talking now? Did I become a ventriloquist? WHAT THE HELL I JUST READ!!! I carry three heads right now! I hold something in my hands: a secret recipe of the Check out my instagram to see my dance moves with this book! 💃🏻📚😂 I’m seeing the stars! THIS IS…. THIS BOOK… THIS STORY… THI…TH…T… I lost the words! Please somebody tell me my lines! Oh boy, weklcjoj4ffejewoi! Oh no, I lost my cognitive skills! I lost my brain! I lost my mind! I lost my mouth! Oh no, how can drink wine without my mouth? Who is talking now? Did I become a ventriloquist? WHAT THE HELL I JUST READ!!! I carry three heads right now! I hold something in my hands: a secret recipe of the best mind bending novel I’ve read lately. Here is the formula: We have a table spoon “Children of Corn” and stir it with two cups of “Sharp Objects” and add some Stephen King and Paul Tremblay’s eerie, spooky, earth shattering, mind crushing thriller elements, mix it with literature’s most batshit crazy mother-daughter dysfunctional relationships starting from Carrie White and Margaret White to Beloved’s Sethe and her spirit daughter. And then cook it over a fire! And let’s sing the DISCO INFERNO’S “Burn baby burn” chorus, then continue with “come on baby light my fire”! But be careful not to be burned! And let’s talk about this unconventional, complex, mind spinning plot: Margot is her last days of 18 and she has a dysfunctional, unhealthy, weird, dependent, a kind of obsessed and sick relationship with her mother. I’m not sure if Margot is the real mother and her mother Jo already lost her marbles from the beginning, having no idea how to raise a kid. Margot feels trapped and save herself from their party of two lives and bring more family members into the equation. But her mother rejects to give her any information about their family history. And one day Margot accidentally finds out she has a grandmother who lives at the weirdest town that the world already forgot it existed, named Phalene. She thinks she found her missing piece, a real opportunity to have a big family including lots of stupid cousins, gossiping aunts, wanker uncles, okay I’m kidding, of course she wants to be a part of real family and make changes with her life so she questions her mother to learn more but she still keeps her mother shut. Margot finally decides she’ll learn everything from her own way! And as soon as she takes her first step to the eerie, ominous town waiting in silence the storm’s coming (or let’s say the big fire’s approaching!) she meets with Tess and Eli and finds out her grandmother’s land on fire. When she reaches her house, she sees a girl lying motionless. As soon as she saves her from fire, she realizes the girl looks just like her and she is dead! And the officers catch her besides the girl think she is responsible from the fire and the girl’s dead. But don’t worry! Grandmother the dearest comes to the station and berates the officers for frightening her granddaughter the sweetest. So Margot goes to the house of grandmother the sneakiest and she finally finds out she already opened dozen cans of worms! She slowly absorbs the secret structure of their family history. And I stop here… because after Margot’s arrival at grandmother’s house, this book turns into something breathtaking, astonishing, grey cell terminator, shocking, twisty, surprising, explicit but also dark, wild, terrifying. I kept mumbling to myself : ‘WTF! WTF! WTF! WTF! WTF! WTF! WTF! WTF! WTF! WTF!” and my husband found me at the living room, sitting on the floor, numb, saliva dripping down my mouth, pale, eyes widened as if I’d seen first 27 minutes of “Saving Private Ryan” over and over again! THIS IS SOOOO CRAZY, NASTY, MIND SPINNING EXPERIENCE and I liked every word, sentence, page, ink of it! I enjoyed the “Wilder Girls” but for the love of mind-bending books, this is so unexpectedly splendid masterpiece and I highly recommend the readers who like something extra ordinary, different, out of your comfort zone! Rory Power rises and shines with this fast pacing, surprising novel! Special thanks to NetGalley and Delacorte Press for sharing this incredible ARC COPY with me in exchange my honest review. I LOVED IT SO MUCH! blog instagram facebook twitter

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    "It's not love, to give your wounds to someone else." Rory Power is carving out that space for gritty, haunting, and disturbing, sapphic YA and I love to see it. I can't tell you what expectations I had for this book but they were met. This cover exudes brittle, burning heat amongst other, darker feelings and I must say that not many covers hit the nail on its head like that. I still can't say that I love the cover - it looks muted and flat? - but it's genius in its own way. I'm not going to say mu "It's not love, to give your wounds to someone else." Rory Power is carving out that space for gritty, haunting, and disturbing, sapphic YA and I love to see it. I can't tell you what expectations I had for this book but they were met. This cover exudes brittle, burning heat amongst other, darker feelings and I must say that not many covers hit the nail on its head like that. I still can't say that I love the cover - it looks muted and flat? - but it's genius in its own way. I'm not going to say much about the plot because I would immediately give away far too much and you best go into this book without knowing much about it. It's a family thriller/mystery with a twist. Let that be all you know. Now I loved this book because I loved This Darkness Mine and Dig. and it felt like a weird combination of the two. (By the way, if you loved any of these three books, I recommend you read the others as well.) The most important aspect of successful storytelling are the characters at its heart. At least, that's true for me. I need complex, flawed, interesting characters rather than shallow figures that have as much depth as the next puddle on your sidewalk. And all Rory's characters are super intriguing, their relationships frayed, often toxic, and very well written. Here's one of my favourite lines from the novel: But she's shaking her heard. "You can't tell me what I meant." I struggle to take a deep breath. "But it sounded that way to me. Doesn't that matter? Doesn't it matter how you made me feel?" You see, good intentions are useless when the effect of your words or actions cause pain. Taken out of context, this can be widely applied, especially to conversations about white privilege and racism. Just a sidetone. There's something about Rory's writing that I can't quite put my finger on. Something that causes an emotional disconnect and therefore fails to captivate me wholly. While I live for the horror and gore, and while I generally enjoy the prose, the words blur together and I often find myself skimming a few sentences before I can stop myself. I also found the ending ever so slightly anticlimactic. There were a few chapters when Rory had me glued to the pages and then, rather than ending with a bang, it was more of a rattle. Still, it's a deeply fascinating novel, one that I believe would make a perfectly disturbing and moody film. I need it. Find more of my books on Instagram

  3. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    THIS WAS SO WEIRD AND CREEPY AND AMAZING

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    "If it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt." -Matthew 26:39 WOOF. Gather round, children, and listen to the tale of how my most highly anticipated YA release of 2020 ended up being a flippity flop of epic proportions. (Obviously this is a biased opinion, and one woman's trash is another's treasure, so please check out all the positive reviews as mine remains clearly in the minority thus far.) I've been sitting here for two days trying to organize m "If it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt." -Matthew 26:39 WOOF. Gather round, children, and listen to the tale of how my most highly anticipated YA release of 2020 ended up being a flippity flop of epic proportions. (Obviously this is a biased opinion, and one woman's trash is another's treasure, so please check out all the positive reviews as mine remains clearly in the minority thus far.) I've been sitting here for two days trying to organize my thoughts into a somewhat coherent review, and I'm left with a similar, albeit slightly worse feeling as I had upon finishing Wilder Girls last year. Whenever I read books that feature anything along the lines of fantasy, dystopian, or even historical, I'm of the camp that craves detailed atmosphere and character building; the more the better! And while Power is a phenomenal powerhouse of creating elaborate, intriguing ideas and beautifully oppressive atmosphere, I'm not sure the characterization and pacing are up to snuff here. "Look at you," Gram whispers. She bends down, kisses the back of my head, and she's holding my shoulders so tight that I can feel bruises setting deep under my skin. I don't mind. It's about time love left a mark on me." In the same vein as the author's debut, Burn Our Bodies Down is horror set in a world similar to our own, but gone bad. Margot has lived on her own with her mom for as long as she can remember, and is forbidden to ask questions about her extended family and where they come from. After she finds a clue leading her to her remaining family, Margot runs away to meet her Gram at the Nielsen farm and hopes to find answers to her many questions surrounding her origins. Shortly after arriving in town, there's an incident that introduces disturbing questions that need answering, and the remaining 70% of the book is us following alongside, curious as to what's wrong with this place. I won't beat around the bush; the only reason I pressed through this book was to find out if my guess, around the 30% mark, of what was going on was correct. Spoiler alert: it was. This could be chalked up to reading more than my fair share of mysteries, but I felt the clue given after the first major event happens only left a small pool of options, especially knowing that this would fall into the supernatural realm and that we would be thrown a red herring or two before the ending. My main concern is that, while there are ample descriptions of this dry and crumbling small town (which I loved), the dialogue is stilted and many characters and plot threads are introduced that either have little to no bearing on the story, or just provide filling repetition. We are briefly told near the beginning of the story that the MC is either a lesbian or bisexual, but then this narrative is all but dropped for the remainder of the story, other than occasionally alluding to some tension between Tess and Margot. Eli is introduced as a staple in Tess's household, and we are constantly lead to wonder whether him and Tess have a relationship beyond friendship, but again this is never really addressed. The final 80% truly picked up in pacing, and I loved how this played out, but it felt as though all the gore and shock value was spared until this moment, which gave the book as a whole a very "safe" feeling. I think maybe if a less distracted focus had been set on a few elements of the story, and if I had been able to form any sort of connections to the characters rather than reading about them at surface level, this would have been a 4-5 star experience. This is likely where I part ways with Ms. Power, but I sincerely wish her all the best, and I highly recommend you check this one out for yourself and form your own thoughts about this thought provoking read. *Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy. *Content Warning: (view spoiler)[Murder and gore (some of this is graphic and descriptive near the end, gaslighting, shoplifting, use of an illegal substance (pertains to the overall plot), arson, suicide. (hide spoiler)]

  5. 4 out of 5

    daph_pink

    3.25 It's been 4 hours since I completed the book and I am still lying on the floor and my mind is racing , it's endlessly racing in spirals and flames! 1. Did I liked the book? no, well idk it was stupid at times but honestly idk. 2. Was it weird? The weirdest y/a mystery I have ever read , it was not only weird but at times stupid too with its lame plot points and illogical conversations and turns. 3. How about the characters? I think they were MEDICORE I didn't connected with them but I think w 3.25 It's been 4 hours since I completed the book and I am still lying on the floor and my mind is racing , it's endlessly racing in spirals and flames! 1. Did I liked the book? no, well idk it was stupid at times but honestly idk. 2. Was it weird? The weirdest y/a mystery I have ever read , it was not only weird but at times stupid too with its lame plot points and illogical conversations and turns. 3. How about the characters? I think they were MEDICORE I didn't connected with them but I think what they did was at times acceptable ! 4. Why I continued reading it? To test how smart I am ! Well after like half of the book was done I was pretty sure if most of the twists and turns but I wanted to continue reading it to know whether I am correct or not ! Guess what I was! And honesty it wasn't that tough ! And for the biggest twist remember think of the wildest guess or if you can remember high school biology the answer is there !(view spoiler)[ ( *Cough* parthenocarpy/asexual reproduction/gene duplication) (hide spoiler)] 5. How about other things like plot,writing? Plot:- ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Writing :- ⭐⭐ Characters :- ⭐⭐⭐ Average :- ⭐⭐⭐ 6. Did I enjoyed it? Yes because it was weird and I am weird and I like weird things, no matter it's supernatural or dark or whatever. 7. Any message for author? She is insanely genius! Nobody in right mind can think that! And I am ready to read kinder girls coz I have already fallen in love with the cover! 8. Would I recommended it? Not everything makes sense sometimes but if you enjoyed it you should recommend it! I enjoyed this book and I will recommend it ! I am going back to lying on floor and thinking how insane that shit was that happened in this book! Why ?? Coz it's 2020 and nothing makes sense to me now!

  6. 4 out of 5

    ELLIAS (elliasreads)

    MEH. This book didn’t make any fucking sense. I feel so stupid after reading this. More like a 2.5 STARS.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Irena BookDustMagic

    I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this book. Burn our bodies down is a masterpiece!! It reminded me of Children of the Corn (Movie series) so much with the very similar atmosphere and small town vibe (and corn), but the story was very different and oh my God, it was soooo good. I have to admit that it wasn't the love at first sight. The writing style was great, and it kept me reading and reading (plus I loved Power's debut Wilder Girls), but Margot was not the character I would root for, and her reading about h I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this book. Burn our bodies down is a masterpiece!! It reminded me of Children of the Corn (Movie series) so much with the very similar atmosphere and small town vibe (and corn), but the story was very different and oh my God, it was soooo good. I have to admit that it wasn't the love at first sight. The writing style was great, and it kept me reading and reading (plus I loved Power's debut Wilder Girls), but Margot was not the character I would root for, and her reading about her relationship with her mother was bitter for me, because of my own relationship with my own mother. In this period of my life, when I really don't have time to read, I managed to finish Burn our Bodies Down in four days. It was just too interesting and I cleared my schedule of everything just so I could read. My favourite part of the story was the atmosphere and horror elements, and as I already said in my review for Wilder Girls, I want to read everything Rory Power writes. I highly, highly recommend Burn our Bodies Down!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tucker (TuckerTheReader)

    [11/13/2019] - this cover is pretty but it doesn't even come close to Wilder Girls' cover ----------- i'd like to see them try to make a prettier cover than Wilder Girls | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram [11/13/2019] - this cover is pretty but it doesn't even come close to Wilder Girls' cover ----------- i'd like to see them try to make a prettier cover than Wilder Girls | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelli Wilson

    One might say: There are different levels of different. Read this book and you might say: Out of the box that is within a circle. Just let that sync in. Go ahead, take a minute. Read it again. Out of the box that is within a circle. Now follow the number trail down. You will get it at the end. 5 4 3 2 1 And Snap! Now you have all the answers! It all makes sense, right? WRONG!! I can come up with a fancy looking phrase and dress up the experience, but if it is gibberish, it is still just gibberish no matter One might say: There are different levels of different. Read this book and you might say: Out of the box that is within a circle. Just let that sync in. Go ahead, take a minute. Read it again. Out of the box that is within a circle. Now follow the number trail down. You will get it at the end. 5 4 3 2 1 And Snap! Now you have all the answers! It all makes sense, right? WRONG!! I can come up with a fancy looking phrase and dress up the experience, but if it is gibberish, it is still just gibberish no matter how pretty you make it look!! "Out of the box that is within a circle". That makes about as much sense as this book did in the end. It has always been just Margot and her mother. Her mother is somewhat emotionally abusive and extremely manipulative. She has always refused to share any information about her past, where she is from, including her own mother, Margot’s grandmother, who is still alive. Margot desperately wants to learn more about her family’s origins and her mother’s past. One day, she decides to visit her grandmother. While staying with her, Margot notices it is certainly a different world where her mother grew up and she understands some of the reasons as to why her mother is the way she is. Additionally, there is a mysterious death that hangs over her visit as well. Her arrival in her grandmother's town was met with an immediate disaster. A huge fire in her grandmother’s corn fields. Margot runs into the fire because she sees someone. They pull her out of the fire, only to discover she is already dead, but most disturbingly she looks identical to Margot’s mother. This woman is not her mother so who is she? What was she doing in the field? How did she die and where did she come from? What is going on?? This book had very pretty writing that I enjoyed reading and the initial plot had me intrigued. This is where my "likes" list ends. It becomes a long drawn out story that gets deeper in baby steps and weirder in adult steps. This alone made my interest wan. In addition, there was so many little strings of plot pulled in tiny directions that do not end up materializing into significant pieces to the final plot, therefore they mostly leave you stretched and uncompelled. I was brain half in half out by the time of the big reveal. So yes, it is certainly a bizarre and unexpected twist! Some readers think it is awesome. Unfortunately, I was ready for it to be over and even that crazy ending wasn't going to save the 90% that was way too long and overly disjointed. Ultimately, it felt like an attempt to salvage the book with a rare and outré ending. Yes, I just used the word "outré" and yes, I get 100 points for that! *Thank you to Random House Children's via NetGalley for providing me with the digital review copy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    Update: Why haven't I read this yet? For real. Earlier: An ARC!!!! Delacorte Press, I love you beyond measure. Thank you so much!!!! Original: Is it too early to be freaking the f* out over this? Old farmhouse, corn fields, creepiness...say no more! Update: Why haven't I read this yet? For real. Earlier: An ARC!!!! Delacorte Press, I love you beyond measure. Thank you so much!!!! Original: Is it too early to be freaking the f* out over this? Old farmhouse, corn fields, creepiness...say no more!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    I went into this one with pretty low expectations because Wilder Girls didn't really work for me, but somehow I still came out of it feeling disappointed. This had all the makings of a book I should love: queer characters, rural small-towns, strained mother/daughter relationships, but something about this really just didn't click for me. I feel like I never really got to know the main character, which kept me from bonding to her or the story or honestly caring about anything that happened. I I went into this one with pretty low expectations because Wilder Girls didn't really work for me, but somehow I still came out of it feeling disappointed. This had all the makings of a book I should love: queer characters, rural small-towns, strained mother/daughter relationships, but something about this really just didn't click for me. I feel like I never really got to know the main character, which kept me from bonding to her or the story or honestly caring about anything that happened. I will say, while the story as a whole didn't super work for me, I did listen to this one as an audiobook and I honestly found the narrator's delivery to be the best part of my reading experience. I would say that if you DO want to read the one, the audiobook would be the way to go. Overall, I found this one to be pretty meh and I don't think I'll be reading more from Rory Power in the future. Womp :c

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy Imogene Reads

    Fires, secrets, mothers and daughters and daughters and mothers, the ties that bind and the ties that break, and sinister overtones come out to play in Rory Power's tour de force sophomore novel. Writing: ★★★★★ Plot: ★★★★★ Pacing: ★★★★★ Atmosphere: ★★★★★ Margot and her mother could be sisters, they look so much alike. Margot doesn't see this as a compliment. Her relationship with her mother, Jo, is anything but sister-like—it is one of flight, fight, and fear. Margot's mother has been running from s Fires, secrets, mothers and daughters and daughters and mothers, the ties that bind and the ties that break, and sinister overtones come out to play in Rory Power's tour de force sophomore novel. Writing: ★★★★★ Plot: ★★★★★ Pacing: ★★★★★ Atmosphere: ★★★★★ Margot and her mother could be sisters, they look so much alike. Margot doesn't see this as a compliment. Her relationship with her mother, Jo, is anything but sister-like—it is one of flight, fight, and fear. Margot's mother has been running from something all of Margot's life. Margot is done with it. Now 17, she's decided it's time to find the family that her mother abandoned, with the hope that anyone—anyone—will accept and love her better than her own manipulative mother. When Margot finds the phone number in her mother's things, she doesn't hesitate. She gives it a ring. Phalene is the type of Nebraskan small town in the middle of its decline. Once a booming farming community, there's almost nothing left. Margot's family, the Nielsens, used to be the source of the town's success. Now it's just Gram, and her weird golden corn that looks dead yet grows, and the secrets that the Nielsen farm keeps to itself. Margot doesn't mind. Her mother has made her used to so many weird things. In her desperation for acceptance, Margot accepts everything about her Gram and slots herself into the Nielsen farm. But Gram's not exactly normal, and Margot found a dead body of a girl who looks just like her on her first day in town. The town thinks Gram's hiding something, and Margot agrees. Did she jump from the frying pan into the fire? There might be a reason her mother was so afraid after all... My thoughts: This is a novel that will attract a certain type of reader, but keep only a few as it's not exactly what it appears to be. I think Rory Power might just be that type of author—which works for me, because I'm now 2/2 with her books. I've loved them both. The story delivers on its advertising: this novel is SPOOKY, and the atmosphere was so taut throughout that I got a kink in my neck from holding myself so tense. If you like creeping suspense and lingering horror, this is the novel for you. There are no jump scares, no dramatic whodunits, but the lingering horror...is intense. However, the main core of this story is not its plot, its genre, or even its character composition. It's in the character relationships. I make that nuance here because Margot, Jo, and Gram are not the most fleshed out characters. But their relationships with each other ARE, and that's where this novel sings. Mothers and daughters. Manipulation, secrets, and the ties that bind and break. This multi-generational character study of one family's method of parenting is singular in its focus and honestly fascinating in its rot. I would never want these relationships in my life—talk about unhealthy—but in their black and white reality it was easy to see the bones of fights I've had with my own mother, and vice versa. The growing pains of teenage girls versus their mothers is something most women can relate to, and in a way this is a horror novel about that experience amplified by a ton of speculative elements. Extremely cool, and extremely well done. Thank you to Delacorte Press via NetGalley for an ARC of this title in exchange for an honest review. Blog | Instagram

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nazanin

    3 Stars Margot is a seventeen years old girl who lives with her mother in a small town. They are isolated and she doesn’t know any of her family members, she even doesn’t know about her father. And whenever she asks her mother about them, she shuts her down. So after finding a trace of her grandmother, she decides to take the matter in her own hands and go after her lineage. She runs away from home but after she finds her Grams something feels wrong, but what? Burn Our Bodies Down was my first rea 3 Stars Margot is a seventeen years old girl who lives with her mother in a small town. They are isolated and she doesn’t know any of her family members, she even doesn’t know about her father. And whenever she asks her mother about them, she shuts her down. So after finding a trace of her grandmother, she decides to take the matter in her own hands and go after her lineage. She runs away from home but after she finds her Grams something feels wrong, but what? Burn Our Bodies Down was my first read by this author and it was a disappointment. First, the story dragged at some places. Second, I guessed the main twist. Third, I hate when the mystery is mixed with the supernatural. And that’s what happened here. I wish I knew this sooner because if I knew, I would never read this story. Told in single POV, 1st person, it’s a standalone novel. Overall, this wasn’t my cuppa but I hope you like it more than me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    Well this one definitely threw me for a loop. I‘ll admit I was pretty cocky and thought I knew exactly where this book was headed, but even when I was on the right track, I got the degree very, very wrong. At one point when I was maybe halfway through reading I commented on Chelsea’s status update that I was “waiting for everything to go off the rails”, and through time and space Rory Power HEARD me and decided to grant me that request. Be careful what you wish for, y’all!! The story starts with Well this one definitely threw me for a loop. I‘ll admit I was pretty cocky and thought I knew exactly where this book was headed, but even when I was on the right track, I got the degree very, very wrong. At one point when I was maybe halfway through reading I commented on Chelsea’s status update that I was “waiting for everything to go off the rails”, and through time and space Rory Power HEARD me and decided to grant me that request. Be careful what you wish for, y’all!! The story starts with 17 year-old Margot and her mom, Josephine, barely getting by in their small apartment and meager income. Beyond poverty, there’s a massive amount of simmering tension between the two of them, at near-constant risk of erupting. Eventually this leads to Margot seeking out the family that her mother has always kept hidden from her. I’m always down for a complex family dynamic. I appreciated the relationship between Margot, her mother and grandmother, Vera, and loved dissecting what each microaggression (or full-on aggression) lobbed at one another meant. There were plenty of secrets that we get to uncover along the way, especially since none of the women are particularly forthright. “Does understanding her mean I have to forgive her?” I also adored Power’s writing. She captures these really specific, human moments between her characters just beautifully. My Kindle copy is filled with highlighted passages, and I’m guessing anyone who’s had even a somewhat-toxic relationship with a family member will be struck by her insights. I ended up skipping Wilder Girls last year and clearly that was my mistake. I know people were guuuushing about the cover, but I hope that the book itself ends up being just as engrossing. That said, I still feel like the story was missing something. Parts just felt underdeveloped. Tess was promising, but both her and Eli seemed like they were added as a means to and end. I never quite understood Josephine, and I think some of her ‘quirks’ needed to be explained a little more. It felt a bit rushed, especially by the end, and I wish Power had taken more time to elaborate on this really creative premise. And it felt pretty dark for a YA novel; I get that the heroine is a teenager, but I don’t know if I would market this to teenagers. In all, there was a lot of good stuff to work with, but it still felt unfinished. I am absolutely interested in reading more from her, though, and I can’t wait to see what she puts out next. *Thanks to Random House Children’s & Netgalley for an advance copy!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    Thank you to NetGalley and Random House Children’s Books for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. I was hesitant to request this one, given the mixed reviews of Rory Power’s debut novel, Wilder Girls, which I haven’t read. Now I’m considering giving it a try, because this book? This book is a masterpiece. The older I get, the harder it is for me to find young adult fiction that still appeals to me, and I feel a little giddy every time I get to add a new book to my list of YA Thank you to NetGalley and Random House Children’s Books for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. I was hesitant to request this one, given the mixed reviews of Rory Power’s debut novel, Wilder Girls, which I haven’t read. Now I’m considering giving it a try, because this book? This book is a masterpiece. The older I get, the harder it is for me to find young adult fiction that still appeals to me, and I feel a little giddy every time I get to add a new book to my list of YA favorites. Burn Our Bodies Down comes right out of the gate with a startlingly realistic portrayal of abuse and neglect. Protagonist Margot’s mother is an infuriating character. It wrecked me to witness how Margot’s toxic upbringing impacted every aspect of her life. I especially appreciated how Power explored the way abusers use gaslighting to win arguments and make their victims doubt their own experiences and reality. Power gives us a well-written, relatable protagonist in Margot. She was remarkably sympathetic and refreshingly complicated. Her first person narration had me experiencing the story as she experienced it, feeling her emotions along with her, desperate to find the truth just like she was. Margot is a lesbian, and her sexuality was never the focus of the story, instead just one part of what made her, her. It felt so natural and right. Overall, Burn Our Bodies Down is incredibly well-paced, with short chapters and a great flow. Power uses the small town setting of Phalene and the interactions between her characters to build a growing sense of unease, a feeling you can’t shake but you can’t pin down, that something is off. I kept wanting to shout, “WHAT IS GOING ON?” and I had to keep reading until I found out. And the ending… wow. This book has the potential to appeal to a wide audience, including adults who don’t usually go for YA. I only had one minor complaint. I’ll keep it vague to avoid spoilers, but there’s a part in the story where Margot reads someone’s diary entries, and the writing style of the entries, with no capitalization or punctuation and lots of repetition, was annoying. But there weren’t too many entries and they were mostly very short, so I haven’t let it affect my rating.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rory Power

    content warnings available here: https://itsrorypower.com/books/burn/ always updating - if you find something is missing from this list, please let me know via my website content warnings available here: https://itsrorypower.com/books/burn/ always updating - if you find something is missing from this list, please let me know via my website

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    Yo what the fuck did I just read?? I was provided a finished copy of this book for review by Underlined. All thoughts are my own. Content Warnings: emotional abuse by parental figure, violence, death, gore, teen pregnancy I have never in my entire experience of reading YA read anything like this book. I mean I'm still genuinely attempting to figure out where Rory Power got this whole idea/concept from. I'm going to try to write this review in the most concise manner because I don't want to spoil Yo what the fuck did I just read?? I was provided a finished copy of this book for review by Underlined. All thoughts are my own. Content Warnings: emotional abuse by parental figure, violence, death, gore, teen pregnancy I have never in my entire experience of reading YA read anything like this book. I mean I'm still genuinely attempting to figure out where Rory Power got this whole idea/concept from. I'm going to try to write this review in the most concise manner because I don't want to spoil ANYTHING for anyone. This is one of those books where I think that it's best that you go into it blind. Burn Our Bodies Down is the second book from Rory Power. I had not read her first book Wilder Girls so I was excited to check this one out especially when I heard it was like a mix of horror, mystery, and thriller. It centers around a young girl by the name of Margot who has a very toxic relationship with her mother and knows absolutely nothing about her other family members. She seeks to find solace and an identity through discovering more about her family, but of course when she takes that journey she ends up learning a lot more than she bargained for. While I feel the need to hold off from saying anything regarding the plot of this book I definitely have a lot to say about the writing. I really enjoyed it. Power writes in a way that keeps the plot moving. If you've followed me for anytime on GR then you know that I'm super critical when it comes to pacing because I have a short attention span. By page 85 Power threw in a plot twist that I did not see coming. I just felt engaged the entire time while reading this book and it explains why I finished it over the course of 2 days. Power also has the ability to keep you guessing until the very end. I mean this book is weird. There's no other way to put it and when you get to the end Power will have you questioning everything that you thought you knew and understood about these characters. It was strange, but beautifully done. I also appreciated Power's ability to craft such important discussions into a book that seems to be defined as both a thriller and a horror. Emotional abuse by parental figures is a huge theme in this book. Power seamlessly wove in discussions regarding generational trauma caused by emotional abuse and how it's hard to break that cycle when the affected person doesn't seek the healing and counseling needed to help themselves. I didn't expect that going into the book. I knew that Margot and her mother were going to have a difficult relationship but I didn't expect the commentary. I really enjoyed that aspect of the book and I'm hoping to see more of those important themes and discussions in her other books. My recommendation is that you go into this book blind and that you don't do too much reading about it. It's strange, but stick with it because that ending....it had me blown away.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elle (ellexamines)

    okay but am i the only one who sort of likes this cover

  19. 4 out of 5

    camisrolihlahla

    This was such an interesting read. Burn Our Bodies Down is my first Rory Power and it was really surprising. I don't read as much YA as I used to, but the thought of YA Horror was very appealing to me and that's why I requested the audiobook from NetGalley. This starts with Margot living with her mother, and they have an unstable relationship. When Margot discovers that she has a grandmother, she escapes town and goes to her grandma's farm. Coincidentally, the plantation is burning when Margot g This was such an interesting read. Burn Our Bodies Down is my first Rory Power and it was really surprising. I don't read as much YA as I used to, but the thought of YA Horror was very appealing to me and that's why I requested the audiobook from NetGalley. This starts with Margot living with her mother, and they have an unstable relationship. When Margot discovers that she has a grandmother, she escapes town and goes to her grandma's farm. Coincidentally, the plantation is burning when Margot gets there and she finds a body amongst the flames. The story kicks off from there. I had a bit of a problem with the writing of this book: it is very descriptive in every way, from the scenario to the main character's emotions. But I just wasn't feeling it: it was a lot of family drama and it became repetitive fast, especially since the audiobook narrator was intense every time that Margot was getting emotional (and she was angry for most of the book). But the ending of this: WOW . I did not expect that plot twist at all, everything came full circle and I just admire Rory Power's creativity. If you like your YA totally twisted and disturbing, here's a good one! (NetGalley Audiobook)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ari

    BLOG | Instagram | Twitter | Amazon | Waterstones Thank you NetGalley and Delacorte Press for this ARC. All thoughts and opinions are mine. How to keep a fire burning. How to stitch a fight up until it's only a scar. That's the kind of thing you learn with a mother like mine. Mostly, though, you learn how to be loved without proof. A book lover often has a difficult time reading the books that they're interested in. Just when the opportunity arrives to finally dive into that story you've been wan BLOG | Instagram | Twitter | Amazon | Waterstones Thank you NetGalley and Delacorte Press for this ARC. All thoughts and opinions are mine. How to keep a fire burning. How to stitch a fight up until it's only a scar. That's the kind of thing you learn with a mother like mine. Mostly, though, you learn how to be loved without proof. A book lover often has a difficult time reading the books that they're interested in. Just when the opportunity arrives to finally dive into that story you've been wanting to read for months, about five other books release and you once again fall behind. That's why, despite the popularity of Wilder Girls last year, I never had the chance to enjoy it. Seeing a new and upcoming release from Rory Power seemed like the perfect opportunity to become acquainted with her imagination. The writing itself is very good. There are no hiccups, no floundering about, and it flows smoothly. Rory Power gets to the point that she wants to make without beating around the bush. I really wanted to enjoy this story, however, and sometimes we want something so strongly that it slips away. While the writing is straightforward, the pace was not. The novel took so long getting to the meat of the plot that I got slightly bored along the way. I didn't really connect with any characters except our lead, something that is at times the case often when a book is written in first-person. I felt for Margot and her plight. That's one thing that can be said for this book: you feel the desperation, frustration, and need coming off this young woman to have the love and family that she has wanted her whole life. It screams out through the pages. Was the true horror and mystery of it all worth it when it finally arrived, however? Yes, it absolutely was. There is something sickening, twisted and disturbing about the history behind the horror of Margot's family. And for that, this book is well worth the read. That something so seemingly small would make me feel as uncomfortable as it did, speaks well for the way that the author unfolds it into the rest of the writing. But it arrived quite late, and developed far too fast for me to properly enjoy. Burn Our Bodies Down has a Stephen King-esque vibe that hit me more than once, and I've noticed that other readers have felt the same. It's this nagging little thing at the back of your head that you notice here and there and can't let go of. I appreciated it, even if the whole of it fell a little more off the mark than I'd hoped. There's merit to this novel, I just wish that more of those daunting details which pop up near the end and made me uneasy—while making everything charged and fraught with terrible possibility—had been delivered a little more starkly from the start.

  21. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    This was legitimately incredible. Such a wild, strange, eerie ride and I loved every moment of it. RTC

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Greendale

    Aimless and detached from start to finish.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Drewthereader20

    Is july going to have a lot of five star reads? This was my first book by the author and I really want to read wilder girls now! Super creepy and loved it soo much! Also thanks to netgalley and Delacrorte press for sending me an e-arc of this and sorry for the late mini review!(:

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mlpmom (Book Reviewer)

    This was...bizarre to say the very least, which isn't necessarily a bad thing but, I'm not sure all the craziness and weirdness completely worked for me. The writing was fabulous and I really did enjoy something original, especially in this genre so bonus stars for that. Overall, not a bad story just different in ways both good and bad. *ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.*

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cortney LaScola - The Bookworm Myrtle Beach

    While I didn't enjoy Burn Our Bodies Down nearly as much as Wilder Girls, I still thought it was a decent book. I could have done without Margot's constant internal monologue analyzing EVERYTHING everyone said and did. It made the book feel really repetitive, and it just made me annoyed with her character. I wish the author had taken all of that and expanded on the mystery instead. The last 75 pages were great, but I wanted so much more. Still a solid 3, but considering how much I loved Wilder Gir While I didn't enjoy Burn Our Bodies Down nearly as much as Wilder Girls, I still thought it was a decent book. I could have done without Margot's constant internal monologue analyzing EVERYTHING everyone said and did. It made the book feel really repetitive, and it just made me annoyed with her character. I wish the author had taken all of that and expanded on the mystery instead. The last 75 pages were great, but I wanted so much more. Still a solid 3, but considering how much I loved Wilder Girls, this was a disappointment.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melanie (mells_view)

    Keep a fire burning; a fire is what saves you. The first, the last, the heart of them all. I spent the majority of this book thinking that it was just sort of a weird little book, and kind of confusing. I thought about how I could see the deeper message, but wasn’t quite sure where the horror side of things would come through. Well, by the end I couldn’t stop thinking about how much I fell in love with this “weird little book” and the messages that were weaved between the stalks of corn. The horr Keep a fire burning; a fire is what saves you. The first, the last, the heart of them all. I spent the majority of this book thinking that it was just sort of a weird little book, and kind of confusing. I thought about how I could see the deeper message, but wasn’t quite sure where the horror side of things would come through. Well, by the end I couldn’t stop thinking about how much I fell in love with this “weird little book” and the messages that were weaved between the stalks of corn. The horrors both real and ones only possible in fiction started to unfold slowly and had me shaking my head and even tearing up a bit. Margot is a character that I think many people will find relatable. Her life as a reality and even in many metaphorical ways. Clearly this one needs to be read going in moderately blind, so I won’t say much more than, this one starts off a bit ominous and slow, but the end is like multiple gut punches that will make every confusing moment worth it. It doesn’t sit right, that nobody will ever know all of it. Even the parts that were mine. AVAILABLE NOW! *ARC

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    4.5/5stars *thank you to Netgalley for providing this ARC* Man, where does Rory Power get her ideas? This was SO weird and wonderful and magical but horrible all at the same time. No clue how one could ever properly explain this book to someone 3/4/2020 : I JUST GOT APPROVED FOR THE ARC FROM NETGALLEY AHHHH

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wren (fablesandwren)

    Thank you to the publisher and Net Galley for providing an earlier copy of this book to review. Everything is my opinion and my opinion alone. This was going to be a three star, but I just loved that ending. The last few chapters of the book really are just the exact kind of creepy a girl needs. When I started the book, I felt like the MC was just being really dramatic without any backstory to back-up her feelings. She didn't have a good relationship with her mom at all, but we didn't spend a lot Thank you to the publisher and Net Galley for providing an earlier copy of this book to review. Everything is my opinion and my opinion alone. This was going to be a three star, but I just loved that ending. The last few chapters of the book really are just the exact kind of creepy a girl needs. When I started the book, I felt like the MC was just being really dramatic without any backstory to back-up her feelings. She didn't have a good relationship with her mom at all, but we didn't spend a lot of time on that and so it felt kind of pushed. But like... gah, that whole ending of the book was CRAZY and I enjoyed it so much. I honestly think Rory writes such creepy-good books!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Angela Staudt

    Thank you NetGalley for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. I really wanted to love this book, but it was a bit too bizarre and with everything that happened it just didn’t work for me. I was not the biggest fan of Wilder Girls, and I know I’m in the small group with that opinion. I honestly was really excited about this book I wanted horror and insane twists and turns. I didn’t get that, but I don’t know what I got either. We follow Margot who has a very strange relationship with her mother Thank you NetGalley for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. I really wanted to love this book, but it was a bit too bizarre and with everything that happened it just didn’t work for me. I was not the biggest fan of Wilder Girls, and I know I’m in the small group with that opinion. I honestly was really excited about this book I wanted horror and insane twists and turns. I didn’t get that, but I don’t know what I got either. We follow Margot who has a very strange relationship with her mother. It’s them against the world, no on else but them. Margot is on the cusp of her 18th birthday and she just wants to know more about her family and where she came from, but her mother doesn’t want any of that thinking. She digs by herself to find out more of where her mother came from and she figures it out. She runs away from her mother, and goes to the town where her mom grew up and finds her grandmother. It was very strange and I didn’t care about anything that was happening. I continued reading for one reason; I wanted to see some horrifying twist that made it worth it. I guessed what was going on pretty early, and I was very let down. I have read a lot of YA horror/thriller books and that may be why this one didn’t live up to the hype for me. I didn’t find it thrilling and I didn’t find any horror. I know I am going to be in the small, small group of people who didn’t find this book amazing. That’s okay though, this is completely my opinion and this book was just not for me. I know so many people will devour this book in one sitting it was just not what I was hoping for. I think in my head I imagined this was going to be a crazy, mind boggling book, but even at the end my feelings were very meh.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    One thing I love about the horror genre is its potential as a way of talking about difficult and painful topics. Burn Our Bodies Down is a perfect example of that. This is a creepy YA horror novel that is really about cycles of violence and abuse in a family and the complexity of these relationships that carry both love and toxic hurt. It does an incredibly job of digging into those issues that lack easy answers. Margot has only ever had her mother. Her secretive mother with strange rules who run One thing I love about the horror genre is its potential as a way of talking about difficult and painful topics. Burn Our Bodies Down is a perfect example of that. This is a creepy YA horror novel that is really about cycles of violence and abuse in a family and the complexity of these relationships that carry both love and toxic hurt. It does an incredibly job of digging into those issues that lack easy answers. Margot has only ever had her mother. Her secretive mother with strange rules who runs hot and cold, can barely take care of herself much less a daughter, who is emotionally abusive. Margot is 17 and longs for a family and for love, but her mother refuses to discuss whether they have any family or where they come from. So when she finds a photo of her mother as a child along with a phone number that turns out to be for her grandmother, she decides to finally leave her mother and travel to this small town to meet her previously unknown relative. But things are strange in this slowly dying midwestern town, her grandma might not be what she seems, and there may have been a good reason that her mother ran away and never looked back. This is a horror novel, so there are disturbing and violent scenes. There is also murder and mentions of abortion and teen pregnancy. But this is just so well-crafted and hits the right emotional notes. It's also queer without centering a romance. Margot is a lesbian and that plays into the story, but not in a way that overtakes anything and this is decidedly not a romance. I won't say more because of spoilers, but I would definitely recommend it to anyone who can handle horror. I received an advance copy of this book for review via NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

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